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Internet Safety Kit

EdView™

Secure And Smart Channel to the Internet
Windows® 95, 98, Windows® NT, Mac OS®

User’s Manual

©1998 EdView, Inc. All Rights Reserved

www.edview.com

Installing EdView™ Channel Lock Version 1.2 for Macintosh
Hardware and Software Requirements • Any Macintosh computer capable of browsing the Internet • 1MB or more of unused RAM • 400K or more of free hard disk space • Netscape Navigator 2.0 (or newer) or Microsoft Internet Explorer 3.0 (or newer) • System 7.1 (or newer) • MacTCP or Open Transport 1.1.2 (or newer) Installation Instructions
1. To access the Internet, your Macintosh computer uses either MacTCP or TCP/IP. EdView Channel Lock works with both programs; however, if your computer uses TCP/IP, you must have Open Transport version 1.1.2 or newer. To determine which program and version you have, do the following: • • Look in the Control Panels folder to determine whether you are using MacTCP or TCP/IP. If you are using TCP/IP, find the Open Transport version number by highlighting TCP/IP in the Control Panels folder and then selecting Get Info from the File menu. If your version of Open Transport is older than 1.1.2, you need to install a newer version. You can find Open Transport Version 1.1.2 on the EdView CDROM or at http://www.apple.com/macos/opentransport/sdk.html

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Change your browser’s home page to http://home.edview.com. If your browser supports a search page, you may also want to set your search page to http://home.edview.com. Use the Control Panels to make sure File Sharing (or Web Sharing) is turned off. Quit all applications. Launch (double click) Install EdView™ 1.2. At the end of the installation process you will choose and confirm a password. If you want the ability to send configuration information from one computer to

another in a multi-user environment, use the same password for all computers.

Remember your password and keep it secure!

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Upon completion of the installation, you will restart your Macintosh. When the system restarts, you will see a red EdView (EV) icon on the menu bar. The red EV indicates that EdView Channel Lock has been installed and is enabled. Security is on.

Information explaining how to customize the EdView Channel Lock (including how to turn it on and off) begins on page 8 of this manual.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Installing EdView™ Channel Lock Version 1.2 for Windows 95,98/NT
Hardware and Software Requirements • PC computer that is capable of browsing the Internet • 16MB or more of RAM (recommended) • 2MB of free hard disk space • Netscape Navigator 2.0 (or newer) or Microsoft Internet Explorer 3.0 (or newer) • Windows 95, Windows 98 or Windows NT 4.0 Installation Instructions Note: If you use America Online, you must use Microsoft’s Internet Explorer or Netscape’s Navigator rather than using the AOL browser. You can download Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and Netscape’s Navigator at www.microsoft.com and www.netscape.com, respectively.
Steps: 1. 2. 3. 4. Change your browser’s home page to http://home.edview.com. If your browser supports a search page, you may also want to set your search page to http://home.edview.com. Quit all applications. Insert the CD-ROM. The installer program will start automatically. (If for some reason the installer does not start automatically, double click the Setupex.exe icon.) Follow the installation instructions. At the end of the installation process you will choose and confirm a password. If you want the ability to send configuration information from one computer to another in a multi-user environment, use the same password for all computers.

Remember your password and keep it secure!
5. Upon completion of the installation, you will have to restart your computer. After your computer has restarted, you will see a red EdView (EV) icon on the right side of the task bar. The red EV indicates that EdView Channel Lock has been installed and is enabled. Security is on.

Information explaining how to customize the EdView Channel Lock (including how to turn it on and off) begins on page 8 of this document. © 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.
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General Information Positive & Productive Use of the Internet
Quality educational experiences engage the learner. They make the learner ask questions and use resources to find answers. Many quality experiences also involve elements of mystery, challenge and fantasy. For decades, computers have offered engaging educational experiences to children as they have honed their writing skills, solved problems, explored concepts and expressed their creativity. In the 1990s, computers have taken on a new role; they have become the gateway to the wealth of information available on the Internet. Users have the ability to: • access information from locations throughout the world • access information that may be changing on a daily basis • communicate directly with experts and newsmakers • contribute to expanding knowledge by sharing their data and publishing original work As a learning resource, the Internet weaves the media and information of history and late-breaking news; the best of prose and classical symphonies; and the newest science and oldest discoveries. With this limitless potential, however, comes distinct risk as well.

