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Volume 153, No. 161, 3 Sections, 24 pages, 9 Inserts

www.yourDU.net

$1 • Junction City, Kansas

Wilson recipient of EDC’s Hoyle award

By Tim Weideman

city.beat@thedailyunion.net

For his service and contribu- tions to the community, Harold Wilson was presented the sec- ond annual Eldon L. Hoyle Economic Development award Friday morning. Wilson accepted the award during the Economic Develop- ment Commission’s Partner- ship Appreciation Day at the Geary County Convention Cen- ter. Wilson said he and Hoyle worked well together during their time together on the Eco- nomic Development Commis- sion (EDC).

“We had a good rapport and always had a very good meeting that proved we could accom- plish any- thing,” he told those gathered for the pro- gram. Wilson, who

along with his wife, Nadine, owned the Credit Bureau from

1954 to 1990, served on the

Junction City Commission from 1963 to 1977. He was mayor three times during his tenure. While Wilson served on the EDC board, Junction City saw an increase in major industry, such as the Foot Locker Distri- bution Center, Armour-Eck- rich, Watco and JC Wire Har- ness. EDC Chair Ben Kitchens said Hoyle would have been proud. “Without a doubt, Eldon’s looking down at us this morn- ing and definitely approves of this award (recipient),” he said. The Junction City Area Chamber of Economic Devel- opment Advisory Committee created the Eldon L. Hoyle Economic Development Award in 2012 in recognition of Hoyle’s contribution and service to the community.

Hoyle died Sept. 15, 2011. He was a realtor in Junction City, but many knew him for his time dedicated to serving the communities. He served as city commis-

sioner from 1973 to 1977 and as Junction City mayor from 1974 to 1975. Hoyle was first elected to the county commission in January

1991 and served a four-year

term. He was elected again in 1999 and remained on the com- mission until 2007. Hoyle also was a former chairman and vice chairman of the EDC and was a member of the board at the time of his death. Last year, Hoyle’s family received the first ever award in recognition of his contribution to area communities.

in recognition of his contribution to area communities. H arold W ilson Atrip to Munson Farms

Harold

Wilson

Atrip to Munson Farms Wow Chase Jordan • The Daily Union A Franklin Elementary student
Atrip to Munson Farms
Wow
Chase Jordan • The Daily Union
A Franklin Elementary student enjoys patting
Big Ben during a visit to Munson Farms. Accord-
ing to Munson Farms, the horse is the second
largest in the United States and the biggest in
Kansas.

EDCrecommends

modifyingVentriaagreement

By Tim Weideman

The existing agreement, drafted when Ventria

arrived in Junction City in 2007, establishes benchmarks for the company and payments it would be required to make if those benchmarks aren’t reached. Essentially, the amendments would give Ven- tria more time before it must

begin making payments to an escrow account for unmet “mile- stones” established in the compa- ny’s agreement with the city, such as number of employees and total acres used for production by a certain year. After hurling questions at the Ventria representatives, the EDC board voted 4-2 to recommend to the Junction City Area Chamber of Commerce board the agree- ment be approved. The chamber then will make a

separate recommendation to the Junction City Commission, which is expected to address the topic on Nov. 5. Located at the city owned facility at 2718 Indus-

Please see Ventria, 10A

city.beat@thedailyunion.net

Ventria Bioscience has made it through the lat-

est recession and claims its outlook is positive. But company management is asking for a finan- cial break from Junction City offi-

cials. On Thursday, members of Ven- tria’s management staff discussed with the Junction City-Economic Development Commission (EDC) proposed amendments to its exist- ing development agreement between the company and the city. The discussion sounded familiar to the EDC board. “I’m your cheerleader,” EDC chair Ben Kitchens told the three Ventria representatives present for the meeting. “I want you to hit the

home run, the grand slam. I think everybody here does. But we’re also tasked with being prudent stewards of the taxpayers’ money and we didn’t do very well the last 10 years. That’s why we’re here with all these questions for you.”

“I think coming up with $250,000 to guarantee to the citizens of this community that the agreement we made seven years ago was appropriate is not unrealistic.”

Gery Schoenrock

Jupiter to shutterfacility

By Tim Weideman

city.beat@thedailyunion.net

Wind turbine parts manufacturer JSB Composite Group will shut down its Junction City plant and move by the end of the year. Junction City Area Chamber of Commerce CEO Tom Weigand shared the information Thursday during the Junction City-Economic Development Commission (EDC) meeting. JSB Composite Group, formerly known as Jupiter Kansas before the plant’s Denmark-based parent compa- ny was purchased by a competitor earlier this year, will close its Junction City plant and move operations to its other North America location in Penn- sylvania. “Their biggest competitor acquired them and they took them where they were,” Weigand told the EDC board. In April, local JSB management told the Junction City Commission the company was deciding which plant it would keep. Please see Jupiter, 10A

ToutingNBAFimpact

it would keep. Please see Jupiter , 10A ToutingNBAFimpact B y T im W eideman city.beat@thedailyunion.net

By Tim Weideman

city.beat@thedailyunion.net

Ron Trewyn believes it’s almost go time for recruit- ment efforts aimed at busi- nesses related to the pro- posed National Bio- and Agro-Defense Facility in Manhattan. During the Junction City-Geary County Eco- nomic Development Com- mission’s (EDC) Partner Appreciation Day pro- gram, the Kansas State University vice president of research said he believes construction on the $1.23

billion facility’s main lab should begin sometime next year. “I think that’s the time that a lot of serious discus- sions have to be had in the region about economic opportunities,” Trewyn told the room of economic development leaders gath- ered Friday morning inside the Geary County Convention Center. Research done at the National Bio- and Agro- Defense Facility (NBAF) would focus on protecting livestock and food supplies in the United States from diseases that could spread

— accidentally or inten- tionally — from other countries. “If you like to eat, NBAF is important,” Trewyn said. Some of that research currently is being per- formed at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center in New York. The plan is to move those operations to Kansas and research addi- tional diseases, too. “Every year, there’s something new that hasn’t been seen before,” Trewyn said. “These (diseases) emerge periodically and we have to have a facility

to be able to work on these.” According to plans Trewyn shared, the hope is to have operations trans- ferred to NBAF by 2021. But Trewyn said many businesses interested in relocating to the region because of NBAF will be looking to move much sooner. Manhattan isn’t the only city companies could look at setting up shop, Trewyn said. “There are very valid reasons why a lot of these folks may not want to be right there, but nearby,”

he said. Conversations have

begun among Junction City Area Chamber of Commerce and EDC offi- cials about how to attract those companies to Junc- tion City. Trewyn said he believes NBAF will represent only

a small part of the eco-

nomic impact. “It’s going to be all these

other (companies) that are going to turn out to be transforming for the state of Kansas,” he said. “But

if we aren’t ready, shame

on us.”

he said. “But if we aren’t ready, shame on us.” The Daily Union is a Montgomery

The Daily Union is a Montgomery Communications newspaper, ©2013

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Today’s forecast

73

Sunny

44

74

Sunday’s forecast

54

Today’s forecast 73 Sunny 44 74 Sunday’s forecast 54 For news updates throughout the day, visit

Around JC

2A

The Daily Union. Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013

Pets

of the

Week

2A The Daily Union. Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013 Pets of the Week ALICE Alice is a

ALICE

Alice is a 2 to 3 year-old female Terrier Mix. She likes to play with other dogs.

female Terrier Mix. She likes to play with other dogs. CALYPSO Calypso is a 3 to

CALYPSO

Calypso is a 3 to 4 year-old male Puggle mix. He is very sweet and likes to play outside.

male Puggle mix. He is very sweet and likes to play outside. JILLIE Jillie is a

JILLIE

Jillie is a 1 to 2 year-old female Shih Tzu mix. She has lots of energy and would make a good lapdog.

mix. She has lots of energy and would make a good lapdog. LANGLEY Langley is 8

LANGLEY

Langley is 8 to 10 year-old male Boxador. He is very food motivated and likes to play in the streets. Lan- gley is also very hyper and is recom- mended for an active person.

Art is so muchfun
Art is so
muchfun

Chase Jordan • The Daily Union

Seitz Elementary student Hanna Nebeker enjoys drawing the school’s mascot (a dragon) with the assistance of her mother Jaiemie. On Thursday, the Fort Riley school hosted their inaugural Family Art Night. During the event, art students from Junction City High School demonstrated their talents as children and parents watched.

Unnameddeveloper eyes lots in Chapman

By Chase Jordan

c.jordan@thedailyunion.net

CHAPMAN — Another business may be coming to downtown Chapman and City Council members want to make sure residents know about it too. Earlier this week, City Administrator Gerry Biek- er discussed and requested input on the possible sale of city-owned property on East Fourth Street. A developer wants to purchase four lots on East Fourth Street. The estimat- ed cost for each lot is between $2,500 and $3,000. Currently, Bieker is not allowed to provide detailed information about the indi- vidual or the project, which may cost more than

$100,000.

