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Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 Vol XIV, Edition 44
Exterior Cleaning Services
650.216.9922
c a r e f u l - c l e a n . c o m
BUDGET BATTLE
NATION PAGE 7
NINERS WR BACK
IN FOUR WEEKS?
SPORTS PAGE 13
DEBT LIMIT OVERTAKING SHUTDOWN AS CRISIS
FOCUS
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Beth Hunkapiller, president of
the San Carlos Elementary School
District Board of Trustees,
announced her resignation
because of actions surrounding the
transfer of funds for
Superintendent Craig Bakers
$1.3 million home loan and what
she called the districts focus on
moving pressing work forward
rather than pro-
tecting the pub-
lics trust in its
work.
Hunkapi l l er
made the
announcement
at the boards
Sept. 26 meet-
ing. Since she
is not running
for re-election,
she is ve meetings shy of com-
pleting 20 years of board service.
Overall, she said, in an emailed
statement, that there should be a
more open process in discussing
the loan situation and other
issues.
In my view, the superintendent
has shortchanged opportunities
for fuller public discussion and
feedback on signicant issues for
the district and public, and the
board majority has seen too late
the losses after permitting such
supposed efciency, she wrote.
In my view, such shortcuts in the
name of efciency dont always
save time. Time savings versus
better process have been subjects
of debate in the district and on the
board. ... I have made an issue of
open process several times prior
to the loan transaction issue.
Shortcuts cost.
The loan, so that the superin-
tendent could move from Redwood
City to San Carlos, occurred one
day prior to the board taking for-
mal action to approve it. The
escrow on the San Carlos home
Baker purchased was scheduled to
close Sept. 13, but went through
on Sept. 11.
At the meeting during which
Hunkapiller resigned, the board
voted to complete training and
create a timeline leading up to the
loan. This was not enough for
School board president resigns over loan questions
Beth Hunkapiller, not seeking re-election, served 20 years on the San Carlos Elementary School District board
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Mateo City Council
voted last night 3-2 to stay neutral
on the $130 million bond Measure
P for facility upgrades in the San
Mateo-Foster City Elementary
School District after being urged
not to endorse it by the citys
mayor and deputy mayor.
The council listened to a packed
house of residents from both cities,
most urging it not to endorse the
measure, before Councilwoman
Maureen Freschet offered a motion
that the council stay neutral on the
ballot measure despite arguments
that the bond was not equitable to
San Mateos poorer, mostly
Hispanic students.
Funds from Measure P will also
go toward reopening Knolls
Elementary School in San Mateo
and for technology for all students
in the district and a solar initiative.
City stays
neutral on
Measure P
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A San Carlos man arrested last
week for allegedly touching three
minors was supposed to be housed
in a locked psychiatric facility
after prosecutors and a judge
changed his earlier indecent expo-
sure conviction to avoid his regis-
tering as a sex offender.
Daniel Mark Brickman, 50, is
most recently accused of annoying
two children and
a teenager in
San Carlos.
When arrested,
Brickman was
identified as a
transient and
gave an Oakland
address; whats
unclear is why
Brickman was
Transient sent to locked psychiatric facility
after last criminal case for indecent exposure
Man accused of touching minors previously
avoided sex offender registration in 2010
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
The Belmont City Council will will decide tonight which of the nal three designs is the right choice to
accommodate all the youth who play soccer and baseball at the Belmont Sports Complex.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
More than two years after the
City Council picked a design rm
to draw up plans to transform the
Belmont Sports Complex from a
group of hard-to-maintain grass
elds to modern synthetic turf, the
council will decide tonight which
of the nal three designs is the
right choice to accommodate all
the youth who play soccer and
baseball at the massive facility.
The trouble is, soccer advocates
like one of the designs for the
larger North Field, baseball advo-
cates like another and staff is rec-
ommending an option that does
not necessarily bridge the divide.
Soccer groups want the entire
North Field turfed while baseball
groups want to keep the diamond a
grass and dirt ineld while turng
the entire outeld.
Staff is recommending a third
alternative that retains a dirt
mound in the spring and summer
while the remaining eld is syn-
thetic turf. The option, which the
Parks and Recreation Commission
approved on a 6-1 vote in June,
would require the use of a portable
pitching mound during the fall
baseball season.
Staff contends the option meets
the needs for both baseball and
soccer; provides flexibility to
accommodate all youth sports
activities; and results in the reduc-
tion in operation and maintenance
costs and benefits the environ-
ment.
The city used about 4 million
gallons of water to maintain the
elds last year.
Staff estimates though that
baseball participants make up
only about 15 percent of all partic-
ipants who use the North Field.
The cost to turf the North Field
and replace the existing lights is
estimated at $2.5 million. It will
cost about $800,000 to turf the
South Field. The elds are expect-
ed to last about 10 years and the
cost to replace the carpet is about
$500,000 to $600,000, according
Turf vote tonight
Belmont Sports Complex has three alternatives the council will consider
Beth
Hunkapiller
See BETH, Page 18
See FIELDS, Page 20
Daniel
Brickman
See BRICKMAN Page 18
WHAT WILL HEALTH
CARE GLITCHES MEAN?
HEALTH PAGE 19
See NEUTRAL, Page 20
Spanish shepherds guide
2,000 sheep through Madrid
MADRID Shepherds led a ock of
2,000 sheep through Madrid on
Sunday in defense of ancient grazing,
droving and migration rights increas-
ingly threatened by urban sprawl and
modern agricultural practices.
Tourists were surprised to see down-
town trafc cut to permit the ovine
parade to bleat bells clanking
across some of Madrids most upmar-
ket urban settings.
Since at least 1273, shepherds have
had the right to use droving routes that
wind across land that was once open
fields and woodland before Madrid
mushroomed to the great metropolis it
is today.
Every year, a handful of shepherds
defend that right in Spains capital
city. Following an age-old tradition,
they paid 25 maravedis coins rst
minted in the 11th to city hall of-
cials to use the crossing.
Shepherds have a right to use around
78,000 miles of ancient paths for sea-
sonal livestock migrations from cool
highland pastures in summer to warmer
and more protected lowland grazing in
winter.
The movement is called transhu-
mance and in Spain up until recently
involved close to 1 million animals a
year, mostly sheep and cattle.
Modern farming practices and the use
of faster road transport are increasing-
ly confining animals to barns or
trucks, because shepherding is costly
and time-consuming, according to the
Ministry of Agriculture, which has
promoted the colorful annual
Transhumance Fiesta in Madrid since
1994.
Spaniards are proud of their cen-
turies-old sheep rearing traditions and
hold the native Merino breed of sheep
in high esteem.
Merinos have gone on to form the
backbone of important wool industries
in places such as Australia and South
America.
Madrid became an important urban
center when King Philip II chose it as
the capital of his vast empire in 1561.
Some paths have been used for more
than 800 years and modern-day Madrid
has sprawled to engulf two north-south
routes. One that crosses Puerta del Sol
Madrids equivalent of New Yorks
Times Square dates back to 1372.
Seventh grader appeals
suspension for gun keychain
COVENTRY, R.I. The family of a
Rhode Island seventh-grader who was
suspended for three days for having a
small toy gun keychain at school is
appealing the suspension.
WJAR-TV reports the family of 12-
year-old Joseph Lyssikatos is appeal-
ing Monday to the superintendent in
the town of Coventry.
Joseph was suspended last month
after bringing a 2-inch keychain he
won at an arcade to Alan Shawn
Feinstein Middle School. Another stu-
dent found it and showed it off to class-
mates, and Joseph was suspended.
He has already served the suspen-
sion, but his parents hope to get it
expunged from his record so Joseph
can try for perfect attendance this year.
Dozens play chess in
public to defy S.F. crackdown
SAN FRANCISCO At least for an
afternoon, the chess players were back
at the usual spot theyve occupied for
years along downtown San Franciscos
busy Market Street.
But instead of hustling a dollar here
and a dollar there with deft openings
and clever traps, the mostly homeless
players and their supporters were play-
ing Sunday in defiance of a recent
police crackdown and ban on the pub-
lic games. And they were backed by a
brass band and several homeless advo-
cates who helped organize the three-
hour chess-in under bright, blue
skies on a hot San Francisco after-
noon.
Earlier this month, police conscat-
ed chess gear, tables and chairs at the
site.
Police said the games had begun to
attract illegal gambling and drug sales
to the area adjacent to a cable car termi-
nal, which is a popular tourist destina-
tion.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor-screenwriter
Matt Damon is 43.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1871
The Great Chicago Fire erupted; res
also broke out in Peshtigo, Wis., and
in several communities in Michigan.
There is an abiding beauty which may be
appreciated by those who will see things as they
are and who will ask for no reward except to see.
Vera Brittain, British author (1893-1970)
Comedian Darrell
Hammond is 58.
Singer Bruno Mars
is 28.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Belgian riot police stand as they are covered with foam sprayed by Belgian reghters during a protest for better work
conditions in central Brussels.
Tuesday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 60s. Northeast winds around 5
mph...Becoming west in the afternoon.
Tuesday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in
the upper 40s. West winds 5 to 10
mph...Becoming northwest 10 to 20 mph
after midnight.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear in the evening then
becoming partly cloudy. Lows around 50. Northwest winds
10 to 15 mph in the evening...Becoming light.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Thursday night through Columbus Day: Mostly
clear. Lows around 50. Highs in the lower 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1869, the 14th president of the United States, Franklin
Pierce, died in Concord, N.H.
I n 1918, U.S. Army Cpl. Alvin C. York led an attack that
killed 25 German soldiers and captured 132 others in the
Argonne Forest in France.
I n 1934, Bruno Hauptmann was indicted by a grand jury in
New Jersey for murder in the death of the son of Charles A.
Lindbergh.
I n 1944, The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, starring
Ozzie and Harriet Nelson, made its debut on CBS Radio.
I n 1945, President Harry S. Truman announced that the
secret of the atomic bomb would be shared only with Britain
and Canada.
I n 1956, Don Larsen pitched the only perfect game in a
World Series to date as the New York Yankees beat the
Brooklyn Dodgers in Game 5, 2-0.
I n 1957, the Brooklyn Baseball Club announced it was
accepting an offer to move the Dodgers from New York to
Los Angeles.
I n 1962, Chuck Hiller of the San Francisco Giants became
the rst National Leaguer to hit a World Series grand slam;
the shot came in Game 4 against New York Yankees pitcher
Marshall Bridges. (The nal score of the game was Giants 7,
Yankees 3.)
I n 1967, former British Prime Minister Clement Attlee
died in London at age 84.
I n 1970, Soviet author Alexander Solzhenitsyn was named
winner of the Nobel Prize for literature.
I n 1982, all labor organizations in Poland, including
Solidarity, were banned.
I n 1992, former West German Chancellor Willy Brandt
died in Unkel, Germany, at age 78.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
SEIZE BRAND COFFEE FUNGUS
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: The beach caf was famous for its
SEA-SONING
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
VIREP
PURET
DEBTUG
ROFTOG
2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Print your answer here:
Entertainment reporter Rona Barrett is 77. Actor Paul
Hogan is 74. Rhythm-and-blues singer Fred Cash (The
Impressions) is 73. Civil rights activist Rev. Jesse Jackson is
72. Comedian Chevy Chase is 70. Author R.L. Stine is 70.
Actor Dale Dye is 69. Country singer Susan Raye is 69. TV
personality Sarah Purcell is 65. Actress Sigourney Weaver is
64. Rhythm-and-blues singer Robert Kool Bell (Kool & the
Gang) is 63. Producer-director Edward Zwick is 61. Country
singer-musician Ricky Lee Phelps is 60. Actor Michael
Dudikoff is 59. Actress Stephanie Zimbalist is 57. Rock musi-
cian Mitch Marine is 52. Actress Kim Wayans is 52.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Solid Gold,No.
10,in rst place;Gold Rush,No.1,in second place;
and Money Bags, No. 11, in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:46.56.
2 5 5
4 16 24 25 44 5
Mega number
Oct. 4 Mega Millions
11 12 17 39 40 5
Powerball
Oct. 5 Powerball
7 8 10 17 33
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
3 6 1 4
Daily Four
9 4 6
Daily three evening
13 22 33 46 47 24
Mega number
Oct. 5 Super Lotto Plus
3
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
* Frescriptians & Bame
MeJicaI 5uppIies 0eIivereJ
* 3 Fharmacists an 0uty
{650} 349-1373
29 west 257B Ave.
{ear EI 0amina}
5an Matea
SAN MATEO
Burglary . A window of a vehicle was
smashed and camera equipment was taken on
the 600 block of Port Drive before 6:43 a.m.
Sunday, Sept. 29.
Theft. Apurse was stolen on 600 block of
Concar Drive before 6:06 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 28.
Burglary. Alaptop was taken from a vehi-
cle on the rst block of Second Avenue
before 9:07 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27.
Disturbance. Ofcers were called to advise
on an employee who broke a co-workers car
window on the 1100 block of South
Amphlett Boulevard before 6:29 a.m.
Thursday, Sept. 26.
Fraud. Fake money was reportedly being
used at the 2900 block of South Norfolk
Street before 3:11 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26.
BURLINGAME
Theft. A theft was reported on the 200
block of Lorton Avenue before 9:15 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 28.
Theft. A theft was reported on the 100
block of Anza Boulevard before 10:57 a.m.
Saturday, Sept. 28.
Thef t . A handicap placard was reported
stolen on the 1400 block of Capin Avenue
before 3:25 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26,
Theft. Askateboard was reported stolen on
the rst block of Mangini Way before 12:32
p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26.
Police reports
This cuts me up
Abusiness was broken into but the only
known missing item was a pair of scis-
sors on the 1400 block of Burlingame
Avenue in Burlingame before 12:45
p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County supervisors this morning will
decide how to divvy up their ve districts for
future elections but some of the suggested
maps raise concern that slivers too small
to support precincts will force some resi-
dents to become absentee voters whether
they want to be or not.
Slivers are small areas where one districts
lines pass near another set of lines like a
city border or congressional district. The
result are precincts too tiny to justify
stafng on Election Day so residents are
required to vote by mail.
The states congressional districts are too
large for any supervisorial district to mirror,
according to National Demographics
Corporation which submitted a 12-page
summary of the plans to the board for con-
sideration.
One attempt to avoid slivers is the so-
called precinct cleanup map which is
among the designs coming before the board
Tuesday morning although not on the rec-
ommended short list.
Supervisor Warren Slocum, a member of
the remapping advisory committee and the
former chief elections ofcer of the county,
said he asked for the cleanup map because
slivers can be important in the overall cost
and turnout of an election.
Boundaries dont follow straight lines
and you get these pockets that can be
confusing. For example, two people can
be on different sides of the same street
but they will be at different pol l i ng
places, Slocum said.
Slocum said hes asked the registrar to
look at the maps to make sure the new lines
dont create problems come Election Day.
The board can consider any of the maps
suggested throughout months of meetings
and workshops but the nine-person adviso-
ry committee is recommending three as
preferable. The trio include the community
unity 4 plan which leaves northern District
Five intact as a majority-minority Asian
district and lumps into District Four
Redwood City, East Palo Alto, east Menlo
Park and North Fair Oaks. The map is
favored by the backers of the voters rights
lawsuit that propelled the boundary
changes. The other two maps are the
Supervisors ready to redraw district lines
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A high-pressure gas line San Carlos of-
cials feared was unsafe had its pressure
reduced by PG&E at 5:15 p.m. yesterday,
effectively removing it from service, accord-
ing to a city statement.
In the statement, the city said it believes
operating Line 147 at the reduced pressure
meets the intent of the injunction issued by
Judge George Miram, and allows Pacic Gas
and Electric to keep the line in use, providing
natural gas to residences and business in San
Carlos. The lower pressure in the line and the
isolation of the line from the gas transmis-
sion system reduces the risk of catastrophic
explosion, the statement said.
City Manager Jeff Maltbie acknowledges
the effort on the part of PG&E to shut down
Line 147 and continues to demand that the
line remain shut down until such time as the
California Public Utilities Commission can
hold public hearings on Line 147 to deter-
mine the current safety of the line and any
future operation of Line 147 as a high pres-
sure transmission line, according to the
statement.