Finding the Good, Keeping out the Bad
Once connection with the Internet has been established, a two-part challenge arises: to find the best resources on the Internet, and to protect children from inappropriate and harmful materials. As the Internet grows, finding the best resources becomes more difficult. Search engines can be used to find information about almost any topic, but a search can yield thousands of results: some are excellent, some are not relevant, some are of questionable accuracy, and some may even be harmful. Countless hours can be wasted sifting through the results trying to find the specific information needed. The second part of the challenge, protecting children from inappropriate and harmful material, has received much attention; because while wonderful educational materials are being found, pornographic, hateful, and violent texts and images can also be accessed. Different approaches have been taken to meet the Internet’s challenges, most focusing on protecting children from the Internet’s dark side. For example, schools have installed filtering and blocking software or instituted acceptable-use policies where students sign a contract agreeing to follow rules of usage. Unfortunately, there are still problems. Acceptable-use rules do not remove the possibility of viewing offensive material. Filtering and blocking solutions find it impossible to outrun the bad sites, and in trying to do so, may prevent access to valuable information. Sites dealing with breast cancer, for instance, may be blocked because they contain the word breast. And neither acceptable-use policies or filtering/blocking software can help kids at home, or in school, find the Internet’s best resources. EdView’s proactive approach meets both parts of the challenge: it keeps out the bad by identifying the good. EdView has two components, the EdView™ Smart Zone and the EdView™ Channel Lock. The EdView Smart Zone, which resides on the Internet, is a dynamic database providing access to tens of thousands of the best and safest educational sites on the World Wide Web. The EdView Channel Lock is a small piece of password-protected software that resides on each individual computer. When the EdView Channel Lock is enabled, users are locked into the wealth of Internet resources in the EdView Smart Zone and are locked out of violent, pornographic or other inappropriate sites.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Using the EdView Smart Zone
Become familiar with the EdView Smart Zone by taking a guided tour. Start your browser, go to http:// school.edview.com, and follow along to find middle-school materials dealing with Mark Twain and his work!

First, choose the grade level for the search: elementary school, middle school or high school. Sites in the EdView Smart Zone may be included in one, two or all three grade levels, depending on the nature of their content. As an aid to young readers, the Smart Zone displays elementary school search results in a large font. For this search, choose Middle School.

Next, choose a category. Choose Language Arts to find information about Mark Twain.

Finally, choose a subcategory. To search for information about Mark Twain, choose Short Stories and Essays.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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The Results Screen provides an educatorwritten description and a link for each site within the subcategory. The heading on the top of the screen shows that the results are for middle school, Short Stories and Essays. At the time of this writing, there are 44 sites for Short Stories and Essays. On your screen, you probably see more; or we may have even subdivided the category due to growth. The EdView Smart Zone is not static; like the Internet itself, it is growing rapidly. The results are divided into pages of ten. Scroll through the selections. Use the page-number bar to access different pages of the results list. Click a site that interests you and explore the content you find. Bookmark the site if you wish. Explore the links; they have all been reviewed for educational value and safety. When you have finished, click the Back button as many times as needed to return to your search results. Explore other sites.

If you try to access a site or link that is not appropriate or has not yet been reviewed, EdView Channel Lock displays a message saying that the requested site is not in the EdView Smart Zone.

To get more focused results, use the search capabilities. Enter the search text Twain and click the Search button to find information about Mark Twain. The search engine checks the URL (address), description and keywords of middle school sites to find the word Twain. When it finds a match, it displays the result. Use the radio buttons beneath the searchtext area to determine whether you search all middle school sites or just those in a specific category. The search results for Twain are now more narrowly focused.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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You can show relationships among multiple terms in a search by using the words: and, or, and near; the phrase and not; as well as parentheses, a single asterisk (*), and a double asterisk. The table below shows examples.

