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Running Head: SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS: ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

An Investigation of the Social Relationships in Autistic Children: An Annotated Bibliography Abigail Tempel Chapin High School

SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS: ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

An Investigation of the Social Relationships of Autistic Children: An Annotated Bibliography The future career I am seriously considering entering is Speech Pathology where I would work with Autistic and regular-ed children on speech and social skills. This research is about experiments that have been done with Autistic children to explore the reasons for the ways they socially interact with people. It was also about why Autistic children dont understand the feeling of loneliness because they would rather be on their own. This research has really helped me to understand the thinking processes of Autistic children and why they have social relationships misunderstandings. These articles are very helpful to someone wishing to understand what Autistic children think about social relationships and how they think social relationships should be. Baron-Cohen, S., Leslie, A. M., & Frith, U. (1985). Does the autistic child have a "theory of mind"? 37-46. Retrieved March 4, 2013. This article is about an experiment that a group of researchers did with normal children, autistic children, and Down syndrome children to test their ability to detect another persons feelings. The autistic children failed the second question which was asking about the dolls thoughts every time they were tested. This article helped me to understand more about why Autistic children don't understand the way we think and what they are thinking about in certain situations. It also helped me to see how much younger their minds work compared to their age. It was also interesting that even the Autistic children had a very high IQ they still failed the behavior question.

SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS: ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY


Bauminger, N., & Kasari, C. (2000). Loneliness and friendship in high-functioning children with autism. Child Development, 71(2), 447-456. doi: 10.1111/1467-8624.00156 This article talks about how loneliness affects Autistics and regular ed children. Autistic children don't feel that sense of loneliness. Most actually prefer to be on their own and don't need friendships. They behave better when they play on their own. Most autistic children have never had a social experience with a peer. I also learned that some Autistic children might not even know what it means to feel lonely. Mundy, P., Sigman, M., Ungerer, J., & Sherman, T. (1986). Defining the social deficits of autism: Contribution of non-verbal communication measures. 27(5), 657-669. Retrieved March 4, 2013. This article explores the ways that verbal communication skills affect children's diagnosis and their skills to play. It was noted that autistic children with low verbal communication, would not play with toys in the right way. I learned in this article that the verbal skills an autistic child has can affect their whole life not just at school. They need to be taught how to play with things the right way. They also need help getting their point across through communication. Rao, P. A., Beidel, D. C., & Murray, M. J. (2008). Social skills interventions for children with asperger's syndrome or high-functioning autism: A review and recommendations. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38(2), 353-361. doi: 10.1007/s10803007-0402-4 This article was about the different types of social deficiencies that autistic children have and ways to fix those deficiencies. It is also about how a group of researchers did

SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS: ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY


many experiments with social intervention programs to try and change the way Autistic children interact with their same age peers. This article taught me that Autistic children do need social intervention so they can create relationships and keep them going. I also learned that speech pathologists are really helpful to autistic children because the positive reinforcement helps them to learn how to become friends and interact with their same age peers. Tager-Flusberg, H. (n.d.). A psychological approach to understanding the social and language impairments of autism. Retrieved March 4, 2013. This article talks about what communication skills to look for in your child to determine Autism. It also explores how social interactions and communication are linked. If the child does not get involved with peers and imaginative games by toddler age, then it shows an impairment in social interactions. The involvement in imaginative activities and peers shows normal communication skills. I learned that Autistic children do need someone like a speech pathologist to teach them how to communicate and play with other children.