The court order was issued Friday after an
alleged set of internal PG&E emails was
sent to San Carlos officials on Thursday,
casting doubt on the condition of the 84-
year-old line that runs 3.8 miles beneath
Brittan Avenue.
PG&E ofcials this weekend said that Line
147 would be shut down out of an abundance
of caution, but assured that the pipeline
would not have been in operation if it was
thought to be unsafe.
San Carlos city ofcials developed con-
cerns over the pipes safety after PG&E rep-
resentatives forwarded city ofcials a series
of internal emails on Thursday that cast doubt
on the condition of the line after a leak
repair.
In one of the emails, a PG&E engineer,
whose name was redacted, expressed con-
cerns to PG&E executives about the thinning
of the pipe, which dates back to 1929.
Pressure reduced on San Carlos pipeline
See LINES, Page 8
See PIPELINE, Page 8
4
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Pedestrian struck,
killed in San Mateo
A66-year-old San Mateo woman was struck by a vehicle
early Saturday morning at 25th Avenue and El Camino Real,
according to San Mateo police.
Shama Ayyad was pronounced dead at the scene and the 18-
year-old driver of the sport utility vehicle that struck her
stayed at the scene and did not appear to be under the inu-
ence of drugs or alcohol, according to police.
The incident, including the low-light conditions, speed of
the vehicle and the direction of trafc signals at the time
remain under investigation, according to police.
The department warned that pedestrians do not automati-
cally have the right of way, even when there is a crosswalk.
Fatal hit-and-run
victim identified
A pedestrian struck and killed in a hit-and-run crash in
Redwood City Saturday evening has been identied.
Vauncelia Thornz, 52, was hit by a minivan in the 1200
block of Marshall Street around 7:10 p.m., according to
police.
Thornz, who has no xed address and appears to be a tran-
sient, was found lying on the ground and pronounced dead.
According to police, witnesses said a dark colored mini-
van struck him. Amale driver was in the car and drove off
after the crash.
Anyone with information is asked to call Redwood City
police at 780-7187.
BART unions decline
to give 72-hour strike notice
Labor leaders for Bay Area Rapid Transit workers say they
are not giving 72-hour notice for a second strike.
Antonette Bryant, president of the Amalgamated Transit
Union Local 1555, and members of the Service Employees
International Union Local 1021 said Monday they are not
giving notice because they want to leave every possible
option for resolution open.
If no deal is reached, the unions could strike again by
Friday when a 60-day cooling-off period expires.
BART spokesman Jim Allison says ofcials are working
hard trying to reach a settlement.
BARTofcials have said they are about $89 million apart
from a four-year contract with the unions, while the unions
say the gap is about $30 million over three years.
Local briefs
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Shared services, maintaining
nances and growing the citys busi-
nesses and infrastructure are top con-
cerns for those seeking the two open
seats on the Millbrae City Council.
The four seeking ofce Reuben
Holober, appointed incumbent Anne
Oliva, Douglas Radtke and Ann
Schneider spoke with the Daily
Journal for endorsement interviews last
week. Oliva was appointed to the coun-
cil after the death of Nadia Holober, for-
mer councilwoman and Reubens moth-
er. Mayor Gina Papan is termed out.
Handling construction and the citys
re assessment tax were also of interest
to candidates.
Development
Candidates expressed interest in
expanding business in the city and a
key part of this plan would be through
developing land near the
BART/Caltrain station.
The 1998 Millbrae Station Area
Specic Plan encompasses 116 acres
around the BART/Caltrain Station area.
Higher density housing, retail, restau-
rant, ofce, hotel and entertainment
uses in a mixed-use development have
yet to materialize. Plans have since
stalled and the site, known as Site One,
hasnt been actively worked on since
2006.
Oliva would like to see a couple plans
in regards to the area.
We came out of tough economic
times and watched everything stop in
regards to development, Oliva said.
A mixed-use, high-density, residen-
tial, commercial and technology busi-
ness friendly space would be Holobers
vision for Site One. Retail and restau-
rants are also necessary for keeping res-
idents shopping in
Millbrae, he said.
A transit-oriented
development with
mixed uses is
Schneiders idea for
the area.
We need to get
the players together
and move forward,
Schneider said. Its
only a couple of
years until Millbrae
goes into the red.
Millbrae needs to be
focusing on eco-
nomic develop-
ment.
Radtke would like
there to be a focus
on retail near the
BART Station so
Millbrae gets sales
tax from purchases.
My vision is probably a bit differ-
ent, he said. Retail would bring the
most revenue. It could accommodate an
anchor store like Target, ofce space
and condos on top. Retail needs to be
dominated by an anchor store.
In regards to the mix of businesses
downtown, candidates would like to see
more diversity.
If elected, Schneider would like to
conduct a community outreach plan to
come up with ways to attract new busi-
nesses.
Oliva said there are a lot of the same
kinds of restaurants and businesses, but
she doesnt leave Millbrae often
because businesses do cover her needs.
There isnt the right mix of business-
es, Holober said. Consolidating busi-
nesses to deal with a lack of square
footage of each building could allow for
larger businesses.
Its not a new issue, he said. Weve
been struggling with this for quite a
while now. I would
like to see a broad
range of restau-
rants.
Further, Radtke
said the mix could be
better, but he is a
believer in the free
market and the busi-
nesses open are a
reflection of what
people are demand-
ing. The city of San
Jose has a plan
where they lower
fees for new busi-
nesses opening,
which he says could
be an option for
attracting more busi-
ness.
The council could
work with the
Chamber of Commerce to think outside
of the box, he said. There were missed
opportunities like losing the Nissan
dealership and Shaws Candy. Broadway
is an eyesore with six empty business-
es.
Candidates addressed lawsuit brought
against the city over alleged lack of
quality construction on the two devel-
opments each have more than 100 units
along El Camino Real 88 Broadway
and Park Broadway.
The city does need to take a stronger
role with construction, Holober said.
Its kind of an embarrassment, he
said. We want to avoid those types of
issues and have the type of staff to make
sure theyre constructed properly.
Similarly, Oliva agreed it was unfor-
tunate, but noted that the construction
of Safeway is a good example of what to
do moving forward. Providing con-
struction workers with prevailing
Four competing for Millbrae City Council
Reuben
Holober
Anne Oliva
Douglas
Radtke
Ann Schneider
See MILLBRAE, Page 20
6
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Sunday, October 20, 2013
Fine Arts Quartet
Sunday, November 10, 2013
Alexander String Quartet with Joyce Yang, piano
Sunday, December 15, 2013
Gala Holiday Concert: A Night at the Opera
Heidi Moss, soprano, Lisa Chavez, mezzo-soprano
Eugene Brancoveanu, baritone, Bryndon Hassman, piano
Non-subscription concert benets Kohl for Kids programs
Sunday, January 12, 2014
Pianist Garrick Ohlsson in Recital
Sunday, February 2, 2014
Trio Cavatina with Samuel Rhodes, viola
Sunday, March 9, 2014
Mir Quartet
Sunday, April 13, 2014
Ariel String Quartet
Sunday, May 4, 2014
Henschel Quartett
Music at Kohl Mansion
31st Annual Season
October 20, 2013 May 4, 2014
Music at Kohl Mansion
2750 Adeline Drive
Burlingame, CA 94010
650.762.1130
www.musicatkohl.org
Experience chamber music as it was meant to be heard.
STATE
GOVERNMENT
Legislation by
A s s e m b l y m a n
Kevi n Mul l i n, D-
South San
Franci sco, to clar-
ify the denition of
extortion to include threats of reporting a
persons immigration status, was signed
by Gov. Jerry Brown and will take
effect Jan. 1, 2014.
By clarifying the denition of extor-
tion, AB 524 will help level the playing
field and prevent unethical employers
from using immigration status as a means
of escaping responsibility for workplace
abuses, coercion and wage theft, accord-
ing to Mullins ofce.
San Bruno City Council
candidates at Farmers Market
On Sunday, Oct. 13, San Bruno farmers
market shoppers on San Mateo Avenue
between Jenevein and Sylvan avenues will
have the opportunity to talk one on one
with the four San Bruno City Council candi-
dates between 10 a.m.and 2 p.m. Candidates
are incumbents Ken Ibarra and Rico E.
Medina, along with Andrew Mason and
Marty Medina.
Thousands of old pilings
to be removed from S.F. Bay
Thousands of derelict pilings soaked with
creosote will be removed from San
Francisco Bay in an effort to clean up an
important habitat for Pacic herring.
The Marin Independent Journal reports
that the state Coastal Conservancy will run
a program to remove 33,000 bay pilings
after receiving a $2 million grant from the
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.
The pilings once supported shing piers
and boat launches.
Pacic herring remain the only commer-
cially harvested sh inside the bay, and
often use the pilings and other hard surfaces
to spawn.
A
ragon Hi gh School s student
newspaper, the Outl ook, won a
national award during a conven-
tion sponsored and presented by the
Journalism Education As s oc i at i on
and the Nat i onal Schol ast i c Pre s s
Associ ati on i n San Franci sco t hi s
past spring. The Aragon publication cap-
tured the Best i n Show prize for its
April 25, 2013 edition among entries of at
least 17 pages.
***
Madel ei ne St eckl ey, a senior at
Capuchi no Hi gh School, is the new
student member of the San Mateo Uni on
Hi gh School Di st ri ct Board of
Trust ees. She will serve in that non-vot-
ing capacity through the fall semester in
2013-14. Her first official meeting was
July 31. The student board member posi-
tion is rotated between district schools
twice a year, during the fall and spring
semesters.
***
Ten 2013 San Mateo Uni on Hi gh
School Di st ri ct seniors were named win-
ners of Nati onal Meri t Schol arshi ps .
Winners were Sangwon Yun, Garre t t
Tan, Brandon Liu and Marie Mihara of
Aragon High School; Grace Hu, Jack
Spi ra and Davi d Wi l l oughby of
Burl i ngame Hi gh School ; Catheri ne
Su of Mi l l s Hi gh School ; and Shadi
Barhoumi, Diane Liu and Vi ct ori a
Xi ao of San Mateo Hi gh School .
***
The San Mat eo- Fost er Ci t y
Elementary School Di s t ri ct recog-
nized Eleanor Lindquist Britter of the
Peni nsul a Speci al Int ere s t Li ons
Cl ub for her contributions toward student
wellness at a board meeting Oct. 3.
***
Notre Dame Hi gh School students,
Crys t al Bat s hon 15 and De vi n
Johnst on 17 and chorus teacher/orches-
tra conductor Kri st i n Pf i ef er, all
received Jeff erson Awards for public
service. The awards were presented on Sept.
18.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news.
It is compiled by education reporter Angela
Swartz. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200,
ext. 105 or at angela@smdailyjournal.com.
Local briefs
LOCAL/NATION 7
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A deputy regional forester cur-
rently overseeing millions of acres
of national forests has been named
the inaugural director of San Mateo
Countys recently re-established
Parks Department.
Marlene Finely, 55, begins Nov.
10 heading a department with a
roughly $10.4 million budget, 60
employees, 17 separate parks and
three regional trails. Finely, who is
returning to California from Utah,
has spent decades with the National
Park Service and U.S. Forest
Service. She said her goal is having
a world-class park system.
Thats a park system thats well
cared for, that has a thriving
ecosystem that people can come out
and enjoy and learn more about
nature, Finely said in a prepared
statement.
She said anoth-
er goal is build-
ing on existing
p a r t n e r s h i p s
with local park
supporters, vol-
unteers and coun-
ty staff.
In the new
job, Finely will
earn $171,662
in addition to a
$10,842 car allowance and up to
$15,000 in relocation assistance.
Don Horsley, president of the
Board of Supervisors, said the coun-
ty has high expectations and noted
Finelys experience and enthusi-
asm.
Our residents have told us time
and again that they want the best
park system in the state and we
share that same goal. We think
Marlene is the right person to lead
us, Horsley said.
One of Finelys rst jobs will be
leading the development of the
Devils Slide Trail which converts
the old tunnel into bike lanes and
hiking and equestrian paths. She
will also help rebuild the countys
parks department which only
recently came back out from under
the umbrella of the Public Works
Department.
Finely graduated with honors
from the University of California at
Davis and has a masters degree in
forest recreation from Oregon State
University. She also has several
accolades including the career
achievement award from the
Society of Recreation
Professionals and the federal
employee of the year award from
Federal Executive Association.
She is married and has two col-
lege-age children.
County names new parks director
Marlene Finely
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Daly City woman accused of
pepper-spraying a grocery store
employee who questioned her leav-
ing with a cart of unpurchased beer
and liquor was sentenced to six
months in jail and banned from
being anywhere that alcohol is pri-
marily sold.
Jessica Danielle Louise Jackson,
21, pleaded no contest to robbery
in April. She later indicated plans to
withdraw the plea but changed her
mind again and accepted sentenc-
ing. She was
given two days
credit against
the six-month
term and placed
on three years
supervised pro-
bation. She
must surrender
Jan. 11.
Jackson was
arrested for the
April 7, 2012 incident at Safeway
inside Westlake Center after police
linked security camera footage and
her license plate to her parents
home where she lives.
Prosecutors say that afternoon
Jackson loaded up a basket with a
30-pack of beer and several bottles
of hard alcohol that still had the
security caps intact. As an employ-
ee alerted by the presence of the
caps followed her out of the store
and asked for a receipt, Jackson
allegedly pulled out a canister of
pepper spray and shot it at the
worker before eeing in a car.
Jackson is free from custody on
$50,000 bail.
Alcohol thief jailed for pepper spraying worker
Jessica Jackson
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON A possible
national default loomed closer on
Monday as the partial government
shutdown lingered, rattling mar-
kets in the U.S. and overseas. A
gridlocked Congress betrayed lit-
tle or no urgency toward resolving
either of the threats.
Stocks got a case of the jitters on
Wall Street, and halfway around the
world China stressed the impor-
tance for the international econo-
my of raising the U.S. debt limit.
Safeguarding the debt is of vital
importance to the economy of the
U.S. and the world, Vice Finance
Minister Zhu Guangyao said,
according to the ofcial Xinhua
News Agency. China holds $1.277
trillion in U.S. Treasury bonds,
second only to Japan.
At home, the political rhetoric
was unchanged and generally
uncompromising while a new
poll suggested Republicans are
paying a heavier price than
Democrats for the deadlock.
President Barack Obama said the
House should vote immediately on
ending the partial closure of the
federal establishment. He accused
House Speaker John Boehner of
refusing to permit the necessary
legislation to come to the oor
because he doesnt apparently
want to see the ... shutdown end at
the moment, unless hes able to
extract concessions that dont
have anything to do with the budg-
et.
Boehner, in rebuttal, called on
Obama to agree to negotiations on
changes in the nations health care
overhaul and steps to curb decits,
the principal GOPdemands for end-
ing the shutdown and eliminating
the threat of default.
Debt limit overtaking
shutdown as crisis focus
REUTERS
Barack Obama speaks about the government shutdown during a visit to
the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in Washington,D.C.
NATION/WORLD 8
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE I
recently received a
phone call from a
local realtor who
was shocked to find
an urn with
cremated remains
located in the closet
of an empty house under renovation. He
had been told by someone working on the
property to just throw these cremated
remains into a dumpster, which didnt seem
right, and he wanted my advice. I told him
that under no circumstances are cremated
remains to be thrown into a dumpster. In
cases where unidentified human remains are
discovered, the County Coroners Office is
to be notified so they can investigate and
determine the appropriate course of action.
Discovering unidentified or seemingly
abandoned cremated remains is disturbing
but not uncommon. Stories of cremated
remains being found on their own in an
unoccupied house or apartment is a problem
that is significant and needs to be addressed.
Ive met with countless families at the
Chapel of the Highlands whove selected
cremation as the final disposition. Even
though these families have decided on
cremation, this is still not the final step of
the process. The next-of-kin is required to
inform us on where the cremated remains
are to go after the physical cremation has
taken place. The cremated remains can
either to be inurned in a cemetery, scattered
at sea or taken to the residence of the next-
of-kin. Those who select to keep the
cremated remains at home feel a desire to
have their loved ones ashes close to them,
or simply have not decided on a final
location to place their loved ones cremains.
