SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.

COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 2
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 3
Mayor and First Lady
Make First Charitable
Donation
El Paso, Texas – Mayor Oscar Leeser was happy to announce that
First Lady Lisa Leeser has selected the Children’s Grief Center of
El Paso as the first non-profit that will receive a donation as part
of their newly created charity. The Mayor and First Lady’s charity
was created after the Leeser’s committed to donate his mayoral
salary during the Inaugural Ceremony in June. The presentation
took place in the Mayor’s office on Wednesday, September 4,
2013.
Quality of Life Bonds transform area hit
by Storm 2006
Long-vacant lots to be replaced with park featuring
playground, basketball court
EL PASO – Seven years after homes on Fiesta
Drive sustained severe damage from historic
flooding, work will begin soon to construct a
pocket park in their place thanks to the Quality
of Life Bonds approved by voters in November
2012.
The park will be constructed on 0.2 acres at
6200 Fiesta Drive.
This project consists of removing existing con-
crete slabs, sidewalks, and driveways. Crews
will then construct or install the following park
amenities: a new concrete basketball court, new
playground equipment, colored concrete side-
walks, new rock walls with wrought iron fenc-
ing, landscape, irrigation, and new lighting.
Construction is expected to begin in early Sep-
tember and take 170 days.
Modifications at six railroad crossings mean
fewer train horns in Five Points
City offers plan to accommodate resulting change in traffic pattern
EL PASO – Trains will soon be able to move more quietly though the Five Points area of Central El
Paso. As part of a joint project with Union Pacific Railroad, the City of El Paso will modify six rail-
road crossings, allowing trains to pass while sounding their horns less frequently.
The project requires the permanent closures of the following Union Pacific railroad crossings:
• Maple Street
• Birch Street
• Cedar Street
• Elm Street.
The following Union Pacific railroad crossings will remain open and undergo upgrades to in-
clude median improvements:
• Piedras Street
• Rosewood Street.
Construction which is scheduled to begin in December 2013 will be overseen by the city’s Engi-
neering and Construction Management Department. The department has scheduled a community
meeting on Wednesday, September 4, 2013, at 5:30pm, at Sunset High School, at 2851 Grant Av-
enue.
To accommodate the resulting change in traffic patterns in the area and to improve safety on busy
the roadways, city staff recommends conversion of the following one-way streets to two-way
streets:
• Arizona Avenue from Alabama Street to Cotton Street
• Grant Avenue from Piedras Street to Cotton Street.
Transportation planners will provide information to the community on their recommendations at
Wednesday’s meeting.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 4
The Ribbon Cutting Ceremony was held on Wednesday August 28
The Breast and Women’s Health Center
Sierra Providence East Medical Center is Proud to Announce the grand Opening of
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 5
Annual Chihuahuan
Desert Fiesta at Tom
Mays Park celebrates
natural wonders of
the Franklin
Mountains
Houdini the Harris Hawk, Agostini-Justiniani the
Hermit tours, and a full slate of local entertainment
promises to make the 9th Annual Chihuahuan Desert
Fiesta a fun day for all. The free event at the Tom
Mays section of Franklin Mountains State Park on
Saturday, September 21, from 9am
to 3pmis sponsored by Texas Parks and Wildlife
Department with the help of volunteers from the
Chihuahuan Desert Education Coalition. Every year
the event attracts hundreds of people to the desert
mountain park in northwest El Paso.
The outdoor venue celebrates the natural wonders of
the Chihuahuan Desert and Franklin Mountains
State Park. Local environmental education groups
will be on hand to offer free demonstrations, guided
tours, guest speakers and informational booths de-
signed to introduce the curious to the wonders of our
fascinating desert.
This year from 10am to 3pm Kent Fisher from
Fisher Brothers Climbing and Gear will be teaching
his class all day at Sneed’s Cory along the roadway
up to the West Cottonwood Springs trailhead.
The Serna Ranch Serna Ranch Youth Leadership
will offer free horse rides, hay rides including a
shuttle to various sites in the park plus a food booth
selling Navajo Fry Tacos, Chili Beans, Nachos,
Chips, Water, and sodas.
For more information contact Franklin Mountains
State Park at (915) 566-6441 or
visit www.chihuahuandesert.org.
Schedule of Events at the Enter-
tainment Stage Area at the End
of the Loop Road next to the
Exhibitor Tent Area
9:15 Short Conservation Tours starting at the
Site 39 overlook head down the backside of
Lower Sunset trail
10:00 Houdini the Harris Hawk from the El
Paso Zoo, Heather Rivera
10:15 Short Conservation Tours starting at the
Site 39 overlook head down the backside of
Lower Sunset trail
10:30 Entertainment to be announced
11:00 Entertainment to be announced
11:00 Short hike along Sunset Trail with Agos-
tini-Justiniani the Hermit
11:30 Champion Studio-Children Folklorico
Continues on page 7
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 6
EPCC to Celebrate Hispanic
Heritage Month
Diversity Programs of El Paso Community College (EPCC) will
celebrate Hispanic Heritage 2013 with many activities during
September and October. “Descúbrete: Empowerment through
Wings of Knowledge,” the event’s theme, will be about literature,
student artwork, music, current affairs and much more. It all be-
gins with September 16th with a month-long art display by EPCC
art students and local artist, Gabriel S. Gaytán in the Administra-
tive Services Center (ASC). Then the official Kick Off will be at
8:30 a.m., September 18 in the Valle Verde Campus, Cafeteria
Annex, 919 Hunter. Activities will continue through the day.
Other major events will include Wednesdays at Lunch. Live
music will be performed in the Valle Verde Campus Courtyard
from noon until 1:00 p.m. on September 25th, October 2nd and
October 9th. Also on Thursday, September 26th, an Immigration
Symposium will be held all day beginning at 8:30 a.m. in the
Valle Verde Cafeteria Annex. Among those scheduled to appear
are Congressman Beto O’Rourke and Senator Jose Rodriguez.
The celebration will conclude with the annual Mentor’s Dinner at
6:30 p.m., Wednesday, October 16th in the EPCC ASC Audito-
rium, 9050 Viscount Blvd., Building A. Keynote Speaker will be,
Dolores Huerta, President of the Dolores Huerta Foundation and
Co-Founder of the United Farm Workers. During the ceremony,
Ms. Huerta will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award and
EPCC will honor other mentors for their contributions to the
community.
All events are free except the Mentor’s Dinner. Tickets for the
Mentor’s Dinner are $20.00 and available at any EPCC Cashier.
For event or ticket information, contact EPCC Diversity Pro-
grams at (915) 831-3324 or visit www.epcc.edu/hispanicheritage.
City Upgrading
Downtown Parking Meters
New Equipment Provides Users Payment
Flexibility
El Paso, Texas – The City of El Paso is upgrading parking
meters in Downtown with high-tech, single-space parking
meters intended to make paying for on-street parking more
convenient, the International Bridges Department an-
nounced today.
The parking meters by Duncan Solutions are solar powered
and accept coins, dollar coins, debit or credit cards.
The installation of the new parking meters began this week.
The City of El Paso has an inventory of about 1,800 parking
meters, most of them located in Downtown. Nearly 90 per-
cent of parking meters in Downtown will be upgraded.
The project should be completed by mid-October 2013. It
cost about $1 million and was funded through the City’s
general fund.
The parking fee at a meter costs 25 cents for every 20 min-
utes. Free parking is provided on Saturdays, Sundays and
city-recognized holidays
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 7
Continued from page 5
Noon Zills in the Desert-Adult Belly Dance Group
12:30 Little Zills- Children Belly Dance Group
1:00 Desert Snakes from the El Paso Zoo, Rick
LoBello
1:30 Tezcatloc Aztec Drums
2:00 Short hike along Sunset Trail with Agostini-
Justiniani the Hermit
2:00 Entertainment to be announced
2:30 Entertainment to be announced
Annual Chihuahuan
Desert Fiesta...
More on Houdini the Harris
Hawk– Appears only at 10am
at entertainment stage area
Houdini is a 12 year old Harris Hawk that came to the
El Paso Zoo from the Riverbanks Zoo and Garden in
August 2012. Harris Hawks hunt in packs earning them
the nickname “Wolves of the Sky”. They can be found
in Southwest United States all the way down to South
America. Like all raptors, Harris Hawks naturally help
control animal populations. They help keep ecosystems
in balance and so protecting their habitats is very im-
portant.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 8
(Chamizal - Juárez)
ARTE
en el
PARQUE
Photo By Daniel Rodriguez
Dream Catchers / Atrapa Sueños by Daniel Rodriguez
El Paso Museum of History Presents
The Missions of Spain in the Borderlands Lecture Series
The El Paso Museum of History,
located at 510 North Santa Fe
Street, is pleased to present The
Missions of Spain in the Border-
lands Lecture Series which will
complement the current Fourth
Wall of Giants on display. On
Saturday, September 7,
2013, at 2:00 p.m.
Dr. Yolanda Leyva will give an il-
lustrated talk on Socorro Mission:
Heart of a Community. This pro-
gram is being made possible in
part with a grant from Humanities
Texas, the state affiliate of the Na-
tional Endowment for the Humani-
ties and is free and open to all.
Dr. Yolanda Leyva has spent many
hours at the Socorro Mission
working with the locals in gather-
ing oral histories for one of her
many projects. As she got to know
the Mission and its people, she dis-
covered that the building is more
than just a structure; it is the beat-
ing heart of a community. Come
join Dr. Leyva as she brings to life
the Socorro Mission: Heart of a
Community.
Dr. Yolanda Chávez Leyva is a
Chicana historian and writer who
was born and raised on the border.
She is currently chair of the De-
partment of History and an associ-
ate professor at the University of
Texas at El Paso. She has spent her
life listening to and now docu-
menting the lives of people who
live on la frontera. She has di-
rected two historical projects fo-
cused on the history of Socorro,
including an oral history project
that highlighted the Socorro Mis-
sion. She is completing two manu-
scripts; Cruzando La Linea:
Mexican Children on the Texas-
Mexico Border, and Calling the
Ancestors: Historical Memory, In-
digenous Identity, and Chicana/o
History.
For more information and to re-
serve a seat, contact Sue Taylor at
915.351.3588 or
taylorsl@elpasotexas.gov.
Images: Courtesy of Dr. Leyva and
Texas beyond History/University
of Texas at Austin
Dr. Yolanda Chávez Leyva
WEDNESDAY
SEPT 11
THURSDAY
SEPT 5
High: 92º Low: 72º High: 91º Low: 73º High: 91º Low: 71º High: 91º Low: 70º High: 89º Low: 67º
TUESDAY
SEPT 10
FRIDAY
SEPT 6
SUNDAY
SEPT 8
MONDAY
SEPT 9
High:90º Low: 69º
SATURDAY
SEPT 7
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 9
By: “Doppler” Dave Speelman
A n s w e r : D – S e p t e m b e r 3 0 t h
Our monsoon season begins June 15th and runs through
what exact date in September?
Not an Impressive August
A. September 5
B. September 20
C. September 25
D. September 30
Weather Trivia:
Partly Sunny
20% Storms
Partly Sunny
10% Rain
Partly Sunny
20% Rain
Weather 101
Partly Sunny
10% Storm
Spotlight E.P.Weather
“Doppler" Dave Speelman is the chief meteorologist at KVIA-TV in El Paso. You can watch his forecasts at 4,
5, 6 and 10 pm on ABC-7 (channel 6 cable). If you would like Doppler Dave to address (explain) any weather
issues you can email him at Dopplerdave@kvia.com.
High: 92º Low: 70º
The month of August was
pretty much a dud for getting
any significant rainfall. We
picked up just a little more than
one inch for the month (1.12”)
when we average just over two
inches (2.01”). This is .89”
below average for the month.
Our monsoon was looking great
after a very healthy month of
rain in July but then we hit this
little snag called August – nor-
mally our wettest month of the
year.
August was also a month where
we kept our triple digit days
below normal. We only had two
days of triple digits – both days
at 100 degrees. This is the least
amount of triple digit days for
August since 2008 when we
had none.
At right is the forecast across
the county for the month of
September courtesy of the Cli-
mate Prediction Center. Notice
El Paso’s temperatures are ex-
pected to be a little bit above
normal and our rainfall ex-
pected to be around average.
P
H
O
T
O
F
O
R
IL
L
U
S
T
R
A
T
IO
N
P
U
R
P
O
S
E
S
O
N
L
Y
Mostly Sunny
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 10
First Friday ArtWalk - San Elizario Historic District
The monthly First Friday ArtWalk continues this Friday
from 6-9pm, with an artist reception throughout the Art
District. The District will feature live entertainment, with
Alegres del Valle BAND at the Bandido Cantina starting
at 7pm. The “Movie on the Wall” will start at 8pm next to
the old jail and the monthly GHOST TOUR will start at
10pm at the Main Street Mercantile.
The event is FREE, with exception of the 10pm Ghost
Tour (ages 10 and up, and $10). Presented by the El
Paso Paranormal Society.
The San Elizario Art District is located off Socorro Rd at
Main Street, in San Elizario. Take Loop 375 south from I-
10 to Socorro Rd, then East seven miles to Main Street
on the right. Look for the San Elizario Art District signs.
Information: 915-851-0093
www.SanElizarioHistoricDistrict.org
Contact: Al Borrego
Photo: San Elizario Artist- Bert Saldaña at work, during
the San Elizario ArtWalk
First Friday
ArtWalk
Friday, September 6, 2013
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 11
SUN METRO INVITES
UTEP FOOTBALL FANS
TO PARK AND RIDE
***Take the bus directly to home games from any of our 6 park
and ride locations***
El Paso, Texas – Parking at and near
UTEP will be at a premium this year, but
football fans have an alternative! Sun
Metro is offering SIX Park and Ride
locations and direct bus service to ALL
2013 UTEP HOME GAMES.
The season opener between the Miners
and the UNM Lobos will kick off at 6
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013. Pick-up
times will vary depending on location
(see page 2); however, most trips will
take place at 4:30 p.m.
The public is reminded that the outside
lanes along Oregon Street are bus-only
lanes — parking is NOT allowed. Don’t
risk being towed!
Bus trips are $3 roundtrip—reduced
fares and bus passes will NOT be ac-
cepted on the special routes. Children 5
and under ride free and must be accom-
panied by an adult.
Parking at most Sun Metro facilities is
free, except at the Union Plaza Transit
Terminal ($5 flat fee before 9 p.m.) and
the Glory Road Transfer Center ($10 flat
fee). Parking is on a first-come, first-
served basis.
This year Sun Metro is introducing a
NEW Park and Ride location at Edge-
mere near R.C. Poe. The new Park
and Ride location is ideal for El Pa-
soans who live near or east of Joe Bat-
tle Boulevard/Loop 375.
SEE COMPLETE LOCATIONS, ON-
LINE AT
WWW.SUNMETRO.NET/FOOTBALL.
PASSENGERS ARE REMINDED TO
HAVE EXACT CHANGE FOR THE
FARE BOX. Drivers can provide
change cards for bus-use only, but DO
NOT have access to currency.
The drop-off sites will be around Memo-
rial Gym, located on the north end of the
Sun Bowl Stadium.
Return trips will begin at the end of the
3rd quarter. Fans will be picked up at the
SAME location as the drop-off site for
each of the routes.
IMPORTANT TIPS TO
REMEMBER:
■ Bus service may be delayed before
AND after the game due to traffic con-
gestion
■ NO FOOD or DRINKS allowed on the
buses
■ NO COOLERS or UMBRELLAS al-
lowed in the Sun Bowl (see full list of
prohibited items at
www.tailgating.utep.edu)
■ NO TAILGATING allowed in any
parking garages
For more information about Sun Metro,
visit www.sunmetro.net or call
(915)533-3333. Like us on Facebook at
facebook.com/sunmetro.
DESIGNATED BUS ROUTES AND
SCHEDULE FOR MINERS VS
LOBOS GAME (09.07.13)
UNION PLAZA TRANSIT TERMINAL
400 W. San Antonio
Parking: $5 per vehicle before 9 p.m.
($10 per vehicle after 9 p.m.)
Cost: $3 round-trip fare
Route: 204 Special
Pick-up times: 4:30 p.m. and 5 p.m.
MISSION VALLEY TRANSFER CENTER
9065 Alameda Ave.
Parking: Free
Cost: $3 round-trip fare
Route: 3 Special (Bay B)
Pick-up time: 4:30 p.m.
WESTSIDE TRANSFER CENTER
7535 Remcon Cir.
Parking: Free
Cost: $3 round-trip fare
Route: 18 Special (Bay D)
Pick-up times: 4:30 p.m. and 5 p.m.
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 12
Continued from page 11
NORTHEAST TRANSIT TERMINAL
9348 Dyer Dr.
Parking: Free
Cost: $3 round-trip fare
Route: 42 Special (north side of terminal)
Pick-up time: 4:30 p.m.
EASTSIDE TRANSIT TERMINAL
1165 Sunmount Dr.
Parking: Free
Cost: $3 round-trip fare
Route: 59 Special (boarding along Sunmount)
Pick-up times: 4:30 p.m. and 5 p.m.
EDGEMERE @ R.C. POE PARK AND RIDE
Edgemere near R.C. Poe (one block west of Rich Beem Blvd.)
Parking: Free
Cost: $3 round-trip fare
Route: 75 Special
Pick-up time: 4:30 p.m.
REMEMBER:
 HAVE EXACT CHANGE FOR THE FARE BOX
($3 per person/round trip; ages 5 and under are free)
 Return trips will begin at the end of the 3rd quarter
 Fans will be picked up at the SAME location as the drop-
off site for each of the routes
BUS ROUTES...
El Paso, TX – Sierra Providence Health
Network (SPHN) cordially invites you to
the Rehabilitation at Sierra Medical Center
Ribbon Cutting Ceremony and Open
House on Thursday, September, 5,
2013 at 11:00 a.m. at Sierra Medical Cen-
ter, 1625 Medical Center Dr. 4th Floor.
Rehabilitation physicians, certified techni-
cians and staff will be on hand to answer
questions, and guests will have an oppor-
tunity to tour the state of the art Inpatient
Rehabilitation facility.
The 18 bed private room Inpatient Reha-
bilitation facility offers comprehensive
care for the many needs of patients with
different medical conditions. Patients will
benefit from specialized, intense rehabili-
tation for medical needs that prevent them
from being admitted into a lower level of
care such as skilled nursing facility.
The new SMC Inpatient Rehabilitation
Program offers cutting edge features,
which includes an Activities of Daily Liv-
ing (ADL) Kitchen that is used to simulate
a return to the home and ensure a success-
ful transition to home living. Another fea-
ture is the Family Day Room, which
provides patients and their families with a
home-like environment to enjoy visitation
during their hospital stay.
Choosing an Inpatient Rehabilitation pro-
gram located in an acute care hospital ben-
efits the patient by providing seamless
transition, emergent medical attention
without the need of transfers, in-house
medical testing, easier follow ups and ac-
cess to physicians.
“Our community deserves this state of the
art Inpatient Rehabilitation facility,” said
Teresa Rosales, CRRN Program Director.
“Our ultimate goal is to restore the pa-
tient’s quality of life by providing them
with the most advanced and comprehen-
sive rehabilitation therapy available in the
El Paso region.”
Sierra Medical Center Inpatient Reha-
bilitation program services include:
• Comprehensive Evaluation
• Daily supervision by a physical medicine
physician specialized in rehabilitation
• Around the clock rehabilitation nursing
care
• Physical therapy focused on restoring
function; increasing coordination, stability
• Hemodialysis/Peritoneal Dialysis
• Discharge Planning & Home Evaluation
• Physicians available on-site 24/7
• Occupational therapy to help patients re-
gain daily function and self-care skills
• Speech therapy for evaluation and treat-
ment of speech-language, cognitive and
swallowing disorders
• Social work and case management
• Psychological counseling
• Orthotic & Prosthetic consultation
Sierra Medical Center Inpatient Reha-
bilitation Ribbon Cutting Ceremony &
Open Info:
Date: Thursday, September 5, 2013
Time: 11:00 a.m.