But Council Member Dale Nelson questioned the

city’s interaction and want- ed to make sure the public was aware of it. In this type of situation,

CityAttorneyDougThomp-

son said the city looks at sealed bids and determines what’s best for the city. “As long as we can let the public know somehow and we don’t do a back room deal,” Nelson said. “That just goes against my grain.” Bieker said he does not like calling it a “back room deal,” and said the present- er will discuss the project next month. “I’m just here saying are you comfortable with the price so he can propose something to you,” Bieker said. “That’s what this is all about. It’s not about me back room dealing with anybody.” Council Member Ron Kabat said the public was

previously notified about property being available for sale. The original plan for the space was for economic development and to estab- lish a grocery store. Although a grocery store in another location is in the works, Council Member Luan Sparks said it’s impor- tant for development to continue. “We got to keep moving ahead,” Sparks said. Bieker said the developer, who is invested in the com- munity, will probably make a presentation next month. “We’ll research to see if there’s any extra steps we have to do to sell property,” Bieker said. He said the item will be placed on the agenda. “If people have concerns, they can come to the meet- ing and voice their opin- ion,” Bieker said.

Milfordcould soon be watching you

By Tim Weideman

city.beat@thedailyunion.net

MILFORD — Bad guys, beware — Milford could soon be watching who comes to town. At Thursday’s City Coun- cil meeting, Mayor Brad Roether said he had conver- sations with Geary County Commissioners, County Attorney Steve Opat and Sheriff Tony Wolf about installing security cameras at the intersection on 12th Street coming into town and another camera at Houston Street on the way out of town. “This camera would point coming into town, so when a person comes into town, it would take a picture or the whole scan,” Roether told the council. “Going out of town, it would be the same.” Roether said the electrical

power needed for the cam- eras already is in place near where they would be installed. The one-time installation would cost $7,000, Roether said, should the council decide at a later date to move forward with the idea. “It’s something we can look at down the road,” he said. The camera also would be monitored only by the Geary County Sheriff’s Depart- ment. A few months ago, Mil- ford suffered a series of vehicle burglaries and a commercial burglary. The cameras could help catch future criminals. “Now you’d know if it’s in-house or out of town,” Roether said. “Because if a car goes out of town, then you know that you’re wast- ing your time looking in town.”

know that you’re wast- ing your time looking in town.” Weather Tonight Sunday Monday Low: 44

Weather

you’re wast- ing your time looking in town.” Weather Tonight Sunday Monday Low: 44 Mostly clear
you’re wast- ing your time looking in town.” Weather Tonight Sunday Monday Low: 44 Mostly clear
you’re wast- ing your time looking in town.” Weather Tonight Sunday Monday Low: 44 Mostly clear
Tonight Sunday Monday Low: 44 Mostly clear High: 73 Low: 58 50 percent chance of
Tonight
Sunday
Monday
Low: 44
Mostly clear
High: 73
Low: 58
50 percent chance
of thunderstorms
High: 70
Low: 50
70 percent chance
of thunderstorms
Kansasforecast fortoday
NEB.
MO.
Colby
64° | 43°
Kansas City
75° | 54°
Salina
73° | 48°
Topeka
72° | 52°
Liberal
68° | 43°
Wichita
79° | 54°
Pittsburg
73° | 57°
OKLA.
© 2013 Wunderground.com
Dailyweatherrecord
MilfordLake
Water elevation
1,145.96
Precip. to 7 a.m. Friday
October to date
October average
Year to date total
Year to date average
Friday’s High
Overnight low
Temp. at 4 p.m. Wednesday
Today’s sunrise
Tonight’s sunset
.02
Conservation pool
1,144.40
1.12
Release
25
2.62
Water temp.
73
29.99
27.96
82
44
81
7:33 a.m.
6:54 p.m.
National forecast Forecast highs for Saturday, Oct. 12 Sunny Pt. Cloudy Cloudy Fronts Pressure Cold
National forecast
Forecast highs for Saturday, Oct. 12
Sunny
Pt. Cloudy
Cloudy
Fronts
Pressure
Cold
Warm Stationary
Low
High
-10s
-0s
0s
10s
20s
30s
40s
50s
60s
70s
80s
90s
100s
110s
Showers
Rain
T-storms
Flurries
Snow
Ice
Showers And Snow In The Pacific Northwest
A low pressure system in central Canada will produce showers
and thunderstorms from the Great Lakes into Texas. The
mid-Atlantic coast will see more wet weather caused by another
storm system off the coast of North Carolina.

Weather Underground • AP

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Correction

In Thursday’s The Daily Union, in a brief about a legislative update in Grandview Plaza, the name of the current Kansas Speaker of the House was incorrect. It actually is Ray Merrick.

Around JC

The Daily Union. Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013

3A

In brief

CenturyLink

reunion

A gathering of current and for- mer employees and their spous- es, contractors and friends of United Telephone/Sprint/Embarq and CenturyLink will be held at Coach’s Grill and Bar. 720 S. Caro- line Avenue, Junction City on Sat- urday, Oct. 19. The event will be from 2 to 5 p.m. For more information, contact Ruth Sanders at (785) 579-6621

Connections Club to meet

The Christian Women’s Con- nections Club invites all women to dinner at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 15, at the Valley View Estates, 1440 Pearl Dr., Junction City.

MPCdelays quarry discussion—again

By Chase Jordan

c.jordan@thedailyunion.net

Nearly 30 residents made a trip to the Municipal Building Thurs- day to oppose the re-opening of a rock quarry just west of Junction City, only to find out their opinions won’t be heard for about another month. The public hearing to consider a conditional use permit for the quarry was postponed — again. Some of the residents’ concerns include blasting, environmental effects and traffic. The six-acre site near the Olivia Farms development has not been

used since 1965. During that time period, it was used for a couple of years to quarry, crush and remove rock for the Milford Lake project. Jim Didas of Range and Civil Construction, LLC. and property owner Scott Johnson want to resume quarry operations at a site located east of Munson Road, between Rucker Road and K-244 Highway. Range and Civil Construction contracts with Fort Riley and the work often requires the use of rock for construction purposes. Didas wants to re-open the quarry, rather than purchase rock from other locations. He also has intentions to establish the quarry as another

source of commercial rock for con- struction and road work purposes. The case was first heard in August and continued to Septem- ber, before being tabled Thursday. Didas addressed the board and said he wants to have documents completed by the end of the month. “We did not receive a formal request for additional documents until a month ago,” Didas said. Didas also said it takes times to respond to certain request and address issues mentioned by the planning staff. Some of those include dust control, blasting and time operations. While addressing the council,

Didas said he has a local engineer- ing firm engaged, received a state permit for rock mining and anoth- er environmental permit. But this may be the last post- ponement. After Didas made his request, the board unanimously approved to allow another continuance with the stipulation that information will presented fully or a decision will be made by the MPC. “I hate to go through all this stuff and have all these people show up every single time,” Board Member Mike Watson said. The next meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. Nov. 14.

JunctionFunctionparties Hollywoodstyle About 250 people attended Thursday night’s Junction Func- tion event at the
JunctionFunctionparties Hollywoodstyle
About 250 people attended
Thursday night’s Junction Func-
tion event at the Marriott Con-
vention Center. The annual
function is the Junction City
Area Chamber of Commerce’s
largest fundraiser of the year.
Among the activities at the Red
Carpet Affair included raffles,
prizes, pictures, auctions and
dinner. How much was raised
from the event was not yet
reported as of Friday night.
Check out more pictures
from this event on our
website and
Facebook page.

Negotiation needed for Milford to join MPC

By Tim Weideman

city.beat@thedailyunion.net

MILFORD — If residents want to continue to park vehicles on grass and have gravel driveways, then something’s got to give. Local officials likely will have to negotiate in order keep those privileges if the town joins the Junction City-Geary County Metro- politan Planning Commis- sion. Blight standards and enforcement procedures could present a few hurdles in Milford’s path toward joining the Metropolitan Planning Commission (MPC). The town has been

interested in joining for a couple months after having encountered code and zon- ing enforcement issues when performing the work in-house. During Thursday’s City Council meeting, Milford Mayor Brad Roether told the council those blight- related hurdles could be clearable. “The county has no prob- lem with that (blight codes),” he said. “Junction City does. But this could be negotiated.” Roether said bringing Milford into the MPC fold wouldn’t be a problem for the county because its resi-

dents already pay county taxes. However, Junction City handles blight issues as part of the MPC. That means a blight offi- cer would need to come to Milford to handle reported problems. “Their main concern is blight and how the city of Milford is going to pay to have somebody to come up here,” Roether said. “I told them, ‘That’s a once-a- month deal. We don’t have to have you guys come up here every day.’” Roether said Junction City Mayor Cecil Aska “made it sound like” nego-

The Daily Union (USPS 286-520) (ISSN #0745743X) is published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday except July 4, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Years Day by Montgomery Communications, Inc., 222 West Sixth St., Junction City, Ks. 66441. Periodicals postage paid at Junction City, Ks. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Daily Union, P.O. Box 129, Junction City, Ks. 66441 The Daily Union is delivered by USPS to Junction City, Ft. Riley, Grandview Plaza, Milford, Chapman, Wakefield, Ogden, Herington, Woodbine, Dwight, White City and Alta Vista. Rates for local mail delivery are $10.00 per month, $30.00 for 3 months, $60.00 for 6 months, and $111.60 for 1 year. Other mail delivery rates are $16.00 per month, $48.00 for 3 months, $96.00 for 6 months and $192.00 for a year.