The key concept for these families to
understand is that keeping cremated remains
at home is a temporary solution and not a
final destination. Some may think that the
cremated remains will be passed down to
following generations and cared for in their
family, but this idea is not being realistic. It
is important to be prepared with a plan to
place the cremated remains in a more
permanent location such as a cemetery or
having them scattering at sea. At the Chapel
of the Highlands we regularly assist families
by guiding them toward a comfortable
solution when these types of situations come
up. Even after long periods with cremated
remains being kept at home we can always
help families in making the correct decisions
and to plan for the future.
Remember, if cremated remains are kept
at home, no matter how well intended,
unforeseen situations can and do come up.
The next-of-kin, who has custody of the
cremated remains, may become ill or pass
away without leaving instructions on what to
do if the cremated remains are left behind.
No matter what the situation you can call us
at the Chapel of the Highlands and we will
help in finding an appropriate solution for
placement of the cremated remains.
If you are still keeping cremated remains
at home please plan a permanent disposition
by leaving instructions in a will, with family
or an executor. This will help insure that the
cremains will be given a final resting place
and shown the respect they deserve.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Cremated Remains Found
In Unoccupied Residence
Advertisement
Republican Party-submitted equity map
and the Nakamura 1G map. Both maps move
Redwood Shores from District Three to
District Four and split Menlo Park between
the two districts.
The county is redrawing the map to both
settle the lawsuit and because voters last
November approved changing the charter to
allow district elections. The new system
requires that only voters within one of ve
specic districts can elect a supervisor who
must also hail from that same district.
Previously, voters countywide elected all
ve supervisors even though each lived and
represented a specic district.
The challenges of drawing new lines
included trying to keep cities intact while
keeping population equal and weighing
other facts like race and socioeconomics.
National Demographics Corporation is
currently reviewing the three preferred plans
for potential federal Voting Rights Acts
risks and, according to its summary, no
problems have been found as of its writing.
More information on the proposed dis-
trict maps and process is available at
www.smcdistrictcommittee.org. The Board
of Supervisors meets 9 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8
in Board Chambers, 400 County
Government Center, Redwood City.
Former Google CEO to
co-write management book
Now that he is no longer Googles CEO,
Eric Schmidt evidently has a lot more time
to write books.
After releasing a technology treatise
about his vision of the future in an
Internet-connected world, Schmidt will
share some of the management tips that he
learned while running Google Inc. for a
decade.
The upcoming book will be called No
Adult Supervision Required: How To Build
Successful 21st Century Companies.
Schmidt is co-writing it with Jonathan
Rosenberg, one of Schmidts top lieu-
tenants at Google.
Publisher Business Plus, an imprint of
Hachette Book Group, announced Monday
that it plans to release the book in the fall of
2014.
Around the nation
Continued from page 3
LINES
Are we sitting on a San Bruno situation?
the engineer wrote. Is the pipe cracked and
near failure? I dont want to panic people but
seems like we should consider this and prob-
ably move this pipe ... for replacement.
The San Carlos City Council declared a
state of emergency Friday and a San Mateo
County judge granted an injunction ordering
the line shut down late that day. The 3.8-mile
line runs the length of the city beneath
Brittan Avenue, a residential street that car-
ries thousands of residents to their homes and
schools daily, according to city ofcials.
The state commission is weighing whether
to ne PG&E up to $2 billion for the 2010
explosion of one of its pipelines in San
Bruno, which killed eight people, injured
more than 60 others and damaged 38 homes.
Continued from page 3
PIPELINE
By Mark Sherman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON In its rst major cam-
paign nance case since the Citizens United
ruling in 2010, the Supreme Court is consid-
ering whether to undo some limits on contri-
butions from the biggest individual givers to
political campaigns.
The justices will hear arguments Tuesday,
the second day of their new term, in a dispute
between the Obama administration and
Republicans who are challenging the contri-
bution limits as a violation of First
Amendment rights.
Supporters of campaign nance laws say
the case poses a threat to the contribution
limits that Congress rst enacted in 1974, in
the wake of Watergate abuses.
In 2010, the 5-4 ruling in Citizens United
freed corporations and labor unions to spend
as much as they wish on campaign advocacy,
as long as it is independent of candidates and
their campaigns. That decision did not affect
contribution limits to individual candidates,
political parties and political action commit-
tees.
Now, Republican activist Shaun
McCutcheon of Hoover, Ala., the national
Republican party and Senate GOP leader
Mitch McConnell of Kentucky want the court
to overturn the overall limits on what con-
tributors may give in a two-year federal elec-
tion cycle. The total is $123,200, including
a separate $48,600 cap on contributions to
candidates, for 2013 and 2014.
The partisan-tinged campaign nance case
comes to the court amid a tense stalemate
over the federal budget that has shuttered
parts of the government, but so far has not
affected the Supreme Court.
Chief Justice John Roberts formally
opened the new term Monday without any ref-
erence to the shutdown. The court has
announced it will operate normally at least
through the end of this week.
Among the appeals denied Monday was
Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinellis
request to review a federal appeals court rul-
ing that threw out the states ban on oral and
anal sex. Ten years ago, the Supreme Court
struck down the Texas anti-sodomy law in a
case involving two adults. Virginia argued
that the Texas ruling did not apply to sex acts
between adults and minors. The case stemmed
from the case of a man convicted of violating
the Virginia sodomy statute for demanding
oral sex from a 17-year-old girl.
High court weighinglimits
on campaign contributions
OPINION 9
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
Overtaxing schools
Editor,
As a parent with three children enrolled
in the San Mateo-Foster City School
District, I am concerned that Measure P
seems to exist primarily as a way to erect
an enormous super school in Foster City.
While this would indeed be a boon for
Foster City, it makes a sad joke out of the
very idea of equity. What good does a ve-
star school site there do for the students in
San Mateo who have contended for years
with terrible overcrowding on many cam-
puses? Borel Middle School and San Mateo
Park Elementary School, for example, are
both at capacity, and Baywood Elementary
School will soon be in the same boat. And
what of the socioeconomic challenges
faced by so many of our students? Where is
the bond measure that addresses that?
Finally, I resent the way technology and
solar power are used to mask the inequity
inherent in the measure as a whole. All the
tablets and smart energy in the world are
not going to increase student achievement
if San Mateo classrooms are packed and
teachers are overtaxed.
Veronica Montes
San Mateo
Teachers support Nishimoto,
Bhopale, Velschow and Measure R
Editor,
The Belmont-Redwood Shores Faculty
Association is endorsing Naomi
Nishimoto, Suvarna Bhopale and Chuck
Velschow for the Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School District Board of
Trustees. We further thank the community
for its unending support of our students and
announce our ofcial endorsement of
Measure R.
Nishimoto: Naomi is respected. As a resi-
dent of Belmont for six years, Nishimoto
is the only non-incumbent who has attend-
ed more than 41 board meetings to under-
stand our school districts successes and
issues rst-hand (nnishimoto.com).
Bhopale: Suvarna is collaborative. As a
resident of Redwood Shores since 2003,
Bhopale has volunteered at Sandpiper
Elementary and served as president of her
homeowners association. She is a propo-
nent of establishing districtwide programs
to support all of our students
(sites.google.com/site/suvarnaforschool-
board). Velschow: Chuck is proven. As a
BRSSD Trustee since April 2011, Velschow
has not governed from abroad. He is a
teacher and the only school board member
in the past years who visited school sites
to see programs in action (chuckforschool-
board.com).
Measure R: BRSFAhas ofcially
endorsed Measure R to protect the high-
quality and well-rounded education that stu-
dents receive in our local schools without
increasing taxes. It will protect math, sci-
ence, reading and writing programs, sup-
port school libraries, attract and retain
qualied teachers and maintain a well-
rounded curriculum, including music and art
(yesonmeasurer.org).
By voting for Nishimoto, Bhopale,
Velschow and Measure R, you will create a
school board composed of two women and
three men who share a collaborative vision
for our district, and you will renew funding
for local schools without increasing taxes.
Angela Sveda
Foster City
The letter writer is the president of the
Belmont-Redwood Shores Faculty
Association.
Washington games
Editor,
The papers, television and radio have
been full of experts, pundits, letter writers,
etc. all talking about one thing: how sena-
tors Mike Lee and Ted Cruz dont understand
how thing get done in Washington. They
are probably right. Senators Cruz and Lee
are not Washington insiders. They arent
good at smoke-lled rooms and backroom
deals. Perhaps they arent talking to
Washington insiders but the American peo-
ple. To the Washington insiders, its all a
big game. Who scores the most points?
Who is up in the polls and down? I am not
sure the American people see it as a game?
It is possible that they view uncontrolled
government spending as irresponsible and
dangerous?
Keith C. De Filippis
San Jose
What have we done wrong?
Editor,
What have we, the American people done
to deserve a divided Congress that would
rather shut down the entire country than to
agree to work together for what is best for
America and not for what is best for the
party?
What have we done to have a Congress
that is so bitterly divided on the party line
that we have become an embarrassment on
a world order? What have we done to make
democracy look like a bunch of bickering
children? The answer is we elected them.
We did not put them there to do this
though. We put them there to do what is
right for us, the American people, not the
party.
America does have a big problem with its
health care. We are the only country in the
world that you can lose everything you
have worked for your entire life if you get
sick and run up a large medical bill.
Obamacare may or may not be the solution,
but the country is shut down because
Congress will not work together for any-
thing better. Right now it is about
Obamacare, tomorrow it will be a different
party issue. To totally shut down this coun-
try because one party cannot work with the
other party to solve the issues of this coun-
try is not just wrong; its illegal. No one
seems to be willing to arrest Congress for
illegal activity. Treason is a better word,
but this cannot go on. If this Congress is
unwilling to work together they need to be
sent home. Come the next election vote
them out, all of them, all parties. If the
box says incumbent, check a different box.
If we do not ladies and gentlemen, we got
what we deserve.
D. Nation
San Mateo
Wake up everybody
Editor,
What we are seeing in America today is
selsh people who want what they want for
themselves and not the common good. For
example, the Republican Party represents
the minority of people who are very
wealthy and are out to protect that wealth at
all costs. The truth is, most Americans are
Democrats and want what is good for the
majority of people. As an example of
American selshness, take a look at a place
like Marin County. They fought to keep
BARTout in Marin, and they fought to
keep Starbucks out, and now they are ght-
ing to keep affordable housing out. All this
because they want to protect their own self-
ish interests. It is time these people wake
up and nd out that we all inhabit the same
Earth together.
Patrick Field
Palo Alto
Its unfortunate ...
Editor,
After reading Philip Hages letter
Harming the economy in the Oct. 5-6
issue of the Daily Journal, its unfortunate
that Mr. Hage didnt pay attention to what
the instructor taught in Economics 101.
Its unfortunate that Mr. Hage didnt take
other classes in college like business and
government classes. Its unfortunate that
Mr. Hage didnt apply the theory of intan-
gible benets regarding government stim-
ulates spending. Its unfortunate that Mr.
Hage doesnt know the difference between
government spending on government func-
tions vs. government stimulates spending.
Yes, the source of the funds for both of
these spending functions come from the
private sector in the form of taxes. Its
unfortunate that Mr. Hage appears to agree
with Mr. Aadahls letter Republicans at
heart (Sept. 28 edition of the Daily
Journal) in the middle of Hages letter.
Then, at the end of Hages letter, Hage
doesnt agree and then makes false and
incorrect statements to make his own opin-
ion sound correct. Its unfortunate that this
type of speaking and writing makes it
sound like the author doesnt know what he
is talking about.
Michael R. Oberg
San Mateo
Single ghost
seeks same
A
dmittedly, the goal of most online
dating sites is eventually ending up
between the sheets.
But what about ending up with someone
wearing a sheet?
Thats right boys and ghouls, the site
GhostSingles.com caters to those whose
heart skips a beat over those whose hearts
have stopped altogether and catch their
breath when faced by those who dont
breathe at all. Match.com and eHarmony can
keep the living; GhostSingles.com is the
place for people
who really believe
love and relation-
ships are grave sub-
jects. In fact, the
site bills itself as
the best dating site
for dead singles.
In fact, the web-
site bans the living
along with zombies
and vampires. So
much for inter-
supernatural species
love between the dead, the undead and the
living dead. And here online site OKCupid
got ack for letting users lter out larger
body types for a fee. At least those bodies
are warm.
But over at GhostSingles, the only heat
users are looking for is passion between two
like-minded spirits not body temperature.
The sites chat now function says it all on
its home page; Other single ghosts are
waiting! And while one assumes these
ghosts have nothing but forever in front of
them, sounds like they are anxious to meet
the potential love of their afterlife.
Or not. The company does concede that no
marriages have ever come from the site, cred-
iting the challenge of getting a priest to
sanctify the union. Obviously, ghosts arent
fans of non-religious ofciants. Adding to
the notion that ghosts arent in any rush to
buy eternity bands, one user quoted in news
coverage of the site a user by the way who
gives her age as 134, so relatively young in
ghost years said she just wants to hang
out and have fun and see what happens, not
looking for anything serious.
Maybe shes haunted by a lifetime of dead-
end relationships; maybe the specter of com-
mitment always spooked her even way back
in those early days of life. Sign up and nd
out at least, do so if youre dead.
Remember the user stipulation. The site also
lets users choose the gender and age range of
the ghost they seek along with a choice of
people who have died horribly, mysterious-
l y, tragically or suddenly. Guess everybody
has a type.
Once the couple connects, the question is
nding the best place to meet up. How about
that abandoned building on the corner?
Curling up on the couch with a retro movie
marathon of Beetlejuice and Poltergeist
could be fun. Maybe they can scare up some
tickets to one of those Hollywood dead
sightseeing bus tours.
First, though, the challenge of nding
ones eternal soul mate starts with a perfect-
ly spine-chilling prole. Single ghost seeks
same. Once liked long walks on the beach.
Now, prefers oating through doors and levi-
tating objects. Also a big fan of booze, er,
boos.
Feel free to use a ghost writer. Personal ad
exaggeration should not be restricted to
earthly dating sites.
To help out, the site does offer some after-
life dating etiquette tips: compliment your
date on their ghastliness, ask if they saw a
light at the end of the tunnel, dont judge too
quickly if your date suddenly vanishes.
So come on ghosts, stop leaving love for
the living. Thanks to the Internet, you, too,
could end your nights with moans and
groans. At least, theres the ghost of a
chance.
Michelle Durands column Off the Beat runs
every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think
of this column? Send a letter to the editor: let-
ters@smdailyjournal.com.
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facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
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Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Investors sent the
Standard & Poors 500 index to its
lowest close in a month Monday as
few signs emerged of a deal to end the
U.S. government shutdown and raise
the nations borrowing limit.
Senate Democrats moved to intro-
duce legislation to raise the nations
debt limit without the unrelated condi-
tions Republicans have said they are
seeking. The White House signaled it
would accept even a brief extension in
borrowing authority to prevent an
unprecedented default by the United
States.
On Sunday, speaker John Boehner
had ruled out a vote in the House of
Representatives on a straightforward
bill to increase the governments bor-
rowing without concessions from
President Barack Obama.
Lawmakers have until Oct. 17 to
reach a deal on increasing the nations
debt ceiling. Failure to strike a deal
could cause the United States to miss
payments on its debt. The Treasury
warned last week that a default could
push the economy into a downturn
even worse than the Great Recession.
Everything now is predicated on
Washington, said Quincy Krosby,
market strategist for Prudential.
That is what the market is focused on
completely, getting a deal done to
avoid a default.
The Standard & Poors 500 index
dropped 14.38 points, or 0.9 percent,
to 1,676.12. The Dow Jones industri-
al average dropped 136.34 points, or
0.9 percent, to 14,936.24. The
Nasdaq composite fell 37.38 points,
or 1 percent, to 3,770.38.
The losses were broad. Nine of the
10 industry groups in the S&P 500
dropped. Phone companies were the
only sector to advance.
Until now, the stock market has
mostly moved sideways since the
shutdown began at the start of the
month, indicating that investors still
expect lawmakers to come up with a
deal. The S&P 500 is down 0.3 per-
cent in October.
In government bond trading, the
yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell
to 2.63 percent from 2.65 percent.
The yield has fallen close to its low-
est in two months. Investors have
bought Treasurys on concern that
U.S. economic growth will slow as
the budget impasse drags on.
There were also other signs that
investors are getting gradually more
nervous about the debt ceiling dead-
line.