Location: Sierra Medical Center, 1625
Medical Center Dr., 4th Floor.
About Sierra Providence Health Net-
work:
Sierra Providence Health Network in-
cludes Sierra Providence East Medical
Center, Sierra Medical Center, Providence
Memorial Hospital and Providence Chil-
dren’s Hospital. The Network also offers a
wide range of outpatient services including
Sierra Providence TotalCare, Sierra Provi-
dence Urgent Care Centers, Sierra Provi-
dence Trawood Center and ER, Sierra
Teen and Women’s Centers, Wound Care
Centers and Sierra Providence Sleep Dis-
orders Center.
!
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Sierra Providence Health Network Celebrates
Rehabilitation at Sierra Medical Center Open House
Pax Christi Film Series presents "Romántico"
A documentary film that focuses on the struggles faced by
undocumented workers is the September selection of the Pax
Christi Film Series. "Romántico" will be shown at 3:00 p.m. on
Sunday, September 15, at El Paso's Mother Teresa Center,
2400 East Yandell Drive. Admission is free.
Newsday says this movie is "visual poetry on the run." It’s
about a musician who leaves San Francisco after many years
to return home to his family in Mexico. When he gets home,
he has to confront again the hardships that led to his first bor-
der crossing.
Sponsors of the film series are Pax Christi El Paso and the
Peace and Justice Ministry of the El Paso Catholic Diocese.
For more information, call (915) 490-1451 or (915) 740-3962
WHAT: Pax Christi Film Series presents "Romántico"
This documentary focuses on the hardships faced by undoc-
umented workers. It’s about a musician who leaves San Fran-
cisco after many years to return home to his family in Mexico.
When he gets home, he is confronted with the struggles and
poverty wages that led to his first border crossing.
WHEN: Sunday, September 15, 2013
WHERE: Mother Teresa Center, 2400 East Yandell Drive, El
Paso
ADMISSION: Free
SPONSORED BY: Pax Christi El Paso and the Peace and
Justice Ministry of the Catholic Diocese of El Paso
INFORMATION: (915) 490-1451 or (915) 740-3962
LIFESTYLES
Sitting Pretty on
a Sectional Sofa
Q: We are redoing our Great Room and thinking of putting a flat-screen
TV over the fireplace. Since we'll mainly be looking in that one direction, it
seems logical to arrange all the seats to face the fireplace, but I don't want
the room to look like a movie theater. What kind of furniture do you rec-
ommend? There are five in our family and always the kids' friends, too.
A: Viva the sectional! Seating that comes with built-in flexibility will be
your best bet. You can just keep adding sections until you have space
enough for everybody. Allow a few independent chairs, too, so when more
friends arrive — or you prefer conversation to TV — everyone can easily
pull into the grouping.
Sectionals lend themselves to cohesive arrangements, carving out a visual
room-within-a-room, especially when they're underscored by an area rug.
Note how neatly the cocktail table fits into the el of the four-piece sectional
in the photo we show here (starring Bernhardt's Brandeis sectional; bern-
hardt.com). No matter where a person sits along the length of the piece, it's
an easy reach to put down a drink, a dish or book on the low table or its
matching end table.
Suburban sprawl: Everyone
has ample room to relax on
this handsome sectional sofa.
Photo: Courtesy Bernhardt.
Another plus: Because sectionals are open-ended — this
one includes a chaise longue on one end — they attract more sitters than
ordinary three-cushion sofas, in the middle seat of which nobody likes to
sit. People would rather perch on the arms or back of an old-fashioned
sofa than land in the center seat. Study the crowd at the next party you at-
tend and you'll see what I mean. Sitting between two people on a regular
sofa can make you feel you're watching a tennis match ... left, right, left
...
Rose Bennett Gilbert is the co-author of "Manhattan Style" and six other
books on interior design.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 14
sustainaBle liVinG By shawn dell Joyce
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Our toilets and sewer
systems are the perfect
pathogen dispersal sys-
tems, according to Sunita Narain of
the Center for Science and Environ-
ment in India. "We take a small
amount of contaminated material and
use it to create vast quantities of water
unfit for human consumption," says
Narain. And we do it several times a
day, in every American household,
suspending a yearly average of 80
pounds of waste in 75,000 gallons of
water per family.
Since Thomas Crapper popularized the
water closet (yes, that's where the
word came from), many experts have
come to view our sanitation system as
the worst idea of all time. We use 3.5
gallons (per flush) of our best drinking
water to dilute a few ounces of "excel-
lent fertilizer and soil conditioner" to
create an expensive, wasteful disposal
problem.
The World Health Organization re-
cently declared that waterborne sanita-
tion is obsolete, and only waterless
disposal of waste will allow enough
water for drinking, cooking and wash-
ing in the world's largest cities.
Waterless and low flow toilets could
save the average household as much as
$50 to $100 a year on water, adding up
to $11.3 million everyday nationally.
These are not the same low-flow toi-
lets that gained a well-deserved bad
reputation ten years ago. Technology
has improved even the lowly Crapper
so that most new toilets use only about
1.6 gallons per flush.
Sweden has popularized a dual bowl
toilet with separate compartments and
separate ways of treating human
waste. This system uses no water and
results in a high quality fertilizer and
composted human manure as byprod-
ucts. The separating toilets cost com-
parably to American toilets but may
take a while to catch on. Dual flush
toilets are becoming more popular
here in the states, and offer users a
choice of .8 gallons per flush or 1.6
gallons per flush depending on the size
of the job.
Composting toilets are completely wa-
terless and can be self contained or at-
tached to a whole building system. If
you have many bathrooms, a whole
building system would be the most
economical. It connects all the dry toi-
lets to a single large compost tank usu-
ally in the basement. There is no sewer
hookup, so the plumbing ends in the
compost tank.
A self-contained composting toilet is
essentially a compost drum enclosed
inside a toilet with a fold out handle
and tray. Some also contain fans and
vents to eliminate odors. We have both
a low-flow toilet and a composting toi-
let in our home. We bought the com-
posting toilet locally from Stoves Plus
in Thompson Ridge, N.Y. It is interest-
ing to see who goes where, and we
often categorized our guests by their
level of queasiness with our plumbing.
Once you get over the initial shock of
"no water in the bowl" it is easy to ap-
preciate the simplicity of a composting
toilet. Wood chips go in, tree food
comes out.
Incinerating toilets are similar to com-
posting toilets in that they are water-
less. But they use electricity to
incinerate human waste to a clean ash
eliminating both pathogens (good) and
soil nutrients (bad).
Many of these alternatives
are costly and require a bit
of plumbing know-how to
install. If you want to re-
duce your water use today:
—Try putting a brick in your
toilet tank to save up to 5
gallons of water per day.
—Install a $5 Frugal Flush
Flapper valve in your existing toilet
and conserve half your water with
each flush.
—Try a $1 Toilet Fill Cycle Di-
verter to save about 1/2 gallon per
flush.
—Pee on the trees if you live in
a secluded area where no one will
know.
—Flush less often using the
"yellow-mellow" rule
—Check your toilet for
leaks, which could waste more than
100 gallons of water per day. Add a
few drops of food coloring to the tank
and see if any colored water leaks into
the bowl after a few minutes.
Shawn Dell Joyce is an award-win-
ning columnist and founder of the Wal-
lkill River School in Orange County,
N.Y. You can contact her at Shawn-
DellJoyce@gmail.com.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Mars and Venus By John Gray
How Long is too Long for an
Engagement?
Dear John, Do you think it is possible to be en-
gaged for five years? Do you think it makes sense? —
Troubled in Plano, Texas
Dear Troubled, It depends on the circum-
stances.
A long engagement is more desirable in a couple
under the age of 25. Why? Because commitment to
higher education or professional commitments is im-
portant to us at this time in our lives, and a long en-
gagement gives us a chance to determine if the
personal traits being demonstrated by our loved one
is indeed the foundation on which to build a lifetime of
love.
However, as we move into our late 20s and our 30s,
we usually hope to have met enough people to know
what we want for ourselves and for our relationships,
and we can determine if potential mates share these
ideals without a long engagement.
On the other hand, if your engagement has been
lengthened based on your fiance's reluctance to com-
mit, take it as a blessing in disguise. If he has doubts,
perhaps he is not right for you in the first place.
If you are ready to get married, let him know that you
have plans for your future, and you will understand if
these do not coincide with his own. By releasing him
from an obligation that concerns him, you'll be free,
too. You'll be able to find someone whose life goals
align with your own.
Dear John, For the past two years, my husband
of 20 years has been working two jobs because he
claims that child support payments takes all of his
money from his primary job. Of course, this means he
is not spending any time with our family or me. He
sees us only when it is convenient for him. I am think-
ing of separation or divorce. —Time Out in Joplin, Mo.
Dear Time Out, I'm sure you appreciate the fact
that he is doing all he can to live up to his financial
obligations to both families. If so, you should acknowl-
edge this to him. Then, instead of generalizing with
him your hope that he makes time with you and the
family, go ahead and make specific requests of his
time.
For example, set a standing "date" night. Initiate the
planning of the first one, and possibly subsequent
ones, until he is comfortable with the idea and real-
izes how much this will mean to both of you. Also, set
aside a specific morning or afternoon each week that
can be a "family event," for a movie, picnic, hike or
family bike ride.
To get what you want in life, you have to ASK. Trust in
your relationship that he will come through with help-
ing satisfy your need for his attention.
2013 John Gray's Mars Venus Advice. Distributed by Cre-
ators Syndicate. John Gray is the author of "Men Are from
Mars, Women Are from Venus." If you have a question, write
John in care of this newspaper, or by email at:
www.marsvenus.com. All questions are kept anonymous,
and will be paraphrased.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Toilet Talk
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 15
enerGy express By Marilynn preston
'tween 12 and 20 By dr. roBert wallace
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The Bloomberg Is Off the Rose:
This Man Needs a Break!
New York City's Mayor Michael
Bloomberg put his foot in it when he re-
cently told the press that the secret to
success is working more hours, taking
less vacation and eating lunch quickly so
you can spend more time at your desk.
His pees-de-resistance? (Pardon my
French.) Take fewer bathroom breaks.
I was disappointed by his
awful advice because the mayor,
until now, has been a ferocious and ef-
fective crusader for health initiatives that
I consider admirable, progressive and,
inevitably, controversial. They don't call
him Nanny Bloomberg for nothing.
Take Bloomberg's widely publicized at-
tempt to ban sodas as big as your head.
Super-sized soda went viral ages ago,
bringing much-needed attention to the
fact that drinking too much sugary soda
is the biological equivalent of pouring
sludge into your hummingbird feeder.
According to the city's health depart-
ment, 57 percent of New Yorkers are ei-
ther obese or overweight. These monster
drinks are filled with sugar you don't
need, additives you don't want, and they
contribute, over time, to diabetes, heart
disease and other nasty problems. Big
gulp!
The mayor's calorie count initiative was
also impressive. With his celebrated
backing, New York City passed a law
that required big chains to put a calorie-
count, in readable-print, on the menu
display, for all the food and drink items
sold.
Brilliant! BB — Before Bloomberg—
who would know that a single portion of
lasagna could weigh in at 950 calories?
Or that the Rice Krispie treats at Star-
bucks is not the low-cal choice you
thought. They actually pack more than
400 calories per square — more than
double the calories in that chocolate chip
cookie on the shelf below.
Knowledge is power. Of course, people
are always free to choose the blueberry
muffin over the banana. But with the
Nanny State nudging you toward aware-
ness, at least you can make an informed
choice. That's why the campaign to label
GMOs is so important. But I digress.
One more Bloomberg-ian health initia-
tive to celebrate involves hospitals in
New York. Thanks to his anti-obesity
campaign, they can no longer get away
serving so much junky, unwholesome
food in their vending machines and cafe-
terias. There have to be healthier op-
tions. Public hospitals were required to
swap white rice for brown, donuts and
cookies for granola bars and nuts. This
is what progress looks like.
The "Cafeteria Crackdown" also banned
deep fryers and made leafy green salads
a mandatory option. Here's my
fave: The new law re-
quired that half-size por-
tions are available.
"We're doing what we should do,"
Mayor Bloomberg said. "If there's any
place that should not allow smoking and
try to make you eat healthy, it's the hos-
pital." Besides the public hospitals, at
least 16 private hospitals have signed on
to his Healthy Hospital Food Initiative,
with more on the way. High five, Mike!
So how could he get it so
wrong at the press conference
the other day? How could someone
so enlightened be so blind to the health
benefits of work-life-bathroom break
balance?
Most people — if they're fortunate
enough to have jobs — already spend
too many hours sitting at their desks.
Americans are notoriously hard work-
ing, and as the workday has gone from x
hours to xxx hours, including a 24/7
connection, we see signs of great suffer-
ing and stress.
As for vacation time, His Honor should
be telling people to take every bit of it.
Rest and relaxation is restorative. There
should be kudos, not shame and blame,
for the person who is smart enough to
create a lifestyle that is in balance, with
ample time for leisure, for family and
friends, for exercising, eating well, sit-
ting still.
Eat lunch at a gallop? No
way. Not only is it bad for your diges-
tion, it's not nourishing to the soul. It is
much better to enjoy your lunch, chew
slowly, appreciate deeply and use your
work break to meditate or walk around
the block.
As for resisting the urge to urinate, mind
over bladder can lead to kidney prob-
lems. (That comment pissed off many
New York urologists.)
So what's going on with Bloomberg? Is
he being funny? Ironic? Over caf-
feinated? Whatever — I forgive. Under
his watch, New York's amazing bike
rental program got rolling. Now he
needs to hop on one himself, backpedal
from that no vacation nonsense and put a
positive spin on work-life balance.
ENERGY EXPRESS-O! LOL
"Just went to the bathroom. Feel like a
failure." —Tweeted by Dan Amira
Marilynn Preston — fitness expert and
Emmy winning producer— is the creator
of Energy Express, the longest-running
syndicated fitness column in the country.
She has a website, marilynnpreston.com,
and welcomes reader questions, which
can be sent to
MyEnergyExpress@aol.com. She also
produces EnExTV, a digital reincarna-
tion of her Emmy winning TV series
about sports, fitness and adventure, for
kids of all ages, at youtube.com/EnExTV
and facebook.com/EnExTV.
COPYRIGHT 2013 ENERGYEXPRESS, LTD.
Police Officers Risk Their
Lives Daily
DR. WALLACE: Why do cops always harass teens? Why don't
they catch adult criminals instead of keeping us out of the mall?
Why do they pull over teen drivers for speeding and allow adult
speeders to drive on by? Why do they bust teens for drinking a
beer in the park and do nothing to drunken adults who stagger out
of bars at midnight? Why do they patrol "lover's lane" looking for
kids making out instead of patrolling streets where gangs are sell-
ing drugs out in the open? Can you answer these questions? —
Jose, El Paso, Texas
JOSE: The vast majority of police officers risk their lives daily to
protect the citizens in their assigned area. I shudder to think what
our communities would be like without police protection.
If you are a law-abiding citizen, I'm sure you will not be suffering
from police harassment.
TEN HOURS OF SLEEP IS SUFFICIENT
DR. WALLACE: I'm 16 and love
my sleep. Now that I'm on sum-
mer break, I'd like to sleep until
noon, even if I go to bed before
midnight. I'm trying to make up
for all the sleep I lost during the
school year because I had an
8:00 a.m. class. My parents think
that I'm lazy. How much sleep is
enough for an active teen? —
Nameless, Corona Del Mar, Calif.
NAMELESS: It's true that teens need more sleep than adults be-
cause of the rapid growth spurts. But sleep cannot be stored by the
body in the same manner that food can (as fat). So excess rest
(more than the body needs) can be interpreted as wasted. Ten
hours sleep in a 24-hour period should be sufficient!
MY GIRLFRIEND WANTS ME TO READ
"LOVE-MAKING" BOOKS
DR. WALLACE: I'm 16 and so is my girlfriend. We are popular at
school and active in school activities. I'm a virgin and my girlfriend
says that she is too, but she says that she no longer wants to stay
that way and wants us to join the ranks of teens who are sexually
active. I'm not sure that I want to enter into a sexual affair at this
time of my life. I'm not a prude, but I don't want to have sex domi-
nate my life right now. My girlfriend has bought books on "love mak-
ing" and wants me to read them. She already has.
Last night, she told me that she will give me two weeks to read the
books and then join her in sexual activity or else she will find a will-
ing partner and, trust me, that won't be too difficult. Now I'm put in a
position that if I want to keep a relationship, I must include sex on
our dates.
Continues on next page
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 16
eVeryday cheapskate By Mary hunt
Shopping for a vacuum cleaner can be a mind-
numbing experience because there are so many
makes and models to choose from — and with
price tags from $25 to $1,500 or more. But don't
worry. Even the most neat-freaky of neat freaks
need not spend four figures on a vacuum to en-
sure a clean house.
To identify the best inexpensive vacuum cleaner
out there, I came up with this criteria: A great
vacuum has to be lightweight, be bag-
less, be easily cleanable and, most im-
portantly, have consistent suction power.
—Lightweight. The test for me is
whether I can pick it up with one hand and carry
it up a flight of stairs. If it takes two people to
lift, you know that's a machine that will knock
the paint off doorjambs and slam into legs of fur-
niture because it's just too heavy.
—Bagless. Disposable vacuum cleaner
bags — though designed to be neat, clean and
convenient — are not always so. Worse, they're
pricey! My ideal vacuum must be bagless but de-
signed in such a way that emptying the canister
is a neat and clean operation.
—Cleanable. Am I the only one who can-
not stand the smell of a dirty vacuum? That's
why I want a vacuum cleaner that comes apart so
I can wash it out. Is that too much to ask?
—Suction power. The best-looking
vacuum in the world is a piece of junk if it can-
not suck dirt out of carpet and upholstery and
pick up every last crumb and speck of dust, dirt
and pet hair in a home. And it needs to have con-
sistent suction regardless of whether the dirt col-
lection canister is empty or nearly full.
After a great deal of research and personal expe-
rience, the coveted designation of "Everyday
Cheapskate's Best Inexpensive Vacuum" goes to
Shark Navigator. What an amazing piece of engi-
neering and ingenuity. Weighing in at less than
15 pounds, it certainly can be called lightweight.
Shark Navigator is bagless, and boy, can it col-
lect a shocking amount of dirt, dust and other
disgusting-looking stuff. The canister lifts off the
machine to be held over a trash can. Pushing a
single button releases the bottom of the canister,
and everything simply falls out. Neat, clean and
quite tidy.
This canister is completely washable. I run a
sink with hot soapy water and put that emp-
tied canister right in. And I wash the felt
and foam filters at the same time and
then roll them in a towel and allow
them a couple of hours to air-dry.
Lastly, no vacuum I have ever used can
measure up to Shark Navigator when it
comes to powerful suction. I think it might ac-
tually suck paint off the wall if put to the test.
This baby handles like a dream, too, with its
swivel action, on-board crevice tools, on/off
brush roll for carpet and hard-surface floors
and hose that stretches to 12 feet. The power
cord is 30 feet long and stores easily on the
back. I'm so sold on Shark Navigator that I
bought two — one for home and one for the
"Everyday Cheapskate" office.
Regular retail for this machine is $249, but you
can be sure I didn't pay that. I paid $149 with
free shipping. That's a deal! To learn more and to
read others' reviews, go to http://Everyday-
Cheapskate.com/sharkvacuum.
