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MAURICIO ZAVALA JAZZ LESSON

THE IONIAN MODE

Part 2

In our previous lesson, we learned the structure of the Ionian Mode (Major Scale), and reviewed its fingerings on the guitar. Now well learn how to transport this scale to different tonalities, and to practice its patterns. How to Transport a Scale To play this scale in different keys, a very simple method can be used. We must first identify the tonic of the scale on our guitar, and then just play it according to the different patterns.

E B G D A E C 4th string, 10th freet C 5th string, 3th freet C 6th string, 8th freet C 5th string, 15th freet

Lets now see pattern 1 on the fretboard. We will take the note C on the 6th string 8th fret as a reference to start the fingering.

E B G D A E

C 6th string, 8th freet

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This is how to proceed if we want to transport these patterns to other keys. Now, we will play the 7 patterns in the key of C. In order to study these patterns in detail and explore all the sounds of the fingerboard, from the lowest to the highest pitch, we will begin with pattern 6 (root note on the 5th string) instead of pattern 1, so we can play the sequence of notes as orderly as possible.

Example 1

Pattern 6 Root note on the 5th string,

E B G D A E
1
1st fret

1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3

2 3 4

3rd freet Fingering for the first note of the pattern starts with finger 2

4
4 4 4

Play /Stop

Example 2

Pattern 7 Root note on the 5th string,

E B G D A E
1 1 1
3rd fret

1 1 1
2

3rd freet Fingering for the first note of the pattern starts with finger 1

2
4 4 4 4

2 2 2

Play /Stop

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Example 3

Pattern 1 Root note on the 6th string,

E B G D A E
1 1 1 1
5th fret

1 1 2 2 3 3

2 2 4 4 4 4

8th freet Fingering for the first note of the pattern starts with finger 4

Play /Stop

Example 4

Pattern 2 Root note on the 6th string,

E B G D A E
1 1 1 1
7th fret

1 1 3 3 2 2

2 2
4

4
4

8th freet Fingering for the first note of the pattern starts with finger 2

4 4 4

Play /Stop

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Example 5

Pattern 3 Root note on the 6th string,

E B G D A E
1 1
8th fret

1 1 1 1
2

8th freet Fingering for the first note of the pattern starts with finger 1

3
4 4 4 4

2 2 2

Play /Stop

Example 6

Pattern 4 Root note on the 4th string,

E B G D A E
1 1 1 1
10th fret

1 1
2

10th freet Fingering for the first note of the pattern starts with finger 1

2
4 4 4 4

2 2 3

Play /Stop

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Example 7

Pattern 5 Root note on the 5th string,

E B G D A E
1 1 1 1
12th fret

1 1 2 3 3 2

2 2 4 4 4 4

4 4

15th freet Fingering for the first note of the pattern starts with finger 4

Play /Stop

Example 8 This is the same pattern we started the sequence with, this time in the upper octave.

Pattern 6 Root note on the 5th string,

E B G D A E
1
13th fret

1
1 1 1 1

2 3 3 4 4 4 4
4

15th freet Fingering for the first note of the pattern starts with finger 2

2 2 2

Play /Stop

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We have seen these seven patterns in the key of C. Always remember when practicing, to start the patterns on the 6th, 5th, and 4th strings (refer to lesson: The Ionian Mode part 1). Then, in order to master these scales practicing them all along the fingerboard in a specific key, do not forget to start with the patterns that is in the lowest pitch, and go up gradually until you cover the whole fingerboard. Make sure to play them in all the keys.

I invite you to study and play these phrases over a Cmaj7 chord using some of these patterns. These four sentences contain elements that are typical in Jazz. In phrases 1 and 2, with the use of arpeggios and somehow leading the end of the sentence to grade 7 of the scale or chord (B), and in sentences 3 and 4, to the use of chromaticisms:

Phrase 1

Play /Stop

Phrase 2

Play /Stop

Phrase 3

Play /Stop

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Phrase 4

Play /Stop

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