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tiations for some leeway wouldn’t be a problem, “but his city council wasn’t there,” so he couldn’t speak for that whole body. The county and Junction City will vote whether to allow Milford to join the MPC on Oct. 28. “Hopefully, that’ll ease the pain up here on some of the issues of planning (and development ordi- nances),” Roether said.

If Milford is allowed to join, then one elected offi- cial from the city would be appointed to the MPC board, which currently has one vacancy. “They said this would work great Jan. 1,” Roether said. “They hope that we could negotiate the two months with whatever we have to do, so we could start this Jan. 1.”

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its “Fall

Escape.” The speaker will be Arlene Blanchard from Yukon, Okla. She is a survivor of the Okla- homa City bombing.

She is a vivacious and talented speaker with her story of survival and beyond.

of

“The Rest of Your Life” (Triumph Over Tragedy) An inclusive fee for dinner will be $11.50. Please call

Daisy at 238-5887 or Laura at 762-3539 to make reservations or cancellations by today.

Join the group for

She’ll

share on the topic

Free

SundayCinema

The October free Sunday Cine- ma will be presented at 2 p.m, Oct. 13 at the Geary County His- torical Museum corner of 6th and Adams Streets. With the turmoil taking place all around the world, it is fitting for all of us to view the two vid- eos titled The Blessings of Liberty and The Statue of Liberty. These two remind us of the positive areas we often overlook. The public is invited to spend an hour with friends, popcorn and these reminders of the good life we have in the USA. The last Sunday Cinema for the year will take place Nov. 10 with the sharing of The Great War of 1918-The American Experience.

Speaker of Kansas House in GVP Saturday

GRANDVIEW PLAZA — Along with local State Rep. Allan Roth- lisberg, Kansas Speaker of the House, Ray Merrick, will appear at a town hall meeting today The pair will provide a legisla- tive update at the Community Center/City Hall in Grandview Plaza, from 10 a.m. to noon. The event is sponsored by the Three Rivers TEA Party.

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Obituaries

4A

The Daily Union. Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013

TevinGeike

March 30, 1993 — Oct. 5, 2013

SPC Tevin Anthony Geike , 20, of Sum- merville, S.C., formerly of Junction City, passed away unexpectedly on Oct. 5, 2013. Graveside services with full military hon-

ors will be held to celebrate Tevin’s life at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 15. at the Highland Cemetery in Junction City, with Pastor Gabriel Hughes officiating. Visitation will be held from 6 to 8 p.m., Monday, Oct. 14, at Penwell-Gabel Johnson Chapel, 203 N. Washington

St. in Junction City. In lieu of flowers, the family would like to encour- age friends and loved ones to make a donation in Tevin’s memory to the Wounded Warrior Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, KS

66675.

Tevin was born on March

30, 1993 in Oswego, N.Y., to parents Troy and Jennifer Geike. From an early age, Tevin was passionate about his love of his country, and was a member of ROTC in high school. He graduated from R.B. Stall High School in North Charleston, S.C. in 2010. After graduation, he joined the United States Army in October 2010, where he trained to serve as an aviation operations specialist and was a member of the 7th Infantry Division at Joint Lewis McChord Base in Washington State. Tevin enjoyed being outdoors, playing video games, and spending time with his

outdoors, playing video games, and spending time with his T evin G eike family and friends.

Tevin

Geike

family and friends. He also enjoyed writing poetry. He had a kind and outgoing personality, and was the kind of man who would gladly give the shirt off of his back to anyone who was in need. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Tevin is survived by his mother, Jennifer L. (Dean) Rose of South Carolina; father, Troy R. (Amy Potter) Geike of Junction City; sisters, Tiffany Bailey, Brittney Sanders, Michaela Dobbs, all of Tenn., Morgan Rose of South Carolina, Constance Rose, Alyssa Moenning, and Briana Potter of Junction City; brothers, Jarod Geike and Joseph Rose of South Carolina, Dillon Moenning and Travis Bennett of Junction City, Michael Miller and Tyler Miller of Alaska; aunts and uncles, Donita Oliveras, Phil Savage, Brenda (Jimmy) Breese and Keith Potter, all of Junc- tion City, Shannon Erickson of Kansas, Daniel Manns of Missouri, David (Alicia) Rose of Wisconsin; nieces and nephews, Sky- lar Bailey, Jordan Bailey, Malorie Sanders, Carson Dobbs, Brantley Dobbs; Grandpar- ents, Donald (Brenda) Manns, James Potter of Junction City, Ray (Dorothy) Bennett of Kansas, William (Dorothy) Council of South Carolina, James (Mary) Dake Jr., of Kansas, and Rick (Rose) Geike of Grandview Plaza. He is preceded in death by his grandmoth- er, Cheryl Potter. To leave a special message online for the family, visit,www.PenwellGabelJunctionCi- ty.com

GeorgeAllen

May 31, 1936 — Oct. 4, 2013

SGM (Ret) George Elvin Allen, son of the late G.A. and Henrietta (Murphy) Allen, was born May 31, 1936 in Tallahassee, Ala. On June 2, 1953, George entered the United States Army and served his coun- try faithfully until his retire- ment on June 30, 1983 after serving 30 years and 28 days. He served during the Korean Conflict, Vietnam and Desert Storm. George had attained the rank of Sergeant Major and was awarded several awards and commendations for his faithful service; some of which include: National Defense Service Medal, Viet- nam Service Medal w/Silver and 2 Bronze Stars, Army Service Ribbon, Vietnam Campaign Medal, Vietnam Cross of Gallantry w/Palm, Overseas Service Ribbon “2,” Army Commendation Medal, Good Conduct Medal (9th Award), Bronze Star Medal w/1st Oak Leaf Clus- ter, Meritorious Service Medal, Parachute Badge,

Expert Infantryman Badge, Combat Infantryman Badge, and the Republic of Viet- nam Civil Actions Medal. After retiring from the mili- tary, George continued serv- ing his country for 14 years as a civil service employee. On Nov. 19, 1955 in Phoe- nix City, Ala., George was united in marriage with the love of his life, Frances L. Warhurst. They shared over 57 years together and were blessed with five children:

Delores, George, Pamela, Collette and Sherri. In his spare time, George loved to be outdoors; wheth- er it was fishing or traveling in the motor home. He was an avid American coin col- lector and he enjoyed bowl- ing. He was a member of the American Legion and the Retired Sergeant Majors Association. Most impor- tantly, he loved spending time with his family and friends, especially the grandchildren. George passed away Fri- day, Oct. 4, 2013 in the Chris-

tian Hospital NE of St. Louis, Mo. having attained the age of 77 years, four months and four days. He will be sadly missed but fondly remembered by all those that knew and loved him. George leaves to cherish his memory, his wife, Fran- ces L. Allen of the home; five children: Delores Klempke of St. Louis, Mo, George Allen, Jr. of Waynes- ville, Mo, Pamela Chambers of Milford, Collette Chaney of Bashor, and Sherri Allen of Atlanta; eight grandchil- dren; nine great grandchil- dren; other relatives and friends. Graveside services with full military honors were held at 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013 in the Missouri Veterans Cemetery — Fort Leonard Wood. Services were under the direction of Memorial Chapels and Cre- matory of Waynesville/St. Robert. Online condolences can be sent at www.memorial- chapelsandcrematory.com.

NEWS TO KNOW

Headlines fromaroundthe world

Associated Press

Rightsgroup accusesSyrian rebels of war crimes

BEIRUT — Syrian vil- lagers described watching rebels advance on their homes, as mortars thud- ded around them. By the end of the August attack, 190 civilians had been killed, including children, the elderly and the handicapped, a human rights group said Friday in its most detailed account of alleged war crimes committed by those fighting the Damascus regime. Human Rights Watch said the offensive against 14 pro-regime villages in the province of Latakia was planned and led by five Islamic extremist groups, including two linked to al-Qaida. Other rebel groups, including those belonging to the Free Syrian Army, a West- ern-backed alliance, par- ticipated in the campaign, but there is no evidence linking them to war crimes, the 105-page report said. The new allegations are bound to heighten West- ern unease about those trying to topple Syrian President Bashar Assad and about who would take over if they were to suc- ceed. “It creates justifiable alarm that the opposition has been infiltrated and undermined by radicals,” said David L. Phillips, a former U.S. State Depart- ment adviser on the Mid- dle East. The Free Syrian Army distanced itself from the five groups identified by HRW as the main perpe- trators, saying it is not cooperating with extrem- ists. “Anyone who com- mits such crimes will not belong to the revolution anymore,” said spokes- man Louay Mikdad.

Peace Prize goes to chemical-weapons watchdog

BEIRUT — The watch- dog agency working to eliminate the world’s chemical weapons won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday in a powerful endorsement of the inspectors now on the ground in Syria on a peril- ous mission to destroy the regime’s stockpile of poison gas.