Mary Hunt is the founder of
www.DebtProofLiving.com, a personal finance member
website. You can email her at mary@everydaycheap-
skate.com, or write to Everyday Cheapskate,
P.O. Box 2099,
Cypress, CA 90630.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
'tween 12 and 20 By dr. roBert wallace
Continued from page 15
I always read in your column about sexu-
ally aggressive guys. What should I do
about a sexually aggressive girlfriend? -
Nameless, Indianapolis, Ind.
NAMELESS: The answer is the same
whether the sexual aggressor is male or fe-
male; a clear, unambiguous "No!" If she
can't accept that, she will have to go some-
where else to satisfy her fantasy. The deci-
sion to have sex, especially when it is
coerced, is far more likely to wreck a rela-
tionship than to "save" it.
Dr. Robert Wallace welcomes questions
from readers. Although he is unable to
reply to all of them individually, he will an-
swer as many as possible in this column.
Email him at rwallace@galesburg.net.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
MY GIRLFRIEND
WANTS ME TO
READ "LOVE-
MAKING"
BOOKS....
The Best Inexpensive Vacuum Cleaner
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 17
On Monday, the winged messenger
Mercury moves out of Virgo and
into the sign of the scales. In Libra,
communication is lighthearted, and it's
easier to see the other person's point
of view. Diplomacy is alive and well,
and many a compromise will be
struck. It also will be harder to make
up our minds. On Tuesday, Venus ad-
justs the cosmic clockwork, slipping
into intense Scorpio for four weeks of
gripping romantic drama.
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You strive
to achieve a healthy frame of mind
this week, and all other health springs
from that effort. The good thing about
feeling down or negative is that it's the
perfect time to train your mind. The
habit of finding the opportunity in
problems will serve you well. In fact, it
will be the key to your success.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Just be-
cause your destination is far away
doesn't mean it's going to be hard to
get to. The directions won't be compli-
cated. A simple effort made on a daily
basis will get you there. This week, re-
inforce consistent action. Schedule an
activity, and repeat it at the same time
every day.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). It feels
good to be needed, but that good feel-
ing may only be detectable after the
fact. While you're doing what others
need, you're too busy to notice how
right it feels. When they no longer
need you, you will recognize what you
had. This will prompt you to be of
service elsewhere.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). The uni-
verse seems intent on doing things
you don't expect, but it's up to you to
interpret these events as surprising,
disappointing, fortunate or unlucky.
Much depends on your attitude. The
less connected you are to the out-
come the better you'll be at interpret-
ing in a way that brings you joy.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You're too
smart to take the hard line on every-
thing today. Believing something that
is not true can be dangerous or lovely.
This week the issue is compounded
by the very nature of truth; it's so lay-
ered that you can't know it absolutely.
The best you can do is interpret things
in a way that empowers you.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Perma-
nence is a myth. There is no such
thing. That's why it's unwise to make
any move out of a desire for perma-
nence. These types of grabby actions
have a desperate air that is repellant
to others. The most attractive energy
is comfortable, easy and accepting of
the fact that things change.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Acceptance
is saying "yes" to where you are and
who you are. It's putting yourself in the
driver's seat as opposed to standing
on the curb and criticizing the car. Ac-
ceptance gives you power. Only those
who accept the moment can control it.
This week you'll go places because
you get in the car and grab the wheel.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You were
a different person back when you first
met your friend, and tomorrow you'll
be a different person again. Reinven-
tion is part of who you are. Old rela-
tionships can be new again if at least
one of the people involved chooses to
see the other as the different person
he or she is each day.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
New people will pop into your life in
the upcoming week. This could have a
startling effect on the people who are
already in your life. They could be-
come jealous and fearful that your at-
tention will wane. Or they could
encourage you, realizing the benefit of
varied influences.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Good
manners are one thing, but you don't
trust people who only say what you
want to hear. The ones who say, "You
may not like to hear this, but..." and
follow with a generally innocuous or
even likeable comment are the ones
who really can't be trusted. Don't
treasure social slickness over hon-
esty.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). How
can you give more than you can give?
Well, you just can, and that's an unex-
plainable phenomenon. Anyway,
keeping score is pointless. Counting
the contributions you've made is a
waste of time that could be spent min-
ing the treasures of your spirit for new
sources of future generosity.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Encour-
age others to contribute to the conver-
sation and the work at hand. If you are
the only one making an effort, it won't
be fun for you. You might think things
will be more complicated if you in-
clude too many people, but in fact,
everything gets lighter and simpler as
you add more people to the equation.
THIS WEEK'S BIRTHDAYS: You're
having fun and are in a positive mood,
so you'll take risks. The first part of
your year is adventurous, and you'll
be gathering influences from far and
wide. What you learn about art, phi-
losophy, religion, sports and culture
will expand your horizons. New friends
will connect with you as you explore
these themes. November and May are
the best for your financial situation.
December brings a big professional
commitment. January transforms your
domestic scene and schedule.
ACROSS
1 Degrade
6 Little or Buddy
10 Grand Coulee
13 Olympic Decathloner John-
son
14 High ranking Turk
15 Kind of trip
16 Two no Trump
18 Where Ipanema is
19 Kind of gin
20 Do a tailor's task
21 Slippery ones
22 Winken and Blinken partner
24 ___ Doodle Dandy
26 Mission Impossible director
32 Fix
33 More painful
34 Doer
38 At the highest point
40 1000 make a kilo
42 West African country
43 Firma's preceder
45 Butter substitutes
47 Ancient
48 Leslie Howard, in Gone With
the Wind
51 Despise
54 Old French coin
55 Leave unacknowledged
56 Respond to stimulus
60 File
64 Highly prized item
65 Female sharpshooter
67 Mature wine
68 Move sideways
69 Heavy rock
70 Scottish negative
71 Overtake
72 Inclined
DOWN
1 Shaw's ___ and the Man
2 Canaanite deity
3 Hairstyle
4 Tejano singer
5 Time frame
6 Engrossed
7 England's Man
8 Model Tiegs
9 Possesses
10 10 's Bo
11 Nimble
12 Bullwinkle
14 Chum
17 1993 DeNiro film, ___ and
Glory
21 Legislate
23 Certain switches
25 Doctors' org.
26 Spoiled one
27 Stravinsky's ___ of Spring
28 First name in 27 Down
29 Actor Flynn
30 Normal Vincent ___
31 House majority leader
35 Expropriated
36 Eye amorously
37 Souped up cars
39 Whitney's jet engine partner
41 South African township
44 Fire residue
46 Put the bite on
49 Organ rupture
50 Skulker
51 Boston's airport
52 Alpha's opposite
53 ___ Semple McPherson
57 Sometimes hard to make
them meet
58 Is sick
59 Bee follower
61 Chorus part
62 Playwright O'Casey
63 Ernie or Gomer
65 Cleopatra's killer
66 Elec. current unit
By Holiday Mathis
Mercury and Venus Change Signs
week 9/5 - 9/11
DEAR ABBY: I am ap-
palled at older workers who
hang onto their jobs so they can
live lavish lifestyles, while
young workers trying to support
families are left with lack of ad-
vancement or even laid off be-
cause they don't have tenure.
I am a single mom,
and when my sons are out of
college I plan to take a less
stressful job (and thus less pay),
so a younger person can have
my job to support a family. I am
so tired of the ME ME ME atti-
tude of our society now. In the
past, there was more of a sense
of social responsibility. Now it's
every man for himself and hang
everyone else! -- DISGUSTED
IN COLUMBUS, OHIO
DEAR DISGUSTED: While
your altruism is laudable, please
try to be less judgmental. Many
older people work longer these
days not to live lavish lifestyles,
but to survive.
Unless you have a
crystal ball that enables you to
see what seniors have in the
bank, it's presumptuous to say
someone should retire. Many
seniors are unprepared finan-
cially to do so through no fault
of their own. And while you
may think now that you'll take a
reduction in pay when your
sons are out of college, it re-
mains to be seen if that will be
feasible for you when the time
comes.
**
DEAR ABBY: My cousin
died a short time ago at a very
young age and in an unnatural
and devastating way. As soon as
people outside the family
started finding out, they began
asking what happened. Many of
these questions were posted on
my relatives' Facebook pages.
Is it just me or isn't
that a very insensitive thing to
do? It's not just that they are
asking questions of a grieving
family who lost their son only
hours before, but that they did it
through Facebook. -- MOURN-
ING IN THE MIDWEST
DEAR MOURNING: Please
accept my sympathy for your
family's tragic loss. We live in
an age in which respect for pri-
vacy has nearly disappeared,
and folks routinely bare inti-
mate and sensitive details about
their lives on the Internet. Of
course questions like the ones
your relatives are being asked
are tasteless -- whether in per-
son or via electronic media. If a
person wishes to convey this
kind of information, it is usually
done VOLUNTARILY, and cer-
tainly not when feelings are
raw.
**
DEAR ABBY: Too often we
hear horrifying stories in the
news about prescription drug
addiction and overdoses. I'd like
to offer hope to addicts who are
still using.
There IS life after
drugs. For 10 years I was ad-
dicted to pain pills. My poor
mother tried everything. She of-
fered me trips or help in buying
a new car if I would just go to
rehab. I refused because I was-
n't ready. I finally hit rock bot-
tom and went into rehab when I
realized my daughter was
pulling away from me. I had
been spending our rent money
on pills I'd buy on the streets.
After I was sober for
a few days, I realized I liked the
feeling. After the sixth day, I
was "me" again, and I loved it. I
have been sober for two years
and am now entering school to
become a patient tech. It's excit-
ing because I will be helping
others. I believe this is what I
was meant to do in life.
Everyone keeps say-
ing I should tell my story, but to
be honest, my story isn't fin-
ished yet. Thank you for letting
me share. -- ENJOYING SO-
BRIETY IN FLORIDA
DEAR ENJOYING SO-
BRIETY: You're welcome.
You're right that your story isn't
over yet, but from where I'm
sitting it looks like the next
chapter will be a happy and
constructive one. I wish you
success in your journey.
**
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van
Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.Dear-
Abby.com or P.O. Box 69440,
Los Angeles, CA 90069.
COPYRIGHT 2013 UNIVERSAL UCLICK
DEAR ABBY by Abigail Van Buren
SINGLE MOM RIPS OLDER WORKERS FOR
STAYING ON THE JOB TOO LONG
Arbor Day
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 18
traVel and adVenture
By Adriana Gardella
Chicago is routinely
among the top U.S.
business travel des-
tinations. But there
are even more en-
ticements to stick
around and explore
once your work is
done. Chief among them are
the city's architectural jewels
and nearly limitless art offer-
ings. Those who visit during
the fall will discover they have
arrived at the perfect time —
before temperatures dip precip-
itously and after the summer-
time hordes have moved on.
In just a weekend it is possible
to cover plenty of ground with-
out straying far from the Loop,
the city's historic business cen-
ter. The River North neighbor-
hood, just north of the Loop
and a short walk across the
Chicago River, is a great place
to begin your explo-
rations.
The district is home to
Chicago's highest concentra-
tion of art galleries, plus nu-
merous restaurants and a busy
nightlife. Gallery openings,
held on Friday nights, are one
way to sample the scene. Plot
your course after checking the
online events calendar offered
by Chicago Gallery News, or
just head to the district's center
— Chicago, Superior and
Huron streets between LaSalle
and Orleans streets — and start
wandering.
As dinnertime approaches,
you'll find you're surrounded
by options, including Sumi Ro-
bata Bar, a sleek space that fo-
cuses on Japanese barbecue. If
the weather cooperates, you
can savor your crackly-
crisp fried chicken
with shishito pepper
paste while seated in
the restaurant's
tranquil garden.
Or pull up a
barstool at the
robata — a
type of
Japanese
charcoal
grill — to
watch
owner and former Japonais
chef Gene Kato create his edi-
ble art behind glass.
Begin your next day with the
Chicago Architecture Founda-
tion's 90-minute river cruise.
From the Chicago River you'll
get the inside story on more
than 50 of the city's most strik-
ing structures, including the
Wrigley Building, Merchandise
Mart and Marina City. For
landlubbers, the foundation of-
fers tours by foot, trolley, bus,
el train and bicycle.
When your boat docks you'll be
within a short cab ride — or a
15-minute walk — from the
Art Institute, one of the city's
cultural treasures.
Even if you
were so in-
clined,
you
couldn't
take in
all that
the mil-
lion-
square-foot museum offers in
one day or perhaps even one
week. So set your priorities and
make a plan.
The Art Institute's imposing
Beaux Arts building, its
main entrance
framed by two enormous
bronze lions, is among the
most-photographed Chicago
landmarks. Inside the
museum you'll
find a perma-
nent collec-
tion most
well-
known
for its
Im-
pressionist, Post-Impressionist
and American paintings. These
include works so ubiquitously
reproduced that they may seem
like old friends: Edward Hop-
per's "Nighthawks," Claude
Monet's "Water Lilies," Vincent
van Gogh's "Self-Portrait" and
Grant Wood's "American
Gothic." But the museum is
also home to art in a range of
forms, spanning cultures
worldwide and nearly every
recorded time period.
Just north of the Art Institute
sits Millennium Park. The pop-
ular meeting place, built to cel-
ebrate the millennium, opened
behind schedule in 2004. Its
24.5 acres feature several
notable works of architec-
ture and public art. At the
center sits the Frank
Gehry-designed
Pritzker Pavilion, a
band shell with
fixed and lawn
seating.
Continues on
next page
The Art Institute of Chicago is home to some of the world's most famous paintings, including "A Sun-
day Afternoon on La Grande Jatte" by Georges Seurat. Photo courtesy of Choose Chicago.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 19
Continued from page 18
Gehry also designed the snake-
like pedestrian bridge that
crosses Columbus Drive, con-
necting Millennium Park with
Grant Park to the east.
Millennium Park's significant
works of public art include
London-based artist Anish
Kapoor's visually arresting
Cloud Gate, a giant bean-
shaped sculpture made of stain-
less steel polished to create the
effect of a distorted mirror that
reflects both sky and skyline.
Crown Fountain is another
must-see in the park. Designed
by Spanish artist Jaume Plensa,
the fountain consists of two 50-
foot glass block towers that
face each other across a reflect-
ing pool. The towers project
images of real-life Chicagoans
who appear to be spitting water
from their mouths gargoyle-
style.
After a day spent exploring
some of Chicago's architecture
and top art destinations, head to
your hotel to recharge before
dinner. Acme Hotel, located in
River North and less than three
blocks from Michigan Avenue's
main shopping stretch, is one
budget-conscious option with a
boutique-hotel feel. Regardless
of whether you check in, the
hotel's recently opened Berk-
shire Room is worth a visit for
custom-made cocktails and bar
snacks like bison tartare, served
in a comfortable, civilized
lounge conducive to conversa-
tion.
Chicago's art offerings are
matched by its continually
evolving dining scene. Plan
ahead if you want to experience
a multicourse tasting menu at
Grace in the West Loop, where
reservations are accepted two
months in advance. Or sample
Macanese cuisine at Fat Rice in
the Logan Square neighbor-
hood. Line up for a seat at a
communal table to find out why
this year Bon Apetit magazine
named Fat Rice the fourth-best
new restaurant in the United
States.
Conclude your whirlwind tour
of Chicago the next day with a
visit to the Museum of Contem-
porary Art, which highlights
painting, sculpture, video and
film created since 1945. The
museum's sculpture garden
overlooks Lake Michigan.
Adriana Gardella is a freelance
travel writer.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
wellnews By scott laFee
Kate Perry Meet
Perry Como
Distracted driving is deadly.
Each day, according to the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, nine people
are killed and 1,060 injured
in auto crashes involving a
distracted driver.
One of the typical explana-
tions tends to be a driver
fumbling with radio buttons,
searching for a good song
and not watching the road.
Researchers at Ben-Gurion
University in Israel wanted to
know if the song itself might
be risky, too.
They recruited 85 drivers, all
around 18 years old, just
over half of them male. The
subjects were each assigned
to drive six challenging road
trips (each 40 minutes in
length) with an experienced
driving instructor. Music was
played on four of the trips:
two with playlists provided by
the teenage drivers, usually
loud, fast-paced vocals, and
two with easy listening/in-
strumental background
music provided by the scien-
tists. On two trips, no music
was played at all.
All 85 drivers committed at
least three errors on one or
more of their six trips, such
as speeding, lane-change vi-
olations and one-handed
driving. Twenty-seven per-
cent of the drivers received
verbal warnings from their
ride-a-long instructor; 17 re-
quired steering or braking by
the instructor to avoid an ac-
cident.
When the teen drivers were
playing their own music, 98
percent made errors, accord-
ing to findings published in
the journal Accident Analysis
& Prevention. When there
was no music at all, the error
rate dropped to 92 percent.
When the music was easy
listening, the error rate fell
dramatically to 77 percent.
Cloud Gate in Chicago's Millennium Park reflects the city and the
people who visit. Photo courtesy of Choose Chicago.
From the
Chicago
River,
Marina
Towers offer
a sampling
of that city's
remarkable
skyline.
Photo
courtesy of
Choose
Chicago.
WHEN YOU GO
For general tourism information: www.choosechicago.com
Chicago Gallery News: www.chicagogallerynews.com
Sumi Robata Bar: www.sumirobatabar.com
Chicago Architecture Foundation: www.architecture.org
Art Institute of Chicago: www.artic.edu
Millenium Park:
www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/dca/supp_info/millennium_park.html
Acme Hotel: www.acmehotelcompany.com
Grace: www.grace-restaurant.com
Fat Rice: www.eatfatrice.com/index2.php#slide-main
Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago: www.mcachicago.org
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 20
a Greener View By JeFF ruGG
Non-Blooming
Plant
Question: I have a
wisteria vine that was planted
several years ago. It has grown
fast and has lots of leaves, but
not one flower. I want to know,
what I can do to make it
bloom?
Answer: A non-
blooming plant's problems fall
into environmental, cultural and
genetic categories. The most
common cause of a non-bloom-
ing plant is that it is not planted
in the best location. Many
plants, like roses, wisteria and
trumpet creeper need lots of
sun. They will grow in shade,
even very shady locations, but
they don't bloom. Plants with
not enough sunlight, moisture
or other improper environmen-
tal conditions find it hard to be
completely healthy.
Healthy plants create starches,
sugars, hormone type chemicals
and many other chemicals that
regulate the growth of flower
and leaf buds, stems and roots.
A properly balanced set of
chemicals will allow the plant
to go through the whole life
cycle. Most plants have a wide
range of chemical levels that
allow them to bloom every
year. Some plants are a bit
more temperamental, requiring
the chemical levels to be more
specific.
One of the cultural problems
that is related to an environ-
mental problem is too much
fertilizer. If you do not know
the existing nutrient level in
your soil, you may not fertilize
the plant properly. Too much
nitrogen will encourage the
plant to grow new leaves and
stems, but not to flower.
Blooming plants that have roots
under or near lawns may get
too much nitrogen, because that
is the nutrient in fertilizer that
is used to grow the leaves on
grass plants. Properly fertilizing
with a high phosphate fertilizer
may help your plants bloom.
Improper pruning is often a
cause of no flowers. Many
plants produce flower buds in
the previous growing season.
Therefore, pruning in the fall
cuts them off. Do very little
pruning for a year to see if this
will help.
Some species of plants take a
long time to mature to an adult
phase where they would bloom.
An oak tree may not bloom for
fifty years after it sprouts.
Transplanting a mature plant
can set it back to a non- or poor
blooming level by disturbing
the chemical balances in the re-
maining parts of the plant. After
it re-establishes its root system,
it can begin blooming again.
Trees take at least a year to be-
come re-established, for each
inch in diameter the trunk was
when it was transplanted.
Shrubs can take as long as a
year for each foot in height.
