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PEARSON

Foundations and Pre-calculus

Mathematics

10

Garry Davis
David Ellis
Jack Hope
Delcy Rolheiser
David Sufrin
Chris Van Bergeyk
David Van Bergeyk
David Zimmer

India Photo Research Carrie Gleason Cover Image Chad Baker/The Image Bank/GettyImages Publishing Team Enid Haley Lesley Haynes Claire Burnett Stephanie Boragina Ioana Gagea Alison Rieger Lynne Gulliver Ellen Davidson David Liu May Look Alison Dale Cheri Westra Carolyn Sebestyen Jane Schell Karen Alley Judy Wilson Copyright © 2010 Pearson Canada Inc. or transmission in any form or by any means. write to the Permissions Department. This publication is protected by copyright. ISBN-13 978-0-321-62684-4 ISBN-10 0-321-62684-2 Printed and bound in the United States 1 2 3 4 5 —CC— 14 13 12 11 10 The information and activities presented in this book have been carefully edited and reviewed. recording.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution. and permission should be obtained from the publisher prior to any prohibited reproduction. storage in a retrieval system. in whole or in part. the publisher shall not be liable for any damages resulting. . For information regarding permission. Brand names that appear in photographs of products in this textbook are intended to provide students with a sense of the real-world applications of mathematics and are in no way intended to endorse specific products. However. mechanical.qxd:math10 3/8/10 10:00 AM Page ii Publisher Mike Czukar Research and Communications Manager Barbara Vogt Design and Art Direction Zena Denchik Composition Lapiz Digital Services. photocopying. or likewise. electronic. from the reader’s use of this material. All rights reserved.

Schmidt Elk Island Public Schools Sherwood Park. Advisors FNMI Advisors Bob Berglind Calgary Board of Education Calgary. MB Robert Sidley Burnaby School District No. BC Shirley A. AB Danielle Lamoureux Conseil scolaire centre-nord no.qxd:math10 2/26/10 12:34 PM Page iii Advisors and Reviewers Pearson Canada thanks its advisors and reviewers who helped shape the vision for Foundations and Pre-calculus Mathematics 10 through discussions and reviews of prototype materials and manuscript. 7 Edmonton. NT Ralph R. James-Assiniboia School Division Winnipeg. 36 Surrey. BC Peter Maguire Yellowknife Education District No. AB Reviewers Christine Ottawa Mathematics Consultant Winnipeg. 42 Maple Ridge. MB Nathalie Houle Winnipeg School Division Winnipeg. 2 Edmonton. Mykituk Edmonton Catholic Separate School District No. BC Francophone Advisors Joe Beaudin Calgary Board of Education Calgary. MB Terry Kaminski Northern Lights School Division No. SK Marc Garneau Surrey School District No. AB Ryan Mann Parkland School Division Stony Plain.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution. AB Susan Ludwig Edmonton Catholic Separate School District No. AB Edward Doolittle First Nations University of Canada Regina. 7 Edmonton. 69 Bonnyville. 1 Yellowknife. 41 Burnaby. AB Northern Advisor Chad Raible Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows School District No. AB iii . MB Andrew Hirst River East Transcona School Division Winnipeg. AB Rhonda German Hawthorne St.