The VIX index, which rises when
investors are getting more concerned
about stock fluctuations, rose to its
highest in more than three months.
The dollar fell against the euro and
the Japanese yen. The dollar index,
which measures the strength of the
dollar against other currencies, fell
for the seventh day in nine. The gauge
is close to its lowest since February.
One of the reasons stocks havent
fallen more is that some investors see
the current stall as a blip rather than a
change in the long-term trend. The
Federal Reserve continues to keep up
its unprecedented stimulus of the
economy, a strategy that has helped
support a four-year surge in stocks.
The stock market climbed to record
levels in September after the Fed said
it would keep buying $85 billion of
bonds a month to support the U.S.
economy. Many investors had
expected the central bank to start
reducing its stimulus.
Minutes from the September meet-
ing will be published Wednesday, giv-
ing investors insight into the central
banks thinking.
We would encourage investors with
a long-time horizon to think of this
as a buying opportunity, said
Kristina Hooper, U.S. Head of
Investment and Client Strategies at
Allianz Global Investors. Many
investors, who bought bonds after the
financial crisis and the Great
Recession, still hold too many bonds
in their investment portfolios, she
said.
Stocks fall as shutdown drags on
Blackberry shares up
on report of buyout interest
NEW YORK Shares of BlackBerry Ltd. rose more
than 4 percent Monday on a report that the company is
in sale talks with a handful of companies.
Reuters reported Friday that the struggling smartphone
maker was holding discussions with Cisco, Google and
SAP about a possible sale of all or part of itself. It cited
several sources close to the matter that it did not iden-
tify. According to Reuters, BlackBerry has asked for pre-
liminary expressions of interest from buyers including
Intel Corp., LG and Samsung, by early next week.
BlackBerry shares rose 32 cents, or 4.2 percent, to
$8.01 in morning trading Monday.
The company released a statement Monday morning
declining comment on the specic report.
But Blackberry noted that its special committee along
with independent nancial and legal advisors is con-
ducting a robust and thorough review of strategic alter-
natives.
Business brief
By Barbara Ortutay
and Ryan Nakashima
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK People dont just
watch TV anymore; they talk about it
on Twitter. From the comfort of couch-
es, they share reactions to touchdowns
and nail-biting season nales and
advertisers and networks are taking
note.
Examples of Twitters influence
abound. The recent fi nal e of
Breaking Bad generated a record
1. 24 mi l l i on t weet s. The conver-
sation peaked at 22,373 tweets per
minute according to analytics firm
SocialGuide. People used the hash-
tag GoodbyeBreakingBad nearly
500, 000 times. During this years
Super Bowl, sports fans generated
24 million tweets about the com-
pet i t i on and nearl y hal f of t he
games nationally televised com-
mercials contained hashtags that
encouraged viewers to tweet.
Twitter, says Debra Aho Williamson,
an analyst at research rm eMarketer,
creates a community, a bond between
people that doesnt really exist with-
out Twitter.
As Twitter prepares for its initial
public offering, the San Francisco-
based company is also working hard to
insert itself into the TV advertising
economy. In recent months, the social
networking company has forged part-
nerships with television content own-
ers such as CBS, MTV and the NFL
through a program it calls Amplify.
The platform lets content owners beam
real-time video clips to Twitter users
who may have seen or could be inter-
ested in their TV programming. It
also allows marketers to communicate
with viewers who saw their TV ads,
extending commercial pitches to con-
sumers smartphones and tablets.
TV tie-ins allow Twitter to diversify
its revenue stream beyond the relative-
ly small niche of digital advertising
campaigns, a move that should appeal
to potential investors. On Thursday,
Twitter unsealed documents for a Wall
Street debut that could take place
before Thanksgiving. While the com-
pany did not reveal how much money it
makes from its TV partnerships, it
touted its own strength as a second
screen for television programming.
Twitter wrote in its S-1 ling with
the Securities and Exchange
Commission that 45% of television
ads shown during the Super Bowl used
a hashtag to invite viewers to engage
in conversation about those television
ads on Twitter.
Twitters public nature makes it an
especially attractive platform for
tracking live-TV conversations. So
much so that Nielsen recently began
using Twitters data to measure online
social activity around TV program-
ming, starting with this falls TV sea-
son.
Twitter tunes in to TV partnerships ahead of IPO
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Salesforce.com
founder Marc Benioff is donating $2.7
million to San Francisco city schools.
The money includes $100,000 in
grants for each of the citys 12 middle
schools as well as hundreds of iPads.
Officials were set to announce the
donation on Monday.
Benioff has also asked district of-
cials to let him know what else the
middle schools need. He said Mayor Ed
Lees goal of preparing middle school
students for the jobs of the future t s
well with his companys philanthrop-
ic foundation.
San Francisco-based Salesforce pro-
vides customer-management software.
Salesforce founder donating $2.7M to S.F. schools
<<Is Crabtrees return looming? , page 13
Bbbbrruuce a force once again, page 13
Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013
MLB PLAYOFFS: CARDINALS, RAYS FIGHT OFF ELIMINATION >> PAGE 15
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA The Oakland Raiders
released quarterback Matt Flynn on
Monday, just six months after bringing him
in to be the starter.
Oakland acquired Flynn in April from
Seattle for a 2014 fth-round draft pick and
a conditional pick in 2015. The Raiders
also reworked Flynns contract to give him
$6.5 million in guaranteed money this sea-
son.
But Flynn was beaten out for the starting
job in the preseason by
Terrelle Pryor and then
fell to third string behind
undrafted free agent Matt
McGloin last week, lead-
ing to his eventual
release.
It just didnt work,
coach Dennis Allen said.
Terrelle came in and he
took over the job. Hes
earned the position that
hes in. So, we just felt like its probably
best to move on from that.
Sports Illustrated rst reported the move.
Flynn made two appearances for Oakland
(2-3) for all that money. He came in late in a
loss at Denver on Sept. 23, after Pryor was
knocked out with a concussion, and then
started against Washington the following
week.
He was booed by the home crowd from the
start of that game and struggled mightily as
the Raiders lost 24-14. He threw an inter-
ception that was returned for a touchdown,
T
he Serra football team picked up
arguably its biggest win since
snapping The Streak against St.
Francis in 2006 when the Padres knocked
off Bellarmine 17-7 Friday night in San
Jose.
The Bells have owned the West Catholic
Athletic League, and the Padres, over the
past several years, but Serra put together
one of its best overall performances under
coach Patrick Walsh in beating the Bells
for the rst time since the 2008 regular
season.
The defense held the Bells to under 200
yards of total offense, while the Padres
offensive unit racked up nearly 400 yards.
Backup quarterback Anthony Smock, mak-
ing his rst varsity start, passed for 170
yards.
All great signs for
the Padre Nation
and a reason to cele-
brate.
But now its time
for all involved to
forget about
Bellarmine and
focus on Fridays
opponent, Sacred
Heart Cathedral,
under the lights on
the Serra campus. A
win over the Bells
does not a champi-
onship team make. Anyone familiar with
the WCAL knows it is a what have you
done for me lately league because any
team in the league is capable of jumping up
and knocking off any other on any given
Friday (or Saturday, as the case may be).
So dont get too caught up in the win
over Bellarmine. There are still games
remaining against the Irish, Valley
Christian, St. Ignatius, St. Francis,
Riordan and Mitty. As Walsh will attest,
any one of those teams could bite the
Padres if they are not prepared.
With Fridays win, the Padres have the
inside track to a WCAL championship. But
it was only game one of a seven-game
gauntlet through which they must maneu-
ver. There is no breathing a sigh of relief
until the season is over.
***
The MLB Network was giving no love to
the Oakland As during the postgame show
following Oaklands 6-3 win over the
Detroit Tigers Monday afternoon.
One of the analysts said the Tigers were
frustrated swinging wet newspapers at
the plate, inferring Detroit should be doing
much more offensively than six runs in
three games.
Why? Perhaps the Tigers arent scoring
runs by the bushel is because Oaklands
pitching is not allowing them to do so.
The fact the As have limited the Tigers to
an average of two runs per game is no
uke. Oaklands starting pitching was
By Noah Trister
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT The Oakland Athletics have
beaten Detroit with both pitching and
power. And thats left the Tigers on the
brink of elimination and simmering with
frustration.
Brandon Moss, Josh Reddick and Seth
Smith homered for the Athletics, who
chased Anibal Sanchez in the fth inning
Monday and defeated the Tigers 6-3 for a 2-1
AL division series lead.
Moss broke a 3-all tie in the fth with a
solo shot, and Smiths two-run drive later in
the inning ended Sanchezs day. It was an
impressive offensive show after the teams
split two taut, low-scoring games in
Oakland.
This one got a little tense in the ninth,
too, when As closer Grant Balfour and
Detroit hitter Victor Martinez started shout-
ing at each other after a foul ball, causing
benches and bullpens to empty.
I dont know what happened. Honestly, I
know that Balfour is ery on the mound
hes yelling a lot and spitting everywhere,
Moss said. Its who he is. You know, some-
times it can ruffle the feathers of other
teams.
The As arent worried about making
friends, especially after losing to the Tigers
See As, Page 14
See FLYNN, Page 14 See LOUNGE, Page 13
Despite big win,
still work to do
Raiders release Matt Flynn
Matt Flynn
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
October 24, 2008: The Serra Padres beat
Bellarmine College Prep 31-23 at San Jose
City College.
At around that same point in time, a
young Kelepi Lataimua was a fth grader.
And there was no way to tell that some-
where in the future, Serra would need that
young man one day to come up huge not
once, but twice if they wanted to beat the
Bells again.
But fast-forward almost ve years and
thats exactly what happened. Serra, who
after that loss went on to endure eight
straight defeats at the hands of the powerful
Bells, found themselves protecting a 17-7
lead late in their latest clash against
Bellarmine.
The game was tight the entire time, said
Serra head coach Patrick Walsh. We can
never seem to pull away.
And so, with Bellarmine threatening near
the Serra goal line, Lataimua took matters
into his own hands, picking off a C.J.
Samuels pass to thwart a drive that could
have made the remainder of Friday nights
17-7 win very interesting.
See ATHLETE, Page 14
Sophomore is Serras next star
Daily Journal Athlete of the Week
SERRAHS.COM
Kelepi Lataimua was huge in Serras win Friday.
REUTERS REUTERS
S Seth S eth Smith w mith wa at tches his homer ches his homerun un y out of y out of
C Comer omeric ica P a Par ark F k Fr rida iday in O y in Oak akland land s 6-3 win. s 6-3 win.
SPORTS 13
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ranked second in the American League
ahead of even the mighty Tigers rota-
tion.
Lets face it. This is really the rst time a
lot of these analysts have seriously studied
the As and are being surprised. Those who
know, however, know it is no uke
Oakland leads this best-of-5 series 2-1. The
Tigers may have the names Scherzer,
Verlander but the As have the wins
behind a pair of young guns: rookie Sonny
Gray shut out the Tigers Saturday night and
second-year veteran Jarrod Parker held
them to just three runs Monday. Just one
more and they will win their rst playoff
series since beating the Minnesota Twins
in the American League Divisional Series
in 2006.
The team that beat Oakland in the 2006
American League Championship Series?
Detroit.
***
The epitaph on the tombstone of Dallas
Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo should
read. until he threw a late intercep-
tion.
Is there a more star-crossed quarterback
in NFL history? Has there ever been a more
prolic thrower than Romo, who,
inevitably, commits a turnover at the worst
possible time? I dont know how many
talking heads on the various NFL-themed
television shows most former players
said basically the same thing: Romo has
incredible talent, but you knew he was
going to throw a late pick.
Which is exactly what Romo did in the
Cowboys 51-48 loss to Denver Sunday.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTACLARA Frank Gore is quick to
point out that a big reason he is on such a
nice roll again in San Franciscos running
game is because of Bruce Millers timely,
hard blocking.
These two work hand in hand, and Gore
gets the credit. Miller hardly minds.
Bruce is a baller, hes a smart player,
Gore said. He can catch, he can block.
An unheralded third-year fullback whose
job is considered among the most important
in the 49ers ground game, Miller has
thrived after switching sides of the ball two
years ago as a rookie.
Hes making a living in front of Gore
and loves it that way. Miller does more than
just block, too: He has nine receptions for
82 yards with his best being a 17-yard
catch, and all his regular work on offense
this year has cut his role on special teams.
Frank, Miller said, smiling as Gore
walked by, having backs like him and
Kendall (Hunter) and LaMichael (James),
those guys make you look good. And de-
nitely experience, knowing the system,
those things help.
Miller made a key block for Anthony
Dixons 2-yard touchdown run in Sunday
nights 34-3 home victory against the
Houston Texans.
Gore ran for 81 yards and a score on 17
carries, while four others had runs of at least
11 yards as the Niners piled up 177 yards
rushing in their most balanced performance
yet.
Millers blocking big for the run game
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA Coach Jim Harbaugh
expects top 2012 wide receiver Michael
Crabtree to return to game action in mid- to
late November after recovering in quick
fashion from a torn right Achilles tendon
that required surgery.
The 26-year-old Crabtree had career highs
last season with 85 receptions for 1,105
yards and nine touchdowns for the NFC
champion Niners, and was a big reason
they returned to the Super Bowl for the rst
time in 18 years. He sustained the injury
during 7-on-7 drills in an organized team
activity May 21.
Its been very good. Its more
November, middle to late November is kind
of what were hoping for, Harbaugh said.
He seems to be on track for that. Thats
what were hopeful for, being able to play.
Crabtree recently resumed running as a
signicant step in his progress. His return
will be a huge boost for a receiving corps
searching for a complement opposite
Anquan Boldin.
Even Harbaugh has been impressed with
Crabtrees healing ability with an injury
that often can take far longer than six
months for full recovery.
I catch it now and then, sometimes even
when were practicing hes doing his rehab
work, pretty much talk to him every day
and things seem to be going well,
Harbaugh said. Hes been very positive
and very upbeat and feels like things are
progressing well.
Harbaugh has traded a few text messages
with linebacker Aldon Smith, absent for
the past two games while undergoing treat-
ment for substance abuse, and the coach
said there are encouraging signs Smith is
getting himself right.
Crabtree could return to play next month
REUTERS
Michael Crabtree is recovering from a training camp Achilles heel injury on May 21.
His first [interception], I
thought, was the biggest one,
Walsh said. And obviously, the
second one iced the game and that
was the end of it.
Indeed, it was only fitting that
Lataimua end up with the ball on
defense as it was he who sparked
the Padres to victory in what has
to go down as one of Serras
biggest West Catholic Athletic
League wins ever.
For his efforts, Lataimua is the
Daily Journal Athlete of the
Week.
As we got to know our person-
nel and dealing with some adver-
sity within our team, injuries and
other things, it was clear we
couldnt afford the opportunity to
have Kelepi just play offense,
Walsh said about handing
Lataimua his own piece of defen-
sive real estate at such a young
age. And very quickly, he
became the best corner we had on
the team. Hes developed into ...
a guy we feel comfortable putting
out on an island. Its a lonely
job, but Kelepi has the mental
capacity, as a competitor, com-
bined with his physical abilities,
to be out there and play man cov-
erage, and zone coverage and hes
a real blessing to have on a
team.
Aside from his two picks,
Lataimua also racked up five tack-
les in what was overall another
inspired defensive performance
by the Padres.
I think the attitude of our
defense reflects the leadership on
our defense, Walsh said. Its
those leaders that have driven the
rest of the young guys like
Kelepi. Its definitely a group
effort that leads to individual suc-
cess.
[Lataimua] is a cool cat. He
doesnt say much. It alway seems
like hes in control of his emo-
tions. He has a short-term memo-
ry. And I think he believes in
himself. Self confidence is prob-
ably the number one character
trait needed to play the corner-
back position. So, at a young
age, its sometimes rare to see a
kid believe in himself so much,
regardless of what you ask him to
do.
On Friday, he was asked to do
more than just shut down the
Bells offensive attack. Known
for his explosiveness on offense,
it was Lataimuas 59-yard recep-
tion that set up Serras first
touchdown of the game giving
them momentum and confidence
the rest of the game.
Hes certainly an impact play-
er when he gets in there on
offense, Walsh said. Hes a guy
you need to account for in the
offensive game plan as well. I
think were all fortunate in San
Mateo County football, to have
Kelepi around for a few more
years.