Smaller potted plants can take a
year for each gallon in pot size.
It is possible that your plant
will never bloom. After consid-
ering the environment and cul-
tural practices to see if they are
OK, it may be better to start
over with a new plant. When-
ever possible, buy a plant when
it has the characteristic you are
most concerned about. If you
want flowers, then buy the
plant when it is in bloom.
Email questions to Jeff Rugg at
info@greenerview.com.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 21
the saVaGe truth on Money By terry saVaGe
Gender Discrimination in LTC Insurance
Attention: Single
women considering
the purchase of
long-term care in-
surance should act
now!
Gender discrimination is taking
over in long-term care insur-
ance pricing — and it is not
only legal, it is expensive for
single women! Until this year,
men and women paid the same
premiums for their policies, but
that is changing quickly.
Many of these price increases
are scheduled to take effect in
the next three weeks, although
existing policies will not be im-
pacted.
Women live longer, and thus
are more likely to need care,
and may be more likely to re-
quire a longer period of custo-
dial care, as they age. And
women are less likely to have
"free" family help to cover their
needs, unlike men, who may
rely on their wives for an initial
period of care.
Since women use more benefits
from their long-term care insur-
ance policies, the insurance
companies are deciding women
who buy policies in the future
will have to pay more for their
insurance. If you're a single
woman who is in the market for
long-term care insurance, you'd
better get your application in
right now!
Premiums for long-term care
insurance policies have been
soaring recently — instead of
remaining steady, as most poli-
cies had projected when they
were purchased. The insurers
admit they miscalculated both
the persistence of the policies
(the fact that few people drop
them, unlike life insurance poli-
cies) and the actual usage of the
policies (why not check into a
nice assisted living facility and
let your policy pay for it?).
Then came the impact of lower
interest rates, leading to lower
investment returns on insurance
company reserves.
As a result, state insurance
commissioners have had little
choice but to grant insurers' re-
quests for premium increases.
I've been writing about that for
two years — explaining the al-
ternatives, which include re-
ducing the coverage amount or
the inflation protection.
But the latest round of premium
increases is being aimed di-
rectly at women — and despite
being a form of gender discrim-
ination, it is perfectly legal!
Most single
female prices
are 50 percent
higher than
single male
prices after insurers
adopt gender-distinct pricing,
according to industry expert
Claude Thau (targetins.com).
His survey shows that of the
largest LTC insurers, Genworth
has gender-based prices in 32
states, John Hancock bases pre-
miums on gender in 41 states,
and Transamerica will do so in
36 states effective Sept. 10,
2013, while Mutual of Omaha
is close to receiving approval in
36 states. Only California, Con-
necticut, Florida, Hawaii, Indi-
ana, New York and the District
of Columbia do not have gen-
der based pricing — yet.
Here's an example
of the potential cost
difference. Brian Gordon,
president of MagaLTC (maga-
ltc.com), an independent
agency specializing in long-
term care insurance policies
provided the following price
quote, showing the impact of
gender-based pricing.
A Genworth policy that offers a
monthly benefit of $6,000 for
four years, with 3 percent com-
pound interest protection for
the benefit amount, and a 90-
day elimination (waiting) pe-
riod, currently costs a
55-year-old woman in Illinois a
premium of $2521.66 per year.
But the new gender-priced pol-
icy for the same woman with
the same coverage has an an-
nual premium of $3142.42 —
more than $600 a year in addi-
tional cost. And Genworth now
prices policies according to
health status, so if you are not
in the preferred category, the
price difference could be even
greater.
If you or a loved one
ever needs the benefits,
you'll find that your
LTC policy was worth
every penny in premi-
ums — and more. Cur-
rently the cost of a single room
in a nursing home is now more
than $70,000 per year — and
climbing at double the rate of
consumer price inflation.
Round-the-clock home nursing
care could double that cost!
And people really do use those
benefits. According to the 2013
Milliman Individual LTCi Sur-
vey, published in Broker World
Magazine, July 2013, the 10
largest insurers reported paying
out slightly over $3 billion in
claims benefits to LTC policy-
holders in 2012, 18 percent
higher than the payouts for the
previous years. And if you in-
clude payouts from insurers
who are no longer selling —
but still paying claims — the
payout was nearly $7 billion.
The alternative is to self-fund.
And when you run out of
money, your state Medicaid
program will cover the costs,
but only in a state-funded facil-
ity. Given the dismal situation
with state budgets, a state-
funded nursing home is not
where you want to spend your
final years or months.
For many years, I've been on a
personal campaign to get
women to buy long-term care
insurance. Here's an astounding
statistic from
WiserWomen.com: 80 percent
of men die married; 80 percent
of women die single!
Women are far more likely to
be the caregivers — using up
retirement savings and their en-
ergy caring for a spouse, only
to be left on their own in their
final years. A long-term care in-
surance buys peace of mind,
not only paying for care, but of-
fering help finding appropriate
caregiver services.
There are many types of
policies, including some that
combine with life insurance
to offer death benefits to
your heirs if you never need
to use the care portion of
your policy. But you'll never
know about them if you don't
ask. And with premiums for
women about to rise sharply,
now is the time to ask! That's
The Savage Truth.
Terry Savage is a registered
investment adviser and is on
the board of the Chicago
Mercantile Exchange.
She appears weekly on
WMAQ-Channel 5's 4:30 p.m.
newscast, and can be reached
at www.terrysavage.com.
She is the author of the new
book, "The New Savage
Number: How Much Money
Do You Really
Need to Retire?"
COPYRIGHT 2013 TERRYSAVAGE PRODUCTIONS
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 22
Water Is the New Gold
As a teen, I remember using all my
strength to open a giant valve in a
ditch that diverted part of the Rio
Grande River into my grandparents'
citrus orchards. The brown water
would bubble up from the valve and
flood into the orchards following the
little trenches I made with a hoe. This
method is called flood irrigation and is
the least efficient way to use water.
Yet 93 percent of the world's farmers
irrigate their crops using this method.
In my younger days, I would never be-
lieve that the mighty Rio Grande
would ever dry up. Yet it, along with
the Nile, Ganges, Colorado and many
other rivers, does not always reach the
sea.
Westerners seem to take water for
granted on this sparkling blue planet.
However, less than three-thousandths
of 1 percent of all fresh water is avail-
able to us humans. The rest is locked
tightly into ice or buried too deep for
our powerful pumps to reach, accord-
ing to the United Nations. We still
manage to use over a quarter of the
Earth's total fresh water in natural cir-
culation, much to the dismay of our
fellow creatures. But even that doesn't
slake our thirst.
Worldwide demand for water has
tripled over the past fifty years as the
world's population has doubled. Mil-
lions of wells, powerful diesel pumps
and the diverting of streams and rivers
are drawing down the water table
below the natural recharge levels. To
put it bluntly, we are using up our
children's water today. What will we
leave for our grandchildren to drink?
Humans need less than two gallons of
water per day for drinking and cook-
ing. Yet we must have a thousand gal-
lons more to grow our food. In
affluent societies like ours, where
meat is a primary staple, we need two
thousand gallons or more per day just
to feed one person. Agriculture ties up
about half our water, mostly to grow
grains to feed animals. It takes about a
thousand tons of water to produce one
ton of grain. It is much cheaper to im-
port grain than to grow it where water
is scarce. Many countries that are run-
ning low on water have become grain
importers, so they don't have to tie up
precious drinking water for agricul-
ture.
Our country is still a grain-exporting
country but at a great cost to our fu-
ture generations. Our water is subsi-
dized, so most big agro-giants don't
pay the real cost of water. Some Cali-
fornia large-scale farms buy water at
$5 per acre-foot, while the govern-
ment estimates the real cost is more
like $40 per acre-foot.
What isn't factored in is that most of
that water comes from fossil aquifers
underground like the Ogallala Aquifer,
which underlies most of our grain-pro-
ducing states. This aquifer is drawn
down at a rate of about ten feet per
year and recharged at a rate of half
inch per year. Two-fifths of our feedlot
cattle are fed grain made of Ogallala
water. Amory Lovins, efficiency guru
from the Rocky Mountain Institute,
points out that "growing that feedlot
steer consumed up to a hundred
pounds of eroded topsoil and eight
thousand pounds of Ice Age vintage
groundwater."
As water becomes the new "gold stan-
dard" around the world, we begin to
see water being used more efficiently.
In our country, water efficiency is im-
proving faster than energy efficiency
as municipalities and farmers begin to
address shortages. Like energy effi-
ciency, the biggest gains are made by
taking the simplest steps. Just by using
drip irrigation and sprinklers, we
could save enough water to meet the
needs of the expanding population.
Here are a few success sto-
ries, courtesy of Amory
and Hunter Lovins from
their book "Natural Capi-
talism:"
—Palo Alto, Calif., saved 27 percent
of its water use by hiring college stu-
dents to teach high-usage homeowners
about ways to be more efficient.
—South Africa's Kruger National Park
saved 74 percent of its water and 52
percent of its electricity by installing
meters, educating people and finding
other simple solutions.
—Oregon farmers saved 10 percent to
15 percent of their water use, thanks to
a three-hour visit by a water efficiency
consultant.
"Like energy, it is much cheaper to
buy efficiency than it is to buy water,"
says Lovins. Let's leave a little water
for the next generation by using our
water more wisely today.
Shawn Dell Joyce is an award-win-
ning columnist and founder of the
Wallkill River School in Orange
County, N.Y. You can contact her at
ShawnDellJoyce@gmailcom.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
sustainaBle liVinG By shawn dell Joyce
P
IC
T
U
R
E
F
O
R
IL
L
U
S
T
R
A
T
IO
N
P
U
R
P
O
S
E
S
O
N
L
Y
How Opting for the
Minimum Payment
Changed My Life
At the time, it seemed like good idea.
But going for the minimum-payment
option "just this one time" turned out
to be the worst mistake of my life. The
day I opened that door and walked
through it, I altered the course of my
life.
I reasoned that I didn't have enough
money to pay the credit card balances
in full, so what was I supposed to do
(oh, hear me whine)? I'd catch up next
month and pay everything down to $0
before my husband found out. All I
needed was a little breathing room.
And with that, I made a 180-degree
turn and headed down the road to fi-
nancial devasta-
tion.
What was an
option the first
time I made
only the mini-
mum payments
soon became
my only choice.
I deceived my-
self into believ-
ing even though
I didn't have enough money to pay for
things now, somehow I'd have enough
to pay for them later. I reasoned that
these banks and department stores
wouldn't lend me this much money if
they didn't know that I could afford it.
And wasn't that a nice surprise.
It took 12 years to ruin my life, putting
me in danger of losing my marriage,
my family and my home. The only
thing that stopped me was that I ran out
of credit.
With both of us unemployed and hav-
ing just received notice that our home
was scheduled to go into foreclosure, I
arrived at the end of myself.
Owing more than $100,000 on all of
my handy credit accounts — and all of
them in default — there was no more
credit. No more options. I was out of
hope, with nowhere to turn. It was in
the darkness of fear and despair that I
realized what I'd done to myself, my
husband and my family. Through my
remorse and pain, I turned to God and
made this promise: I would pay back
all of the debt no matter how long it
took or what I had to do, if I could only
keep my family and my home.
For the next 10 years, I did exactly
that. I never worked so hard in my life.
Overnight I turned into a cheapskate —
frugal beyond the legal limit, I'm sure.
I worked every kind of job I could get
my hands on. I developed a payback
plan. I became a giver and a saver even
while deeply in debt. After 10 years
and $88K repaid, I was restless. This
was taking too long. So, as just another
way to
raise funds,
I decided to
try my
hand at
writing a
subscrip-
tion
newsletter
with the
goal to help
others do
what we
were doing. That was in 1992. It wasn't
an overnight success, but almost.
It took another three years to pay back
the entire debt (13 years in all), and in
the process I developed a passion to
learn all I could about personal money
management.
Now I live to help others do the same.
Want to know more? I would be hon-
ored to have you join us online at
Debt-Proof Living
(DebtProofLiving.com).
Mary Hunt is the founder of
www.DebtProofLiving.com and author
of 23 books, including her 2012 re-
lease, "7 Money Rules for Life." You
can email her at mary@everyday-
cheapskate.com, or write to Everyday
Cheapskate, P.O. Box 2099, Cypress,
CA 90630.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
eVeryday cheapskate By Mary hunt
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 23
kids talk aBout God By carey kinsolVinG
El Paso Parks and Recreation
Mini Sports Developmental
Soccer League
Ages 4-7
Who: El Paso Parks and Recreation Department
What: Mini Sports Developmental League (4-5 and 6-7)
(co-ed)
When: Registration (September 3rd – September 21st)
League starts: September 28, 2013 – November 16, 2013
(Games played on Saturdays (9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.)
Where: Recreation Centers listed below:
Armijo Multipurpose
Carolina Nolan Richardson
Don Haskins Pat O’Rourke
Galatzan Pavo Real
Gary Del Palacios San Juan
Leona F. Washington Veterans
Marty Robbins
Fee: $34 per child (Scholarships Available)
Registration: Online at www.elpasotexas.gov/parks or any
Recreation Center
Information: (915) 544-0753
PICTURE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY
Why Is It Important to Be Courteous?
Lewis Copeland tells the story
of a mother who boasted about
the good manners of her little
darling at a dinner party.
"Charlie, my dear, won't you
have some beans?" she said.
"No," was the ill-mannered
reply from the so-called cherub.
"No!" exclaimed the astonished
mother. "No what?"
"No beans," said the child.
You won't hear "no" without a
"thank you" from Gunter, age 7,
because he says: "The only
time you have to be polite is at
the table. It will make the day
better."
Gunter, the dinner table is great
place to start, but you'll find
courtesy is useful in many areas
of life.
"Courtesy is important
so we don't get out of
control," says A.C., 9.
"If you're not polite,
you won't have any
friends," says Hicks,
11. Without considera-
tion for others, "people
will think you're gross"
or that "you look like a
slob," say Jason, 10, and
Taylor, 12.
Courtesy will make your re-
lationships better, says
Kelsey, 9: "That is how peo-
ple will start liking you.
Being kind and loving to
people is how you really
make your friends."
Courtesy can be little things
like opening doors or saying
"thank you" or "you're wel-
come," says Jordan, 11. "People
will be nicer to you and think
better of you."
Continues on page 26
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 24
After School Program Registration
Program is Free
El Paso, Texas - The City of El Paso Parks and Recreation Department starts the 2013-2014 edition
of their After School Program on Monday, September 9, 2013. The free program for ages 6-12 will
be housed at city Recreation Centers and select public schools from school dismissal till 6:00 p.m.
Individuals may register in person at any Recreation Center. All of the public school locations will be
done at the school site only. The Braden Aboud Foundation has been a valued member of the pro-
gram with donations for equipment and supplies.
Location Address Phone No.
Armijo 700 E. 7th St. 544-5436
Carolina 563 N. Carolina St. 594-8934
Chihuahuita 417 Charles St. 533-6909
Don Haskins 7400 High Ridge St. 587-1623
Galatzan 650 Wallenberg St. 581-5182
Gary Del Palacio 3001 Parkwood St. 629-7312
Leona Ford Washington 3400 E. Missouri St. 562-7071
Marty Robbins 11620 Vista Del Sol St. 855-4147
Nolan Richardson 4435 Maxwell Ave. 755-7566
Pat O’Rourke 901 N. Virginia St. 533-1611
Pavo Real 9301 Alameda St. 858-1929
Rae Gilmore 8501 Diana St. 751-4945
San Juan 701 N. Glenwood St. 779-2799
Seville 6700 Sambrano St. 778-6722
Veterans 5301 Salem St. 821-8909
Burleson (EPISD) 4400 Blanco Ave. 544-0753
Coldwell (EPISD) 4101 Altura Ave. 544-0753
Cooley (EPISD) 107 N. Collingsworth St. 544-0753
Crosby (EPISD) 5411 Wren Ave. 544-0753
Douglass (EPISD) 101 S. Eucalyptus 496-8070
Dowell (EPISD) 5249 Bastille Ave. 544-0753
Paul Moreno (EPISD) 2300 San Diego Ave. 544-0753
Roberts (EPISD) 341 Thorn Ave. 544-0753
Rusk (EPISD) 3601 N. Copia St. 544-0753
Stanton (EPISD) 5414 Hondo Pass Dr. 544-0753
Vilas (EPISD) 220 Lawton St. 544-0753
Ascarate (YISD) 7090 Alameda Ave. 544-0753
Del Valle Elem. (YISD) 9251 Escobar Dr. 544-0753
Video GaMe reViews By JeB hauGht
'Saints Row IV' Eschews Realism
DEVELOPER: Volition Inc.
PUBLISHER: Deep Silver
SYSTEM: Sony PlayStation 3
(PC, Xbox 360)
PRICE: $59.99
ESRB RATING: Mature
REVIEW RATING: 4.0 stars
(out of 5)
Let's face it; the "Saints Row"
series started improving the
moment developers quit trying
to compete with the "GTA" se-
ries. Eschewing realism was a
great decision, especially since
it leads to such wild
and wacky game
play! If you thought
the prequel was sur-
real, wait until you
play "Saints Row
IV."
A lot has happened since the
3rd Street Saints retook Still-
water. Most importantly, their
leader has become the Presi-
dent of the United States and
placed his homies in the cabi-
net. When aliens invade Earth,
the POTUS is forced to enter a
Matrix-like pseudo-environ-
ment to eliminate the alien
treat. Sound crazy? You bet it
is!
Players begin their surrealistic
adventure by creating their
president in the most
ad-
vanced character-
builder I've ever seen. It has
way more customization than
is needed, but that's why it's
possible to create just about
anything you can imagine.
Want to play as a purple-
haired, overweight clown wear-
ing a tutu or a Steampunk
gentleman with a top hat? It's
do-able!
The virtual version of Stillwa-
ter is so large that it would feel
overwhelming if not for the
handy map and GPS features. I
also ap-
preciate
how I can
save stolen
cars into my
"memory" in-
stead of driving them to my
hideout. Now all it takes is the
press of button to make one
magically appear.
Oddly enough, the addition of
superpowers to the game al-
most negates the need for vehi-
cles. Why drive around when
you can fly through the air and
run up the side of buildings?
Of course, superpowers do
make the game much more ex-
citing, and nothing beats the
feeling of speed-running into
the thick of battle, sucking ene-
mies into a black hole, and then
casually strolling away.
Continues on next page
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 25
Continued from page 24
Sporting deep customization
and a huge variety of game play
in a completely surrealistic sce-
nario, "Saints Row IV" is a
welcome respite from serious
drama.
'Space Hulk'
DEVELOPER: Full Control
Studios
PUBLISHER: Full Control
SYSTEM: Windows PC, Mac
PRICE: $29.99 Download
ESRB RATING: Mature
REVIEW RATING: 3.5 stars
(out of 5)
"Space Hulk" is a Warhammer
40k offshoot that debuted as a
tabletop board game in 1989
and then became a video game
in 1993. Although this futuristic
turn-based series never became
wildly popular, it still had a
solid fan base. Now the original
game has been remade for com-
puters, and, in my opinion, this
rendition is a bit too faithful.
Just like an elephant, the dis-
graced Blood Angels chapter of
the Space Marines never forget.
In fact, they're still seeking re-
demption for an event six hun-
dred years in the past that
almost wiped them out. That's
why they're sent to investigate
and claim the Sin of Damnation
spacecraft that's been adrift for
hundreds of years, which is
where the game takes place.
Players control one or two
squads of Space Marines
throughout story mode in
twelve different missions that
include: reviving fellow sol-
diers, escorting VIPs, purging
specific areas and slaying
countless Genestealers. It's a
good thing the Space Marines
are heavily armed because Gen-
estealers are nimble creatures
with a penchant for blood.