In honoring the Organi- zation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the Norwegian Nobel Com- mittee said “recent events in Syria, where chemical weapons have again been put to use, have under- lined the need to enhance the efforts to do away with such weapons.” The prize came 10 days after OPCW inspectors started arriving in war- torn Syria to oversee the dismantling of President Bashar Assad’s chemical arsenal. While world leaders and former Nobel laureates praised the group’s selec- tion, some in Syria lament- ed that the prize would do nothing to end the blood- shed, most of which is being inflicted with con- ventional weapons. “The killing is continu- ing, the shelling is con- tinuing and the dead con- tinue to fall,” said Moham- med al-Tayeb, an activist who helped film casual- ties after the deadly chem- ical attack in August that the rebels and the govern- ment have blamed on each other. The peace prize, he added, should have gone to “whoever helps the Syr- ian people get rid of Bashar Assad.” After focusing on such themes as human rights and European unity in recent years, the Norwe- gian Nobel Committee this time returned to the core purpose of the 112-year- old Nobel Peace Prize — disarming the world. Founded in 1997, the OPCW had largely worked out of the limelight until this year, when the United Nations called upon its expertise. The OPCW’s selection caught many by surprise. It was widely expected that the peace prize would go to Malala Yousafzai,

the 16-year-old Pakistani girl who was shot in the head by the Taliban last October for championing education for girls. “She is an outstanding woman and I think she has a bright future, and she will probably be a nominee next year or the year after that,” said Nobel committee chair- man Thorbjoern Jagland. The peace prize commit- tee has a tradition of not just honoring past achieve- ments, but encouraging causes or movements that are still unfolding. The OPCW was formed to enforce the Chemical Weapons Convention, the 1997 international treaty outlawing such arms. The Nobel Peace Prize came just days before Syria officially joins as OPCW’s 190th member state on Monday. “I truly hope that this award and the OPCW’s ongoing mission together with the United Nations in Syria will (help) efforts to achieve peace in that country and end the suf- fering of its people,” OPCW Director-General Ahmet Uzumcu said at The Hague, Netherlands. After the Aug. 21 chemi- cal weapons attack that killed hundreds in Syria, Assad faced the prospect of a U.S. military strike. To avert that, he acknowl- edged his chemical weap- ons stockpile, and his gov- ernment quickly signed on to the Chemical Weap- ons Convention and allowed OPCW inspectors into the country. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry congratulated the OPCW on Friday, say- ing: “Since that horrific attack, the OPCW has taken extraordinary steps and worked with unprece- dented speed to address this blatant violation of international norms that

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shocked the conscience of people around the world.” Former Soviet leader and 1990 Nobel peace lau- reate Mikhail Gorbachev said: “I believe this recog- nition can provide the impetus to accelerate efforts to rid the world of these deadly weapons. A chemical weapons-free world is within grasp.”

A senior Syrian rebel,

Louay Safi, called the prize a “premature step” that will divert the world’s attention from the blood- letting, while Fayez Sayegh, a lawmaker from Syria’s ruling party, declared the Nobel to be a vindication of Assad’s government and its will- ingness to give up its chemical weapons.

In giving the prize to an

international organiza- tion, the Nobel committee highlighted the Syrian civil war, now in its third year, without openly sid- ing with any of the com- batants. The fighting has killed more than 100,000 people, devastated many cities and towns and forced mil- lions of Syrians to flee their homes and country. U.N. war crimes investi- gators have accused both Assad’s government and the rebels of wrongdoing, although they say the regime’s abuses are worse. Geir Lundestad, secre- tary of the Nobel commit- tee, noted that the award was focused on chemical weapons, not the wider conflict in Syria, but added: “Of course, the committee hopes that a peaceful solution will be achieved in Syria.” The struggle to control chemical weapons began in earnest after World War I, when agents such as mustard gas killed more than 100,000 people. The 1925 Geneva Con- vention banned the use of chemical weapons, but their production or stor- age wasn’t outlawed until the Chemical Weapons

Convention came into force.

Seven nations — Alba- nia, India, Iraq, Libya, Russia and the United States, along with a coun- try identified by the OPCW only as “a state party” but widely believed to be South Korea — have declared chemical weapon stockpiles and have destroyed them or are in the process of doing so.

However, the Nobel committee noted that some countries, including the U.S. and Russia, have not met the April 2012 deadline. “I have to recognize that they have particular chal- lenges. They have huge stockpiles of chemical

weapons,” the Nobel com- mittee’s Jagland said. “What is important is that they do as much as they can and as fast as they can.” According to the OPCW, 57,740 metric tons, or 81 percent, of the world’s declared stockpile of chemical agents have been verifiably destroyed. An OPCW report this year said the U.S. had destroyed about 90 percent of its arsenal, Russia 70 percent and Libya 51 percent. Established by Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, the Nobel Prizes have been handed out since 1901.

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The Daily Union.

Official Geary County Newspaper Official City Newspaper Junction City • Grandview Plaza • Milford

John G. Montgomery Publisher Emeritus

Tim Hobbs

Publisher/Editor

Penny Nelson

Office Manager

Lisa Seiser

Managing Editor

Jacob Keehn Ad Services Director

Grady Malsbury

Press Supervisor

Past Publishers

John Montgomery, 1892-1936 Harry Montgomery, 1936-1952 John D. Montgomery, 1952-1973

To the Public

“W e propose to stand by the progressive movements which will benefit the

condition of the people of these United States.”

John Montgomery and E.M. Gilbert Junction City Union July 28, 1888

Anotherview Bring on Sequester 2.0: Raiseceiling, but forcedebt fix

The following editorial appeared in the Chicago Tribune on Thursday, Oct. 10

A merica’s elected leaders have spent the past few weeks trashing their public standing on Main Street and abroad, and they don’t seem

to care. President Barack Obama’s approval rating is heading lower, but he won’t be running for office again. The approval rating for Congress already is about as low as it can go. So what? The majority of lawmakers hold safe seats in gerrymandered dis- tricts. The president nor the lawmakers at the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue may be hearing lots of noise from the American public, but given their collective job security, the folks we’ve sent to Washington aren’t feeling real heat. Americans are disgusted with the lack of leader- ship — from two parties in two branches of govern- ment — that’s now on display: the impetuous brinkmanship, the unwillingness to negotiate, the arrogant sense that, Just as soon as you surrender, we can talk about our disagreements. This is no way to do business. Especially the people’s busi- ness. The president and Congress need a bigger incen- tive to salvage something substantial out of the mess they’ve made. The scorn of the electorate isn’t doing it. This just might: another, more pain- ful budget sequester. An amplification of the man- datory reductions in spending growth that are now in force. Call it Sequester 2.0. Our idea would work like this: First, Congress has to head off a federal default by agreeing to raise the debt ceiling, the upper limit on federal borrowing. Failing to do so within the Treasury Department’s deadline of Oct. 17 — a mere week from Thursday — would be reckless. It makes no sense to take a chance on killing off the economic recovery with a self-inflicted wound of such uncer- tain consequences. But one more rise in the ceiling, followed by a signing ceremony and a nice lunch, would only perpetuate the growth of a national debt that has swollen to almost $17 trillion. What’s needed is certainty of consequences if Washington solves its short-term problem, the debt ceiling, but not the long-term problem, runaway borrowing that condemns future generations to pay for today’s spending. Plus interest. For too long, the president and Congress have evaded any real consequences of failing to reduce the debt’s fat share of our gross national product. Enough of that. Any agreement now to extend the debt limit has to include a fixed timetable for action on curtailing total debt — and a measured consequence for inaction. If no progress is made in putting America on a sound fiscal footing, then something has to happen that isn’t irresponsible, as a debt default would be, but that hurts enough so that no responsible lawmaker would want it. We were fans of the first sequester because it did indeed produce a consequence for group failure to slash our annual budget deficits and their endur- ing progeny, our national debt. Congress and the president had a deadline to come together and make a debt deal that would begin to secure Amer- ica’s long-term future. Time and again, they failed to reach an agreement before their self-imposed deadline of March 1. By their action, or rather their inaction, Con- gress and the White House triggered their own self- imposed consequence, the sequester they had passed into law. In other words, they were willing to live with the immediate, automatic cuts to the growth of defense spending, which pained Republi- cans, and to the growth of social spending, which pained Democrats. Here’s how it worked: In 2011, Congress autho- rized an increase in the debt ceiling in exchange for $2.4 trillion in deficit reduction over the next decade. The total included $1.2 trillion in specific spending cuts, and another $1.2 trillion to be identi- fied later in 2011 by a bipartisan, bicameral group of lawmakers known as the “Supercommittee.” When the Supercommittee failed to make a deal, across-the-board cuts in the growth of spending occurred. We’d like to see that same approach again: Raise the debt ceiling to avoid a default, but force a debt fix within, say, three months or face a much more dramatic haircut to each party’s sacred cows. But a Sequester 2.0 would have to really hurt: Don’t again reduce the growth of spending. This time, reduce spending. That is, raise the ante in order to force action on reducing accumulated debt that does confront the America as we know it with an existential threat. Forcing both parties, both branches of govern- ment, to put more chips on the table would be a responsible way to get results from a president and Congress that already are gambling with America’s future.