4 Surface Areas of Right Pyramids and Right Cones 3.2 Math Lab: Measuring Length and Distance 13 1.5 Polynomials of the Form 45 3.6 Surface Area and Volume of a Sphere Checkpoint 2 1.7 Solving Problems Involving Objects 157 x2 36 3.5 Volumes of Right Pyramids and Right Cones 3.2 Using the Tangent Ratio to Calculate Lengths 4.1 Factors and Multiples of Whole Numbers 134 + bx + c Checkpoint 2 159 168 179 55 3.1 The Tangent Ratio 70 2.2 Perfect Squares.4 Fractional Exponents and Radicals 222 4.3 Relating SI and Imperial Units Checkpoint 1 and Their Roots 142 24 Checkpoint 1 148 3.6 Applying the Exponent Laws 235 237 2.3 Mixed and Entire Radicals 213 Checkpoint 1 220 4.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution.3 Common Factors of a Polynomial 26 1.6 Applying the Trigonometric Ratios 4 Roots and Powers 97 103 204 4.4 Math Lab: Modelling Trinomials as Binomial Products 1.4 The Sine and Cosine Ratios 89 2.qxd:math10 2/26/10 12:34 PM Page iv Contents 1 Measurement 1.6 Polynomials of the Form ax2 + bx + c 53 150 3.3 Math Lab: Measuring an Inaccessible Height 84 Checkpoint 1 87 2.7 Solving Problems Involving More than Study Guide and Review 244 Practice Test 105 249 One Right Triangle 113 Study Guide and Review 122 Project: Algebra and Number Human Calculators 250 Practice Test 127 Cumulative Review: Chapters 1 – 4 252 Project: Measurement Ramp It Up! 128 Cumulative Review: Chapters 1 and 2 130 iv . Perfect Cubes. 16 1.5 Using the Sine and Cosine Ratios to Calculate Lengths Checkpoint 2 2.7 Multiplying Polynomials 182 Study Guide and Review 62 3.1 Imperial Measures of Length 3 Factors and Products 4 1.1 Math Lab: Estimating Roots 78 2.2 Irrational Numbers 207 4.8 Factoring Special Polynomials 188 Practice Test 67 Study Guide and Review 196 Practice Test 201 2 Trigonometry 2.5 Negative Exponents and Reciprocals 229 Checkpoint 2 4.

6 General Form of the Equation for a Linear Relation 377 Study Guide and Review 386 Practice Test 391 v .2 Solving a System of Linear Equations Checkpoint 1 274 5.6 Properties of Linear Relations 300 5.qxd:math10 2/26/10 12:34 PM Page v 5 Relations and Functions 7 Systems of Linear Equations 5.5 Slope-Point Form of the Equation for a Linear Function 365 Checkpoint 2 375 6.2 Properties of Functions 264 7.1 Developing Systems of Linear Equations 5.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution.3 Math Lab: Investigating Graphs of Linear Functions 455 Answers 332 6.2 Slopes of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines 344 Checkpoint 1 450 543 Acknowledgments 547 6.3 Interpreting and Sketching Graphs 276 5.4 Slope-Intercept Form of the Equation for a Linear Function 357 Project: Relations and Functions Exercise Mind and Body 456 Cumulative Review: Chapters 1 – 7 458 462 Glossary 535 Index 352 6.7 Interpreting Graphs of Linear Functions 311 System of Linear Equations 428 Study Guide and Review 324 Checkpoint 2 440 Practice Test 329 7.4 Using a Substitution Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 416 5.5 Using an Elimination Strategy to Solve a 7.4 Math Lab: Graphing Data 284 5.3 Math Lab: Using Graphing Technology to Solve a System of Linear Equations 411 Checkpoint 1 414 7.1 Representing Relations 256 7.5 Graphs of Relations and Functions 287 Checkpoint 2 298 Graphically 394 403 7.6 Properties of Systems of Linear Equations 442 Study Guide and Review Practice Test 6 Linear Functions 6.1 Slope of a Line 354 6.

Linear Functions 7. ALGEBRA AND NUMBERS 3. and 7 have you solve applied problems while you reinforce your learning. RELATIONS AND FUNCTIONS 5. Relations and Functions 6. Roots and Powers Project: Human Calculators Cumulative Review: Chapters 1 – 4 Extend your work with patterning. By focusing on one topic at a time. Measurement 2.qxd:math10 2/26/10 12:34 PM Page vi Your Book at a Glance This book organizes your grade 10 course into three major topics. . 4. Systems of Linear Equations Project: Exercise Mind and Body Cumulative Review: Chapters 1 – 7 Projects after Chapters 2.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution. vi Build on what you have learned about algebra to study graphs and explore patterns. algebra. Cumulative Reviews cover all the content up to that point in the book. you can: • spend more time on new concepts • develop deeper understanding • improve your recall of math concepts and strategies • make connections across topics MEASUREMENT 1. and number concepts as you develop tools for solving new types of problems. Factors and Products 4. Trigonometry Project: Ramp It Up! Cumulative Review: Chapters 1 and 2 Apply and extend what you know from previous grades as you investigate and solve real-world problems involving measurement.

vii . Big Ideas… tell you the learning goals for the chapter. Building on… tells you what you need to know before learning new concepts. Learning through the Big Ideas: • lets you make sense of math topics • helps you understand how the topics are related • lets you learn more efficiently Look for an illustration where the math of the chapter is applied.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution. New Vocabulary… identifies the new terms you will use as you work through the chapter.qxd:math10 2/26/10 12:34 PM Page vii Chapter Opener Each chapter is organized around a few key Big Ideas of mathematics. The caption describes the application.