Search Text Examples and Results Search Text Results
civil war civil and war civil or war civil near war Sites having the phrase civil war in their URLs, keywords or descriptions—most will deal with the Civil War. Sites having both civil and war (in any order) in their URLs, keywords or descriptions—most will deal with the Civil War. Sites having either civil or war in their URLs, keywords or descriptions—sites may deal with any war, civil rights or the Civil War. Sites having both civil and war in their URLs, keywords or descriptions, but the words must be near each other. Near is similar to and in function, but returns the results ranked in order, list ing the results with the words closer together first. Sites having war, but not civil in their URLs, keywords or descriptions—sites may deal with wars other than the Civil War, such as the Revolutionary War or World War II. Sites having war and either civil or II in their URLs, keywords or descriptions—most will deal with the Civil War or World War II. Sites having a word that starts with invent in their URLs, descriptions or keywords—matches could include inventor, inventors, invention, inventions, inventory, inventories and so forth.The asterisk, often called a “wildcard,” helps expand a search. Sites having some form of the word sing in their URLs, keywords, descriptions—matches could include sing, sang, sung and singing.

war and not civil war and (civil or II) invent*

sing**

For additional information about searching, click the Tips for Searching link shown near the search-text area.

Suggest a Site
The EdView Smart Zone includes the best safe educational sites on the Internet. If you would like to recommend a favorite site for inclusion in the EdView Smart Zone, click the Suggest a Site link on the top part of the screen. Suggested sites are reviewed using the guidelines found in Appendix A. The review process generally takes about seven days.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Customizing the EdView Channel Lock
This section describes customizing the EdView Channel Lock for both Macintosh and Windows 95/98/NT computers. Most screen shots shown are for the Macintosh version, but the Windows 95/98/NT screens have essentially the same content. Procedures that differ by platform are shown in adjoining boxes. Small differences between platforms are shown in [brackets].

Customizable Features
Customizable features include: • General—turn EdView Channel Lock on or off. With Channel Lock on, users can explore the Internet in safety; with Channel Lock off, access is allowed for the entire Internet. • Services—determine whether access to services such as e-mail and file transfer protocol (ftp) download is appropriate. • Sites—make sites outside the EdView Smart Zone available. • Servers—add, delete and select security servers

Note—exciting new feature: Within a multi-user environment that has a utility which supports sending
files from one computer to another, you can use that utility to send EdView Channel Lock configuration options to all of your computers. In order to use this feature, all computers must have the same password. See page 13 for more information.

Getting Started

When you have installed EdView Channel Lock and restarted your computer, an EdView (EV) icon will appear on your menu bar. When the EV is red, the Channel Lock is on; when the EV is grayed, the Channel Lock is off. To customize the EdView Channel Lock, position the mouse over the EV, hold down the mouse button, and choose Edit Preferences… from the menu.

When you have installed EdView Channel Lock and restarted your computer, an EdView (EV) icon will appear on your task bar. When the EV is red, the Channel Lock is on; when the EV is grayed, the Channel Lock is off. To customize the EdView Channel Lock, double click the EV.

After you enter your password, you can access the configuration options.

After you enter your password, you can access the configuration options. UG v4.s

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

General Tab
The General tab has three controls: • Channel Lock Enabled • Always Enable Channel Lock at Startup • Change Password button Channel Lock Enabled • Remove the check from Channel Lock Enabled to turn off the Channel Lock. Check Channel Lock Enabled to turn on Channel Lock, customized according to your settings. (See the other tabs for customizing options.) [On the Macintosh version, you can enable or disable Channel Lock by positioning your mouse over the EV icon on the task bar, holding down the mouse button, and selecting Enable Channel Lock or Disable Channel Lock from the menu that is displayed. If you choose Disable Channel Lock, you will be prompted for your password.] Note: To improve performance, most browsers cache (temporarily store) pages you have visited. When you request a page that is in cache, the browser displays the cached version rather than reloading the page. If you visit an unapproved site with the EdView Channel Lock off, pages from the unapproved site may still be in your cache when you turn Channel Lock on. Therefore, you should empty your cache whenever you turn on the EdView Channel Lock. Check your browser’s user manual to learn how to empty the cache. Always Enable Channel Lock at Startup Check Always Enable Channel Lock at Startup to ensure that the Channel Lock will be enabled when your students turn on the computer—even if Channel Lock was disabled when the computer was shut down. Change Password Click the Change Password button to change your password. The procedure for changing a password is shown below.