Congress that already are gambling with America’s future. o pinion The Daily Union. Saturday, Oct. 11,

opinion

The Daily Union. Saturday, Oct. 11, 2013

5A

future. o pinion The Daily Union. Saturday, Oct. 11, 2013 5A American Graffiti 40 years later

American Graffiti 40 years later

O n Saturday nights at my house, I often trot out classic movies and force the urchins to watch them.

There is much wailing and gnashing of teeth, but I think it’s important to teach kids about American culture, and films certainly are a big part of it. Actors like John Wayne, Cary Grant, Marilyn Monroe and Audrey Hepburn

are worth seeing and remembering.

So the other night I trotted out “American Graffiti,” a film released 40 years ago. The movie was directed by “Star Wars” creator George Lucas and chronicles one night in the lives of some California teenagers in the year

1962.

The first thing the kids noticed was Harrison Ford playing a young hood driving a hot rod. That got their atten- tion. The movie features other great actors such as Richard Dreyfuss and Charles Martin Smith, along with Ron Howard and Cindy Williams, who turned the “Graffiti” success into the television hits “Happy Days” and “Laverne and Shirley.” About 20 minutes into the movie, which is heavy on dialogue and light on explosions, the urchins pulled out their iPads and began typing away. Dismay enveloped me. “So you don’t like this?” I asked the

14-year-old.

“It’s OK. I’m listening.”

I asked the 14-year-old. “It’s OK. I’m listening.” B ill O’ reilly Commentary “But you’re playing

Bill O’ reilly

Commentary

“But you’re playing with that machine!”

“I can multitask!”

A few minutes later, the 10-year-old

demanded popcorn. I told him we’d get some halfway through the flick. “Do they ever get out of the cars?” the urchin wailed. “That’s the culture in California.

They cruise around in cars listening to the radio.” “But there are so many cars!” I was losing them.

So I paused the movie and brought in

snacks. I demanded they shut off the machines while eating. “Why?” the 14-year-old asked. “Because you can’t text, eat and watch a movie at the same time.” “Yes, I can. I always do that.” “They’re still in cars,” the 8-year-old said. We got through the movie, but just barely. Their interest peaked when The Pharaohs, a gang of juvenile delin-

quents, forced Dreyfuss to vandalize a police car. Finally, some destruction! After “American Graffiti” conclud- ed, I asked for their reviews. I got them while their heads were down looking at their iPads. The consensus: It was OK. Too many cars. These days, the machines and awful films that blow things up every 10 sec- onds are delivering heavy blows to

American culture. The graffiti is on the

wall. The attention spans of young people average about 30 seconds. Base- ball? Forget it. Chess? Are you kidding me? We live in a time where machines that deliver instant gratification rule. But I will continue to fight the cyber- space power. Coming attraction: Hitch- cock’s “The Birds.” Let the texting begin.

Bill O’Reilly is host of the Fox News show “The O’Reilly Factor” and author of many books, including the newly released “Killing Jesus.” To find out more about Bill O’Reilly and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit www.creators.com. This column originates on the website www. billoreilly.com.

Teapartiers reacting withfury

W hen Barack Obama was elect- ed president in 2008, many pundits and political observ-

ers were eager to expunge the nation’s brutal and long-running history of stark racial oppression. They spoke of a “post-racial” society freed from the divisions of tribe, healed of the deep wounds that ached and bled along the color line for centuries. Even those who were less sanguine about the disappearance of racism — myself included — believed that the election of the nation’s first black pres- ident signaled a new era of greater racial harmony and understanding.

Surely, a nation ready to be led by a black man was ready to let go many of its oldest and ugliest prejudices. But that was a very naive notion. It turns out that Obama’s election has, instead, provoked a new civil war, a last battle cry of secession by a group of voters who want no part of a country led by a black man, no place in a world they don’t rule, no home in a society where they are simply one more minor- ity group. Call those folks “tea par- tiers.” The ultraconservatives who have taken over the Republican Party are motivated by many things — antipathy toward the federal government, con- servative religious beliefs and a tradi- tional Republican suspicion of taxes, among them. But the most powerful force animating their fight is a deep- seated racial antagonism. Don’t take my word for it. Democracy Corps, a political research and polling group headed by Stanley Greenberg and James Carville, has published a report from a series of focus groups conducted with segments of the Repub- lican Party — moderates, evangelicals and tea partiers.

lican Party — moderates, evangelicals and tea partiers. cynthiatucker Commentary The report confirms that Republi-

cynthiatucker

Commentary

The report confirms that Republi- cans, especially the tea partiers, “are very conscious of being white in a country that is increasingly minority. The race issue is very much alive.” It also notes that “Barack Obama and Obamacare is a racial flashpoint for many evangelical and tea party vot- ers.” Tea partiers believe that the Demo-

cratic Party is intent on expanding the social safety net in order, basically, to buy votes. They see “Obamacare” as a sop to that alleged 47 percent of lazy Americans who don’t want to work, don’t pay any taxes and live off govern- ment handouts. And, of course, those lazy Americans are, in their view, vot- ers of color. One focus group participant actually described the mythical America he pined for this way:

“Everybody is above average. Every- body is happy. Everybody is white. Everybody is middle class, whether or not they really are. Everybody looks

that

Democracy Corps isn’t the only research group that has ferreted out the racial antagonism at the heart of tea partiers’ radicalism. Writing in The New York Times, journalist Thomas Edsall shared portions of an email exchange with political scientist Chris- topher Parker, co-author of “Change They Can’t Believe In: The Tea Party

Very homogeneous.”

and Reactionary Politics in America.” Parker said that “reactionary conser- vatives” believe “social change is sub- versive to the America with which they’ve become familiar, i.e., white, mainly male, Protestant, native born, straight. ‘Real Americans,’ in other words.” None of this should come as any great surprise. In 2010, a New York Times poll of tea partiers found that more than half said the policies of the Obama administration favor the poor, and 25 percent thought that the admin- istration favors blacks over whites — compared with 11 percent of the gen- eral public. Their racial paranoia has long been clear. If anything has been surprising, it’s been the potency of their hatred, the irrationality of their tactics, the venom in their backlash. But, as they see it, they are fighting for their way of life — their control, their power. This is an existential battle, and they’re willing to burn down the coun- try to save it from people of color. That’s why they’re willing to risk defaulting on the nation’s debt for the first time in history. The only whiff of good news is that tea party supporters tend to be older than average. Their cohort is diminish- ing and will be replaced by a younger voting bloc whose members don’t hew to their antediluvian views. But the tea partiers are going to be with us for a while, and it’s going to be a wild ride.

Cynthia tuCkeR, winner of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for commentary, is a visiting professor at the University of Georgia. She can be reached at cynthia@cynthiatucker.com.

About thispage

The Opinion page of The Daily Union seeks to be a community forum of ideas. We believe that the civil exchange of ideas enables citizens to become better informed and to make decisions that will better our community. Our View editorials represent the opinion and institutional voice of The Daily Union. All other content on this page represents the opinions of others and does not necessarily represent the views of The Daily Union. Letters to the editor may be sent to The Daily Union. We prefer e-mail if possible, sent to m.editor@thedailyunion.net.

Police & RecoRds

6A

The Daily Union. Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013

JunctionCity

PoliceDepartment

The Junction City Police Depart- ment made 23 arrests and responded to 128 calls in the 48-hour period ending 6 a.m. Fri- day.

Wednesday

• 10:36 a.m. — Accident, 1209 Perry St.

• 12:22 p.m. — Accident, 1901 Harvest Court

• 1:39 p.m. — Accident, Eighth St. and Madison St.

• 2:02 p.m. — Accident, 1115 Haven Drive

• 3:17 p.m. —Accident, 17th St. and Washington St.

— Disturbance,

1000 block of W. 12th St.

• 3:25 p.m. — Accident, 721 W.

Eighth St.

• 5 p.m. — Accident, 204 Grant

Ave.

• 6:30 p.m. —Accident, 18th St. and Jefferson St.

• 6:30 p.m. — Domestic, 2200 block of Old Highway 40

3:25 p.m.

• 7:15 p.m. —Theft, 1701 West-

wood Blvd.

• 8:23 p.m. — Disturbance, 127

E. 10th St.

— Theft, 618 W.

Sixth St.

Thursday

• 2:28 a.m. — Disturbance, 614

N. Washington St.

E.

Chestnut St.

• 12:01 p.m. — Accident, 900 N. Eisenhower Drive

• 12:33 p.m. — Accident, Ninth

St. and Washington St.

• 1:01 p.m. — Disturbance, 214

E. 16th St.

• 2 p.m. — Domestic, 200 block

of E. Ninth St.

• 2:05 p.m. — Burglary, 315 S. Adams St.

• 5:04 p.m. — Accident, 1701 N. Washington St.

• 6:08 p.m. — Disturbance, 100

W. Seventh St.

• 7:29 p.m. — Damage to prop- erty, 310 S. Hammons Drive

• 9:40 p.m. — Disturbance, 1911 Lacy Drive

• 9:46

• 9:12

p.m.

a.m.

— Theft,

604

Friday

• 2:39 a.m. — Disturbance, 416

W. Sixth St.

• 3:06 a.m. — Domestic, 900

block Westridge Drive

GrandviewPlaza

PoliceDepartment

Reports from the Grandview Plaza were not received as of Fri-

day afternoon.