However, it seems like thick
Terminator armor is no match
for razor-sharp claws.
Space Marines and Genesteal-
ers alternate turns in which they
spend points for everything
from moving to reloading to
using weaponry. All Space
Marines are armed with power-
ful weaponry like heavy bolters
and flamethrowers, and some
can even use magic! On the
other hand ... err ... claw, Gen-
estealers overwhelm their ene-
mies with high numbers and
fast movement.
While the narrow corridors pro-
vide a heightened sense of fore-
boding, poor visuals and odd
close-ups practically ruin the
tension. In addition, a
weapon/character upgrade sys-
tem would be very welcome to
the series. It would also be nice
if the numerous bugs and typos
were fixed ASAP.
"Space Hulk" is fun when en-
gaging in online multiplayer,
but I doubt if the single-player
mode will lure many newcom-
ers to the series.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM.
Video GaMe reViews...
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 26
Continued from page 23
One of the best reasons to be always courteous is "because
of the Golden Rule," says Meredith, 11: "Do unto others as
you would have them do unto you."
The rule itself "represents much more than a common-sense
or self-centered motivation for conduct," says Bible scholar
Robert Guelich. "The primary focus of this saying is on
doing for others rather than on what one will have done in
return."
When Jesus taught the golden rule, it was in the context of
an active relationship with his Father (Matthew 7:12). As
people experience the healing and wholeness of God's
proactive love, they become channels of blessing to their
relatives, friends and even enemies.
"I think courtesy is important because God is very courte-
ous," says Hannah, 10.
"God is love, and love is courteous," adds Tait, 8. Yes, Tait,
the love of God is the basis for courtesy. As a wise man once
said, courtesy is "love in small things."
"Love does not behave rudely," the Apostle Paul wrote in his
beautiful ode to godly love in I Corinthians 13. How many
marriages end in divorce because couples fail to show sim-
ple courtesy to each other? Have you ever thought of putting
the cap on the toothpaste as an act of love?
In this same ode, the Apostle Paul mentioned patience or
long-suffering as another love trait. Rudeness often starts
with impatience, which can escalate into fatal actions. How
many car wrecks are caused by impatience and rudeness?
Brantley, 10, cites the ultimate act of patience and love as
her motivation for being courteous: "God is so gracious that
he sent his son to die for us, so that we can go to heaven. I
want to be as gracious and as courteous as him. He loves us
and is gracious to us every day, but sometimes we don't real-
ize it."
Point to ponder: Love is polite.
Scripture to remember: "Love suffers long and is kind; love
does not envy; love does not parade itself, is not puffed up;
does not behave rudely, does not seek its own, is not pro-
voked, thinks no evil" (I Corinthians 13:4-5).
Question to consider: Do you think of others before you
think of yourself?
Listen to a talking book, download the "Kids Color Me
Bible" for free, watch Kid TV Interviews and travel around
the world by viewing the "Mission Explorers Streaming
Video" at www.KidsTalkAboutGod.org. Bible quotations are
from the New King James Version.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CAREYKINSOLVING
Why Is It Important
to Be Courteous?
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 27
Dog Day
Swimming Event
at Nations Tobin Aquatic Center, 8831 Railroad Drive
September7th and 8th (10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.)
Who: City of El Paso Parks and Recre-
ation Department, Animal Rescue
League, El Paso Humane Society, and
other Dog Adoption Agencies
What: Dog Day Swimming Event
When: September 7th and 8th
(Saturday and Sunday)
Where: Nations Tobin Aquatic Center,
8831 Railroad Drive, El Paso, Texas
The Animal Rescue League will
have dogs available for adop-
tion along with other adop-
tion agencies. The
Drowning Prevention Coali-
tion of El Paso will be on
hand to give tips on water
safety.
The Humane Society will
also be offering micro-chipping for dogs
at $15 per dog while supplies last and
dogs will be available for adoption.
Information Stacy Wright –
(915) 544-3556
SOLVING A FELINE
MYSTERY
Catch cat illness early by watching for your pet’s cues
By Dr. Marty Becker
and Gina Spadafori
Universal Uclick
Cats are good at hiding signs
of illness, and even better at
hiding when they’re ill. That’s
why we cat owners need to
know our cats well, so we can
notice the subtle changes that
may mean something deadly
is brewing.
Learn to know
what’s normal for your cat,
and what routines he likes to
follow. Pay attention to both
physical changes, such as a
gain or loss in weight, and be-
havioral ones, especially in
these areas:
► Changes in eat-
ing habits, especially loss of
appetite: Be aware of how
much your cat eats and make a
mental note of any changes.
More than a day without eat-
ing is reason for concern. In a
multi-cat household of free
feeders, you may have a hard
time figuring who’s eating
what. Make a conscious effort
to see each of your cats at the
food dish daily, and if you
give them canned rations once
a day, feed them separately.
► Changes in litter-
box habits: Many times, a “be-
havior” problem is really a
health problem, and avoiding
the litter box or using it more
often than normal is one of the
classic symptoms. A cat with
an undiagnosed urinary-tract
infection or diabetes, for ex-
ample, may break his normal
patterns of litter-box use. He’s
not “bad” — he’s sick!
► Changes in
drinking habits: Cats drink
more in the summer than in
the winter, but even taking
that into consideration, you
should be aware of changes in
your cat’s drinking habits —
too much or too little.
► Changes in
grooming: If you notice your
cat looking ill-kempt, he likely
has a problem, especially if
he’s normally fastidious.
Grooming is one of the most
important parts of a cat’s rou-
tine, and the cat who isn’t tak-
ing care of his coat isn’t well.
► Changes in
voice: You know what’s nor-
mal for your cat — how often
he pipes up and how he
sounds when he does. If your
cat is noisier than usual or
more quiet or the sounds he
makes are different, something
is going on.
Wellness examina-
tions (once or even twice a
year) are especially important
for cats, but cats are statisti-
cally less likely than dogs to
see a veterinarian at all. That
makes keeping an eye on a
cat’s physical and behavioral
variances even more impor-
tant.
Taking your cat in
for what veterinarians call an
“ADR” or “Ain’t Doing
Right” visit may seem unnec-
essary, but any veterinarian
and many a cat lover will tell
you about cats whose lives
were saved (or about the
money that was saved) be-
cause their owners turned their
observations into a veterinary
visit and caught something be-
fore it got worse.
Cats can be mysteri-
ous creatures, but they typi-
cally share clues to their
secrets. Careful owner obser-
vation and some veterinary
sleuthing has solved many fe-
line health mysteries. Take the
time to be a feline detective,
and you and your cat will both
be better off!
Acat who “lets himself go” may be ill: Routines such as grooming are very im-
portant to cats, and changes should be considered a clue that a pet may be sick.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 29
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 35
Q: I know we're having a heat
wave, but I have to think about
fireplaces now! We are remod-
eling, adding a Great Room
downstairs and a new master
bedroom up. The Great Room
will have a real wood-burning
fireplace, but I don't want to
deal with ashes and soot in our
bedroom.
A: Easy answer: Think gas.
Point-and-shoot technology
makes a gas-fueled fireplace a
dream, pun intended, in a bed-
room. And some of the new
versions are so real-looking
that you can almost hear them
crackle.
There's even newer technology
that includes the crackle: vent-
less fireplaces that burn an al-
cohol gel fuel cartridge. No
smoke, no odor, no soot, and
the fire crackles and dances for
about two hours per cartridge,
promises one manufacturer
(Hearth Cabinet, HearthCabi-
net.com, which claims to make
the only vent-less fireplaces ap-
proved for use in code-crazy
New York City).
Rose Bennett Gilbert is the co-au-
thor of "Manhattan Style"
and six other books on interior de-
sign. COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Décor Score
By Rose Bennett Gilbert
Vent-less Fireplaces
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 36
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 37
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 40
Now Showing
THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY
OF BONES
Open Nationwide 08/21/13
Synopsis In New York City, a seemingly
ordinary teenager named Clary Fray (Lily
Collins) learns that she is descended from
a line of Shadowhunters -- half-angel
warriors who protect humanity from evil
forces. After her mother (Lena Headey)
disappears, Clary joins forces with a group of Shadowhunters and
enters Downworld, an alternate realm filled with demons, vam-
pires and a host of other creatures. Clary and her companions
must find and protect an ancient cup that holds the key to her
mother's future.
INSTRUCTIONS
NOT INCLUDED
Open Limited 08/30/13
Runtime 115 min
MPAA Rating PG-13 for Lan-
guage, Thematic Elements, Sex-
ual Content.
Starring Eugenio Derbez, Jes-
sica Lindsey, Loreto Peralta,
Daniel Raymont, Alessandra
Rosaldo, Hugo Stiglitz, Sammy
Pérez, Arcelia Ramírez, Agustín
Bernal, Karla Souza, Margarita
Wynne
Genre Comedy drama
Synopsis An irresponsible play-
boy (Eugenio Derbez) must
grow up quickly when a former
lover gives him their daughter to raise -- then leaves without a
trace.
RIDDICK
Open 09/06/2013
Runtime 119 min
MPAA Rating R for strong violence, language and some sexual content/nudity.
Starring Vin Diesel,Karl UrbanDave Bautista,Katee Sackhoff,Nolan Gerard
Funk,Bokeem Woodbine,Jordi Molla,Raoul Trujillo,Antoinette Kalaj,Keri Hil-
son,Neil Napier
Genre Action/Adventure, SciFi/Fantasy
Synopsis Having been betrayed and left for dead on a sun-scorched planet,
Riddick must fight for his survival against the deadly alien predators that exist
in this barren land. After activating an emergency beacon Riddick soon finds
himself battling teams of mercenaries from around the galaxy who are deter-
mined to bring him home as their bounty.
THE ULTIMATE LIFE
Open Limited 09/06/13
Runtime 109 min
MPAA Rating PG for A Brief Battle
Scene, Mild Thematic Elements.
Starring Bill Cobbs, Peter Fonda,
Lee Meriwether, Ali Hillis, Logan
Bartholomew, Abigail Mavity,
David Mann, Drew Waters, Brett
Rice, Jack DePew, Elizabeth Ann
Bennett
Genre Drama
Synopsis Despite his best intentions,
a billionaire has trouble making his
beloved girlfriend a priority. He
reads his grandfather's journal in the
hope that it will provide guidance on how to live his life.
CLOSED CIRCUIT
Open 08/28/2013
Runtime 96 min
MPAA Rating R For language and
brief violence.
Starring Eric Bana,Rebecca
Hall,Ciarán Hinds,Jim Broad-
bent,Riz Ahmed,Lee Asquith-
Coe,Santi Scinelli,Kenneth
Cranham,James Doherty
Genre Suspense/Thriller
Synopsis Following a mysterious
explosion in a busy London mar-
ket, the police swoop, a suspect is
detained, and the country prepares for one of the most high-pro-
file trials in British legal history. Two exceptional lawyers with a
romantic history step into a dangerous web of secrets and lies,
and when evidence points to a British Secret Service cover up,
it's not just their reputations, but their lives that are at stake.
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US 3D
Open Nationwide 08/30/13
Runtime 92 min.MPAA Rating PG
Starring One Direction.Genre Docu-
mentary
Synopsis The members of One Direc-
tion discuss their hometown begin-
nings, their appearance on "The X-Factor" and their meteoric rise
to fame.
THE GRANDMASTER
Open Expanded 08/30/13
Runtime 130 min
MPAA Rating PG-13 for Language, Brief
Drug Use, Some Smoking, Violence.
Starring Tony Leung Chiu Wai, Zhang
Ziyi, Chang Chen, Wang Qingxiang,
Zhang Jin, Zhao Benshan, Song-Hye Kyo
Genre Biography, Martial arts, Drama
Synopsis The story of the martial arts
master (Tony Leung Chiu Wai) who
taught the Wing Chun style of kung fu to
Bruce Lee.
GETAWAY
Genre Action, Thriller
Synopsis Though he used to race cars for a
living, Brent Magna (Ethan Hawke) is now
pitted against the clock in the most impor-
tant race of his life; an unseen criminal (Jon
Voight) has kidnapped Brent's wife, and to
get her back, he must follow the man's in-
structions to the letter. Brent commandeers
the ultimate muscle car -- a custom Ford
Shelby GT500 Super Snake -- and, with a
tech-savvy young passenger (Selena Gomez), sets out on a high-
speed chase to rescue his beloved.
BLACKFISH
Runtime 83 min
MPAA Rating PG-13 for Mature The-
matic Elements, Disturbing Violent Im-
ages.
Genre Documentary
Synopsis The story of Tilikum, a captive
killer whale that has taken the lives of
several people, underscores problems
within the sea-park industry, man's rela-
tionship to nature, and how little has been learned about these
highly intelligent mammals.
BLUE JASMINE
Runtime 98 min
MPAA Rating PG-13 for Sexual Con-
tent, Mature Thematic Material, Lan-
guage.
Starring Alec Baldwin, Cate
Blanchett, Louis C.K., Bobby Can-
navale, Andrew Dice Clay, Sally
Hawkins, Peter Sarsgaard, Michael
Stuhlbarg, Tammy Blanchard, Max
Casella, Alden Ehrenreich
Genre Comedy drama
Synopsis After her marriage to a wealthy businessman (Alec Bald-
win) collapses, New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) flees
to San Francisco and the modest apartment of her sister, Ginger
(Sally Hawkins). Although she's in a fragile emotional state and
lacks job skills, Jasmine still manages to voice her disapproval of
Ginger's boyfriend, Chili (Bobby Cannavale). Jasmine begrudg-
ingly takes a job in a dentist's office, while Ginger begins dating a
man (Louis C.K.) who's a step up from Chili.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 41
*BLUE JASMINE (PG-13)12:05 pm | 2:25 pm
| 4:45 pm | 7:10 pm | 9:45 pm
*CLOSED CIRCUIT (R)11:55 am | 2:30 pm |
5:00 pm | 7:30 pm | 10:05 pm
*D-BOX KICK ASS 2 (R)11:45 am | 2:15 pm |
4:45 pm | 7:30 pm | 10:00 pm
*GETAWAY (PG-13)12:30 pm | 2:50 pm |
5:10 pm | 7:30 pm | 9:55 pm
*JOBS (PG-13) 10:50 am | 1:40 pm | 4:30 pm
| 7:40 pm | 10:30 pm
*KICK ASS 2 (R)11:45am | 2:15pm | 4:45 pm
| 7:30 pm | 10:00 pm
*LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER (PG-13)
| 10:45 am | 1:45 pm | 4:40 pm | 7:35 pm |
10:25 pm
NOW YOU SEE ME (PG-13)12:15 pm | 2:45
pm | 5:25 pm | 7:55 pm | 10:25 pm
*PARANOIA (PG-13)5:25 pm | 7:50 pm |
10:15 pm
2D R.I.P.D. (PG-13) 11:10 am | 1:30 pm | 4:00
pm | 7:05 pm | 9:30 pm
THE CONJURING (R)11:00 am | 1:35 pm |
4:20 pm | 7:25 pm | 10:10 pm
*THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS:
CITY OF BONES (PG-13)10:30am |11:30 am
| 1:25 pm | 2:20 pm | 4:10 pm 5:10 pm | 7:20
pm | 8:00 pm | 10:10 pm | 10:50 pm
*2D THE SMURFS 2 (PG)11:45 am | 2:15 pm
| 4:45 pm | 7:15 pm | 9:40 pm
*3D THE SMURFS 2 (PG)12:35 pm | 3:00 pm
*THE ULTIMATE LIFE (PG)11:45 am | 2:25
pm | 4:55 pm | 7:25 pm | 9:55 pm
2D THE WOLVERINE (PG-13)10:45 am |
1:35 pm | 4:30 pm | 7:15 pm | 10:05 pm
*YOU'RE NEXT (R) | 10:35 am | 12:55 pm
| 3:15 pm | 5:35 pm | 7:55 pm | 10:15 pm
EAST POINTE
MOVIES 12
I-10 & Lee Trevino
Schedule good for
Friday September 6th
PREMIERE MONTWOOD 7
Schedule good for 9/6 - 9/12
2D EPIC (PG)11:25 am | 2:05pm | 4:35pm | 7:15 pm
| 9:35 pm
NOW YOU SEE ME (PG-13)11:35 am | 2:15 pm |
4:50 pm | 7:25 pm | 10:00 pm
2D PACIFIC RIM (PG-13)11:45 am | 6:45 pm
3D PACIFIC RIM (PG-13) 4:00 pm | 9:40 pm
THE HEAT(R)11:30a|2:00p|4:30p|7:10 pm | 9:50 pm
THE LONE RANGER (PG-13)11:40 am | 2:50 pm |
6:10 pm | 9:20 pm
WHITE HOUSE DOWN (PG-13) 11:20 am | 2:45 pm
| 6:40 pm | 9:30 pm
2D WORLD WAR Z (PG-13)11:15 am | 4:25 pm |
9:45 pm
3D WORLD WAR Z (PG-13) 1:50 pm | 7:05 pm
2200 N. Yarbrough
Premiere Cinemas
6101 Gateway West S.15
2D EPIC (PG) 11:50a | 2:15p | 7:30p
2D IRON MAN 3 (PG-13) 11:20a | 6:00p
3D IRON MAN 3 (PG-13) 2:50p | 9:05p
2D MAN OF STEEL (PG-13) 12:05p | 6:35p
3D MAN OF STEEL (PG-13) 3:10p | 9:40p
NOW YOU SEE ME (PG-13)
| 11:15a | 1:50p | 4:35p | 7:15p | 10:00p
2D PACIFIC RIM(PG-13)
| 12:30p | 3:25p | 6:20p | 9:30p
3D PACIFIC RIM(PG-13)
| 11:30a | 2:25p | 5:20p | 8:30p
2D THE CROODS (PG) 11:00a | 3:40p
3D THE CROODS (PG) 1:20p | 6:15p
THE HEAT (R) 11:05a | 1:45p | 4:25p | 7:05p |
8:45p | 9:45p
THE LONE RANGER (PG-13) 11:25a | 2:35p |
6:05p | 9:15p
THE PURGE (R) 5:10p | 9:55p
WHITE HOUSE DOWN (PG-13)
| 12:15p | 3:50p | 6:55p | 9:50p
2D WORLD WAR Z (PG-13) 11:10a | 1:55p |