Changing the Password
Click the Change Password button, which is located on the General tab (see above). Type your current password; then enter and confirm a new password.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Services Tab
When EdView Channel Lock is enabled, services such as File Transfer Protocol (FTP) and Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) are not available. Use the Services tab to enable services by port number. (On the Internet, a port is a numbered “logical connection place.” Different services on a server “listen” to different ports for appropriate information.) Check a port to make it available; remove the check to make it unavailable. Enable only the ports you will need. Enabling/disabling e-mail: Use the Services tab to determine whether or not your students can access e-mail. Different types of e-mail use different ports/services. Check your e-mail documentation to determine what ports/services you need. If you cannot find any information, you can usually guarantee access to e-mail by enabling all of the following services: SMTP, POP2, POP3, IMAP2, and IMAP3. If you access your e-mail by visiting a specific site (sometimes called “hotmail”), refer to the section on the Sites Tab. (See page 11 of this manual.) Restricting access to chat rooms: By default, EdView Channel Lock does not allow access to ports that are associated with Internet Relay Chat (IRC). However, some websites include chat rooms. EdView reviewers approve only carefully monitored chat rooms that are sponsored by reputable organizations such as NASA. Teachers who access the Internet through services such as America Online should know that their students do have access to the service-sponsored chat rooms, whether or not EdView Channel Lock is enabled. Your service provider may offer controls that limit or prevent access to chat rooms. Using America Online (AOL): To use AOL, you must enable port 5190. You may need to use the arrows or scroll bar to see this port. Adding a Port Click the Add Service/Port button. Enter the port number and a description of your choosing (no descriptions are required for the Windows 95/98/NT version). There are no fixed rules for assigning services to ports, but general conventions are listed in the following table.

Port Service
20 21 23 25 109 110 143 220 FTP Data FTP Control Telnet SMTP (Mail) POP2 POP3 IMAP2 IMAP3

Description
FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is used to send files to and from a server. To use FTP, enable both port 20 and port 21. FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is used to send files to and from a server. To use FTP, enable both port 20 and port 21. Telnet is used to log onto remote computers. SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) is used to send and receive SMTP e-mail. POP2 (Post Office Protocol 2) is a client-server protocol in which e-mail is received and held for the user by the Internet server. POP3 (Post Office Protocol 3) is a client-server protocol in which e-mail is received and held for the user by the Internet server. IMAP2 is a client-server protocol in which e-mail is received and held for the user by the Internet server. IMAP3 is a client-server protocol in which e-mail is received and held for the user by the Internet server. AppleShare IP is needed when users access the Chooser to select a server. America Online (TCP/LAN) is needed for users who access America Online via the Internet.

548 AppleShare IP 5190 America Online

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Sites Tab
When the EdView Channel Lock is enabled, users can visit only the sites in the EdView Smart Zone. To give students access to other sites, you can: 1. Suggest a Site. Use this option for sites that might be of interest to other users. All suggested sites which meet the guidelines and criteria of EdView’ Education Advisory Board will be made available to all who visit the Smart Zone. To suggest a site, go to the EdView Smart Zone+, click the Suggest A Site link, and recommend the site. (See page 7 for more information.) Turn off EdView Channel Lock (see page 9) and visit sites outside the Smart Zone. Use this option when you need immediate access to a site, or when you plan to visit many sites outside the EdView Smart Zone. Use the Sites tab. Use this option to enable immediate access to sites outside the EdView Smart Zone. You are responsible for determining the appropriateness of the content of the sites you add.

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Adding a Site To add a site, you need its Internet Protocol (IP) address. The NSLookup utility at http://security.edview.com/nslookup provides IP addresses for URLs (addresses). You can access NSLookup by clicking the Go To NSLookUp link on the Sites tab (Macintosh) or the Add Site dialog box (Windows 95/NT)

Enter the host portion of the site’s URL in the keyword box. Then press Enter. The host portion of the URL is the part of the address that comes after the “http://” and continues up to the first slash. For example, the host portion of http://school.edview.com/search/ is school.edview.com.