JunctionCity

FireDepartment

The Junction City Fire Depart-

ment made four transports and responded to 10 calls in the

24-hour

Thursday. A report for Thursday was not received as of Friday after-

a.m.

period

ending

8

noon.

GearyCounty

Sheriff’s

Department

Reports from the Geary County

Sherrif’s

received as of Friday afternoon.

Department

were not

GearyCounty

DetentionCenter

Reports from the Geary County

Detention

received as of Friday afternoon.

Center

were

not

GearyCounty

MarriageLicenses

Sept. 30

• Cody Allen Sills, Keianna Dai- lyn Boykin

• Thomas Lavonne Spradley,

Zania Cherelle Goodman

• Dylan Scott Lonsway, Miranda

Elizabeth Anne Main

• Julian LaDarious Stanley, Davi- na Denise Stanley

Oct.1

• Robert Wesley Ingram, Tiffany Shannon Ingram

John Albright,

Lekischa Renae McDonald

• Robin Troy Gonsalvez II, Sara

• Christopher

Elizabeth McAuliffe

Oct.2

• Kelly Michael Ammann, Rhon- da Sue Dewey

Oct.3

• James Nasir Hicks, Taquela Monique Hicks

Chisum,

Ivette Angelica Garcia

• Landon Marcus Hebert, Bren-

da Marie Hebert

• Ricahard Robert Pepper, Nata- lia Bejan

• Michael William Gola, Eunhye Jung-Gola

• Matthew Timothy O’Bryan, Laetitia Ray O’Bryan

Oct.4

• Anthony

Dewaun

• Nathaniel Robert Phenes, Jus-

tine Marie Kapela

• Michael Scott Ford, Erin Eliza- beth Ford

• Eric Shane Coffman, Kristina Ann Sanchez-Fontimayor

• Erik Michael Milkie, Erin Lee Kilpatrick

• Justin David Rollins, Annah

Alicia Rollins

• Patrick Aaron Jess Montgom- ery, Ariel Renee Sandoval

DivorceFilings

Oct.2

• Patrick M. Snider, April M.

Coner

Dennis

James

Ammelia G. Bray

Williams,

• Bradley Alan Dill, Kelsey Can-

dacelee Galloway

Oct.3

• Charles Lee Williamson Jr.

Jessica

Michell

Andrews,

GearyCounty

District Court

Criminal complaints were filed

in the following person felony cases during the one-week period

ending noon Friday.

Oct.9

• State of Kansas vs. Bradley

Alan Purdue — Count 1: criminal

threat, Count 2: battery

Associated Press

Kansas juggling on shutdowncan’t last

TOPEKA — Kansas can’t shield residents relying on social services from the fed- eral government’s partial shutdown past mid-Novem- ber, Gov. Sam Brownback’s chief spokeswoman said Friday. The governor issued a statement promising that his administration is com- mitted to minimizing the shutdown’s effects and can juggle state funds to pro- grams normally sustained with federal dollars because it has healthy cash reserves.

But the governor added that an extended shutdown puts programs “in jeopar- dy.” Brownback spokeswom- an Eileen Hawley said the state also drew down enough federal funds before the shutdown began to con- tinue providing benefits through October under the Women, Infants and Chil- dren program, which helps poor mothers with young children buy food. Kansas also has enough federal funds on hand to finance benefits under the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families program through mid-November. But Hawley said that if the state shifts its cash reserves into those pro- grams, it can’t be sure the

NewsfromaroundKansas

federal government will reimburse it later. “If the shutdown contin- ues into November, we have to take a serious look at what our options are,” Haw- ley said. Brownback’s statement and Hawley’s comments came as congressional Republicans in Washington offered a proposal for end- ing the 11-day partial shut- down. Brownback’s office announced Thursday that he had recalled all but seven of 66 workers at the Department of Labor fur- loughed last week and directed the agency to can- cel plans to furlough anoth- er 119. He said the moves ensure that the department can

continue processing bene- fits for unemployed work- ers. The state can cover fed- erally financed spending because it had more than $430 million in cash reserves as of the beginning of the week, he said.

KansasSupreme Court disbars OverlandPark lawyer

TOPEKA — The Kansas Supreme Court has dis- barred an Overland Park lawyer after finding he committed professional misconduct. The Kansas City Star reports that the court

issued its disbarment order Friday in the case against Michael Clay Schnittker. The order says Schnittker “systematically stole” more than $150,000 that belonged to his law firm over a three- year period. The order also says he only stopped after his law partner discovered discrep- ancies in the firm’s finan- cial records.

Kansas man gets 10 yearsforsolicitation

HOLTON — A northeast Kansas man has been sen- tenced to 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to sex- ual exploitation of a child. The Topeka Capital-Jour- nal reports that 46-year-old

James Michael Baxter of Holton pleaded guilty Aug. 23 to one count of electron- ic solicitation and two counts of sexual exploita- tion of a child. He was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison. After serving his sen- tence, Baxter will serve 60 months of parole and be required to register as a sex offender for 25 years. Baxter was arrested April 27 after Jackson County sheriff’s deputies and officers with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security served a search warrant in connection with an investigation into the distribution of child por- nography.

investigation into the distribution of child por- nography. Celebrating 129 YEARS of Serving You! ASK ABOUT

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Business/Calendar

The Daily Union. Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013

7A

WeeklyCalendar

The Daily Union. Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013 7A WeeklyCalendar Today 10 a.m. Geary County Women’s Democratic

Today

10 a.m. Geary County Women’s

Democratic Club meets at Church

of Our Savior Methodist Church, Thompson Drive

Anonymous,

W. Seventh St. p.m. Doors open at JC Frater-

nal Order of Eagles, 203 E. 10th St.

6:30 p.m. JC Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie Bingo, 203 E. 10th St., open to public

p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous, W. Seventh St.

Sunday, Oct. 13

119

Noon

1

8

119

Narcotics

Noon Doors open at JC Fraternal Order of Eagles, 203 E. 10th St. Noon Alcoholics Anonymous,

119 W. Seventh St.

1:30 p.m. American Legion Post

45 Auxiliary Bingo, Fourth and

Franklin Streets

8

p.m. Narcotics Anonymous,

119

W. Seventh St.

Monday, Oct. 14

9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Exercise at Senior Citizens Center

Center,

Board Meeting

Noon Alcoholics Anonymous,

119 W. 7th St.

Noon to 1:30 Lunch, followed by Bingo at Senior Citizens Center

1 to 2:30 p.m. Troubadours of JC

rehearse at Geary County Senior Center, 1025 S. Spring Valley Road

2 p.m. Doors open at Junction

City Fraternal Order of Eagles, 203

E. 10th St.

6 p.m. JC South Kiwanis meets at Valley View.

Duplicate

Bridge, 1022 Caroline Ave.

7 p.m. Hope Al-Anon meeting at

First United Methodist Church

9:30

Senior

Citizens

6:45

p.m.

Social

ferson.

8

p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous,

119

W. Seventh St.

Afternoon Bingo at Senior Citi- zens Center Senior Citizens Center errands to bank and post office

Senior Citizens

Center

Tuesday, Oct. 15

Troubadours,

9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Line dancing at Senior Citizens Center 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Friend-to- Friend Caregiver Support Group, Faith Lutheran Church, 212 N. Eisenhower Drive

10 a.m. Preschool Storytime

(Ages 3-5), Dorothy Bramlage Pub-

lic Library, 230 W. Seventh St.

Bible study at

Senior Citizens Center

Noon Alcoholics Anonymous,

10

to

11

a.m.

119

W. Seventh St.

2

p.m. Doors open at the Junc-

tion City Fraternal Order of Eagles,

203

E. 10th St.

5

to 8 p.m. Junction City Frater-

nal Order of Eagles Aerie and Aux-

iliary kitchen is meals

open with full

5:30 p.m. Library Board, Doro- thy Bramlage Public Library, 230 W.

Seventh St.

6 p.m. Sunflower Quilters Guild,

Dorothy Bramlage Public Library,

230

W. Seventh St.

6

p.m. Evening Storytime (Ages

3-8), Dorothy Bramlage Public

Library, 230 W. Seventh St. 6:30 p.m. JC Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie Bingo, 203 E. 10th St.,

open to public

6:30 p.m. Sunflower Quilters Guild, Dorothy Bramlage Library

7p.m. CompositeSquadronCivil

Air Patrol, JC airport terminal, 540 Airport Road

238

W. Eighth St.

8

p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous,

119

W. Seventh St.

Computer class, Senior Citizens Center Senior Citizens Center errands to Fort Riley

Wednesday, Oct. 16

a.m. mous, 119 W. Seventh St.

6:45 a.m. Breakfast Optimist Club, Stacy’s Restaurant, Grand- view Plaza 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Exercise at Senior Citizens Center

10 a.m. Toddler Time (18-36

Anony-

6:30

Alcoholics

Months w/Adult caregiver), Doro- thy Bramlage Public Library, 230 W. Seventh St.

11 a.m. Preschool Storytime

(Ages 3-5), Dorothy Bramlage Pub- lic Library, 230 W. Seventh St.