SPORTS 14
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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by
lost a fumble in the second half
and was sacked seven times as he
lacked pocket presence.
Pryor came back to regain the
starting job and led the Raiders to
a 27-17 victory Sunday night over
the Chargers as Flynn sat watch-
i ng.
This kids going to continue to
improve, Allen said. Hes proba-
bly leaps and bounds ahead of
where we thought he would be at
this point in time. The key for him
is he continues to work and con-
tinues to strive to get better on the
little things.
After spending four years as
Aaron Rodgers backup in Green
Bay, Flynn was one of the most
sought after quarterbacks on the
free-agent market in 2012 based
largely on one dynamic start.
Flynn threw for 480 yards and six
touchdowns in the 2011 season
finale for the Packers against
Detroit.
Flynn had also played well in
one start the previous season
against New England, throwing
for 251 yards and three touch-
downs in a loss.
Seattle signed Flynn and paid
him $8 million last season even
though he was beaten out for the
starting job by rookie Russell
Wilson. That made him expend-
able and the Raiders acquired him
April 1 to be the heir apparent to
Carson Palmer.
Flynn struggled in training
camp with a sore elbow and was
eventually beaten out by the vast-
ly improved Pryor, who surprised
the Raiders coaching staff and
front office with his rapid
improvement.
in a five-game division series last
year. Oakland can close out this
series Tuesday and reach the AL
championship series for the first
time since 2006 when the
Athletics were swept by the
Tigers.
Oakland will send rookie Dan
Straily to the mound against
Detroits Doug Fister.
Theres no tricks. Weve got to
win the game tomorrow to try to
extend it to Game 5. Its that sim-
ple, Tigers manager Jim Leyland
said. We ran into another situa-
tion where we didnt put enough
runs on the board and an excellent
starting pitcher didnt have a very
good day.
Sanchez, the American Leagues
ERA leader, allowed six runs
five earned and eight hits in 4
1-3 innings. Smith has homered
off Sanchez more than any other
player, having now done it twice
in the regular season and twice in
the playoffs.
There was activity in the
Detroit bullpen before Smiths
homer Monday, and he made the
Tigers pay for sticking with the
struggling Sanchez.
Sometimes he starts out a little
slow, you figure hes going to get
it going, Leyland said. Today
he just really didnt get it going.
He made a couple of real bad
pitches the last inning he was out
there to Moss and Smith.
Jarrod Parker gave up three runs
in five innings for Oakland, and
the Tigers couldnt rally against
the bullpen.
Balfour pitched a hitless ninth
for the save. Martinez had just hit
a foul ball when he started look-
ing back at Balfour, who yelled
something at the designated hit-
ter.
Martinez started slowly toward
the mound, and players from both
teams came running out. The situ-
ation eventually calmed and no
players were ejected. Plate umpire
Gary Darling said warnings were
sufficient.
I said, Why you staring me
down like that? Balfour said.
He was staring me down. He
knew what he was doing.
Martinez said Balfour threw in a
profanity when he yelled toward
the plate.
Im not a rookie. Im a veter-
an, and Im a leader on my teams.
I dont take that, Martinez said
while including a few profane
words of his own during his
explanation. He cant intimidate
me.
When he was with Tampa Bay,
Balfour was involved in a testy
exchange with Chicagos Orlando
Cabrera in a division series game
against the White Sox in 2008.
Continued from page 11
FLYNN
Continued from page 11
AS
Continued from page 11
ATHLETE
SPORTS 15
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
National Basketball Association
NEW ORLEANS PELICANS Waived F Rodney
Carney.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS Placed K Dustin Hopkins on
injured reserve. Signed QB Thad Lewis from the
practice squad. Claimed OL Antoine McClain off
waivers from Oakland. Released OL Sam Young.
GREENBAYPACKERS Signed CB James Nixon
from the practice squad.Placed LB Robert Francois
on injured reserve.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS Activated WR LaVon
Brazill.Waived DE Lawrence Guy.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Claimed WR
Stephen Williams off waivers from Seattle.Waived
WR Jeremy Ebert.
MINNESOTAVIKINGS Agreed to terms with
QB Josh Freeman.
NEWENGLANDPATRIOTS Re-signed CB Mar-
quice Cole. Released S Kanorris Davis and LB Ja-
Gared Davis.
OAKLAND RAIDERS Activated WR Andre
Holmes. Released QB Matt Flynn. Waived OL Jack
Cornell.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
LOS ANGELES KINGS Agreed to terms with F
Scott Sabourin on a three-year entry level contract.
PHILADELPHIAFLYERS Fired coach Peter Lavi-
olette.
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
CLEVELANDINDIANS Sent LHP Clay Rapada
outright to Columbus (IL). National League
MIAMI MARLINS Sent RHP Jose Ceda, RHP
Steven Ames, 1B Joe Mahoney, 3B Gil Velazquez, C
Koyie Hill,LHP Zach Phillips and RHP Kevin Slowey
outright to New Orleans.
TRANSACTIONS
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 2 3 0 .400 135 159
Dallas 2 3 0 .400 152 136
Washington 1 3 0 .250 91 112
N.Y. Giants 0 5 0 .000 82 182
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 5 0 0 1.000 134 73
Carolina 1 3 0 .250 74 58
Atlanta 1 4 0 .200 122 134
Tampa Bay 0 4 0 .000 44 70
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 3 2 0 .600 131 123
Chicago 3 2 0 .600 145 140
Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 118 97
Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 115 123
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 4 1 0 .800 137 81
San Francisco 3 2 0 .600 113 98
Arizona 3 2 0 .600 91 95
St. Louis 2 3 0 .400 103 141
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 4 1 0 .800 95 70
N.Y. Jets 3 2 0 .600 98 116
Miami 3 2 0 .600 114 117
Buffalo 2 3 0 .400 112 130
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 4 1 0 .800 139 79
Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 115 95
Houston 2 3 0 .400 93 139
Jacksonville 0 5 0 .000 51 163
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 3 2 0 .600 117 110
Cleveland 3 2 0 .600 101 94
Cincinnati 3 2 0 .600 94 87
Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 69 110
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 5 0 0 1.000 230 139
Kansas City 5 0 0 1.000 128 58
San Diego 2 2 0 .500 108 102
Oakland 1 3 0 .250 71 91
SundaysGames
San Francisco 34, Houston 3
San Diego at Oakland, late
Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Wash-
ington
MondaysGame
N.Y. Jets 30, Atlanta 28
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 3 3 0 0 6 12 8
Boston 2 2 0 0 4 7 2
Detroit 3 2 1 0 4 6 7
Ottawa 2 1 0 1 3 5 5
Montreal 2 1 1 0 2 7 5
Florida 2 1 1 0 2 4 9
Tampa Bay 2 1 1 0 2 4 5
Buffalo 3 0 3 0 0 2 7
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 2 2 0 0 4 7 1
Carolina 2 1 0 1 3 4 4
N.Y. Islanders 2 1 0 1 3 6 6
N.Y. Rangers 2 1 1 0 2 4 5
Columbus 2 1 1 0 2 6 6
Washington 3 1 2 0 2 10 12
New Jersey 3 0 1 2 2 7 12
Philadelphia 3 0 3 0 0 3 9
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 2 2 0 0 4 11 2
Colorado 2 2 0 0 4 9 2
Winnipeg 3 2 1 0 4 12 10
Chicago 2 1 0 1 3 8 7
Dallas 2 1 1 0 2 4 5
Minnesota 2 0 0 2 2 5 7
Nashville 2 0 2 0 0 3 7
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 2 2 0 0 4 8 2
Vancouver 3 2 1 0 4 12 10
Anaheim 3 2 1 0 4 8 11
Calgary 3 1 0 2 4 12 13
Phoenix 2 1 1 0 2 5 5
Los Angeles 3 1 2 0 2 7 10
Edmonton 3 1 2 0 2 11 15
MondaysGames
Edmonton 5, New Jersey 4, SO
N.Y. Rangers 3, Los Angeles 1
TuesdaysGames
Colorado at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Phoenix at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m.
Florida at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Nashville, 5 p.m.
New Jersey at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
WednesdaysGames
Chicago at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Calgary, 5 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
As6,
Tigers3
10/7
Endregular
season
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/9
@Galaxy
6p.m.
ESPN
10/20
vs.Heredia
7p.m.
10/23
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/13
@Titans
1:05p.m.
FOX
10/20
@Jaguars
10:05a.m.
FOX
10/27
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
@Chiefs
10a.m.
CBS
10/13
vs.Steelers
1:05 p.m.
CBS
10/27
vs.Philly
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/3
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
@Tigers
2:07p.m.
TBS
10/8
vs.Dallas
2:30p.m.
NBCSports
10/26
at Blues
5p.m.
NBC
10/15
vs.Rangers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/8
at Canucks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/10
vs.Senators
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/12
vs.Flames
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/19
at Stars
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/17
vs. Tigers
If necessary
10/10
TUESDAY
GIRLTENNIS
St. Francis at Notre Dame-Belmont, Sacred Heart
Prep at Castilleja, Harker at Crystal Springs, Menlo
School at Notre Dame-SJ, 3:30 p.m.; Aragon at
Burlingame,Sequoiaat Carlmont,SanMateoat Half
Moon Bay, Menlo-Atherton at Hillsdale,Terra Nova
at Capuchino, El Camino at South City, Oceana at
Mills,Woodside at Westmoor, 4 p.m.
GIRLSVOLLEYBALL
Burlingame at Hillsdale, Carlmont at Menlo-Ather-
ton, San Mateo at Woodside, South City at Aragon,
Half Moon Bay at Mills,El Camino at Jefferson,Terra
Nova at Westmoor, Sequoia at Capuchino, Menlo
School at Mercy-SF, Castilleja at Sacred Heart Prep,
Crystal Springs at Mercy-Burlingame, 5:45 p.m.;
Notre Dame-Belmont at Presentation, 6:30 p.m.
BOYSWATERPOLO
Sacred Heart Prep at Mitty, 3:30 p.m.; Woodside at
Half Moon Bay,Terra Nova at Hillsdale,San Mateo at
Mills, 4 p.m.; Priory vs. Capuchino at Mills, 6:30 p.m.
GIRLSWATERPOLO
Woodside at Half Moon Bay,Terra Nova at Hillsdale,
San Mateo at Mills, 5:15 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
BOYSWATERPOLO
Menlo-Atherton at Menlo School, 4 p.m.;
Burlingame at Aragon,Carlmont at Sequoia,4 p.m.
GIRLSWATERPOLO
Castilleja at Menlo-Atherton,4 p.m.; Burlingame at
Aragon, Carlmont at Sequoia, 5:15 p.m.
THURSDAY
GIRLSTENNIS
Notre Dame-Belmont at St.Ignatius,Menlo School
at Sacred Heart Prep, Notre Dame-SJ at Crystal
Springs,Mercy-Burlingame at Pinewood,3:30 p.m.;
Half Moon Bay at Carlmont, San Mateo at Aragon,
Menlo-Atherton at Sequoia, Hillsdale at
Burlingame,El Camino at Oceana, Capuchino at
South City,Westmoor at Terra Nova, Mills at Wood-
side, 4 p.m.
GIRLSVOLLEYBALL
Carlmont at San Mateo, Woodside at Burlingame,
Menlo-Atherton at Aragon, Hillsdale at South City,
El Camino at Terra Nova, Westmoor at Half Moon
Bay, Jefferson at Capuchino, Mills at Sequoia,
WHATS ON TAP
By Will Graves
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH Michael Wacha
heard the chants. Then again,
when 40,000 people clad in black
scream your name relentlessly for
the better part of three hours, its
kind of hard to miss.
The goal was to rattle the St.
Louis rookie, remind him that 22-
year-old pitchers arent built to
withstand the pressure of an elimi-
nation game.
One problem. Wacha doesnt
really do rattled. He doesnt do
pressure, either. The louder PNC
Park grew, the more unhittable
Wacha became.
I kind of like it, Wacha said.
It kind of gives me adrenaline. I
kind of use it in my favor.
And the Pittsburgh Pirates
not to mention anyone else he
might face in the postseason
kind of need to get used to it.
Wacha took a no-hit bid into the
eighth inning and the Cardinals
showed off their October poise,
edging the Pirates 2-1 Monday to
force a winner-take-all Game 5 in
the NLdivision series. St. Louis is
7-1 over the last three years with
its season on the line.
I think you take high talent and
high character people that are
motivated and support each other,
and they dont give up, Cardinals
manager Mike Matheny said.
Thats a tough combination.
One the Pirates are still trying to
master. Pedro Alvarez hit his third
home run of the series, connecting
with one out in the eighth for
Pittsburghs only hit in Game 4.
Cardinals tie up NLDS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. The
Tampa Bay Rays are still aoat in
the AL division series.
Jose Lobaton hit a solo home
run with two outs in the bottom of
the ninth inning into the giant
sh tank beyond the center-eld
wall, and Tampa Bay staved off
elimination once again by beating
the Boston Red Sox 5-4 Monday
night.
The Rays cut Bostons lead in
the best-of-five series to 2-1.
Game 4 is Tuesday night at
Tropicana Field, with Jake Peavy
starting for the Red Sox against
Jeremy Hellickson.
Tampa Bay took a win-or-go-
home game for the fourth time in
nine days. The Rays did it with an
unlikely stroke as Lobaton, who
came off the bench late in the
game, connected against Red Sox
closer Koji Uehara.
Its unbelievable. Its some-
thing you cant explain, Lobaton
said. We never give up. Were
going to keep ghting.
HR keeps Rays hopes alive
16
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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HEALTH 17
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Two Americans, German-American win Nobel in medicine
By Malcolm Ritter and Karl Ritter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Two Americans and a German-American
won the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday for illuminating
how tiny bubbles inside cells shuttle key substances
around like a vast and highly efficient fleet of vans, deliv-
ering the right cargo to the right place at the right time.
Scientists believe the research could someday lead to
new medicines for epilepsy, diabetes and other condi-
tions.
The work has already helped doctors diagnose a severe
form of epilepsy and immune deficiency diseases in chil-
dren. It has also aided research into the brain and many
neurological diseases, and opened the door for biotech
companies to make yeast pump out large quantities of use-
ful proteins like insulin.
The $1.2 million prize will be shared by James
Rothman, 62, of Yale University, Randy Schekman, 64, of
the University of California, Berkeley, and Dr. Thomas
Sudhof, 57, of Stanford University.
They unlocked the mysteries of the cells internal trans-
port system, which relies on bubble-like structures called
vesicles to deliver substances the cell needs. The fleet of
vesicles is sort of the FedEx of the cellular world.
When a pancreas cell releases insulin or one brain cell
sends out a chemical messenger to talk to a neighboring
one, for example, the vesicles have to deliver those sub-
stances to the right places on the cell surface. They also
ferry cargo between different parts of a cell.
Imagine hundreds of thousands of people who are trav-
eling around hundreds of miles of streets; how are they
going to find the right way? Where will the bus stop and
open its doors so that people can get out? Nobel com-
mittee secretary Goran Hansson said. There are similar
problems in the cell.
Jeremy Berg, former director of the National Institute of
General Medical Sciences in Bethesda, Md., said the prize
was long overdue and widely expected because the work
was so fundamental and has driven so much other
research.
Berg, who now directs the Institute for Personalized
Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh, said the work
provided the intellectual framework that scientists use to
study how brain cells communicate and how other cells
release hormones.
So the work has indirectly affected research into virtual-
ly all neurological disease as well as other diseases, he
said.
In the 1970s, Schekman discovered a set of genes that
were required for vesicle transport. Rothman revealed in
the 1980s and 90s how vesicles delivered their cargo to
the right places. Also in the 90s, Sudhof identified the
machinery that controls when vesicles release chemical
messengers from one brain cell that let it communicate
with another.
This is not an overnight thing. Most of it has been
accomplished and developed over many years, if not
decades, Rothman said.
Rothman said he lost grant money for the work recog-
nized by the Nobel committee, but he will now reapply,
hoping the prize will make a difference in receiving fund-
i ng.
Schekman said he was awakened at 1 a.m. at his home in
California by the chairman of the prize committee, just as
he was suffering from jetlag after returning from a trip to
Germany the night before.