On the results screen, you generally find the host’s IP address displayed below the host name. Write or copy that four-number address.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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On the Sites tab, click the Add button. Enter the site’s four-number IP address in the IP Address field. In the Domain Name field, enter the host portion of the URL (the same portion you used with the NS Lookup utility). [On the Macintosh version, sites you add will have a check box control to make them available or unavailable.] Heavily accessed sites, including some media sites, have different IP addresses in different parts of the country and may periodically change their IP addresses. If you cannot access a site you added, you may need to recheck its IP address. Be aware that the IP address you enter is the IP address for an entire host, and therefore users can access all information and services available through that host.

Servers Tab
The security server verifies that the URLs (addresses) that users have requested are in the EdView Smart Zone. Use the Servers tab to add and delete security servers and select the one(s) you want to access. At present, the only security server available is security.edview.com. (The Internet Protocol address for security.edview.com. is 206.204.30.42) Future versions of EdView will make use of additional security servers.

Restricting Students to Teacher-Selected Sites
For a highly structured activity where you want to access only a few selected sites, do the following: • Add the sites using the Sites tab. If the addresses are complicated, you may want to bookmark them in the browser. • Under the Servers tab, remove the check from all server check boxes. When you have completed these steps, the only sites that students can access are the ones available under the Sites tab; you cannot even access the EdView Smart Zone at http://home.edview.com. Therefore, when the activity has been completed, it is very important to go back to the Servers tab and enable all appropriate servers.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Copying the Configuration for a Multi-User Environment
If your computer has a utility that supports sending files from one computer to another, you can send configuration options to all computers on your network. To use this feature, all computers must have the same EdView Channel Lock password. The configuration options are stored in the files listed below. Choose the one that is appropriate for your platform and operating system. Macintosh: System Folder -> Preferences -> EdView™ Channel Lock Prefs Windows 95: (windows root)\system\Evconfig.cfg Windows NT: (windows root)\system32\Evconfig.cfg To send the configuration to all computers in your lab, do the following: 1. Configure the EdView Channel Lock on the “master” computer, enabling appropriate ports/services, adding sites, and so forth. 2. Use your lab’s utility to send the appropriate preferences file to the other computers on your network. [In a Macintosh multi-user environment, computers are updated immediately.] [In a Windows 95/NT multi-user environment, the updating takes place when you go to a computer, double click the EV icon, enter the password, and click OK.] Being able to share configurations is particularly helpful when you have added sites through the Sites tab. If your lab does not have network software that lets you share files, you can move the preferences files from a central computer to other computers via floppy disk.

Lost Password
If the password is lost, e-mail support@edview.com or call the EdView Support Line at 1-888-949-9905.

Removing EdView Channel Lock
Macintosh Because you will need to restart your computer at the end of this process, quit any programs you are using and make sure File Sharing is turned off. Launch Install EdView™ School 1.2. On the pull-down menu in the upper-left corner of Install EdView School, select Custom Remove. Then click the Remove button. When the process is complete, click the Quit button and restart your computer. At the completion of the restart, the EdView EV icon will no longer be on the menu bar. Turn on File Sharing (if you turned it off in step 1). Windows Because you will need to restart your computer at the end of this process, quit any programs you are using. Click the Start button in the lower-left corner of your screen. From the Settings Menu, choose the Control Panel. From the Control Panel, select Add/Remove Programs. From the resulting list, select Channel Lock for Windows. You will be prompted for your password. When the process is complete, you will restart your computer. At the completion of the restart, the EdView EV icon will no longer be on the task bar.