4:30p | 7:10p | 9:50p
3D WORLD WAR Z (PG-13) 11:55a | 2:30p |
5:05p | 7:45p
Schedule good for 9/6 - 9/12
CINEMARK CIELO VISTA
Gateway West Blvd/Cielo Vista Mall
CINEMARK 14 - EL PASO
West side of El Paso at Mesa & I-10
Las Palmas i-10 @ Zaragosa
RiddickR119 Mins
11:20am | 2:30pm |
5:35pm | 8:35pm |
11:30pmDigital Cin-
ema 12:55pm |
4:00pm | 7:00pm |
10:00pm
Instructions Not In-
cludedPG-13115 Mins
Digital Cinema
12:00pm | 1:45pm |
3:30pm | 5:20pm |
7:20pm | 9:00pm |
10:40pm | 11:25pm
One Direction: This
Is UsPG92 Mins
11:50am | 2:20pm |
4:50pm | 7:30pm |
10:05pmDigital Cin-
ema 1:05pm 3:35pm
Lee Daniels' The But-
lerPG-13132 Mins
Digital Cinema
11:15am | 3:00pm |
6:30pm | 9:50pm
We're the Millers
R110 MinsDigital Cin-
ema 11:10am |
1:50pm | 4:40pm |
7:40pm | 10:30pm
The Ultimate Life
PG109 MinsDigital
Cinema 11:05am |
1:55pm | 4:45pm |
7:35pm | 10:25pm
GetawayPG-1389
MinsDigital Cinema
12:25pm | 2:55pm |
5:25pm | 7:55pm |
10:35pm
Closed CircuitR96
MinsDigital Cinema
9:40pm
The Grandmaster
PG-13130 MinsDigital
Cinema 11:10am |
1:50pm | 4:35pm |
7:25pm | 10:10pm
The World's End
R109 MinsDigital Cin-
ema 12:35pm6:20pm
You're NextR94 Mins
Digital Cinema 12:05p
2:40pm | 5:10pm |
7:45pm | 10:15pm
The Mortal Instru-
ments: City of Bones
PG-13130 MinsDigital
Cinema 12:30pm |
3:45p 7:05p 10:20pm
Kick-Ass 2R107 Mins
Digital Cinema
11:25am | 2:10pm |
4:50pm | 7:30pm |
10:15pm
ElysiumR109 Mins
Digital Cinema
12:20pm | 3:50pm |
6:40pm | 9:30pm
PlanesPG92 Mins
2:00pmDigital Cinema
11:30am | 4:30pm |
7:10pm
Percy Jackson: Sea
of MonstersPG106
MinsDigital Cinema
12:10pm | 2:50pm |
5:30pm
2 GunsR109 Mins
Digital Cinema
11:40am | 2:25pm |
5:15p 8:00p 10:45pm
The Conjuring
R111 MinsDigital Cin-
ema 3:25pm |
9:10pm
Grown Ups 2
PG-13100 Mins
Digital Cinema
6:10pm | 8:50pm
Despicable Me 2
PG98 Mins4:10pm |
9:20pmDigital Cinema
11:00a 1:30p 6:50pm
This Is the End
R107 Mins
Digital Cinema
8:10pm | 10:50pm
Schedule good for Friday Sept 6
TINSELTOWN
RiddickR119 Mins9:15am
3:45pm 7:00pm 10:05pm
Digital Cinema 10:15am |
1:30pm | 4:45pm |
8:00pm | 11:00pm
Instructions Not Included
PG-13115 MinsDigital Cin-
ema 10:30am | 1:20pm |
4:15pm 7:10pm 10:20pm
One Direction: This Is Us
PG92 Mins10:10am |
1:00pm | 3:50pm |
6:40pm | 9:30pm
Digital Cinema 11:00am
Lee Daniels' The Butler
PG-13132 MinsDigital Cin-
ema 11:50am | 3:20pm |
6:50pm | 10:10pm
We're the MillersR110
MinsDigital Cinema
10:35am | 1:20pm |
4:40pm 7:50p 10:35pm
Getaway PG-1389 Mins
Digital Cinema 10:40am |
1:25pm | 4:10pm |
6:55pm | 9:40pm
The GrandmasterPG-13
130 MinsDigital Cinema
10:05am | 1:10pm |
4:15p 7:20pm | 10:15pm
The World's End
R109 MinsDigital Cinema
10:20am | 1:15pm |
4:25pm7:30pm | 10:30pm
You're NextR94 Mins
Digital Cinema 9:00pm
The Mortal Instruments:
City of BonesPG-13130
MinsDigital Cinema
2:50pm 6:20pm | 9:50pm
ElysiumR109 Mins
Digital Cinema 9:25am |
12:20pm | 3:25pm |
6:30pm | 9:35pm
PlanesPG92 Mins
9:40am | 3:25pm
Digital Cinema
12:30pm | 6:10pm
Percy Jackson: Sea of
Monsters PG106 Mins
Digital Cinema 10:25am |
1:35pm | 4:35pm
2 Guns R109 Mins
Digital Cinema 10:45am |
1:45pm | 4:50pm |
7:55pm | 10:40pm
This Is the End
R107 MinsDigital Cinema
7:40pm | 10:25pm
Schedule good for Friday Sept 6
RiddickR119 Mins
Digital Cinema10:00am
11:00am | 1:00pm |
2:00pm | 4:00pm |
5:00pm | 7:00pm |
8:00pm | 10:15pm
Instructions Not In-
cludedPG-13115 Mins
Digital Cinema10:20am
1:20pm | 4:20pm |
7:20pm | 10:20pm
One Direction: This Is
Us PG92 Mins10:45am
| 1:45pm | 4:45pm |
7:45pm | 10:45pm
Digital Cinema
1:05pm | 7:05pm
We're the Millers
R110 MinsDigital Cin-
ema 10:30am |
1:30pm | 4:30pm |
7:30pm | 10:30pm
The World's End
R109 MinsDigital Cin-
ema 10:35am |
1:35pm | 4:35pm |
7:35pm | 10:35pm
PlanesPG92 Mins
11:00am | 5:00pm
Digital Cinema
1:15pm | 7:15pm
Percy Jackson: Sea of
MonstersPG106 Mins
2:00pmDigital Cinema
10:15am | 4:15pm |
10:15pm
2 GunsR109 Mins
Digital Cinema10:25am
| 1:25pm | 4:25pm |
7:25pm | 10:25pm
The Spectacular Now
R95 MinsDigital Cin-
ema 10:40am |
1:40pm | 4:40pm |
7:40pm | 10:40pm
BlackfishPG-1383
MinsDigital Cinema
10:05am | 4:05pm |
10:05pm
TurboPG96 Mins
11:10am | 5:10pm
Digital Cinema
1:10pm | 7:10pm
Despicable Me 2
PG98 Mins2:10pm |
8:10pmDigital Cinema
10:10am | 4:10pm |
10:10pm
This Is the End
R107 MinsDigital Cin-
ema 9:00pm
Schedule good for Friday Sept 6
Schedule good for 9/06
1D3D:THIS IS US (PG)11:00 | 1:20 |
4:00 | 7:00 | 9:20
2 GUNS (R)1:35 | 4:10 | 7:15 | 9:50
CONJURING, THE (R)6:30 | 9:15 |
12:00am
DESPICABLE ME 2, 2D (PG)
11:00 | 1:30 | 4:00
ELYSIUM (R)11:00 | 1:40 | 4:20 |
7:15 | 9:55
GETAWAY (PG13)11:15 | 1:45 |
4:15 | 7:00 | 9:30 | 12:00am
INSTRUCTIONS NOT INCLUDED
(PG13)11:00 | 1:45 | 4:30 | 7:15 |
10:00 | 12:15am
KICK-ASS 2 (R)2:40 | 8:30
LEE DANIELS THE BUTLER
(PG13)11:00 | 1:50 | 4:40 | 7:30 |
10:20
MORTAL INSTRUMENTS (PG13)
11:15 | 5:20 | 11:10
PERCY JACKSON:SEA O/MON-
STERS2D (PG)11:00 | 1:40 | 4:20
PLANES 2D (PG)12:25 | 2:50 | 5:15
| 7:40 | 10:05
RIDDICK (R)1:00 | 2:15 | 4:00 | 5:05
| 7:00 | 8:00 | 9:50 | 10:50 | 12:20am
THIS IS THE END, REISSUE (R)
11:30 | 2:10 | 4:50 | 7:30 | 10:10
WERE THE MILLERS (R)
11:15 | 1:55 | 4:35 | 7:15 | 9:55 |
12:00am
WOLVERINE 2D, THE (PG13)
7:00 | 10:00
WORLDS END, THE (R)
11:30 | 2:10 | 4:50 | 7:40 | 10:20
YOURE NEXT (R)11:00 | 1:25 | 4:20
| 7:00 | 9:30 | 12:00am







INSTRUCTIONS NOT INCLUDED (PG13) Fri. 2:20 5:00
7:50 10:20
RIDDICK (R) Fri. 1:15 4:30 4:50 7:15 10:00 10:30
THIS IS THE END (R) Fri. 1:30 PM
GETAWAY (PG13) Fri. 4:10 7:05 9:45
THE GRANDMASTER (PG13) Fri. 1:45 4:40 7:30 10:15
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (PG) Fri. 3:00 7:40
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US IN 3D (PG) Fri. 12:40
5:20 10:05
THE WORLD’S END (R) Fri. 2:00 7:25 9:25
YOU’RE NEXT (R) Fri. 7:00 9:55
THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES
(PG13) Fri. 1:00 4:00
LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (PG13) Fri. 1:55 4:45 7:45
10:25
PLANES (PG) Fri. 12:15 2:25 4:35 7:10
WE’RE THE MILLERS (R) Fri. 2:30 5:05 7:35 10:10
TIMES FOR SEPTEMBER 6 - SEPTEMBER 12
Coming Soon
INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2
Open Nationwide
09/13/13
Runtime 105 min
MPAA Rating PG-13 for
Thematic Elements, Intense
Sequences of Terror/Vio-
lence.
Starring Patrick Wilson,
Rose Byrne, Barbara Her-
shey, Lin Shaye, Ty Simp-
kins, Steve Coulter, Leigh
Whannell, Angus Sampson,
Andrew Astor, Danielle
Bisutti, Hank Harris, Jocelin
Donahue, Lindsay Seim,
Garrett Ryan, Tom Fitz-
patrick
Genre Horror
Synopsis Soon after their showdown with evil spirits that pos-
sessed their son, the Lamberts, Renai (Rose Byrne) and Josh
(Patrick Wilson), are ready for their lives to return to normal.
However, something still is seriously off, especially with Josh,
who - unbeknown to Renai - is possessed too. In order to free
Josh's soul and finally defeat the malevolent forces around them,
Lorraine Lambert (Barbara Hershey) and her ghost-hunting
friends investigate the past to save her family's future.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 42
If you want your upcoming event listed in SPOTLIGHT’S Out & About section, please send all your relevant data
by e-mail to: editorial@spotlightepnews.com
Out & About
Calendar of upcoming events for El Paso/ Southern New Mexico are
from September 5th - 11th, 2013
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NORTHEAST/
CENTRAL
EPCC Summer
Repertory encores
— El Paso Community College
Performers Studi0 hosts encore
performances of two of its hit
summer repertory musicals
Sept. 5-8 at El Paso Trans-
mountain Campus Forum The-
atre, 9570 Gateway North. All
proceeds go toward scholar-
ships for EPCC Performance
Studies Students. Tickets: $15
($10 non-EPCC students, mili-
tary; $7 EPCC students, fac-
ulty, staff, seniors).
Information: 831-5056, 637-
4029 or epcc.edu/theater.
• “Bloody, Bloody, An-
drew Jackson,” is 8 p.m.
Thursday and Friday, Sept. 5-6.
The show is a comedic Wild
West rock musical about the
founding of the Democratic
Party. It redefines Andrew
Jackson, America’s seventh
President, as an emo rock star
and focuses on populism, the
Indian Removal Act, and his re-
lationship with his wife Rachel.
• “Next to Normal” is 8
p.m. Saturday and 2:30 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 7-8. This Tony
Award/Pulitzer Prize winning
rock musical is about a mother
who struggles with worsening
bipolar disorder and the effects
that her illness has on her fam-
ily.
‘The Odd Couple’
— El Paso Playhouse, 2501
Montana, presents the female
version of Neil Simon’s com-
edy classic through Sept. 7. Di-
rected by Darci Georges.
Showtimes are 8 p.m. Friday
and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sun-
day. Tickets: $10 ($8 seniors,
$7 military/students with ID;
$5 students under 18). Informa-
tion: 532-1317, elpasoplay-
house.com.
Crossland Gallery
— The El Paso Art Associa-
tion’s gallery is at 500 W.
Paisano (in the Art Junction of
El Paso). Hours are 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. Tuesday through Friday,
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays. In-
formation: 534-7377 or of-
fice@elpasoartassociation.com.
Showing Sept. 6-21:
Works by Anna
Campbell and Wanda
Richardson in the Bissell
Gallery; Dorothy Morales in
the Cox Gallery and Linda
Buck in the Williams Gallery.
Gala opening is 5 to 8 p.m. Fri-
day, Sept. 6.
Showing Sept. 6-Oct. 4 at the
Lobby Gallery (upstairs): Clay
Self-Portraits and Paintings by
ceramist Judith C. Garcia and
Erica Contreras. Gala opening
is 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6.
‘Dog Day’ swimming
event — City of El Paso Parks
and Recreation Department’s
5th annual dog swim days are
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday, Sept. 7-8, at Nations
Tobin Aquatic Center, 8831
Railroad. Social dogs will be
allowed to enjoy a pool day in-
teracting with other friendly
pets. Cost: $2 per dog (owners
free). Information/pool rules
for pets: Stacy Wright, 544-
3556 or elpasotexas.gov/parks.
Animal Rescue League, Hu-
mane Society and other adop-
tion agencies will have dogs
available for adoption. Humane
Society will also offer micro-
chipping for dogs at $15 per
dog, while supplies last.
Drowning Prevention Coali-
tion of El Paso will give tips on
water safety.
MISSION
VALLEY
Texas Bump and
Shine — Lowrider Maga-
zine hosts the inaugural car
show and music fest at noon
Saturday, Sept. 7, at El Paso
County Coliseum, with ven-
dors, live music and a Lowrider
Magazine-sanctioned car show.
Tickets: $20; free for ages 12
and younger. (Ticketmaster).
Car show registration/informa-
tion: 231-6739.
Main stage performers include
Freestyle Legends, Debbie
Deb, Angel (original Cover
Girl), Lisette Melendez, “Lil
Susie, MC Magic, N2Deep,
Chingo Bling, Rodney O & Joe
Cooley, Carolyn Rodriguez,
Maestros Del Party, DJ Baby
Chino, E-Money, Young Breed,
Dapper Don and Xpensive
Taste.
Serata Lirica III —
Mariko Reider, a long-time El
Paso music teacher, pianist and
vocalist, hosts “An Evening of
Beautiful Music” featuring op-
eratic arias, duets and famous
Japanese melodies at 6 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 7, at the
Chamizal National Memorial,
800 S. San Marcial. Admission
is free. Information: 532-7273.
Guests of honor are Gretel
Suetterlin, cembalo (harpsi-
chord); Anita Steadman, violin;
and Ida Steadman, cello. Fea-
tured artists are Angelo Ferrari,
tenor; Mariko Y. Reider, con-
tralto; Paulina Dominguez, so-
prano; and Dr. Ezequiel Meza,
accompanist. Master of Cere-
mony is Norma Favela.
Jazz at Sunset — El
Paso Community College will
host the free outdoor jazz show
6 to 10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6, at
EPCC’s Valle Verde Campus’s
Americana Language Village,
919 Hunter with performances
by Ruben Gutierrez and Case
Closed, along with the Candice
Reyes Quintet. Opening per-
formance by Jorge Gonzalez
Trio. Bring a blanket or lawn
chair. No alcohol allowed. Re-
freshments will be sold. Infor-
mation: 831-2096
Continues on page 44
♦ Reg|slral|or 0ead||re |s 3epleroer 25, 2013
♦ worer's 0|v|s|or (ages 50-ê9) (ages Z0 ard 0ver)
♦ Ver's 0|v|s|or (ages 50-ê9) (ages Z0 ard 0ver)
♦ 0ouo|e E||r|ral|or Forral




6|ty of E| Paso
Parks and Recreat|on
Hemor|a| 8en|or 6enter
huachas "washers" Tournament

|nformat|on:
Arturo Va|adez
(915} 5ô2-42ô8
- - - - - - - - -
Amy whee|er
(915} 5ô2-42ô8
8:00 a.m.-Thursday, 8eptember 2ô, 2013
at Hemor|a| 8en|or 6enter, 1800 ßyron 8t.

Awards
Medals will be awarded for 1st, 2nd and 3rd Place
in each Male and Female Age Category

Web Site Information
www.elpasotexas.gov/parks

Free Registration - Register Now

SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 43
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 44
Continued from page 42
Cafe Tacvba — The
Mexican rockers perform at 6
p.m. Friday, Sept. 6, at Socorro
Entertainment Center , 11200
Santos Sanchez (off Socorro
Road, 4.5 miles southeast of
Loop 375). Admission is free.
Information: 860-7777 or
speakingrockentertainment.com
EASTSIDE
‘Shake Your Pom
Pom’ run — The 5K run
and kids dash benefiting West
Texas Cheer is 8 a.m. Sunday,
Sept. 8, at Album Park, 3001
Parkwood. Registration: $20
($15 per person for teams of 10
or more). Race day registration
(individuals only): $25. Online
registration at raceadventure-
sunlimited.com.
Packet pick up is noon to 6
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, at Up
and Running, 1475 George Di-
eter, Suite 0, at 7 to 7:45 a.m.
on race day at the start line.
El Paso Sungold
Sweet Adelines —
The chorus will host a recital at
3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 8, at St
Paul’s Methodist Church, 7000
Edgemere. Tickets (available at
the door): $10 ($7 seniors, ages
12-18; free for ages 11 and
younger). Information:
Jeanette, 778-7503, or Toni,
309-8415.
DOWNTOWN/
WESTSIDE
Sunland Art
Gallery — The newly re-
located gallery featuring origi-
nal art, paintings and
photographs, jewelry, prints
and gift items by local artists is
at 5034-D Doniphan, in Placita
Santa Fe (behind Tippi Tea
Room). Hours are 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.
Information: Cil Abeyta, 584-
3117 or 474-0053.
The Grand Reopening is Sat-
urday, Sept. 7, with artist
demos by gallery members
noon to 6 p.m. and reception 6
to 9 p.m. Showing through Sep-
tember is “New Beginnings,”
all new work by gallery mem-
bers.
Woman’s Club
Fall Festival —
Woman’s Club of El Paso, 1400
N. Mesa, will host its annual
bazaar 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Satur-
day, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sun-
day, Sept. 7-8, with a bake sale,
local artists and vendors, a
“Granny’s attic” and dining in
the tea room. Proceeds benefit
the preservation and restoration
of the club, built in 1916. Ad-
mission: $3 at the door; lunches
begin at $9. Information: 532-
6131.
Minerpalooza 2013
— UTEP’s 23rd annual back-
to-school bash and pep rally is
Friday night, Sept. 6, in the
center of UTEP’s campus, cor-
ner of University and
Hawthorne. The family-
friendly event features fall
sports teams, games, informa-
tion booths and appearances by
UTEP athletes, along with live
entertainment and family activ-
ities. Admission is free; food
and some activities sold sepa-
rately. Miner game tickets will
be sold. Information: 747-5670
or minerpalooza/com.
Mobb Deep— The hip-
hop duo’s 20th Anniversary
Tour is 8 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 8,
at Lowbrow Palace, 111 E.
Robinson. with Alchemist, DJ
Nyce1ne. Tickets: $25. Infor-
mation: 356-0966 or thelow-
browpalace.com
Encores and Over-
tures — El Paso Opera
kicks off its 20th anniversary
season with its largest
fundraiser at 6 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 8, at Camino Real Ball-
room, 101 S. El Paso, with
New York City Opera star Lau-
ren Flanigan, Marie Gaiey and
singers from El Paso Opera
Young Artists’ Program. Black
tie optional. Tickets: $125
($300 for two; $1,20 table for
ten). Information: 581-5534 or
epopera.org.
‘Arias, Broadway
and More’ — The adult
students of Dan Wright present
their fall recital at 2 p.m. Sun-
day, Sept. 8, at First Christian
Church, 901 Arizona (entrance
on Ange). Admission is free.
Information: 565-1110.
End of Summer
Dinner and Dance
Bash— Dance for Dreams
presents the dance event 8 p.m.
to 1:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 7,
at Hilton Garden Inn El Paso
Airport, 6650 Gateway East,
with live entertainment by
Latin Band Azucar and dancing
to salsa, merengue, bachata,
cumbia, cha-cha and more.
Semi-formal attire. Tickets: $35
in advance; $45 at the door
(cash only). Active duty mili-
tary is $32 with ID (includes
dinner and non-alcoholic bever-
age). Information: Deliris Mon-
tanez or Dance for Dreams
Foundation (found on Face-
book and active.com) or (704)
293-4307.