I wasnt thinking too straight. I didnt have anything
elegant to say, he told The Associated Press. All I could
say was Oh, my God, and that was that.
He called the prize a wonderful acknowledgment of the
work he and his students had done. I called my lab man-
ager and I told him to go buy a couple bottles of
Champagne and expect to have a celebration with my
lab, he said.
Sudhof, who was born in Germany but moved to the U.S.
in 1983 and also has American citizenship, told the AP he
received the call from the committee while driving in
Spain, where he was due to give a talk.
REUTERS
A combination of undated handout photos of the 2013 Nobel medicine prize winners. From left, Randy Schekman,Thomas
Suedhof and James Rothman.
18
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Hunkapiller, as she saw other misconduct
associated with the loan and wanted an audit
conducted.
In particular, she took issue with fellow
Trustee Seth Rosenblatt for his domineer-
ing conduct regarding the loan and how it
took place.
[It] interfered with the boards ability to
do perform its duty, she said in the state-
ment. Superintendent Baker maintained he
should remain removed from the loan issue
because he was a beneciary of the loan.
She also contended that Baker was not
only a beneciary of the loan, but asked the
district business ofcial to move the hous-
ing funds ahead of formal board approval.
Baker said he had no comment on
Hunkapillers statement but expressed sad-
ness by her departure.
I was very saddened and disappointed to
receive her resignation so close to nishing
out her 20th year, Baker said in an email.
She has been an absolutely stellar board
member and has given to this community
beyond measure.
Rosenblatt said he doesnt have the time
to correct all of her factual misstatements
about the board, the district and its superin-
tendent, but the issues she cited at the last
meeting were thoroughly debated by the
trustees before votes were taken.
It is unfortunate that Beth Hunkapiller
chose to end her long and distinguished
career on the San Carlos school board in
such a bizarre manner, Rosenblatt said in
an email. Reasonable people understand
that individual judgments may differ, and
the bodys majority may vote in a way dif-
ferent from our personal opinion. That is
the nature of having ve members on the
board, and the strength of democracy is hav-
ing these healthy disagreements.
He went on to say the district has done an
incredible job over the last four years, both
accomplishing more and engaging more
deeply with the community than has ever
been done in the past.
We have been an outstanding example in
the county and around the state, and its dis-
appointing that Beth has chosen to drop out
rather than work with us to face the major
issues and opportunities we will continue to
have, he said in the email.
Hunkapiller disagreed with Rosenblatts
view that there was proper discussion of the
loan and that a majority of the board was
rm in its opinion that no investigation of
the loan transaction should occur at the out-
set of public discussion.
I have previously raised Rosenblatts
domineering conduct and the superinten-
dents manipulation of open public process
as governance issues with the superintend-
ent and board, she wrote. I believe, in
general, the boards proper role with the
loan transaction issue was to assure all
information that should be known was
known and shared with the public. Some
board members assumed defensive roles
without full information.
When ofcials in public agencies make
mistakes, a common problem is to shrink
from disclosing what happened and to make
the problem worse, she wrote.
I believed the district was better than
this, she wrote.
Hunkapiller has lived in San Carlos with
her husband since 1983. She has two chil-
dren who graduated from San Carlos
schools. Her experience includes journal-
ism work for the Kansas City Star and Los
Angeles Times, middle school reading and
English teaching, along with work as a
school administrator, director of the Charter
Schools Division and work with the
California Department of Education.
Trustee Adam Rak, who sided with
Hunkapiller in wanting a review done on the
loan process, expressed his disappointment
for her departure.
Im disappointed she wasnt able to n-
ish term, but shes made her decision, Rak
said. Shes certainly made her impact. I
wish her the best.
Continued from page 1
BETH
in San Carlos because his last criminal case
in San Mateo County was resolved in a way
to keep him in custody and treatment.
We dont know why Mr. Brickman does
not remain in a facility. Did someone deter-
mine he wasnt a risk? Was he ever housed in
such a facility? said District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe.
He said Brickman may very well have
been discharged from the facility but regard-
less the belief is that he did go off his med-
ication.
Brickmans housing is what led Judge Lisa
Novak to agree for him to change a 2010
indecent exposure conviction to one of
annoying a minor. Had the original charge
stood, Brickman, who was under a legal
conservatorship, would have been required
to register as a sex offender and be prohibit-
ed from remaining in his psychiatric hous-
ing. At the time, prosecutor Melissa
McKowan said the switch was totally a
technicality because the sentence of credit
for time served was the same. The only dif-
ference was registration which she said gave
the county more flexibility in where
Brickman would live.
Brickmans former defense attorney Eric
Liberman could not be reached for comment.
At the time of the 2011 resentencing, he
said the change was what the original plea
deal had been but that an error was made at
sentencing and the ip back was appropri-
ate because his client while inappropriate,
is not perceived to be a heinous sex offend-
er.
During several weeks in February 2010,
Brickman allegedly fondled and grabbed at
three nurses, used sexually coarse lan-
guage toward the staff and, on ve occa-
sions, masturbated in public areas of the
San Mateo Medical Center psychiatric unit.
On Feb. 25, 2010, Brickman grabbed a 20-
year-old female psychiatric patient and
attempted to sexually assault her until staff
forcibly pulled him off the woman, accord-
ing to prosecutors.
Brickmans delusions reportedly led him
to believe he had been put in the ward to
plant his seed in women.
McKowan said in 2011 that Brickman did
not pose a risk to the general public by not
registering as an offender.
This is a guy whose whole problem was
conduct in the hospital. Nothing ever hap-
pened in the street, McKowan said at the
time.
However, now authorities say something
did happen in public.
Last Thursday night, Brickman was arrest-
ed at the intersection of San Carlos Avenue
and Elm Street in San Carlos after allegedly
touching a 4-year-old girl and a 7-year-old
boy inappropriately. Authorities say he
then fled and touched a 16-year-old girl
inappropriately.
The new case shows that prosecutors
arent prophets by any stretch and a
reminder that someone in a structured, insti-
tutional setting on medication is one thing
but its no guarantee that when they release
people they wont go off their meds,
Wagstaffe said.
Wagstaffe said the public also has to
remember that the reason for the resentenc-
ing was to keep Brickman locked up. Had
resentencing not happened, Brickman
would be out and on probation but registra-
tion wouldnt necessarily have kept him
from groping people in the streets.
At least we kept him in a facility at least
for some time, he said.
On Friday, Brickman was charged with
one count of sexual battery and two counts
of battery. He pleaded not guilty and bail
was set at $10,000. Assistant Presiding
Judge Joseph Scott said that if Brickman
cannot post bail he should be housed at
Cordilleras Mental Health Center.
Continued from page 1
BRICKMAN
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The glitch-ridden rollout
of President Barack Obamas health care law
has opponents crowing: Told you so! and
insisting it should be paused, if not
scrapped.
But others, including insurance compa-
nies, say theres still enough time to x the
online enrollment system before uninsured
Americans start getting coverage on Jan. 1.
After emergency repairs over the weekend,
consumers in different parts of the country
Monday continued to report delays on
healthcare.gov, as well as problems setting
up security questions for their accounts. The
administration says the sites crowded elec-
tronic waiting room is thinning out. Still,
ofcials announced it will be down again for
a few hours starting at 1 a.m. Tuesday for
more upgrades and xes.
Despite the confusion, the insurance
industry has held off public criticism.
Alarmed that only a trickle of customers got
through initially, insurers now say enroll-
ments are starting to come in and they expect
things to improve.
The last major federal health care launch
the Medicare prescription program in 2006
also had big startup problems.
Government leaders who oversaw it say
things could look very different in a couple
of months for Obamas law if the administra-
tion manages to get a grip on the situation.
There wasnt enough time for testing, so
the dress rehearsal became opening night,
said Michael Leavitt, who as President
George W. Bushs top health ofcial, was
responsible for the Medicare drug plan debut.
The moment of truth is going to come in
the middle of November, when people want
to see the real deal, said Leavitt, who cur-
rently heads a consulting rm that advises
states on the health overhaul. If they dont
have this running smoothly by then, its
going to be a bigger problem than were see-
ing today.
The insurance industry is calling for
patience. This is a marathon and not a
sprint, Karen Ignagni, head of the trade
group Americas Health Insurance Plans, said
in a statement. We anticipate enrollments
will continue to increase in the days and
weeks ahead.
Obamas law also known as the
Affordable Care Act was designed to pro-
vide insurance for people who dont have
access to coverage on the job. Middle-class
uninsured people can buy a government-sub-
sidized private plan, while the poor and near-
poor will be steered to Medicaid in states that
agree to expand the safety net program. The
online insurance markets were envisioned as
the 21st century portal to an overhauled sys-
tem.
But when the health care markets went live
last week, millions of curious Americans
overwhelmed federal and state insurance web-
sites. The level of interest could be read as a
good sign, since polls just prior to the
launch found most uninsured people unaware
it was coming. Yet for many, the consumer
experience was like a Saturday morning
spent twiddling thumbs at the local motor
vehicle department.
Some prospective customers got a screen
that told them to wait and nothing hap-
pened, for hours. Others started to sign up
and got trapped by a recurring glitch when
they tried to set up security questions to pro-
tect their personal accounts.
Health care law glitches are they fatal or fleeting?
There wasnt enough time for testing, so the dress rehearsal
became opening night. ...The moment of truth is going to come
in the middle of November, when people want to see the real deal.
Michael Leavitt, President George W. Bushs former top health ofcial
DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, OCT. 8
Movie screening: Bully. 6:30 p.m.
Half Moon Bay Library, 620 Correas
St., Half Moon Bay. Facilitated by
Peninsula Conict Resolution. Part of
San Mateo Countys RESPECT 24/7
month-long project. Free. For more
information go to www.smcl.org.
Lettice and Lovage. 8 p.m. Hillbarn
Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster
City. Lettice Duffet, an enthusiast of
history and the theater, is a tour
guide at one of the most mundane
of Londons stately homes. She livens
up her tours by fabricating wildly
theatrical stories, which comes to
the attention of her conventional
employer, Lotte Schon.
Performances run through Nov. 3.
Starting at $23. For more informa-
tion email go to hillbarntheatre.org.
Make Music: Altoid Tin
Synthesizer Part II. 3:30 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Complete your
awesome altoid tin synthesizers and
start making music using our amp.
All materials provided. Ages 13-18.
Free. For more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9
RSVP Deadline for Newcomers
Club. The Newcomers Club
Luncheon will take place on
Tuesday, Oct. 15 at the Basque
Cultural Center, 599 Railroad Ave.,
South San Francisco. The social
begins at 11:30, lunch will be served
at noon, the program will begin at 1
p.m. There will be a bazaar and bake
sale with treasures, baked goods and
books. $25. Checks must be received
by today (Wednesday, Oct. 9). Send
checks to Janet Williams, 1168
Shoreline Drive, CA San Mateo
94404. For more information call
286-0688 or email
smartjanestar@gmail.com.
TheatreWorks Presents: Warrior
Class. Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. The show runs until
Sunday, Nov. 3. $19 to $73. For more
information call 463-1960 or go to
www.theatreworks.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500.
Michael Svanevik Presents at
Filoli. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. 86 Caada
Road, Woodside. $25. For more infor-
mation call 364-8300 ext. 508.
Teen Low-Budget Movie: Psycho.
3:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Psycho is a 1960 American sus-
pense/horror lm directed by Alfred
Hitchcock starring Anthony Perkins,
Vera Miles, John Gavin and Janet
Leigh. Rated R, 109 minutes. Free. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Project Read Menlo Park tutor
training. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Menlo Park Library, 800 Alma St.,
Menlo Park. Free. For more informa-
tion call 330-2525.
Mango: Online Language
Learning. 7 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Learn how to access and
use a free online language learning
tool, set up an account and begin to
learn a language at home using
Mango languages: ESL, Spanish,
Chinese, French, Italian and many
more. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org.
Club Fox Blues Jam. 7 p.m. to 11
p.m. 2209 Broadway, Redwood City.
$5 For more information call (415)
341-3455.
College Planning and Financial
Aid Seminar. 7 p.m. Millbrae Library,
1 Library Ave., Millbrae. This seminar
will discuss college pricing, the
admissions process, nancial aid and
how to best navigate the entire
complex college funding system.
Free. For more information call 697-
7607.
THURSDAY, OCT. 10
Job fair and workshop for veter-
ans, active and reserve members
and military spouses. 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Hyatt Regency San Francisco
Airport, 1333 Bayshore Highway,
Burlingame. For more information
call (202) 463-5807.
Woodside Day of the Horse
Riding Around the World. 10 a.m.
to 2:30 p.m. Woodside Town Hall,
2955 Woodside Road, Woodside.
Free horse fair with petting zoo,
pony rides, riding info and a Wells
Fargo stagecoach. There will be a
progressive trail ride for $40. For
more information go to
www.whoa94062.org/index.php/da
y-of-the-horse or call 380-6408.
Flu Shot Clinic by Sutter Care.
10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road. $25. For more information call
616-7150.
Drinking with Lincoln. 1 p.m. to 3
p.m. Rendez Vous Cafe, 106 S. El
Camino Real, San Mateo.
Dragon Productions presents:
Rich and Famous, a play by John
Guare. 2 p.m. Dragon Theater, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A surreal
comedy with music that is part
vaudeville, part absurd and an
entirely funny romp through the
perils of being a successful artist.
Pay-what-you-can preview. For more
information go to www.dragonpro-
ductions.net.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to
9 p.m. Broadway Caltrain Station on
California Drive and Carmelita
Avenue, Burlingame. There will be a
10-vendor lineup. For more informa-
tion call (415) 274-2510.
Affordable Care Act community
forum. 6 p.m. Main Library
Auditorium at the South San
Francisco Public Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco. To
help prepare South San Francisco
residents, Tyler Smith from Seton
Medical Center will explain the
requirements of the Affordable Care
Act. An English language program
will take place. Questions will be
taken from the audience. For more
information call 829-3867.
FRIDAY, OCT. 11
San Mateo Sunrise Rotary Club
presents: Working on the Crystal
Springs/San Andreas
Transmission Upgrade Project,
Biologist Perspective. 7:30 a.m.
Crystal Springs Golf Course, 6650
Golf Course Drive, Burlingame.
Features guest speaker Jill Grant, a
senior biologist with BioMaAs. The
cost of attending is $15 and includes
breakfast. To RSVP call Jake at 515-
5891.
Rendez Vous Idol. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Rendez Vous Cafe, 106 S. El Camino
Real, San Mateo.
Zopp Family Circus. 4 p.m. and 7
p.m. Red Morton Park, 1455 Madison
Ave., Redwood City. The seventh
generation of Zopp Family Circus
will be in town from Oct. 11 to Oct.
20. Show times vary daily. Events are
wheelchair accessible and open to
the public, all ages. Adult tickets: $15
to $25; youth tickets: $10 to $15. For
show times and more information
go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events
/zoppe.html.
Burlingame Lions Club Bingo. 6
p.m. The Lions Hall, 990 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. $25. For more
information call 875-7569.
Girl Rising Movie Screening. 6:30
p.m. College of San Mateo, 1700 W
Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. Students
at Middle College at College of San
Mateo are looking to raise money for
micro loans to support women in
Guatemala. For more information
call (415) 786-3737.
The Magic Castle. 7 p.m. Coastal
Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main St.,
Half Moon Bay. Adults: $35, seniors
and students: $25, kids 5 to 12: $20.
For more information and to pur-
chase tickets call 569-3266 or go to
www.coastalrep.com.
Art Guild of Pacicas 55th Annual
Members Exhibition. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Sanchez Art Center, 1220-B
Linda Mar Blvd., Pacifica. Runs
through Nov. 17. For more informa-
tion go to artguildofpacica.org.
Foster City Social Dance. 7:30 p.m.
to 11:30 p.m. Foster City Recreation
Center, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster City.
There will be various dance lessons
available. Caual dress is ne and no
partner is necessary. Admission
includes light snacks, beverages,
mixer dances, prize drawings, profes-
sional performances and more.
Tickets are $12. For more informa-
tion call 571-0836.
New adaptation of Dracula at
Notre Dame de Namur University.
7:30 p.m. NDNU Theatre, 1500
Ralston Ave., Belmont. The
Department of Theatre and Dance at
Notre Dame de Namur University
presents Dracula, a new adaptation
of the 1897 novel by Bram Stoker.