Lesson Focus… states the learning goal for the lesson. Try This or Think About It… presents an activity or a problem that uses ideas from Make Connections. Make Connections… presents previous content. The activity or problem leads you to new concepts. Look for margin notes that define or explain a key term. or definitions.qxd:math10 2/26/10 12:34 PM Page viii Numbered Lessons Each lesson links to the Big Ideas stated at the start of the chapter. viii Colour boxes highlight important rules. formulas. so you can make connections between what you already know. . or an application. then apply what you have learned. and what you are about to learn.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution. In each lesson you Construct Understanding.

and before starting the Exercises.qxd:math10 2/26/10 Examples… model strategies for solving problems. or ask you to think about key points. Discuss the Ideas… after working through the Examples. Exercises… are organized by A/B/C levels of difficulty and allow you to check your skills and understanding. ix . or from the world of careers. The World of Math… highlights interesting math facts from the world around you. Margin questions extend your thinking. and record. Reflect… prompts you to think about. what you learned. 12:29 PM Page ix Check Your Understanding gives you an opportunity for immediate reinforcement after each Example. Each lesson provides practice for the concepts you’ve been working with. from history.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution.

Try This… presents an extended activity.qxd:math10 2/26/10 12:29 PM Page x Math Lab Lessons Math Lab lessons provide more time to explore the math using materials or technology. After completing Try This. x . check if you’re on the right track.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution. As in other lessons. Assess Your Understanding… provides a few key questions so you can apply what you learned in Try This. you’ll find the Lesson Focus and Make Connections.

Assess Your Understanding… provides questions related to each lesson. Checkpoints let you check your understanding so far.qxd:math10 2/26/10 12:30 PM Page xi Review and Study Features Checkpoints occur at key intervals in the chapter. At the end of each chapter: Study Guide… summarizes the important concepts and skills from the chapter. Review… pages provide additional practice. Connections… gives a picture of what you’ve been learning.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution. Concept Development… summarizes important content. Practice Test… lets you try a sample test before you take a class test. so you can reflect on Big Ideas as they’ve been developed. xi .

xii . these book features support your learning. Cumulative Reviews… help you recall content from earlier in the course. Projects… present applications where you can use the math you have learned to solve problems.qxd:math10 2/26/10 12:30 PM Page xii Cumulative Reviews and Projects After 2 or 3 chapters.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution.

In addition to the Chapters. They will help you locate material. and check your work as you practise. you’ll find these tools for learning: • A Glossary of key math terms. or with others.Math10_fm_3rd_evalution. so you can check the meaning of new math vocabulary • Answers to exercise questions so you can check your work • An Index to let you locate where a topic is covered Use these book features throughout the course. xiii . interpret examples.qxd:math10 2/26/10 12:30 PM Page xiii End of Book Features This book provides supports you can use to learn on your own.

qxd 12/7/09 3:45 PM 1 Page 2 Measurement BUILDING ON ■ working with metric units of measure ■ determining the surface areas and volumes of right prisms and cylinders BIG IDEAS ■ You can use proportional reasoning to convert measurements. ■ The volume of a right pyramid or cone is related to the volume of the enclosing right prism or cylinder. ■ The surface area of a sphere is related to the curved surface area of the enclosing cylinder.wncp10_1_1. ■ The surface area of a right pyramid or cone is the sum of the areas of the faces and the curved surfaces. NEW VOCABULARY imperial units unit analysis SI system of measures apex right pyramid and right cone slant height lateral area sphere .

and Klingon.qxd 12/7/09 3:45 PM Page 3 S TA R S H I P E N T E R P R I S E A replica was constructed in Vulcan. Visitors are welcomed in 3 languages: English. The base is part of a pyramid and it supports a 31-ft.wncp10_1_1. . long spacecraft. Vulcan. Alberta. in June 1995.