11 a.m. to Noon Blood Pressure

Checks at Senior Citizens Center

Noon Noon Kiwanis meets at

Kite’s, Sixth and Washington

streets Noon Alcoholics Anonymous,

119 W. Seventh St.

12:15 p.m. Weight Watchers, Presbyterian Church 113 W. Fifth

St.

p.m. Doors open at the Junc-

tion City Fraternal Order of Eagles,

203 E. 10th St.

1 to 4 p.m. Cards at Senior Citi-

zens Center

6 to 7:45 p.m. AWANA Club,

First Southern Baptist Church 6:30 p.m. Bingo at American Legion Post 45, Fourth and Franklin streets

7 p.m. LIFE Class: Out of the

Darkness and Into the Future, Dor-

othy Bramlage Public Library, 230

W. Seventh St. 7:30 p.m. Melita Chapter 116,

2

7:30 p.m. Chapman Rebekah

Lodge #645, Chapman Senior Cen-

ter

8

p.m. Narcotics Anonymous,

119

W. Seventh St.

8

p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous,

Presbyterian Church, 113 W. Fifth

St.

Senior Citizens Center errands to Dillons Registration deadline for 10/18 Teen After Hours, Dorothy Bram- lage Public Library, 230 W. Seventh St.

Thursday, Oct. 17

9:30 a.m. MOPS (Mothers of

Preschoolers), First Southern Bap- tist Church, child care provided

10 a.m. Wiggles & Giggles Baby

Time (0-18 Months w/one-on-one

adult caregiver), Dorothy Bramlage Public Library, 230 W. Seventh St.

11 a.m. Preschool Storytime

(Ages 3-5), Dorothy Bramlage Pub- lic Library, 230 W. Seventh St. Noon Alcoholics Anonymous,

119 W. Seventh St.

1 p.m. TOPS (Take Off Pounds

Sensibly), Episcopal Church of the

Covenant, 314 N. Adams St.

2 p.m. Doors open at the Junc-

tion City Fraternal Order of Eagles,

203

E. 10th St.

4

p.m. Elementary Explorers,

See the Sea of Monsters,” Dorothy

Bramlage Public Library, 230 W. Seventh St.

5 to 8 p.m. Junction City Frater-

nal Order of Eagles Aerie and Aux-

iliary kitchen is

meals 6:30 p.m. Bingo at American Legion Post 45, Fourth and Franklin

open with full

streets 6:30 p.m. Flinthills Depression and Bipolar Alliance Support

Group, First Christian Church, Fifth and Humboldt, Manhattan

Library, 230 W. Seventh St. 7:30 p.m. Stated Communica- tions, Union Masonic Lodge No. 7

AF&AM

8

p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous,

119

W. Seventh St.

Senior Citizens Center errands to Walmart Computer class, Senior Citizens Center

Friday, Oct. 18

9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Exercise at Senior Citizens Center Noon Alcoholics Anonymous,

119

W. Seventh St.

2

p.m. Doors open at the Junc-

tion City Fraternal Order of Eagles,

203 E. 10th St.

5 to 8 p.m. Junction City Frater- nal Order of Eagles kitchen is open with short-order meals

6 p.m. Ogden American Legion

Bingo, 515 Riley Blvd.

6 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous,

Women’s meeting, 119 W. Seventh

St.

6:30 p.m. JC Fraternal Order of Eagles Auxiliary Bingo, 203 E. 10th St., open to public

6:30 p.m. Teen After Hours, Teen Read Week Celebration “Seek

the Unknown” (Registration Dead-

line 10/16-Middle & High School Students), Dorothy Bramlage Pub- lic Library, 230 W. Seventh St.

8

p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous,

119

W. Seventh St.

Saturday, Oct. 19

Anonymous,

119 W. Seventh St.

1 p.m. Doors open at JC Frater-

nal Order of Eagles, 203 E. 10th St.

6:30 p.m. JC Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie Bingo, 203 E. 10th St., open to public

Noon

Narcotics

Sunday, Oct. 20

Noon Doors open at JC Fraternal Order of Eagles, 203 E. 10th St. Noon Alcoholics Anonymous,

119 W. Seventh St.

Kapaun

Knights of Columbus, basement of

St. Mary’s Chapel, Fort Riley

1:30 p.m. American Legion Post

45 Auxiliary Bingo, Fourth and

Franklin Streets

12:15

p.m.

Father

8

p.m. Narcotics Anonymous,

119

W. Seventh St.

Monday, Oct. 21

9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Exercise at Senior Citizens Center Noon Alcoholics Anonymous,

119 W. 7th St.

1 to 2:30 p.m. Troubadours of JC

rehearse at Geary County Senior Center, 1025 S. Spring Valley Road

2 p.m. Doors open at Junction

City Fraternal Order of Eagles, 203 E. 10th St.

6 p.m. LIFE Class: Basket Mak-

ing, (Registration Deadline 10/7),

Hobby Haven

6 p.m. JC South Kiwanis meets at Valley View.

Duplicate

Bridge, 1022 Caroline Ave.

7 p.m. Talk About Literature in

Kansas, Ordinary Genius by Thom- as Fox Averill, Dorothy Bramlage Public Library, 230 W. Seventh St.

7 p.m. Hope Al-Anon meeting at

First United Methodist Church

7 p.m. Hope Al-Anon, First Unit-

ed Methodist Church, 804 N. Jef-

ferson.

6:45

p.m.

Social

8

p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous,

119

W. Seventh St.

Afternoon Bingo at Senior Citi- zens Center Senior Citizens Center errands to bank and post office Bingo, Senior Citizens Center

7

p.m. Hope Al-Anon, First Unit-

7

p.m. LIFE Class: English as a

Order of the Eastern Star, 722 1/2

7

p.m. LIFE Class: Women &

8

p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous,

Troubadours,

Senior Citizens

ed Methodist Church, 804 N. Jef-

Second Language, Library Corner,

N.

Washington St.

Wealth, Dorothy Bramlage Public

119

W. Seventh St.

Center

Greekheroesopening

Submitted Photo

Greek heroes restaurant, located on 1032 South Washington St., had a ribbon cutting ceremo- ny last week to celebrate their opening.

cutting ceremo- ny last week to celebrate their opening. Stocks rise as debt talks continue B

Stocks rise as debt talks continue

By Joshua Freed

AP Business Writer

The closer Washington gets to a deal over the debt ceiling, the higher stocks go. Stock prices rose on Fri- day as investors bet against a U.S. debt default. It was the second day of gains after the Dow Jones indus- trial average posted its big- gest point rise of the year on Thursday. With an hour of trading left, the Dow was up 83 points, or 0.6 percent, to 15,209. The Standard &

Poor’s 500 index was up eight points, or 0.5 percent, to 1,701. The Nasdaq rose 27 points, or 0.7 percent, to

3,787.

Call it the Sigh of Relief Rally. A partial government shutdown pushed the Dow below 15,000 this week before President Barack Obama and House Republi- cans met on Thursday to talk about the outlines for a possible deal. Obama and Republican senators met on Friday, too. Stocks set new highs in mid-September but

declined steadily since then as the federal government got closer to the partial shutdown that began Oct. 1. That shutdown entered its 11th day on Friday. Even more troubling for investors is the expectation that the government will reach its borrowing limit on Oct. 17, which raises the possibility of a default on government borrowing. U.S. government bonds are usually considered the world’s safest investment, so even the possibility of a default has rattled inves- tors.

 

THE WEEK IN REVIEW

 

WEEKLY STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

 

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

   

WEEKLY DOW JONES

 

uu

NYSE

 

NASDAQ

   

Wk

Wk

YTD

Wk

Wk

YTD

Name

Ex

Div Last

Chg %Chg%Chg

Name

Ex

Div Last

Chg %Chg%Chg

 

Dow Jones industrials

-136.34 -159.71

26.45

323.09 111.04

9,761.76 +86.06

dd

3,791.87 -15.89

AT&T Inc

NY

1.80

34.20

+.90

+2.7

+1.5

HewlettP

NY

.58

22.80 +1.54

+7.2

+60.0

Close: 15,237.11 1-week change: 164.53 (1.1%)

Close: 15,237.11 1-week change: 164.53 (1.1%) MON

MON

NY 1.80 34.20 +.90 +2.7 +1.5 HewlettP NY .58 22.80 +1.54 +7.2 +60.0 Close: 15,237.11 1-week
NY 1.80 34.20 +.90 +2.7 +1.5 HewlettP NY .58 22.80 +1.54 +7.2 +60.0 Close: 15,237.11 1-week
NY 1.80 34.20 +.90 +2.7 +1.5 HewlettP NY .58 22.80 +1.54 +7.2 +60.0 Close: 15,237.11 1-week
NY 1.80 34.20 +.90 +2.7 +1.5 HewlettP NY .58 22.80 +1.54 +7.2 +60.0 Close: 15,237.11 1-week

AbtLab s

NY

.56

33.76

+.34

+1.0

+7.7

HomeDp

NY

1.56

76.32

+.54

+0.7

+23.4

 