Tickets are $10. To reserve tickets call
508-3456 or email
boxofce@ndnu.edu.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Musical Arts Goes to the Movies.
7:30 p.m. Taube Center, NDNU cam-
pus, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
From The Jazz Singer through the
Disney classics and Les Miserables,
this musical revue will showcase
some of the most famous songs
from the movies. Additional per-
formances on Oct. 11, 12, 18 and 19
at 7:30 p.m. and Oct 13 and 20 at 2
p.m. $25 for adults, $15 for stu-
dents/seniors. Purchase tickets at
brownpapertickets.com/event/4605
3.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
wages is important, she noted.
Having adequate staff checking plans
and encouraging developers to hire
high-quality workers would be
Schneiders plan.
The city had a cop-out response,
Radtke said, noting the city inspector
should be held accountable for faulty
buildings being constructed.
Shared services
With the citys Fire Department shar-
ing services with nearby cities and
police services contracted out to the
Sheriffs Ofce, candidates were mostly
in favor of the plans, which they say
save the city money.
Theres a benet in shared services,
Radtke said. Efciencies are created and
its outstanding out much money is
saved.
On the topic of the citys re assess-
ment tax which expires in spring of
2014 candidates had varying views.
Millbrae voters originally passed the
$144 yearly fee for re services on sin-
gle-family homes in 2004 as one solu-
tion to address the citys budget crisis,
which began in 2001. It was extended in
2009. The levy brings in about $1.44
million annually.
The re assessment tax needs to be
earmarked for public safety, so that
Millbrae residents get what they are
paying for, Radtke said. He said the title
of the re tax assessment renewed four
years ago has a misleading title.
Amounts go to general fund rev-
enue, he said. If renewed, wed want to
keep the city accountable and make lan-
guage to dedicate to public safety.
In terms of the re departments move
toward a merger with other cities,
Schneider was in favor.
This is the future for many other
departments in small cities, she said.
We need to do a much better job of edu-
cating the public. In the long run, I
would not like to do a re assessment
every ve years, but rather make it per-
manent.
Holober supports passing a new tax
since the city doesnt have the funds
right now, but in the future he would like
to avoid such a levy. Oliva was also in
favor of the merger and would like to see
another assessment passed to keep the
city in good nancial shape.
Additionally, candidates also support-
ed consolidating other services.
Police and re are a good start,
Holober said. Adding the Public Works
Department and certain programs in
Parks and Recreation Department to the
list of shared services would be wise, he
added.
Schneider and Radtke agreed that
Parks and Recreation could be consoli-
dated, while Schneider emphasized sen-
ior programming and grant funding are
other options for consolidation.
The city may not be big enough to
have one trained grant writer,
Schneider said. Id also like to see part-
nerships with schools and economic
development.
Some partnerships for projects are
good, Oliva said.
The partnership with the Sheriffs
Ofce is awesome, she said. I appreci-
ate us having our own services; theres
pride in that.
Continued from page 5
MILLBRAE
to a staff report the council will hear
tonight.
The complex has three elds, Marina
Field where Little League is played, the
South Field which hosts soccer and
softball and the North Field, which is a
baseball and soccer eld.
Paying for the work is proposed to
be a combination of sources including
youth sports funding, grants, private
donations, naming rights, city funds
and revenue from signage; according
to the staff report.
Vice Mayor Warren Lieberman told
the Daily Journal he has yet to pick a
favored alternative.
I much prefer grass over turf but the
elds are built over a watershed and the
salinity level makes it difcult to keep
the grass healthy, Lieberman said.
Turng does allow for more playing
time.
The demand for playing time is high
in Belmont but many of the elds in
the city, including at schools, can be
off limits for months at a time due to
rainy weather.
Belmont began considering synthet-
ic turf at the complex, located on the
east side of Highway 101, in 2009. At
the time, the project gained support
from both the Parks and Recreation
Commission and City Council. Agrant
proposal was sought to foot the bill,
but not granted, however. The city had
once considered using Redevelopment
Agency money to pay for the upgrades
but the has state since dissolved all of
those agencies in the state.
The Belmont City Council meets
7:30 p.m., tonight, City Hall, 1 Twin
Pines Lane, Belmont.
Continued from page 1
FIELDS
About $62 million, or 48 percent, of
the bond will go toward a rebuild of
Bowditch Middle School in Foster City
if voters in both cities approve the
measure in November.
Both San Mateo Mayor David Lim
and Deputy Mayor Robert Ross, how-
ever, posed lengthy arguments before
the vote was made as to why it was not
fair for students in San Mateo.
Lim and Ross oppose the measure, in
part, because all seven members of the
Superintendents Committee on
Overcrowding Relief had Foster Citys
interests in mind since no one from San
Mateo sat on the committee.
The two also argued that the bond
does not address equal access to a quali-
ty education since San Mateo has an
average population of 31 percent low-
income students compared to only 4
percent low-income students in Foster
City.
Lim said it is a social justice issue and
that a spotlight needs to be shined on
the grave inequities between the haves
and have nots.
The district is seeking to expand
capacity at Bowditch Middle School in
Foster City to accommodate all of the
citys fth graders since its three ele-
mentary schools are at capacity.
Other facility improvements include
$18 million to upgrade and reopen
Knolls Elementary School in San
Mateo; $18 million to install solar
panels on school district property; $30
million to provide for core standards
improvements, including the upgrade
of technology for students throughout
the district; and $2 million for undeter-
mined needs.
Lim said he initially had support for
the bond until he started asking ques-
tions that neither the district nor the
bonds supporters could sufficiently
answer.
The districts Superintendent Cynthia
Simms told the council last night that
an opportunity would be lost to address
equity issues between students in both
cities without rst adding capacity to
Bowditch.
Even Supervisor Dave Pine, who does
not live in the district, showed up late
to the meeting to urge the council not to
vote against endorsing Measure P.
Freschet said the matter should be left
up to the voters to decide and was sup-
ported by councilmen Jack Matthews
and Brandt Grotte.
Matthews told bond supporters that
perhaps asking for the councils
endorsement was not the best idea.
If passed, property owners will pay
$19 per $100,000 of assessed property
value annually to pay off the bond.
The district still has $70 million
remaining in Measure L funds that was
approved by district voters in 2008.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
NEUTRAL
COMICS/GAMES
10-08-13
Mondays PUZZLE soLVEd
PrEVioUs
sUdokU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 L.A. zone
4 Horrid-tasting
8 Above
12 Freud, to himself
13 Enthralled
14 Commanded
15 Ski instructor
16 Chanels nickname
17 Black gem
18 Element No. 16
20 Drop feathers
22 Admirer
23 Big elephant
25 Hits
29 Marble
31 Thicken, as cream
34 Bah!
35 Lectern
36 Hula swivelers
37 Charlotte of Bananas
38 Cadiz kiss
39 Festive night
40 Drove (along)
42 Geologic divisions
44 Cartoon Elmer
47 Mellowed
49 Like a raft
51 Baja Ms.
53 Gym org.
55 Twice DI
56 Henhouse
57 DEA operative
58 Architects wing
59 About (2 wds.)
60 Fencers sword
61 Change color
down
1 Dots on dice
2 Cancel
3 Oar pin
4 Carpet cleaner
5 Mr. Stravinsky
6 Rapper Tone
7 Id companions
8 Orchestra members
9 Actor Jean-Claude
10 Ben & Jerry rival
11 Tyranno<00AD>
saurus
19 Eats no food
21 Owns
24 Pen points
26 Huge hairstyle
27 Florentine farewell
28 Hull part
30 Opposite of cheer
31 Friend of Fidel
32 Exist
33 Phone company employee
35 Kareem -Jabbar
40 Half a fy
41 Blot out
43 Opened
45 Round on top
46 Like many papers
48 Force unit
49 Land parcel
50 Scrabble block
51 Chem. or bio.
52 Mr. Howard
54 Atlas page
diLBErT Crossword PUZZLE
Cranky girL
PEarLs BEForE swinE
gET FUZZy
TUEsday, oCToBEr 8, 2013
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Explore some of the
dreams you have yet to fulfll. Open up discussions
with people you have teamed up with in the past. A
challenge could set you back.
sCorPio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Make alterations to
the way you live. Your interest in different lifestyles
and philosophies will help you choose an innovative
and rewarding direction that promotes the use of your
creativity.
sagiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Emotions and
uncertainty will surface due to someones vague or
misleading expectations. Protect your reputation
and prepare to make a positive move.
CaPriCorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Let your ambition
point you in the right direction. Take on tasks that no
one else wants, and you will impress onlookers and get
a vote of confdence when asking for favors.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Dont let
someones negativity stand between you and your
accomplishments. Strive to be innovative and
take on a challenge that allows you to use your
versatility and imagination. Youre in a good cycle
for romance.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) Keep things out
in the open, or you may face confusion or be
manipulated into doing something you dont like.
Pay more attention to your personal possessions
and assets. Be wary of those trying to use
emotional blackmail to get their way.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) Bargain hunting will pay
off. Dont overspend or make a donation you cannot
afford. Romance is on the rise, but refrain from letting
love cost you emotionally or fnancially.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) A slow and methodical
approach will be your ticket to success and greater
freedom. Open up your home to visitors. Sharing
your thoughts will help you get a better perspective
regarding your next move.
gEMini (May 21-June 20) Emotional upset due to
uncertainty or deception must be dealt with cautiously.
Make changes and take part in activities that will take
your mind off your troubles.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) Engage in events that
open your mind to different cultures or give you greater
insight into your friends, loved ones or children. Share
with the people you care about and build a closer bond.
LEo (July 23-Aug. 22) Problems at home can be
expected. Stay on top of any changes being made or
interference you face. Dont get angry if you offer
solutions, youll remain in control.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Its a good day to travel
for business or pleasure. Attending a conference or
getting together with people you havent seen in some
time will lead to interesting ideas and future plans.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
LEGAL ASSISTANT FT/PT Attorney
support service, Pay by Experience,
(650)697-9431
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CAREGIVER -
NOVELLES DEVELOPMENTAL SERV-
ICES Ogden Day Program is hiring direct
care staff to work with adults with physi-
cal and developmental disabilities. Mon-
Fri, day shift only. Interested applicants
should fax resume to 650.692.2412 or
complete an application, Mon-Fri, 9am-
3pm at 1814 Ogden Drive, Burlingame.
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
Immediate openings for full time
Dietary Aide and part-time Cook.
Must be experienced with excellent
communication skills and ability to 4/2
schedule. Apply in person at
2140 Carlmont Dr., Belmont, CA
OUTSIDE POSITION
Enter our full training plan for a career
in marketing. Flexible hours - local
travel only - expenses and top com-
pensation to $28.83 per hour, includ-
ing bonuses to $49.66 per & up.
Exciting and lucrative. (650)372-2811.
Mr. Swanson.
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have.Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
30+ hours a week. Counter, wash, dry
fold help. Apply LaunderLand, 995 El Ca-
mino, Menlo Park.
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNAS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
GENERAL -
NOW HIRING!
Delivery carriers and Book baggers to
deliver the local telephone directory in
San Mateo North, Central and sur-
rounding towns. Must have own relia-
ble vehicle. $12-$14 per hour. Call 1-
855-557-1127 or (270)395-1127.
GOOD NITE INN Redwood City
is hiring for the following positions:
Full-Time Room Attendants- Starting at
$8.45/hr., $8.70 after 90-days.
Full-time Guest Service Agents- Starting
at $9.50/hr., $9.75 after 90-days
Good Benefits and quarterly bonus plan.
Apply in person or online at:
www.goodnite.com (see careers)
Call: 650-365-5500
M/F/D/V & EOE
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257700
The following person is doing business
as: Daly Kitchen, 25 Washington St., DA-
LY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Plate, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 09/01/2013.
/s/ Dylan Walker/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/24/13, 10/01/13, 10/08/13, 10/15/13).
23 Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523164
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
MARK ROMANOVICH BEZVERKH
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Mark Romanovich Bezverkh
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a) Present name: Mark Romanovich
Bezverkh
b ) Present name: Angelica Elizabeth
Bezverkh
c) Present name: Camille Evelyn Bez-
verkh
a) Proposed name: Mark Romanovsky
b) Proposed name: Angelica Elizabeth
Romanovsky
c) Proposed name: Camille Evelyn Ro-
manovsky
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 18,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/11/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/10/2013
(Published, 09/17/13, 09/24/2013,
10/01/2013, 10/08/2013)
CASE# CIV 523337
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Victor Caacoy Galvan
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Victor Caacoy Galvani filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Victor Caacoy Galvan
Proposed name: Victor Caacoy Galban
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 24,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/12/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/10/2013
(Published, 09/17/13, 09/24/2013,
10/01/2013, 10/08/2013)
CASE# CIV 523695
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Maria Kristina Kleczewski
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Maria Kristina Kleczewski
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Maria Kristina Kleczewski
Proposed name: Maria Krystyna Klec-
zewska
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 29,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
800 North Humboldt Street., San Mateo,
CA 94401. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/12/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/10/2013
(Published, 09/17/13, 09/24/2013,
10/01/2013, 10/08/2013)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257256
The following person is doing business
as: SGC Financial and Insurance Serv-
ices, 3 Waters Park Dr., Ste. 115, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Link-Allen & As-
sociates, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 03/02/2009.
/s/ Cara Banchero /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/17/13, 09/24/13, 10/01/13, 10/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257246
The following person is doing business
as: Butler Fearon OConnor School of
Irish Dance. 415 Grand Ave. SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Patrick
Vincent OConnor 1501 Church St., #3,
San Francisco, CA 94131. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on July 1, 2013.
/s/ Patrick Vincent OConnor /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/17/13, 09/24/13, 10/01/13, 10/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257246
The following person is doing business
as: MB Services 1200 E. Hillsdale Blvd.,
#123, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Marilou B. Brezinka same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Marilou B. Brezinka /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/17/13, 09/24/13, 10/01/13, 10/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257245
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Massage Pro, 3718 El Camino
Real SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Yu-
min Xi, 170 Northlumberland Ave., Red-
wood City, CA 94063, Dong Wei Liu 170
Northlumberland Ave. Redwood City, CA
94063, and Badyin Ketcik, 1451 Beach
Park Blvd. Apt., 204, FOSTER CITY, CA
94404. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Badyin Ketcik /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/17/13, 09/24/13, 10/01/13, 10/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257661
The following person is doing business
as: Stage2 Marketing, 26 Hayward Ave.
#206, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Debor-
ah Doylem, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on03/01/2006.
/s/ Deborah Doyle/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/24/13, 10/01/13, 10/08/13, 10/15/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257714
The following person is doing business
as: La Mente Clara, 19 N. Fremont St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Belquis R.
Bolanos, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Belquis R. Bolanos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/24/13, 10/01/13, 10/08/13, 10/15/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257474
The following person is doing business
as: Parkside Optometry, 1880 S. Norfolk
St., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Walter
Wong, 1831 Lexington Ave., San Mateo,
CA 94402. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Walter Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/24/13, 10/01/13, 10/08/13, 10/15/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257699
The following person is doing business
as: Interconnected Consulting, 517 Cher-
ry Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Melvin E. Phillips and Patricia A. Phillips
Living Trust, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Trust. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Melvin Phillips /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/24/13, 10/01/13, 10/08/13, 10/15/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257614
The following person is doing business
as: Royal Prestige of Bay City, 139
Mitchell Ave., Ste. 232, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Maria Leo-
nor Flores 766 Edinburgh St., San Fran-
cisco, CA 94112. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Maria Leonor Flores /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/24/13, 10/01/13, 10/08/13, 10/15/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257691
The following person is doing business
as: Oration, 563 Pilgrim Dr. Ste. A, SAN
MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Oration Health,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
06/01/2013.
/s/ Mike Reisler /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/01/13, 10/08/13, 10/15/13, 10/22/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257829
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: White Orchid Day Spa, 74 E.
3rd Ave. SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Linh Thi Tran and Chanchit Wanno-
nam, 44 Neptune St., San Francisco.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Linh Thi Tran /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/01/13, 10/08/13, 10/15/13, 10/22/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257813
The following person is doing business
as: Burlingame Taxi Cab, 711 S. Bay-
shore Blvd. #26 SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Sonia Banados, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
09/25/2013.