Canada adopted SI units to measure length.1 3:45 PM Page 4 Imperial Measures of Length LESSON FOCUS Develop personal referents to estimate imperial measures of length. this form of the metric system has been adopted by many countries. including Canada. and the mile. construction and manufacturing industries continue to use imperial units. Many Canadians use imperial units to measure their height. Make Connections The SI system of measures is an abbreviation for Le Système International d’Unités. Look around the classroom. What is your height? Some imperial units of measure are the inch. Which object has a length of about one foot? Which object has a length of about one inch? Which object has a length of about one yard? 4 Chapter 1: Measurement . In 1976.wncp10_1_1.qxd 12/7/09 1. the foot. However. the yard. Since 1960.

Why is it necessary to have standard units of length? F. 1 in.wncp10_1_1. Use a measuring tape to measure each length. in thumb units. What other referents could be used for each length? ■ one inch ■ one foot ■ one yard 1. TRY THIS Work with a partner. Compare the measures in your personal units with those of your partner. For which imperial unit could you use your arm span as a referent? D. Hold a piece of string from your nose to the longest finger of an outstretched arm. in foot units. You will need a ruler and measuring tape with imperial units. and scissors. A. in arm spans. string. For which imperial unit could you use your thumb length as a referent? B.qxd 12/7/09 3:45 PM Page 5 Construct Understanding Many units in the imperial system are based on measurements of the human body. Use the length of your thumb from its tip to the first joint as a measuring instrument.1 Imperial Measures of Length 5 . Use a ruler or measuring tape to measure each length. Have your partner cut the string to this length. Use a ruler or measuring tape to measure each length. Use this string to estimate then record the length and width of the classroom. Use your thumb to estimate then record the length of your pencil and the dimensions of your textbook. For which imperial unit could you use your foot length as a referent? C. Use your foot length to estimate then record the length and width of a bookcase. Determine approximately: ■ how many thumb lengths equal one foot length ■ how many foot lengths equal one arm span ■ how many thumb lengths equal one arm span E.

ϭ 1760 yd. Distance walked in 20 min 1 mi. Foot length 1 ft. tenths. The ruler below has 16 divisions between 1 two adjacent inch marks. Thumb length Foot ft.wncp10_1_1. 1 mi.. To measure the length of an object. On maps and scale diagrams. For example. The length of one mile was first established as the distance a Roman soldier could walk in 1000 paces. 6 Chapter 1: Measurement . Imp erial Unit Abbrev iat ion Referent Relat ionship between Units Inch in. you must first determine the smallest indicated unit by counting the number of divisions between two adjacent inch marks. you may see symbols for imperial units instead of abbreviations. 1 yd. so 7 its length is 3 in. 1 yd. One inch is 1” and one foot is 1’. which 16 1 is written as in. Many rulers marked with imperial units show one inch divided into eighths. ϭ 12 in. people measured the distance between two places by the number of days it took to travel from one place to the other. or sixteenths.qxd 12/7/09 3:45 PM Page 6 People have been measuring for thousands of years. Mile mi. these units were standardized as imperial units. ϭ 36 in. 16 A fraction of an imperial measure of length is usually written in fraction form. and relationships between the units were determined. so the smallest indicated unit is of an inch. Early trades people created their own measuring devices and units. One pace is 2 steps. 1 ft. Over time. not decimal form. ϭ 5280 ft. ϭ 3 ft. and 4 in. Yard yd. 16 The pencil point is closest to the 7th division mark between 3 in. Arm span 1 yd. The imperial unit for measuring long distances is the mile.