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Troubleshooting and Support
For documentation, a list of known problems and workarounds, updates, and FAQs, visit www.edview.com. For additional help, e-mail us at support@edview.com or call us at 1-888-949-9905. Support hours are 8:00am-5:00pm Central Time Zone.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Appendix A EdView Guidelines for Evaluating Sites
The vision of EdView is to provide kids with safe, smart, and fun access to the Internet. In that context, EdView strongly embraces the philosophy of inclusion. EdView’s Reviewers seek proactively to include the best educational websites on the Internet. At the same time, EdView recognizes, as have libraries over the years, the incongruous nature of having Playboy as easily accessible as Plato. Thus, EdView has applied certain standards to the selection process that will ensure the achievement of all goals. These CRITERIA and GUIDELINES were developed by EdView with guidance and direction from the education community. Subsequently, they have been reviewed and endorsed by the EdView Education Advisory Board. (See www.edview.com for Advisory Board members.)

CRITERIA FOR SMART
To accomplish these visionary objectives, a process for site inclusion has been implemented for EdView. It is not EdView’s intent to include everything. Instead, the intent is to provide a quality, selective tool that increases the ease of navigating the Internet. The result is a comprehensive database of excellent educator-approved websites that have been categorized according to subject matter and level of appropriateness. The criteria for SMART focus on three primary areas: Content, Design and Credibility. CONTENT Information is relevant, germane and educationally sound • Sites stimulate interest, imagination and response • Sites present meaningful and useful content that will educate and inform • Sites present information in a comprehensive manner that is appropriate to a diverse range of audiences • Sites present content that is both current and relevant DESIGN Sites are stimulating, logical and user-friendly • Sites are designed to be easily and intuitively navigated • Sites are organized and explained in a way that is easy to understand • Sites utilize systematic mini-lessons when the focus is skill-building • Sites encourage critical and independent thinking CREDIBILITY The creators, sources, and timeliness lend intrinsic value to the sites • Sites contain information on the resources and sources used to comprise their content • Sites include the date on which the site was last updated • Sites include information about the author • Sites include information that is current and up-to-date

GUIDELINES FOR SECURE
To reassure that users will enjoy a safe and secure Internet environment, EdView has identified a number of areas and has established guidelines to address them. These GUIDELINES were developed by EdView with significant input from the Education Community. Subsequently, they have been reviewed and endorsed by the EdView Education Advisory Board.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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SEX AND NUDITY • Exclude all sites that contain pictures of the human form in a state of full or partial nudity. Exceptions can be made for those sites that include nudes and partial nudes as examples of fine art; sites for health education; and sites that have intrinsic educational value. Such examples should be representative of the human condition; have educational benefit; and have stood the “test of time.” No exceptions will be made for sites directed at younger children. • Exclude sites that contain text or pictures that depict anyone or anything involved in explicit sexual acts or in other forms of lewd and lascivious behavior. This would include masturbation, copulation, pedophilia and bestiality. It would also include people involved in heterosexual, bisexual, lesbian or homosexual encounters; and phone sex ads, dating services, adult personals, CD-ROM’s and videos. • Exclude all sites that contain text and pictures that fail to treat contraception, family planning and sexually transmitted diseases in a clinical, informative and educational manner. VIOLENCE AND PROFANITY • Exclude all sites that contain profanity and obscene words and phrases. Exceptions can be made for sites that make reference to or include works of literature that have educational benefit; do not appeal to prurient interests, and have stood the literary “test of time.” No exceptions will be made for sites directed at young children. • Exclude sites that contain crudely vulgar text and pictures; and are grossly deficient in civility and propriety. This includes representations of maiming, bloody figures and indecent depictions of bodily functions. • Exclude sites that contain text and pictures that advocate violence; extremely aggressive and combative behavior; and unlawful political measures. This would include “how to” information on making and using weapons, ammunition and pyrotechnics materials for unlawful reasons. TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND DRUGS • Exclude sites that contain text and pictures that advocate the use of illegal drugs or provide directions for their use. Exceptions can be made for sites in which information is presented for the purpose of educating and increasing knowledge; and for literature deemed to have educational benefit. • Exclude sites that advocate and glamorize the use of tobacco and alcohol. The value of the information in a site that advertises tobacco and alcohol should be weighed carefully against the impact of that advertising. RELIGION, CULTS AND ILLEGAL ACTIVITIES • Exclude sites that contain pictures and text that advocate or proselytize specific churches, religions and religious organizations. However, sites that provide relevant educational information on churches and religions should not be excluded. • Exclude sites that contain pictures and text that advocate devil worship; cult and gang membership; and an affinity for evil. This would include influences that could compromise free will and critical thinking. • Exclude text and pictures that advocate questionable or illegal activities such as chain letters, copyright infringement, computer hacking, phreaking (using someone’s phone lines with out permission) and software piracy. This exclusion would also include gambling-related activities such as lotteries; casinos; betting; numbers games; and on-line sports and financial betting.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Appendix B FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)
Q: How often is the EdView Smart Zone updated?
A: The database is generally updated every evening.