Bluetree concert —
The Belfast, Ireland contempo-
rary Christian band performs at
7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, at
Historic Magoffin Hall, 801
Magoffin (at Virginia). The
band is best known for its song
“God of This City,” covered by
Chris Tomlin.
Continues on next page
The El Paso Museum of Art announces
Artists on Art with Stephen Hansen
Thursday, September 12, 2013 @ 5:30 pm • FREE
Artists on Art - located at the
El Paso Museum of Art (EPMA) provides
local artists an opportunity to exhibit one
work of art in any media accompanied by a
30 minute discussion on their work and its
relation to the Museum’s permanent collec-
tion. There are four exhibits per year and
the work is exhibited for a three-month pe-
riod. Artists interested in being featured in
Artists on Art are encouraged to contact
Christian Gerstheimer, Curator at (915)
532-1707 x 20.
Stephen Hansenwas born
in 1950 in Seattle, WA and is a self-taught
artist whose primary media are papier-
mâché, bronze, resin and steel. He lives
and works in Las Cruces, NM. Hansen has
become known for his ironic, figurative
sculptures that subtly critique contempo-
rary, usually middle-class American, cul-
ture using stereotypes and sly humor. With
artwork that is life-like rather than realistic
Hansen’s figures and animals often repre-
sent ideas rather than individuals. Hansen
typically depicts scenes from everyday life
inspired by common phrases twisting
meanings and subjects for humorous ef-
fect. Hansen’s preferred medium, papier-
mâché, further testifies to his unpretentious
subjects and themes, although his work un-
doubtedly includes a worthy intellectual
and aesthetic component.
Hansen is a recipient of the 2009 "Gover-
nor's Award for Excellence in the Arts" in
New Mexico. Hansen has exhibited his
work in group exhibitions throughout the
United States since the 1970s. In 1992 and
2009 retrospectives of Hansen’s work were
shown at Museums in Michigan and New
Mexico respectively. Hansen’s work is in
the following select corporate collections:
AES, Washington DC, Capitol Records,
Los Angeles, Continental Air Transport,
Chicago, Herman Miller Inc., MI, London,
Paris, Toronto, Hughes Aircraft, El Se-
gundo, CA, Jyukano Research Institute,
Toyko, McDonald's Corporation, Oak-
brook, IL, Toronto, SIT Group S.A., Lux-
embourg, Standard Oil of Indiana, Chicago
and Upjohn Pharmaceutical, Kalamazoo,
MI.
Parking is available at the Mills Street,
Camino Real, and Convention Center
garages for a small fee. Free metered park-
ing is available on Main Street on Satur-
days and Sundays.
Image Credit:
Stephen Hansen
The Solar System, 2013
papier-mâché, 24 x 57x 5 in.
Courtesy of the artist
Please join us on Thursday, September 12, 2013 at 5:30 pm at the El Paso Museum of Art for Artists
on Art with Stephen Hansen. This event is free to the public.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 45
F
O
R
IL
L
U
S
T
R
A
T
IO
N
P
U
R
P
O
S
E
S
O
N
L
Y
Continued from page 44
Bluetree concert ...
Their latest album “Live: Mis-
sion Edition” was released ear-
lier this year. Admission is free,
but a donation will be taken for
Bluetree’s work in fighting
human trafficking. RSVPs are
requested: go to
bluetreeelp.eventbrite.com to
register. Presented by Paseo
Christian Church.
Band members will also speak
and lead worship at 10 a.m.
Sunday, Sept. 8, at Paseo, 801
Magoffin.
UTEP Football —
The Miners open their season
hosting the Universitys of New
Mexico Lobos at 6 p.m. Satur-
day, Sept. 7, at Sun Bowl Sta-
dium. Ticket information:
747-5234, 544-8444 or utepath-
letics.com.
This is the first season for new
head football coach Sean Ku-
gler. Coach Mike Price retired
last year after the team finished
with a 3-9 record. Also in his
first season with the Miners is
starting quarterback Jameill
Showers, who transferred from
Texas A&M.
•The Lobos of the Mountain
West Conference finished 4-9
last season. Team leader is sen-
ior running back Kasey Carrier.
Future Engineers
5K — Texas Society of Pro-
fessional Engineers’ fundrais-
ing 5K competitive run and 5K
and 1 mile fun walks are 8 a.m.
Saturday, Sept. 7, at Up and
Running 3233 N. Mesa. Regis-
tration (through Sept. 5): $20
per event ($15 students, mili-
tary and ages 60 and older).
Late registration is $25 for all
events (no discounts). Informa-
tion: 478-5663. Online registra-
tion at
raceadventuresunlimited.com.
Packet pickup is 11 a.m. to 6
p.m. Friday, Sept. 6, at Up and
Running, and 7 to 7:45 a.m. on
race day.
T-shirts for first 200 registered
participants; refreshments at
the finish line. Proceeds benefit
El Paso Chapter UTEP Engi-
neering Endowment Scholar-
ship Fund.
Alfresco! Fridays
— The 11th season of free out-
door concerts continues at 6
p.m. Friday, Sept. 6 ,with
Brown Betty (classic
rock) at Arts Festival Plaza (be-
tween El Paso Museum of Art
and Plaza Theatre). Presented
by the El Paso Convention and
Performing Arts Centers and
the El Paso Convention and
Visitors Bureau. No outside
food or beverages, or pets al-
lowed. Information: 534-0665
or alfrescofridays.com.
SOUTHERN
NEW MExICO
Elephant Days — The
City of Elephant Butte’s annual
celebration is Sept. 6-8 at 204
Warm Springs Dr. Live music,
food, vendors and a car and
motorcycle show. This year’s
theme for the City of Elephant
Butte’s celebration is “Elephant
Days Adventures.” Admission
is free. Information: (575) 744-
4892 or
cityofelephantbutte.com.
Arts crafts, food and music are
4 to 9 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. to 9
p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sunday.
Saturday events include a Car
and Motorcycle Show 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. at Elephant Butte Inn,
401 Hwy 195. The annual Ele-
phant Days parade at 10 a.m.;
rock crawl demonstrations and
FMX FreeStyle Motocross are
11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and a hot air
balloon glow is at dusk.
Sunday’s events include the
Balloon Regatta at 7 a.m. at
Elephant Butte State Park; live
music by “On Call” 10 a.m. to
2 p.m.; and Freestyle FMX mo-
tocross is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Elephant Butte
Balloon Regatta —
The 33rd annual regatta is Sat-
urday and Sunday, Sept. 7-8 at
Lion’s Beach, Elephant Butte
Lake State Park. Events include
competitions, mass ascension
of around 50 hot-air balloons,
vendors, arts and crafts, food,
music and more. Admission: $5
per car. Information: (575) 821-
8558 or ebbr.org.
The relay event includes a
chase boat for each balloon.
The skipper carries a drop
marker (baton) onto the lake.
The balloonists then do a water
landing, known as a “Splash
and Dash,” receiving the baton
and carrying it to the desig-
nated drop area. Awards follow
for both the winning pilots and
skippers.
Taste of Downtown
Silver City — The an-
nual event featuring a “walk-
about tour” of 20 area
restaurants, cafes and coffee-
houses is 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 7, in downtown Silver
City. The event features food
samples from various menu
items from different restaurants
and shops, vendors and more.
Cost: $20; available at Yankie
Creek Coffee House; The Curi-
ous Kumquat, Alotta Gelato,
Silver City Visitor Center and
Am-Bank. Information: (575)
534-9005 or silvercitymain-
street.com.
Also Downtown, Paula
Geisler will create “Ghost Mu-
rals” dusk to 9 p.m. outside 415
N. Bullard.
St. Genevieve’s Fi-
esta — The Las Cruces
church’s annual fiesta celebrat-
ing the church community’s
154th year, is 11 a.m. to 10
p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 8
p.m. Sunday, Sept. 7-8, at St.
Genevieve’s Parish Hall, 1025
E. Las Cruces, with live enter-
tainment by Mariachi Vocalist
Ramiro and Cindy and Elena
Naranjo, Ballet Folklorico, and
more, gorditas, hamburgers,
desserts, drinks, snacks, chil-
dren activities, arts & crafts,
Chinese and silent auctions,
raffles and more. Admission is
free. Information: (575) 524-
9649 or stgen.info.
A dance is Saturday evening
with music by Lencho y los
Correcaminos.
Mass is 11 a.m. Sunday, fol-
lowed by the procession to the
fiesta.
Huachas tournament is 2 p.m.
Sunday; registration begins at 1
p.m. Prizes awarded to first and
second place. Entry cost: $20
per team ($10 individual entry).
St. Anne’s Fiesta —
St. Anne’s Parish host its an-
nual fiesta and barbeque 11
a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 8,
in the Courthouse Park, 700 S.
Silver, in Deming, N.M. Infor-
mation: (575) 546-3343 or 1-
800-848-4955.
‘Greater Tuna’ — No
Strings Theatre Company
opens its season with the comic
favorite by Jaston Williams, Ed
Howard and Joe Searsthrough
Sept. 15 at the Black Box The-
atre, 430 N. Downtown Mall in
Las Cruces. Directed by Ceil
Herman. Tickets: $12 ($10 stu-
dents and seniors over 65). In-
formation/reservations: (575)
523-1223 or no-strings.org.
This send-up of small town
morals and more features a col-
orful cast of characters inhabit-
ing Tuna, Texas, the state’s
third-smallest town.
“Movie under the Stars” with
El Paso Parks and Recreation
Who: City of El Paso Parks and Recreation Department
What: Movie “Here Comes the Boom”
When: September 7, 2013
Preview activities begin at 5:30 p.m. (Movie at dusk)
Where: Eastwood Park, 3001 Parkwood St.
El Paso, Texas – The City of El Paso Parks and Recreation Department will host
a free showing of the movie “Here Comes the Boom” at dusk on Saturday, Sep-
tember 7, 2013 at Eastwood Park, 3001 Parkwood St.
The free event is being sponsored by the Navy Federal Credit Union with
the movie comedy starring Kevin James and Salma Hayek being shown on a 45
ft. screen. Bring your own chairs and enjoy the nighttime skies and a great family
atmosphere. Information – Julian Tarango – (915) 544-0753.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 46
Dj Spotlight | BARE
For Los Angeles bassline
technician BARE, aka
Sean Rodela, The BARE
sound is a product of
deep roots in rock, west
coast hip-hop (as part of
the Vital Mindz collective)
and aggressive drum ‘n’
bass (as past alias Re-
born). These influences,
combined with ultra crisp
drum programming, slick
melodies and mind alter-
ing bass modulation,
spawn face melting dub-
step anthems that practi-
cally rewind themselves.
“I’d have to say that the
love of making something
from nothing inspires me
to make music,” BARE
says. “There is no better
feeling than when you
see people go insane to
something you created
from scratch!”’ BARE’s stu-
dio output is astounding
to even the most prolific
producers – his uncanny
ability to crank out top
quality tracks on an al-
most weekly basis leaves
his fans with plenty to sink
their teeth into.
The madness doesn’t
end there. A monster be-
hind the decks, BARE’s
high energy, “all killer no
filler ” DJ performances
have earned him a repu-
tation as a tough act to
follow. He’s developed a
particularly rabid fan base
–anyone who’s experi-
enced a BARE set (and
lived to talk about it) will
tell you he’s a DJ who ab-
solutely loves what he
does. BARE is never afraid
to engage his crowd – he
tends to be as active on
the mic as he is on the
decks, keeping the crowd
locked and constantly
coaxing them to go as
mental as possibly.
There is no question BARE
has clawed his way into
the ranks of the bass
music elite - and he’s not
going anywhere. If you
don’t know, time to get to
know…
Catch BARE at TRAPFEST
America’s Premier Trap
and Bass Music Tour
Saturday, September 28th
Union Plaza Club District
www.TRAPFEST.com
Brought to you by: J&K
Present and CrowdSurf
Concerts Ticket info at:
facebook.com/JandKPre-
sent
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 47
Nightlife calendar
Music Releases
September 8th
Mobb Deep @ Lowbrow Palace
September 28th
TrapFest Blockparty @Union Plaza
Club District
September 28th
Axel Boman @Pasha
Oct 4th
Jimmy Edgar @ Lowbrow Palace
Nov 9th
Morgan Page@ Buchanans events
center
Nov 11th
Baauer @ Tricky Falls
Keith Urban - Fuse
Sheryl Crow - Feels like Home
Arctic Monkeys - AM
Gloria Estefan - The Standards
Janelle Monae- The Electric Lady
Kaskade - Atmosphere
Goldfrapp - Tale of Us
The Weeknd - Kiss Land
Newsboys - Restart
Ministry - From Beer to Eternity
Madonna - MDNA World Tour
The Clash - Soundsystem
September 10th
LADY ANTEBELLUM
PAN AMERICAN CENTER - MARCH 25, 2014
Tickets On Sale Beginning Friday, November 15 at 10 AM
LADY ANTEBELLUM EXTENDS HEADLINING TAKE ME
DOWNTOWN TOUR INTO 2014
WITH ANNOUNCEMENT OF ADDITIONAL NORTH AMERICAN
TOUR DATES
Friends Kip Moore and Kacey Musgraves Re-Enlist
for the Tour’s 2nd Leg
Nashville, TN – August 27, 2013 – Seven-time GRAMMY award-winning trio Lady Ante-
bellum has extended their headlining TAKE ME DOWNTOWN TOUR with 40 new dates
scheduled for 2014. Previously announced guests for the 2013 run, Kip Moore and
Kacey Musgraves, will also continue with the group for the second leg of the tour that
begins Jan. 9 in Charleston, WV and runs through April.
Lady A recently announced their 50-plus city North American TAKE ME DOWNTOWN
TOUR, which will open Nov. 8 in Southaven, MS. First tour dates begin to go on sale
Sept. 13. Fans can visit www.ladyantebellum.com for the most updated on-sale informa-
tion for all tour dates and www.cidentertainment.com/ladyantebellum for VIP opportuni-
ties.
ADDITIONAL TOUR NOTES: The tour will make a stop in Roanoke, VA at Roanoke
Civic Center on Thursday, December 12, 2013. Tickets go on sale September 13.
Cincinnati, OH, previously scheduled on December 12, moves to Tuesday, January 14,
2014.
Last year, Lady A hosted over one million fans across the globe in 11 countries on their
first headlining world tour, which earned them Billboard Touring’s “Breakthrough Award,”
CMA’s “International Artists Achievement Award” and will accept the “Jim Reeves Inter-
national Award” at this fall’s ACM Honors. For updates on tour dates and ticket info, visit
www.ladyantebellum.com.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 48
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013
IT’S GOOD FOR YOUR GAME
By T.J. TOMASI
GOLF INSIDER
Anything but
short
BIRDIES AND BOGEYS
Wrists are set for spin
One of your jobs during the downswing is to pre-
serve the cup or bend in your trail wrist. The re-
tention of this cup provides two important
benefits: (1) It lags the shaft behind the hands for
power, and (2) it stabilizes the clubface through
impact.
The lead wrist also must be set in the desired po-
sition and kept that way through impact. By seal-
ing your wrists, the small muscles of your hands
and arms stay calm. They have already done their
job by forming the levers necessary for power
during the backswing. Now it is up to your friend
momentum to open up the levers so your power
is dumped into the ball.
Always remember that under pressure, small
muscles choke while big muscles stay under con-
trol, so your goal is to build a swing in which
your arms and wrists simply respond rather than
lead.
All the movements that are going on in your
body as you swing cause an enormous amount of
kinesthetic clutter, interference that makes it hard
to track your hands — where exactly are they
and what are they doing? With more than 600
muscles, 207 bones and billions of brain nerves,
your ability to focus on accomplishing a task in
the context of these competing demands is se-
verely decreased — unless you practice.
Thus you must train yourself specifically to iden-
tify the position of your wrists. Here is the best
drill I know to train your wrists to respond to the
forces of momentum, one that has worked won-
ders for those who persevere. It trains you to
track your lead wrist wherever it goes.
There are three positions of your lead wrist that
you need to program in for the downswing: (1)
cupped for a fade, (2) bowed for a draw and (3)
square for straight. This is for golfers whose
setup is correct. Practice using a series of three-
ball sets where you start the downswing by cup-
ping the wrist for the first ball, bowing it for the
second ball, and somewhere in between for the
third.
The idea is not to be concerned with accuracy,
but simply to create the spin on call. Learn to
control spin first and accuracy will follow.
Insider Takeaway: Practice hard until you
get good control of your wrists because this is the
gateway to quiet golf that you will need as we go
forward.
Note how this player’s right wrist is still cupped
just before impact. From this position, his swing
is quiet — no manipulation needed — because
all he has to do is keep rotating his body.
Dustin Johnson bows his left wrist at the top of
his swing to produce his predominant shot shape
— a draw.
Put your weight forward
DRILLS FOR SKILLS
There are not many non-negotiables in
the golf swing, i.e., swing mechanics dic-
tated by physics and biomechanics, but
being on your front hip when you strike
the golf ball is one of them. Players who
hang on their trail side during the down-
swing can make contact with the ball, but
they can’t win the game of probabilities
swing after swing.
To practice hitting from your lead hip,
take your normal setup with a short iron,
then drop your back foot back and bal-
ance on your toe with all your weight on
your front leg. Take a few practice
swings, keeping your weight forward,
then make your real swing, hitting down
and through.
Hit three shots using the drill techniques,
then three without it until you’ve got it. Taking practice swings with all my weight on my front leg
gives me the feel of hitting from my front side.
Strength is at the core
Q: I’m 68 years old and have lost at least 50 yards off my
tee ball in the last few years. I don’t exercise much and my
job involves a lot of sitting (I’m an accountant). Any ideas?
— R.B.
A: I’m going to bet that your problem is that the muscles in
your pelvis are out of shape from so many years of sitting.
Studies confirm common sense: Inactivity leads to muscle at-
rophy. But how soon this begins is counterintuitive — after
only three days of disuse, the disintegration starts.
Since the mid-section of your body must be in good working
order for you to create distance, I suggest the following exer-
cise for flexibility, strength and stability. But as always, con-
sult your physician before starting a new exercise program.
Lie on your back and cross your right ankle over your left
knee. Then interlock your hands behind the thigh of your left
knee. Now with your head resting on the floor, pull your left
knee up toward your chest until you can feel a stretch in your
right hip. Do this in a controlled manner. Your goal is to do
this five times in each direction, holding each stretch for 20 to
25 seconds.
And don’t sit for more than an hour at a time. Stand up and
do some knee bends or walk down some stairs. In other
words, move every 60 minutes.
(To Ask the Pro a question about golf, email him at:
pblion@aol.com.)
ASK THE PRO
On the last hole, an impossible putt
from off the green stood in the way
of a miraculous comeback. Five
holes earlier, his body let him down
as a bad back took him to his knees
— literally. But now the stage was
set for another Tiger Woods miracle
— the kind he pulled off with amaz-
ing regularity a decade ago.
Remember the chip in from an im-
possible spot behind the 16th green
to win the 2005 Masters? The ball
teetered on the lip so you could see
the Nike swoosh and with Verne
Lunquist shouting, “In your life,
have you seen anything like that!” it
fell in.
So I fully expected his 25-foot putt
from off the green to go in, and it
was dead on line and breaking into
the center of the cup. Then, almost as
if it remembered that this was 2013,
not 2005, the ball did the unthink-
able: It petered out an inch away.
Short is not an option; short is no
chance. Long, perhaps, too hard, a
pull or a push, but never short — not
Tiger. In your life, did you ever think
you’d see Tiger short?