and inches ii) inches b) Convert 62 in. and 51 in. ϭ 4 ft.wncp10_1_1. feet. Write this improper fraction as a mixed number. 3 in. 1 ft. ϭ 180 in. 3 in... we use proportional reasoning when we divide by 12 to convert a measurement in inches to a measurement in feet. ϭ 1 yd. Similarly. ϭ 1 ft. ϭ 15 ft. ϭ 3 ft. feet. ii) 252 in. ii) Since 5 yd. ϭ 4 ft.qxd 12/7/09 3:45 PM Example 1 Page 7 Converting between Imperial Units CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) Convert 5 yd. to: i) feet ii) inches 1. ϭ 1 yd. ϭ ft. to convert feet to inches multiply by 12. 2 ft. 4 ft. ii) 51 in. to convert inches to feet. When you convert a measurement from a larger unit to a smaller unit. ϭ 12 in.1 Imperial Measures of Length 7 . as illustrated on the next page. ϭ 15 ft.] 5 yd. ϭ 5(3 ft. and 1 ft.) 5 yd. in 1 yd. divide by 12. to: b) Convert 51 in. ϭ 15(12 in. 51 51 in. [Answers: a) i) 21 ft. in Example 1. 5 yd. b) i) Since 12 in. 3 in. we multiply by 3 to convert a measurement in yards to a measurement in feet.. so. 1 ft. 1. ϭ 4 ft. and inches a) i) Since 1 yd. ii) 1 yd. do you expect the number of units to increase or decrease? Why? There are 3 ft. 12 51 in. 12 3 51 in. to: i) feet and inches i) feet ii) yards. Since 3 ft.) 5 yd. b) i) 5 ft. to convert yards to feet multiply by 3. 2 in. ϭ 1 yd. a) Convert 7 yd. 2 in. We also use proportional reasoning when we write then solve a proportion. to: i) feet and inches SOLUTION ii) yards. this is one type of proportional reasoning.

is 37 ft. divide by 12. so Anne must buy 12 ft. excluding closets and doorway. 12 The perimeter of the framed picture will be 11 ft.89/ft.89) C ϭ $22. Method 2 Use a proportion. ϭ 11 ft.68 Before taxes. 12 So. is 11 ft. 1 ft. What is the cost of material before taxes? [Answers: a) 12 yd. ϭ ft.99/yd.. is equal to the ratio of 1 ft. ϭ 11 ft.qxd 12/7/09 3:45 PM Example 2 Page 8 Solving a Problem Involving Converting between Units Anne is framing a picture. 12 4 136 in. a) What length of baseboard is needed. the material will cost $22. 8 Chapter 1: Measurement How could you use mental math and estimation to check that your answer is reasonable? . The perimeter of the bedroom.68. 4 in. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. Ben buys baseboard for a bedroom. 4 in. in yards and feet? b) The baseboard material is sold by the yard. The ratio of x feet to 136 in. 136 in. The cost. 4 in. a) What will be the perimeter of the framed picture in feet and inches? b) The framing material is sold by the foot. The perimeter of the framed picture will be 136 in. 1 x 136 a b ϭ 136 a b 136 12 136 xϭ 12 4 x ϭ 11 12 4 11 ft. b) $77. is: C ϭ 12($1. C. to 12 in. of framing material. Write a proportion. Let x represent the length in feet. It costs $5. 136 136 in. b) The perimeter of the framed picture is greater than 11 ft.wncp10_1_1. What will be the cost of material before taxes? SOLUTIONS a) Method 1 To convert inches to feet. 4 in. x 1 ϭ 136 12 Multiply each side by 136. It costs $1.87] The perimeter of the framed picture will be 11 ft.

1 ft. × Example 3 Solving a Problem Involving Two Unit Conversions The school council has 6 yd. we can write the relationship between feet and inches as a 12 in. to inches.) 6 yd. ϭ 216 in. a) How many banners can be made? b) Use unit analysis to verify the conversions. ϭ × Eliminate corresponding units. fraction in two ways: and 12 in. 1 ft. ϭ 12 in. so we can multiply any number by the fraction and not alter its value. We write: 1 ft. 12 Since this measurement is equal to the measurement in Example 2. 136 ϭ ft. Convert 6 yd. Each bracelet needs 8 in. ϭ 18(12 in. 136 in.1 Imperial Measures of Length 9 . Unit analysis is one method of verifying that the units in a conversion are correct. [Answer: a) 18] 5” 5” 5” 5” 6 yd. a) How many bracelets can Tyrell make? SOLUTION a) Since the width of a banner is measured in inches. to feet. convert the length of the material to inches.wncp10_1_1. 1 yd. of fabric that will be cut into strips 5 in. 1 ft. 1 ft. the conversion is verified. ϭ 3 ft. 1 12 in.) 18 ft. 136 in. (Solution continues. 12 in. Each fraction is equal to 1. 136 in. 12 4 ϭ 11 ft. ϭ 18 ft. wide to make decorative banners for the school dance. ϭ 6(3 ft. ϭ × 1 12 in. 1 ft. 18 ft. These fractions are conversion factors.qxd 12/7/09 3:45 PM Page 9 We can use unit analysis to verify a conversion between units. For Example 2. of cord. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3.) 1. Since we are converting 136 in. of cord to make friendship bracelets. b) Use unit analysis to check the conversions. Tyrell has 4 yd. we use the conversion factor with feet in the numerator.