AdobeSy

Nasd

52.19

+.62

+1.2

+38.5

iShJapan

NY

.15

11.94

+.20

+1.7

+22.5

TUES

WED

THUR

FRI

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

AMD

NY

3.83

-.08

-2.0

+59.6

iShChinaLC

NY

.93

38.36

+.35

+0.9

-5.2

16,000

A M J J A S O
A
M
J
J
A
S
O

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

AlcatelLuc

NY

3.68

-.16

-4.2 +164.7

iShEMkts

NY

.77

42.83

+.72

+1.7

-3.4

Alco Strs

Nasd

13.91

-.07

-0.5

+47.7

iS Eafe

NY

1.76

64.44

+.59

+0.9

+13.3

EmOPES n 25.97

+9.15

+54.4

Celgene rt

2.79

+2.00 +253.2

Alcoa

NY

.12

8.32

+.36

+4.5

-4.1

iShR2K

NY

1.70 107.68

+.66

+0.6

+27.7

GSE Hldg

2.78

+.76

+37.6

VisnChina

6.26

+3.81 +155.5

Amarin

Nasd

5.09 -2.09

-29.1

-37.1

Intel

Nasd

.90

23.26

+.45

+2.0

+12.8

15,500

DirGMBear

60.42 +15.92

+35.8

AltairN rs

6.65

+3.49 +110.4

Amgen

Nasd

1.88 110.89

-2.02

-1.8

+28.6

IBM

NY

3.80 186.16 +2.06

+1.1

-2.8

MensW

5.75

2.83

6.37

CSVLgNGs 18.53

PampaEng

PrisaB

Edenor

45.95 +11.21

+1.40

+.63

+1.20

+3.47

+32.3

+32.2

+28.6

+23.2

+23.0

ReconTech

Ku6Media

CamcoF

NV5 wt

ChiFnOnl

3.93

3.23

5.96

2.19

2.94

+1.54

+1.19

+1.92

+.69

+.74

+64.4

+58.3

+47.5

+46.0

+33.6

ApldMatl

AriadP

AutoData

BP PLC

Nasd

Nasd

Nasd

NY

.40

1.74

2.16

18.00

72.51

42.15

+.43

4.26-14.54

+.99

-.13

+2.4

-77.3

+1.4

-0.3

+57.3

-77.8

+27.4

+1.2

JDS Uniph

JPMorgCh

JohnJn

Kroger

Nasd

NY

NY

NY

1.52

2.64

.66

-.42

-.16

89.45 +2.14

41.71 +1.15

14.67

52.51

-2.8

-0.3

+2.5

+2.8

+8.6

+20.2

+27.6

+60.3

15,000

BBVABFrn

7.88

+1.46

+22.7

ArrowRsh

8.05

+2.01

+33.3

BkofAm

NY

.04

14.19

+.14

+1.0

+22.2

LSI Corp

Nasd

.12

7.69

-.19

-2.4

+8.8

PrisaA

2.40

+.43

+21.8

Synutra

7.10

+1.77

+33.2

Barc iPVix

BarrickG

NY

NY

.20

14.53

17.23

-.53

-.80

-3.5

-4.4

-54.3

-50.8

LillyEli

NY

1.96

48.88

+.50

+1.0

-.9

14,500

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

BlackBerry

Nasd

8.07

+.38

+4.9

-32.0

MktVGold

NY

.46

23.05 -1.14

-4.7

-50.3

 

Boeing

BrMySq

NY

1.94 117.98

+.78

+0.7

+56.6

Merck

NY

1.72

47.29

-.94

-1.9

+15.5

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

NY

1.40

47.68

+.16

+0.3

+47.9

MicronT

Nasd

16.84 -1.63

-8.8 +165.6

 

MUTUAL FUNDS

 

K12 19.01 -10.86

-36.4

AriadP TowerGp lf AcornEngy xG Tech n Amarin CoronadoB CytRx Endocyte Chimerix n AgiosPh n

4.26 -14.54

-77.3

Cemex

NY

.45

10.80

-.58

-5.1

+13.8

Microsoft

Nasd

1.12

34.13

+.25

+0.7

+27.8

   

Pretium g 4.78

-1.94 -28.9

4.49

-3.14

-41.2

Cisco

Nasd

.68

23.28

+.26

+1.1

+18.5

MorgStan

NY

.20

27.95

+.96

+3.6

+46.2

 

Total Assets

 

Total Return/Rank

Pct Min Init

DirGMnBull 26.07 -9.26 -26.2

3.22

-1.72

-34.8

Citigroup

NY

.04

49.22

+.08

+0.2

+24.4

NokiaCp

NY

6.65

-.08

-1.2

+68.4

Name

Obj

($Mlns)

NAV

4-wk

12-mo

5-year

Load

Invt

PumaBio n

44.52 -11.77

-20.9

3.18

-1.34

-29.6

CocaCola

NY

1.12

37.77

+.57

+1.5

+4.2

Oracle

NY

.48

33.26

+.05

+0.2

-.2

Alliance Bernstein GlTmtcGC m American Funds FnInvA m American Funds GrthAmA m American Funds IncAmerA m American Funds InvCoAmA m American Funds MutualA m

WS

77

65.30

+2.3

+19.1/D

+11.4/E

1.00

2,500

CSVInvNG 12.01 -3.03 -20.1 RubyTues 6.12 -1.42 -18.8

CSVInvBrnt 26.53 -4.38

DxGldBll rs 38.65

-6.41 -14.2

-14.2

5.09

-2.09

-29.1

ColgPalm s

NY

1.36

61.45 +2.12

+3.6

+17.6

Penney

NY

8.00

+.14

+1.8

-59.4

LB

38,326

48.80

+1.6

+23.8/B

+15.8/B

5.75

250

5.77

2.29

10.50

-2.30

-.86

-3.87

-28.5

-27.3

-26.9

ConAgra

Corning

NY

NY

1.00

.40

30.85

14.45

+.48

-.18

+1.6

-1.2

+4.6

+14.5

Pfizer

PwShs QQQ

NY

Nasd

.96

.98

28.72

79.23

-.28

-.17

-1.0

-0.2

+14.5

+21.6

LG

MA

65,675

64,365

42.26

19.81

+1.3

+1.8

+26.6/A +15.7/C

+13.3/B

+14.1/B

5.75

5.75

250

250

MaxcomTel 2.18 -.36 -14.2

16.55

-5.94

-26.4

CSVelIVST

NY

26.33

+.39

+1.5

+58.7

ProUShSP

NY

35.50

-.68

-1.9

-34.4

LB

50,866

36.23

+1.3

+22.8/C +14.4/D

5.75

250

PrUShNG rs81.19 -12.78

-13.6

24.76

-8.42

-25.4

Dell Inc

DxSCBr rs

Nasd

NY

.32

13.85

21.78

+.01

-.65

-2.9

+36.5

-59.7

RegionsFn

NY

.12

9.59

+.16

+1.7

+34.5

LV

18,890

33.30

+1.3

+20.3/D +14.9/C

5.75

250

   

RiteAid

NY

4.99

-.20

-3.9 +266.9

 

WS

34,514

36.78

+1.9

+22.6/C

+15.6/B

5.75

250

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

DxSCBull s

NY

64.30 +1.03

+1.6 +101.1

SpdrDJIA

NY

3.54 152.17

+1.78

+1.2

+16.5

American Funds NewPerspA American Funds WAMutInvA Davis NYVentC m Fidelity Contra Hartford HealthcarA m Hartford MidCapA m Lord Abbett AffiliatA m PIMCO TotRetIs Putnam GrowIncA m Putnam GrowOppA m Putnam InvestorA m Putnam VoyagerA m Vanguard 500Adml Vanguard InstIdxI Vanguard InstPlus Vanguard TotStIAdm Vanguard TotStIdx

m

m

DryShips

DuPont

Nasd

3.42

-.36

-9.5 +113.8

LV

46,223

37.29

+1.1

+21.8/C +15.0/C

5.75

250

Name

Vol (00)

Last

Chg

Name

Vol (00)

Last

Chg

NY

1.80

57.93

-.72

-1.2

+28.8

S&P500ETF

SiriusXM

NY

Nasd

3.39 170.26

+1.37

+0.8

+19.6

LB

3,141

37.90

+0.2

+22.8/C

+13.1/E

1.00

1,000

S&P500ETF6534963170.26+1.37

BkofAm 4310551 14.19 +.14

Facebook4913912 49.11 -1.93

MicronT 4102297 16.84 -1.63

EMC Cp

ErthLink

NY

Nasd

.40

.20

25.30

5.09

-.13

+.16

-0.5

+3.2

-21.2

Sprint n

SPDR Fncl

NY

NY

.05

.32

3.88

6.00

20.31

-.07

-.44

+.26

-1.8

-6.8

+1.3

+34.3

+8.1

+23.9

LG

SH

68,651

397

93.80

27.31

+1.4

+0.4

+21.5/D +16.3/C

+32.6/C +18.9/C

NL

5.50

2,500

2,000

Barc iPVix3870665 14.53

-.53

SiriusXM 2467979 3.88

-.07

EnPro

NY

60.16

+.94

+1.6

+47.1

TalismE g

NY

.27

12.29

+.10