Q: EdView is based on the concept of an inclusion list, or library of sites. I understand that it is impossible to outrun the bad sites, but aren’t the good sites always changing as well?
A: During our first year of operation, our main focus has been to build the EdView Smart Zone, our library of the best and safest educational sites on the Internet. As we move forward, a major part of our focus will be to maintain this library. The EdView Smart Zone features the “best of the best” educational sites. While there is little chance that these sites would provide access to the Internet’s dark side, they can move or change in other ways. Some of the procedures for maintaining the quality of the EdView Smart Zone are: • •refreshing this database each day to ensure that IP addresses are current and the sites are still available • •having category managers re-reviewing sites to ensure their on-going quality • •using a back-end spider process to flag sites that are no longer available or have moved • •having human reviewers check sites that have been flagged by the back-end spider process • •receiving information about new and existing sites via the EdView Smart Zone’s Suggest-a-Site link

Q: Why do I have to use EdView Channel Lock when I can connect to the EdView Smart Zone for free?
A: EdView Channel Lock keeps users secure from inappropriate materials on the World Wide Web. We encourage you to use our EdView Smart Zone at any time. What we provide with EdView Channel Lock is a lock to our library. This lock is low maintenance and provides personalization and access to additional future libraries that may be region specific. Additionally, with EdView Channel Lock, all MacTCP and TCP/IP traffic is subject to the constraints of the Channel Lock; thus email can be controlled if so desired, as well as access to downloads via FTP and access to the Internet via Telnet or Gopher.

Q: Once I accessed an unapproved site when the EdView Channel Lock was on. Why did this happen? What should I do?
A: To improve performance, most browsers cache pages you have visited. When you request a page that is in cache, the browser displays the cached version rather than reloading the page. If you visit an unapproved site with the EdView Channel Lock off, then turn on the Channel Lock, pages from the unapproved site may still be in your cache. The best procedure is to empty your cache whenever you turn on the EdView Channel Lock. Another solution is to click the reload (refresh) button to force the browser to reload the page.

Q: Why is it that I get to a site, but when I try to access some of its links, I get the message, “Sorry, the requested site is not in the EdView Smart Zone?”
A: The EdView Smart Zone is very much like a library. Just as one book can reference other books which may or may not be part of the library’s collection, sites in our collection may link to other sites that we either have deemed to not have enough educational value, are inappropriate or that we have not yet verified. This illustrates the granularity and full security of our system.

Q: How does your EdView Channel Lock model work?
A: Our architecture is flexible enough to have our security model change as needed. There are several pieces to our current model. For example, we have the granularity to add an entire host to our library, or just a site, or directory, within the host. In the first case, every site that might be on that host, and all the

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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links between the various pages on that host, are in the EdView Smart Zone. In general hosts that fall into this category are media sites, where the host has on it essentially the same type of material as one encounters in their standard media (e.g. USA Today). Another piece of our security model is we can add only a particular site to our library. In this case only the pages and graphics explicitly associated with the site are available.

Q: Do you have geographically diverse, redundant systems? If one of your database servers becomes overworked or goes down...are there others to take its place so that your service is not interrupted?
A: We have redundant systems and a scalable design. Currently EdView is using ConXion for its primary hosting. ConXion has its own network backbone and multiple web farms. During the summer of 1998 we added multiple fault tolerant servers to different geographic areas on ConXion’s backbone. With this added level of commitment, even an entire part of the country could go down and we would still be live.