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 50
DON’T MISS IT
The Golf Necktie loops
around your neck and is
held in place with a foot
plate under your back
foot. Make a few adjust-
ments for length, and
you’re ready to go. Dur-
ing your backswing,
keeping a light, steady
pressure against the
Necktie will give you the
feel of staying down,
promoting better ball
striking and preserving
your spine angle.
I don’t recommend you
use this for full swings,
only for your short
game. Find it at
www.dwquailgolf.com
for $22.
Keep a level head
ABOUT THE WRITER
Dr. T.J. Tomasi
is a teaching
professional in
Port St. Lucie,
Fla. Visit
hiswebsite at
tomasigolf.com.
A good
8 feet
What announcers say when
they don’t know the exact dis-
tance of a putt, but it looks a
bit longer than the rounded
number, such as 8 or 4 or 2.
Actually, there’s nothing good
about an 8-foot putt under
pressure. The tour success rate
is just 50 percent. When Justin
Rose missed a putt to tie
Adam Scott on the last hole of
The Barclays, an announcer
said, “It’s a good 4 feet,” but it
turned out to be a very bad 4
feet 11 inches and a miss that
cost him a playoff.
GOLF SPOKEN HERE
“I just think I
look a little
better in orange
than him, so I
just wanted to
prove it today.”
— Jonas Blix, who dressed in
orange for the final round of
the Barclays with his buddy
Ricky Fowler. It was like watch-
ing parking cones play golf.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 51
NEXT
UP...
SPRINT CUP
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS NATIONWIDE SERIES
Race: Federated Auto Parts 400
Where: Richmond International Raceway
When: Saturday, 7:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: ABC
2012 Winner: Clint Bowyer (right)
Race: Virginia 529 College Savings 250
Where: Richmond International Raceway
When: Friday, 7:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN2
2012 Winner: Kevin Harvick
Race: Fan Appreciation 200
Where: Iowa Speedway
When: Sunday, 2 p.m. (ET)
TV: Fox Sports 1
2012 Winner: Ryan Blaney
NOTEBOOK
Chase contenders: Some rise to the top, some have disappointing
runs, at Atlanta Motor Speedway
As often is the case since NASCAR in-
stituted the Chase for the Sprint Cup,
when it comes to crunch time, the
cream rises to the top.
The finishing order of Sun-
day night’s AdvoCare 500 at Atlanta
Motor Speedway, the next-to-last race
before the start of the championship-
deciding, 10-race Chase, found eight
Chase contenders in the top 10.
Kyle Busch, who seized the
lead with a strong restart with 33 laps
to go, scored his fourth win of the sea-
son, while Joey Logano continued his
two-month hot streak with a runner-up
run that saw him come from behind
both early and late in the 500-mile race.
Since finishing 40th at New
Hampshire Motor Speedway on July
14, Logano hasn’t finished worse than
eighth and has risen from 18th in the
points standings to eighth.
He said that assuming he
holds on to his Chase spot through Sat-
urday night’s race at Richmond, he
considers himself one of the favorites
to take the title.
“I feel like, with three
straight top-fives right now, we have a
really good shot at it,” Logano said.
“This team is super strong, and it looks
like we’re hitting our stride at the right
time, right here.”
Martin Truex Jr. finished
third despite severe pain from a broken
wrist suffered the week before at Bris-
tol Motor Speedway, while fellow
Chase contenders Kurt Busch and Ryan
Newman completed the top five.
Jeff Gordon was sixth, Dale
Earnhardt Jr. eighth and Kevin Harvick
ninth, with only seventh-finishing Juan
Pablo Montoya and 10th-place Brian
Vickers joining the Chasers in the top
10 at Atlanta.
Kyle Busch secured his spot
in the Chase, joining Jimmie Johnson,
Clint Bowyer, Kevin Harvick, Carl Ed-
wards and Matt Kenseth. He said that
just like his win at Atlanta, winning his
first Sprint Cup championship will be
an uphill climb. But he’s encouraged
by his team’s rebound from a bad start
to win the AdvoCare 500 and cruise
into the Chase just a year after he
missed the cut for the championship
run.
“What I’m most proud of
[from Atlanta] is not necessarily what I
did, but just what these [crew] guys
were able to do,” he said. “It all comes
full circle sometimes, but we were in a
whole different situation 365 days ago
and not being able to make the Chase,
and [Sunday] was a night where we
needed to prove to ourselves that we’re
championship contenders.”
Three drivers who entered
Atlanta with their Chase berths secure
had disappointing runs, as Jimmie
Johnson was involved in a pit road in-
cident on his first stop and struggled to
a 28th-place finish, which followed fin-
ishes of 36th at Bristol and 40th at
Michigan. Clint Bowyer blew an en-
gine while leading and finished 39th,
and Carl Edwards, who led 68 laps in
the early going, faded to 18th at the
end.
Edwards said that contact
with Gordon doomed his chances of
winning at Atlanta, where he got his
first Cup win. He and Gordon dis-
cussed the incident after the race but
didn’t come to any agreement about
what happened.
“[Gordon] wasn’t very happy
with our conversation, but at the end of
the day, I feel like he was the aggres-
sor,” Edwards said. “The bigger picture
for us is we had a pretty bad night.”
Continues on page 56
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Kyle Busch in Victory Lane after winning the Sprint Cup AdvoCare 500 at Atlanta Motor Speedway.
A year after domi-
nating the 2012 Nationwide
Series race at Atlanta Motor
Speedway, leading 157 of 195
laps only to lose to Ricky
Stenhouse Jr. on the last lap,
Kevin Harvick rolled to a rela-
tively easy win in Saturday’s
Great Clips/Grit Chips 300.
Harvick dominated
the last half of the race, lead-
ing 132 laps, and held off
Kyle Busch in the closing laps
to secure his first Nationwide
victory of the season, the
40th of his career and his
second at AMS.
Busch was the run-
ner-up ahead of Sam Hornish
Jr., Kasey Kahne and Kyle
Larson.
Hornish’s finish al-
lowed him to push his points
lead from six to 10 over sec-
ond-place Austin Dillon, who
finished eighth at Atlanta.
Kevin Harvick makes
up for 2012 loss with
easy win in Nation-
wide race at Atlanta
Motor Speedway
Kevin Harvick takes the check-
ered flag in the Nationwide
Series race at AMS.
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 52
By Christopher A. Randazzo
Double Act! – Hyundai’s all-new Santa Fe
now offered in 2 versions
When the Hyundai Santa Fe
was launched over a decade
ago, it was Hyundai’s first and
only sport-utility vehicle. Now
entering its third iteration, the
Santa Fe is taking on dual roles.
As the Santa Fe Sport, it takes
on other crossover vehicles like
the Chevy Equinox, Ford Es-
cape and Honda CR-V – and
does a very good job. Then, as
the larger Santa Fe, it replaces
the outgoing Hyundai Veracruz.
Don’t remember the Veracruz?
No worries - most don’t. It was
Hyundai’s answer to those that
felt that the Santa Fe at the time
was too small. The Veracruz of-
fered three rows of seats and
nice amount of luxury – all of
which is now featured in the
Santa Fe.
Recently I had an opportunity
to spend a week’s time in both
a Santa Fe Sport and a Santa
Fe, and in what is becoming a
reoccurring theme, the
Hyundais impressed me.
Santa Fe Sport
The five-passenger Sport ver-
sion is the smaller of the two
and features a nice, chiseled
body that follows Hyundai’s
“fluidic sculpture” theme. It’s
handsome and rivals the Ford
Escape as being the most at-
tractive small SUV on the road
today. I’m not sure who is de-
signing vehicles at Hyundai
these days, but they sure do de-
serve a nice raise.
Inside the Santa Fe Sport is an
interior that is spacious and
very comfortable, and even lux-
urious. Features like a sunroof,
Infinity sound system, dual cli-
mate control, heated seats and a
leather interior are all available.
Occupants sit in a very upright
position, making them feel high
above the road – one of the
main reasons why people like
SUVs. Living up to its name,
the Sport can handle 35.4 cubic
feet of cargo behind the seats.
Fold the seats down flat and
that number jumps to 71.5 –
right in line with the CR-V and
RAV4.
The base engine in the Sport is
a 2.4 liter four-cylinder that
makes 190hp. It does fine, but
opt for the 2.0T trim level and
the Sport is fitted with a 2.0 tur-
bocharged four that increases
output to 264 hp. Fuel economy
drops slightly from 21/29 to
19/24, but the extra power is
worth it. Both motors use a six-
speed automatic transmission
and the Sport can be had in ei-
ther front-wheel drive or all-
wheel drive.
Santa Fe
So you need more passenger
room? That’s where the Santa
Fe, minus the Sport label,
comes in. With a longer wheel-
base, the Santa Fe enhances
second-row comfort with more
legroom and offers competitive
third-row accommodations.
Styling wise, the larger Santa
Fe gets a different D-pillar
treatment along with larger
wheels and dual exhaust tips.
Those exhaust tips lead up to
the sole engine available in the
Santa Fe – a 3.3 liter V6. Mak-
ing 290 hp and 252 lb-ft of
torque with a six-speed auto-
matic, it is able to achieve 18
mpg in town and 24 mpg on the
highway.CONT/NEXT PAGE
Allmendinger to
return to Sprint Cup
full-time in 2014
A.J. Allmendinger, whose racing career appeared
to be in great jeopardy when he failed a drug test in July
2012 and lost his ride with Penske Racing, will return to the
Sprint Cup circuit full-time next season as driver of the No.
47 Toyota, the same car he’s been driving on a limited
basis this season.
He said during a press conference at Atlanta that
the one-car JTG-Daugherty Racing team suits him fine.
“Everybody’s got such good family values,” he
said. “It’s been great for me to be a part of the race team so
far. It’s a good, little race team ... I feel like we can really
build this race team and make it stronger.”
Allmendinger has made four starts already in the
car this season, with a best finish of 10th at Watkins Glen.
The hiring of Allmendinger means that the car’s
longtime driver, Bobby Labonte, will be looking for a new
ride in the future. He was set to drive the No. 51 Phoenix
Racing Chevrolet this weekend at AMS, but broke three
ribs in a bicycling accident last week. He was set to share
the No. 47 with Allmendinger in the remaining races this
year, but whether he’ll return to the car is uncertain.
Allmendinger said he won’t be a part of pushing
Labonte out of the car.
“That’s not my decision, and I’m not going to push
for that either,” he said.
A.J. Allmendinger
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 53
1. Jimmie Johnson, 837
2. Clint Bowyer, 809
3. Kevin Harvick, 795
4. Carl Edwards, 795
5. Kyle Busch, 786
6. Matt Kenseth, 768
7. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 750
8. Joey Logano, 729
9. Greg Biffle, 727
10. Kurt Busch, 719
Continued from page 52
My time with the Santa Fe
Sport was all intown driving
and running errands. I really
fell for the 2.0 turbo engine as
it delivered plenty of smooth
power comparable to a V6 but
I still manage to get more than
20mpg out of it. With its
smaller footprint, the Santa Fe
Sport was perfect for stop and
go driving and as a daily com-
muter.
A few weeks later I was driv-
ing all around the state of
Texas in the larger Santa Fe
along with three passengers.
While we didn’t use the third
row seats, there was plenty of
room for luggage, ice chests,
and everything else that goes
along on a family road trip.
The V6 really shined on the
open highway where it could
pass slower traffic with ease or
simply cruise along effort-
lessly, delivering a smooth,
quiet ride.
As a family hauler, the Santa
Fe – either one - is really hard
to beat. If you can get by with
the Sport, its smaller size and
more fuel-efficient engines
make it more affordable. But if
seating capacity is a priority,
the larger Santa Fe fits the bill.
Either way, Hyundai has done
it again by offering impressive
vehicles that are making the
competition cringe.
Santa Fe...
Laps led by Denny
Hamlin in the past 17
Sprint Cup races at
Richmond International Raceway, tops
among all drivers.
Laps led at Richmond by Joey
Logano (seven career Cup starts)
and Brad Keselowski (eight Cup
starts), the fewest of any contenders for the
Chase for the Sprint Cup.
Major NASCAR victories for
Toyota with Kyle Busch’s win
in the AdvoCare 500 at At-
lanta Motor Speedway.
Points positions lost at Atlanta Motor
Speedway by Brad Keselowski and
Kasey Kahne, the most of any
Chase contenders.
1,390
0
250
4
By The Numbers:
2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport
AWD 2.0T / Limited AWD
Base Price: $29,450 / $34,850.00
Price as Tested: $35,925 / $38,730.00
Layout: front-engine - all-wheel drive
Engine: 2.0 turbo four-cylinder / 3.3 liter V6
Transmission: six-speed automatic
Horsepower: 264 / 290 hp
Torque: 269 / 252 ft-lbs
EPA Fuel Economy:19, 24 / 18, 24 (city, highway mpg)
[Visit me at www.carsbycar.blogspot.com or email me at
autocran@gmail.com]
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 54
DIABLO SS GONZALEZ NAMED
ALL-STAR
EL PASO, TX – When El
Paso’s shortstop gets on
base, he is dangerous. And
Gonzalez gets on base a lot.
El Paso Diablo, Maikol Gon-
zalez, was named the Amer-
ican Association’s All-Star
SS for 2013. The Venezuela
native, joined El Paso in
2011, and has been the only
player to remain on the ros-
ter since. This year alone,
Gonzalez was named
league Hitter of the Week
twice, and was awarded
MVP during Sunday’s last
Diablo home game at Cohen
Stadium.
The former Division II All-
American ranks fifth in the
American Association with a
.341 batting average, which
has helped Gonzalez steal a
league-best 46 bases in
2013. Add in Gonzalez’s
nine triples, which rate him
third in the league, and you
have a formidable leadoff
hitter and the American As-
sociation’s top shortstop. In
his first two seasons in the
Diablo uniform, he posted a
combined batting average of
.332, with 5 home runs, and
78 runs batted in, as a short-
stop from 2011 to 2012.
“We are extremely proud of
Maikol for being named to
the American Association
All-Star Team. To those
around him on a daily basis,
this award comes as no sur-
prise. Maikol exemplifies
what it means to be a pro-
fessional both on and off the
field,” said Shawn Suarez,
Diablo Director of Baseball
Operations.
Ganassi betting on Kyle Larson’s talent over
his seat time in appointing him driver of No. 42
Chevrolet in 2014
Sprint Cup team owner Chip
Ganassi has a track record of
taking chances when he hires
race drivers, and that was the
case again as he’s picked the
relatively inexperienced Kyle
Larson as the new driver of his
No. 42 Chevrolet beginning
next year.
In choosing Larson, a
21-year-old racer who has just
24 Nationwide Series career
starts and six more in the
Camping World Truck Series,
Ganassi is betting that the
youngster’s immense talent will
overcome his lack of seat time
in vehicles similar to the ones
he’ll drive on the Sprint Cup
circuit. Larson has a win and a
second-place finish in Trucks
this season and six top-five fin-
ishes in the Nationwide Series,
but he’s a regular winner on
short-track circuits.
And in teaming up
with Ganassi, Larson, who has
been under contract with the
veteran team owner since last
year, also is gambling that
Ganassi, who hasn’t won a Cup
race since 2010, can deliver
him a car capable of continuing
his upward career climb.
Fellow racer Ryan
Newman said that while Larson
is short on NASCAR starts, his
experience in sprint cars and
other forms of motorsports has
him prepared to take over the
car now driven by Juan Pablo
Montoya.
“I think Kyle has def-
initely proven across the board
he can drive absolutely any-
thing — anywhere, anytime,”
Continues on page 56
Chip Ganassi (right) announces the appointment of Kyle Larson as the new driver of the No. 42 Sprint
Cup Chevrolet in 2014.
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 55
Chase Elliott becomes youngest winner in Truck Series history with
victory on road course at CTMP
Chase Elliott, the 17-year-old son of
Sprint Cup veteran Bill Elliott, scored
a dramatic — and controversial — vic-
tory in Sunday’s Camping World
Truck Series race on the road course at
Canadian Tire Motorsport Park in
Bowmanville, Ontario.
Elliott, who became the youngest
driver ever to win a major NASCAR
race, grabbed the lead just yards from
the finish line after contact with race
leader Ty Dillon — contact that sent
Dillon crashing into the retaining bar-
rier.
Elliott motored away to
score his first Truck win in just his
sixth career start.
“We only have so many
shots to win these things. I really hate
to win them like that; I really do,” El-
liott said in his Victory Lane interview.
“That’s not how I race, and that’s
never been how I’ve raced before.
“I had a shot. I was up next
to Ty and I knew he was going to try
and chop me off. I tried to make up the
difference ...
“Sometimes you’ve got to
do what you’ve got to do to get to Vic-
tory Lane.”
Elliott said an angry Dillon,
who finished 17th and is third in series
points, 63 behind leader Matt Crafton,
leaned in his window after the race
and told him there would be payback,
most likely this week at Iowa Speed-
way.
“He just told me I was better
than that, and we’re probably going to
have some problems next week at
Iowa, so we’ll have to play it by ear
when we get there,” Elliott said.
Chase Elliott celebrates his Chevrolet
Silverado 250 victory with his father,
Sprint Cup veteran Bill Elliott (left),
and his mother, Cindy.
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 05, 2013 PAGE 56
Continued from page 51
Gordon said that Edwards caused
most of the trouble after the first run-in be-
tween the two of them, which he said was
partially his fault.
“[Edwards] decided that he was
going to get me back, I guess, every other
time I was around him all night,” Gordon
said.
Kasey Kahne, who will be in the
Chase at least as a wild card entry, was in-
volved in the same pit-road incident as
Johnson, lost 31 laps while his car was
being repaired, and finished 36th.
Dale Earnhardt Jr., Greg Biffle
and Kurt Busch head to Richmond in the
top 10 but not assured of Chase berths,
while Newman and Truex are 14th and
15th, respectively, in the standings with a
win apiece, giving them chances to secure
wild card Chase berths.
Defending Cup champion Brad
Keselowski will need a dramatic turn of
events at Richmond to even have a chance
to try to defend his title. He blew an engine
after leading 31 laps, finished 35th and
dropped four spots in the standings to 15th,
28 points out of the top 10.
Keselowski said that to say he’s
frustrated with his season is an understate-
ment, but he said it’s not because his cars
aren’t fast.
“We ran up front, and we con-
tinue to show that we at least have the
pieces of what it takes every week to be a
title threat and to be in the Chase,” he said.
“But we just haven’t put together all those
pieces every week, and that’s what it
takes.”
Busch celebrates his AdvoCare 500 win with a burnout.
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Chase contenders...
Continued from page 54
Newman said, adding that the real tests will come off the track.
“I think the biggest challenge he’s going to have ahead of him
is not what happens outside of this [media] room, it’s what
happens inside of this room — the media part of it; the public-
ity part of it,” Newman said.
For his part, Larson said he’s up to the challenges.
He said his sprint car experience will help him transition from
the Nationwide cars he’s now driving to the more powerful
Cup cars.
“With my sprint car background, they’re 1,400-pound cars with
900-horsepower engines,” he said. “I’m used to having way too
much horsepower. I think that will translate well to the Cup
cars.”
Larson said that even if there are some unknowns as far as
moving up to the Cup series so quickly, he wouldn’t do it any
other way.
“These opportunities don’t come about very often,” he said.
“You never know when you have another shot like this. You
have to capitalize on it and do the best you can.”
Ganassi, who also fields the No. 1 Chevrolet driven by Jamie
McMurray, said he believes his team can give Larson cars ca-
pable of continuing his career climb.
“I think our cars have shown they can run in the top five, top
10 on a pretty regular basis this season,” he said, adding that
he’s not expecting Larson to take him to Victory Lane immedi-
ately. “I think Kyle is the kind of driver, when he sees an op-
portunity in front of him, he takes it. If that means it’s a win —
hey, great. There’s no pressure for him to win his first year
out.”
Chip Ganassi...