6 yd.446… 5280 The distance between Paxson and the Canadian border is approximately 276 mi. 3 ft. 1 ft. represents 4 750 000 in. 1 1 yd. the distance between Seward and Anchorage in Alaska is 3 1 in. first convert yards to feet. . 11 3 in.) ϭ 17 515 625 in. to miles: 1 459 635. Since this measurement is equal to the measurement in part a. 3 ft. inches in the numerator: 1 ft. Write a conversion factor for feet and inches. 1 ft. the conversion is verified. ϭ 276. × × ϭ × × 1 yd. What is this distance to the nearest mile? 16 SOLUTION The map scale is 1 in.. ϭ (6 × 3 × 12) in.wncp10_1_1. 16 Divide by 12 to convert 17 515 625 in.417… 12 Divide by 5280 to convert 1 459 635.417. feet in the numerator: 1 yd.2 5 43 banners can be made. Write a conversion factor for yards and feet. 12 in. Example 4 Solving a Problem Involving Scale Diagrams A map of Alaska has a scale of 1:4 750 000. with 3 ft. b) To convert yards to inches.qxd 12/7/09 3:45 PM Page 10 The number of banners is: 216 ϭ 43.417… ft. with 12 in. represents 16 (3 + 11/16) * 4750000 11 17515625 3 (4 750 000 in. Then. to feet: 17 515 625 ϭ 1 459 635. ϭ 216 in. On the map with a scale of 1:4 750 000. 6 yd.] . The distance on the map between Paxson and the Canadian border 11 is 3 in. 10 What conversion factor could you use to convert the units in one step? Chapter 1: Measurement CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4. 12 in. then convert feet to inches. What is the distance 4 between these two towns to the nearest mile? [Answer: approximately 131 mi.

Pierre-Marc converted 21 ft. to feet b) 574 in. 13. a) How many mats can David make? b) Use unit analysis to verify the conversions. 5 in. 12.wncp10_1_1. and 8 ft. 9 in. feet. a) Which imperial unit is most appropriate to measure the length of a piece of notepaper? Why? b) Use a referent to estimate the length of a piece of notepaper. How many inches shorter is Sandy than Leonid? 7. His answer was 7 yd. Why is it important to measure with standard units? Give an example. It costs $10.1 Imperial Measures of Length 11 . 2. to inches b) 63 yd. 6 in. feet. a) the length of your arm from wrist to elbow b) the height of your classroom c) the distance from your classroom to the school office d) the perimeter of your school grounds 9. Measure to check your estimate. feet. Convert: a) 2 mi. to feet c) 48 in. of material that he will cut into strips 15 in. Estimate each measurement in imperial units. b) The fencing material is sold by the yard. Measure to check your estimate. a) Which imperial unit is most appropriate to measure the height of the door in your classroom? Why? b) Use a referent to estimate the height of the door. Carolyn is building a pen for her dog. Explain the process. When might you use referents to estimate a measure? Exercises A 3. Explain the process.99/yd. Their respective heights are 7 ft. 5. 10. a) Explain how you can use a proportion to convert the perimeter to yards and feet. a) the height of your desk b) the thickness of a mattress c) the width of a car d) the length of a flat panel TV e) the distance from the school to your home 4. David has 10 yd. and inches. 7 in. Is his answer correct? If your answer is no. to a measurement in yards. In 2008. and feet 1. 6. wide to make mats. show the correct conversion. to miles. 1 ft. into yards. yards. Explain how to convert a measurement of 165 in. to yards. Sandy Allen and Leonid Stadnyk were the world’s tallest living woman and man.qxd 12/7/09 3:45 PM Page 11 Discuss the Ideas 1. and inches c) 7390 ft. Convert: a) 3 ft. to feet B 8. Which imperial unit is the most appropriate unit to measure each item? Justify your choice. The perimeter of the pen is 52 ft. and inches. What is the cost of material before taxes? 11.