Q: What happens if I forget my Channel Lock password?
A: Call the EdView support team at 1-888-949-9905. A temporary password can be generated for you.

Q: After installing the EdView Channel Lock, why doesn’t my e-mail program work properly?
A: Installing the Channel Lock will disable the sending and receiving of e-mail except for those users of America Online. In order to enable e-mail functions, go into the EdView Channel Lock Preferences and select the proper ports for both sending and receiving (see p.10 of User’s Manual).

Q: Am I able to use Yahoo, Excite, Edmail, etc. for sending and receiving e-mail?
A: Yes. To access these sites, add the appropriate IP addresses into your Sites Tab in the EdView Channel Lock Preferences. Go to the EdView homepage under Support/FAQ to access the IP addresses for the following e-mail services: § Yahoo § Excite § Edmail

Q: How does your solution work with a proxy server?
A: EdView Channel Lock Version 1.2 works with most proxy servers. Because proxy servers look up websites for the client user, we added features to both the EdView Channel Lock and to our security server to automatically sense whether a proxy server is being used. Some proxy implementations are done in such a way that the browser does not know that it is using a proxy server. Currently, the EdView Channel Lock does not work with this type of implementation. Additionally, the user needs to be aware that if you add the proxy server as a site via the Sites tab, anything the proxy server accesses from the Internet will appear as if it came from the proxy and, thus, be “allowed” by the EdView Channel Lock. We are also investigating a version of our Channel Lock that would reside on the proxy server itself—thus eliminating the need for individual clients and individual configuration settings.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Appendix C Glossary of Terms
Below are some common Internet terms and their definitions. You can find a good online source for definitions at www.whatis.com. Bookmark Using your browser to store the addresses of favorite sites for later access. Netscape Navigator uses the term bookmark. Microsoft’s Internet Explorer uses the term favorites. Browser Cache Software that is used to access and view Internet resources such as web pages. A place on your hard drive where your browser can temporarily keep copies of web pages you have visited recently. When you request a page that is in cache, the browser displays the cached version rather than reloading the page. A program on your computer that makes a request to a program on a different computer. The browser on your computer is a client that requests resources, such as web pages, from other computers on the Internet. Information that a server sends to your browser. Your browser stores this information so that future communication with that server will have more continuity. Transmitting a file from one computer to another. (Electronic mail) - correspondence sent from one person to another via computer. (Frequently Asked Questions) - lists of frequently asked questions and their answers, which are often posted at websites. (File Transfer Protocol) - a method for moving files from one computer to another. Many Internet sites have libraries of files that users can download using FTP. A request from a browser to a web server. The number of hits that a website receives in a month is one measure of the traffic to that website.

Client Cookie Download E-mail FAQ FTP Hit

Home Page The first page you see when you start your browser, or the main page of an organization’s website. Internet The enormous collection of inter-connected networks that can be accessed by computer users throughout the world.

IP Number (Internet Protocol Number) a unique number associated with each computer on the Internet. An IP number has four parts separated by dots. ISP Keyword Link Netscape Port Protocol Server Site TCP/IP (Internet Service Provider) - an organization that provides access to the Internet. A word associated with a site. Search engines use a site’s keywords to help users find sites that meet their interests. A location on a web page (often a graphic or highlighted text) that users can click to access another location. The company, Netscape Communications, or its popular browser, Netscape Navigator. On the Internet, a numbered “logical connection place.” Different services on a server “listen” to different ports for appropriate information. On the Internet, a set of rules governing communication between computers. A computer or program that fills service requests from client programs, usually on other computers. Servers on the Internet fill service requests sent by your computer’s browser. A location on the Internet. Many websites have addresses that begin with www. (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) - the program that computers on the Internet use to communicate with each other.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Telnet URL

A means of accessing the login prompt of a remote computer.

(Uniform Resource Locator) - the address of a resource on the Internet. Http://www.edview.com is the URL of the EdView website. Web A popular subset of the Internet that uses Hypertext Transfer Protocol (http) and Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). The Web is also known as WWW or the World Wide Web.

© 1998 EdView, Inc. All rights reserved.

UG v4.s