/s/ Sonia Banados /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/01/13, 10/08/13, 10/15/13, 10/22/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257818
The following person is doing business
as: DM Salon Kreations & Supplies,
1501 Pine Knoll Dr., BELMONT, CA
94002 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Desh Deepak Malhothra,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Desh Deepak Malhothra /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/01/13, 10/08/13, 10/15/13, 10/22/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257774
The following person is doing business
as: Aarsenault Plumbing, 801 Kathryne
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mike
Agelopoulos 303 29th Ave., San Mateo,
CA 94403 and Mike Isola, same address.
The business is conducted by a Joint
Venture. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
09/19/2013.
/s/ Mike Agelopoulos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/08/13, 10/15/13, 10/22/13, 10/29/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257664
The following person is doing business
as: Terrific Health Coaching, 625 Mira-
montes Street, Ste. 202, HALF MOON
BAY, CA 94019 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Jane Kingston 312
Central Ave., Half Moon Bay, CA 94019.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
09/12/2013
/s/ Jane Kingston /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/08/13, 10/15/13, 10/22/13, 10/29/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: Oct. 4, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
OUR PLACE FAMILY RESTAURANT
L-PSHIP
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
742 Polhemus Rd.
SAN MATEO, CA 94402
Type of license applied for:
41 - On-Sale Beer and Wine - Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 08, 2013
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #243706
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: La
Menta Calra, 19 N. Fremont St. SAN
MATEO, CA 94401. The fictitious busi-
ness name was filed on 07/2011 in the
county of San Mateo. The business was
conducted by: Armand Hernandez and
Belquis Bolanos same address.
/s/ Belquis Bolanos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 09/20/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 09/24/13,
10/01/2013, 10/08/2013, 10/15/2013).
203 Public Notices
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF
DOUGLAS COUNTY, KANSAS
DIVISION SIX
IN THE INTEREST OF
RYDER W. HADL
Case No. 2012-JC-0078
DOB: xx-xx-2011, a male
NOTICE OF HEARING
(K.S.A. Chapter 38)
TO: Shane Crady
COMES NOW Petition-
er, the State of Kansas, by and
through counsel, Emily C. Haack, As-
sistant District Attorney, and provides
notice of a hearing as follows:
A petition to find child a
child a need of care and a motion to
terminate the parental rights pertain-
ing to the child identified above has
been filed with the Court requesting
the Court find the parents of the
above named child are each unfit by
reason of conduct or condition that
renders them both unable to care
properly for the child and the conduct
or condition is unlikely to change in
the foreseeable future and the pa-
rent's parental rights should be termi-
nated. The Court may also make oth-
er orders including but not limited to
requiring a parent to pay child sup-
port.
On the 8th day of Octo-
ber 2013, at 3:15 p.m., each parent
and any other person claiming legal
custody of the minor child is required
to appear for an Adjudication, Dis-
position, and a Hearing on the Mo-
tion to Terminate Parental Rights
before the District Court, Division 6 at
the Douglas County Law Enforcement
and Judicial Center, 111 E 11th
Street, Lawrence, Kansas. Prior to
that time, the parents, grandparents
or any other party to the proceeding
may file a written response to the
pleading with the clerk of the Court.
Jody M. Meyer, an attor-
ney in Lawrence, Kansas, has been
appointed as counsel for Shane Cra-
dy. Juanita M. Carlson an attorney in
Lawrence, Kansas, has been appoint-
ed as guardian ad litem for the child.
You are hereby noti-
fied that, pursuant to K.S.A. 60-255,
a default judgment will be taken
against any parent (or other person
entitled to custody) who fails to ap-
pear in person at the hearing or by
counsel with whom the party has
had contact and provided specific
instructions on how to proceed at
the hearing.
EMILY HAACK #23697
Assistant District
Attorney
111 East 11th Street
Lawrence,
Kansas 66044
(785) 841-0211
SUMMONS
(FAMILY LAW)
CASE NUMBER: FAM105985
NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): JOSE FRANCKLIN MEN-
JIVAR RAMIREZ.
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): SONIA
GUADALUPE TORRES DE MENJI-
VAR
NOTICE! You have 30 calendar days af-
ter this summons and legal petition are
served on you to file a response (form
FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have
a copy served on the petitioner. A letter
or phone call will not protect you.
If you do not file your response on time,
the court may make orders affecting your
marriage or domestic partnership, your
children. You maybe ordered to pay sup-
port and attorney fees and costs, If you
cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for
a fee waiver form.
If you want legal advice, contact a law-
yer immediately. You can get information
about finding lawyers at the Californias
Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the
California Legal Services web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by con-
tacting your local county bar association.
Tiene 30 dias corridos despues de haber
recibido le entrega legal de esta Citacion
y peticion pare presentar una Respuesta
(formulario FL-120 o FL-123) ante la
corte o llamada telefonica no basta para
protegerlo.
Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo la
corte puede dar ordenes que afecten su
203 Public Notices
matrimonio o pareja de hecho sus bienes
y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte tam-
bien le puede ordenar que pague manu-
tencion, y honorarios y costos legales. Si
no puede pagar la cuita de presentacion,
pida al secretario in formulario de exen-
cion
Si desea obtener asesoramiento legal,
pongase encontacto de inmediato con un
abogado. Puede obtener informacion
para encontrar a un abogado en el Cen-
tro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio Web de
los Servicios Legales de California
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org) o ponien-
dose en contacto con el colegio de abo-
gados de su condado.
NOTICE: If a judgment or support order
is entered, the court may order you to
pay all or part of the fees and costs that
the court waived for yourself or for the
other party. If this happens, the party or-
dered to pay fees shall be given notice
and an opportunity to request a hearing
to set aside the order to pay waived court
fees.
AVISO: Si se emite un fallo u orden de
manutencion, la corte pude ordenar que
usted pague parte de, o todas las cuotas
y costos de la corte previamente exentas
a peticion de usted o de la orta parte. Si
esto ocurre, la parte ordenada apagar
estas cuotas debe recibir aviso y la opor-
tunidad de solicitar una audiencia para
anular la orden de pagar las cuotas ex-
entas.
The name and address of the court are
(El nombre y direccion de la corte son):
Superior & Municipal Courts: County of
San Mateo
1050 Mission Rd., South San Francisco,
CA 94080
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the petitioners attorney or the peti-
tioner with out an attorney are (El nom-
bre, direccion y numero de telefono del
abogado del dermandante, o del deman-
dante si no tiene abogado, son);
Sonia Guadalupe Torres de Menjivar,
565 Second Ln.
South San Francisco, CA 94080
Date: (Fecha) August 25, 2011
John C. Fitton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 24, October 1, 8, 15, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, FOUND!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardis market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
210 Lost & Found
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)315-5902
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24x24x24, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
24
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
296 Appliances
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA, Jerry Rice & Ronnie
Lott separate action figures. Original box-
never displayed.. $49 for all three fig-
ures. Cash. SOLD!
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, 650-595-3933 eve
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$70 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 650-595-3933
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 650-595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 high, 40 wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500. Call
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27 SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20 color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $50 for all 650 345-
3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
bankers rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31 Tall, 61 wide, 18 deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelfs plus drawers
$95 OBO (650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
304 Furniture
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK END table 2' by 2' by 2' $25
(650)594-1149
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41 in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owners
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MIXING BOWLS, 3 large old brown $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
MORTAR BOX Filled with new mansory
tools, $50 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COLEMAN CAMPING equipment
12'X12' tent, lantern, & stove all for $60.
SOLD!
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
310 Misc. For Sale
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute canno
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9 tall, 11 diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12Lx
5W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MENS LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, SOLD!
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, SOLD!
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
(650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATIO SUNDIAL - vintage armillary iron
+ 18" rd, $60 request photos to
green4t@yahoo.com
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, Calculate with Confidence, 4th
edition, like new, $20., obo
(650)345-3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suitcase
1950's collectibles perfect large pearl col-
or hard surface $50 (650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
310 Misc. For Sale
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)315-5902
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, SOLD!
UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. (650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
SOLD!
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28, limited ed.
w/Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-5902
WHEEL CHAIR (Invacare) 18" seat with
foot rest $99 (650)594-1149
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Stylish ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
COWBOY BOOTS brown leather size 9
perfect condition $50 SOLD!
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
25 Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Big bird of myth
4 Spiny desert
plants
9 Bathyspheres
domain
14 Thurman of
Batman & Robin
15 Underway
16 Like one in the
sulks
17 Shows off ones
connections
19 What the truth
sometimes does
20 When repeated,
soothing words
21 Top of the charts
23 Tanning site
24 Strips off
25 Buzz off!
28 Next-generation
relatives
32 Modernized pre-
1949 auto
37 Hold dear
38 Stat for Mariano
Rivera
39 No-no
41 Tell a whopper
42 Mag with
relationship
quizzes
45 Metropolitan
distance unit
48 Way up or down
50 Do in, as a
dragon
51 Wild Australian
dog
54 Pub order
58 Aptly named
Nevada border
community
known for its
casinos
62 Powerful
explosive,
familiarly
63 Three-time Tony
winner Uta
64 Lunchbox
sandwich
protector
66 Eyeball-bending
pictures
67 Somewhat wet
68 Physicians org.
69 Wavy dos
70 At exactly the
right time
71 Agreeable
response
DOWN
1 Litters littlest
2 Nebraska city on
the Missouri
3 Caravan beast
4 Rhythmic flow
5 Congos cont.
6 Ring-tailed critter,
to Crockett
7 Refill to the brim
8 Whos there?
response
9 Hamlets love
10 Flowed swiftly
11 Cyprus currency
12 To whom it
actually does
concern letters
13 Wall St. institution
18 Uneven, as a
leafs edge
22 Big London
attraction
26 ABA dues payer
27 Gillettes __ II
razor
29 Wyo. neighbor
30 Idle of Monty
Python
31 Hides partner
32 In a few __
33 Equine gait
34 Tabula __: blank
slate
35 Japanese sash
36 Two lowercase
letters have them
40 Olive __
43 Heavily weighted
exam
44 Points in the right
direction
46 Its unpleasant
when things end
on one
47 Like some poetry
49 NBC show that
launched many
comics careers
52 Doodad
53 French __ soup
55 Held in check
56 Picture holder
57 Frat party wear
58 Look for
bargains
59 Weak-ankle
support
60 Ice cream
thickener
61 Spectacular
65 Baton Rouge
sch.
By Clive Probert
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
10/08/13
10/08/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5x34.5 made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored with green la-
pel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
318 Sports Equipment
BLACK CRAFTMANS 24" bike 21 gears
like new $99 650 355-2996
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FREE STANDING Baskeball Hoop and
backboard, portable, $75 SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)315-5902
RED HAWK Ruger .44 Mag Revolver
with leather holster & belt 3 boxes of
shells, $1000 best offer, SOLD!
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new 650 255-2996
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
318 Sports Equipment
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTMAN 48 volt electric mower $25
650 255-2996
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2004 NISSAN MAXIMA 96k, great con-
dition, $7500, obo, (650)692-4725.
Leave Message
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$3,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
620 Automobiles
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD 93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUVs
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
14' BASS Boat no motor with trailer $99
(650)851-0878
72 18 RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, SOLD!
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4 wide, 6
1/2 long & 2 1/2 deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
670 Auto Parts
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
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Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
Windows Doors
Cabinets Casing
Crown Moulding
Baseboards
Artificial Grass Gazebos
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICAS HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
House Cleaning Move In/Out
Cleaning Janitorial Services
Handyman Services
General Errands Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
OSULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
REDWOOD FENCES
AND DECKS
Chain Link
Ornamental Iron
Quality work at reasonable rates
(650)703-0344
License #289279
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
Gutters and downspouts,
Rain gutter repair,
Rain gutter protection (screen),
Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs Maintenance Painting
Carpentry Plumbing Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof
Repair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chriss Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
t :BSE DMFBO VQ BUUJD
CBTFNFOU
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JODMVEJOH DBST USVDLT BOE
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&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
t $PNQMFUF MBOETDBQF
NBJOUFOBODF BOE SFNPWBM
t 'VMM USFF DBSF JODMVEJOH
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SFNPWBM BOE TUVNQ
HSJOEJOH
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t 0SOBNFOUBM DPODSFUF
t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
27 Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Painting
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
Tile Mosaics
Natural Stone Countertops
Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
CUBIAS TILE
Entryways Kitchens
Decks Bathrooms
Tile Repair Floors
Grout Repair Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Windows
ASSOCIATED WINDOW
CLEANING
Servies include:
Gutter Cleaning, Airduct
Cleaning, Pressure Washing,
Window Cleaning and more.
10% off an one service.
Free estimates call
(650)583-0420
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you cant
Refuse!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Insurance
Massage Therapy
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
WORLD 28
Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PIGSKIN
Pick em Contest
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local taxes associ-
ated with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded as is and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The
Daily Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual it nds to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the promotion; to be
acting in violation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name & photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the
Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros and Original Nicks are not eligible to win. Must be at least 18 years of age. Call with questions or for clarication (650) 344-5200.
Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros and Original Nicks from all liability, claims, or actions of any kind
whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros
and Original Nicks Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE NINTH ANNUAL
PIGSKIN
Pick em Contest
Week Six
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 10/11/13
Pittsburgh NY Jets
Cincinnati Buffalo
St. Louis Houston
Carolina Minnesota
Philadelphia Tampa Bay
Oakland Kansas City
Green Bay Baltimore
Detroit Cleveland
Tennessee Seattle
Jacksonville Denver
New Orleans New England
Arizona San Francisco
Washington Dallas
Indianapolis San Diego
TIEBREAKER: Indianapolis @ San Diego__________
ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If theres a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certicates to Redwood
General Tire Pros and Original Nicks. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pickem Contest is free to play.
Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
What is the deadline?
All mailed entries must be postmarked by the Friday prior to the weekend of games, you may
also drop off your entries to our ofce by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
times as you like using photocopied entry forms. Multiple original entry forms will be discarded.
You may also access entry entry forms at www.scribd.com/smdailyjournal
NAME ____________________________________
AGE _____________________________________
CITY _____________________________________
PHONE ___________________________________
Mail or drop o by10/11/13 to:
Pigskin Pickem, Daily Journal,
800 S. Claremont Street, #210,
San Mateo, CA 94402
The Daily Journal will not use
your personal information for
marketing purposes. We respect
your privacy.
By Jason Straziuso and Robert Burns
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NAIROBI, Kenya The man U.S. Navy
SEALs tried to take down in Somalia over
the weekend was a Kenyan who had plotted
to attack his countrys parliament build-
ing and the United Nations headquarters in
Nairobi, according to a Kenyan govern-
ment intelligence report.
The pre-dawn, seaside SEAL raid on
Saturday targeted Abdulkadir Mohamed
Abdulkadir, who is also known as Ikrima,
a U.S. official told The Associated Press.
The U.S. troops are not believed to have
captured or killed their target. The official
insisted on anonymity because he wasnt
authorized to release the information
In the internal report by Kenyas
National Intelligence Service, Abdulkadir
is listed as the lead planner of a plot sanc-
tioned by al-Qaidas core leadership in
Pakistan to carry out multiple attacks in
Kenya in late 2011 and early 2012. The AP
has previously reported that those
attacks, linked to the Somali Islamic
extremist group al-Shabab, were disrupt-
ed.
The report, which was leaked to AP and
other media in the wake of the Sept. 21
terror attack on Nairobis Westgate Mall
that killed more than 60 people, lists
Samantha Lewthwaite a Briton known
in British media as the White Widow
as one of several key actors in the plot
to attack Parliament buildings, the U.N.
Office in Nairobi, Kenyan Defense Forces
camps and other targets. The plotters also
intended to assassinate top Kenyan polit-
ical and security officials, the report said.
Police disrupted that plot. Lewthwaite,
who was married to one of the suicide
bombers in the 2005 attack on Londons
transit system, escaped capture when she
produced a fraudulently obtained South
African passport in another persons
name. Late last month Interpol, acting on
a request from Kenya, issued an arrest
notice for Lewthwaite.
Target of SEAL raid planned attacks in Kenya
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
A U.S. embassy ofcial secures the area around the embassy building after a powerful bomb
blast in Nairobi, Kenya.