b) The border is purchased in 12-ft. before taxes? 15.qxd 12/7/09 3:45 PM Page 12 14. Erica follows the gardener’s advice and plants tulips beside her 18-ft. 40 in. a) What is the value of a stack that has the same height as Mount Logan. 4 in.C.69/ft. the distance between Trois-Rivières 5 and Québec City is 2 in.wncp10_1_1. Each ream costs $3. 26 in. the tower is 35 in. How many rolls are required? c) Each roll of border costs $12. before taxes. between Plamondon and Bonnyville. B. What is the distance 8 between these cities to the nearest mile? 18.49. 20. A student can walk 30 ft. the distance between Prince Rupert. 9 in. What is the map scale. apart. 1 in. Twenty reams of paper form a stack 40 in. A gardener recommends planting tulip bulbs 8 in. How far could she walk in 1 h? Write the answer in miles and yards. The trim costs $1. On the map. In the puzzle. 2 ft. which is 19 500 ft. AK. A map of Québec has a scale of 1:1 500 000. to the nearest thousand? 21. On a map of British Columbia and Alaska. tall. a) In a basement renovation. 6 in. The width of the doorway is 3 ft. How much will the border cost.. 5 What is the height of the Eiffel Tower in feet? 17. high? b) How can you use mental math and estimation to determine if your answer is reasonable? 2 22. high. The actual distance 16 between these towns is 95 mi. Reflect 12 Chapter 1: Measurement 16. A 3-D puzzle of the Eiffel Tower has a scale of 2 1:360. before taxes? b) The contractor uses the same trim around this window. 5 What is the approximate value of a stack of toonies that spans the 100 mi. AB? How would you use a referent to estimate a length? How do you determine the appropriate imperial unit to record the measure of that length? . rolls. high. How many tulip bulbs will Erica need? C 19. and 9 Ketchikan. a) What is the total length of border needed? 12 ft. 8 ft. Five toonies form a stack that is in. What is the cost of the trim for the room. the contractor measured the length of a wall in a square room as 18 ft. A wallpaper border is to be pasted halfway up the wall around a child’s bedroom. in 10 s. sidewalk. Determine the cost of the trim for the window. is 2 in. The contractor plans to place wood trim along the bottom of each wall.

2 Math Lab: Measuring Length and Distance 13 .wncp10_1_2-1.qxd 12/7/09 2:52 PM Page 13 MATH LAB 1.2 Measuring Length and Distance LESSON FOCUS Use measuring instruments and personal strategies to determine linear measures.3. Make Connections How do you think the person who makes these glass vases checks that the dimensions of each vase are correct? 1.

an eraser. a bottle. this is supported by the similarity of the word “inch” to the word “thumb” in several languages. THE WORLD OF MATH Historical Moment: The Origin of the Inch 1 in.3. You will need: ■ rulers and measuring tapes in both SI and imperial measures. tum is inch and tumme is thumb. and yard stick ■ string ■ calipers ■ 3 objects with different sizes and shapes. C. metre stick. Use both imperial units and SI units to measure the object in as many ways as you can. Alternatively. such as a can. a desk Repeat the following steps for each object: A. Describe any problems you had making the measurements and the strategies you used to solve the problems. King David I of Scotland described an ynche as the width of a man's thumb at the base of the nail. pouce means inch and also means thumb. For example. Choose appropriate measuring instruments.” referring to one-twelfth the length of a man’s foot. in French. Justify your choice of units.wncp10_1_2-1. the Anglo-Saxon term inch was defined as the length of 3 corns of barley. 14 Chapter 1: Measurement The word inch may be derived from the Latin word uncia meaning “one-twelfth part. How can you measure the perimeter of a can without using the formula for the circumference of a circle? B. Use a referent to estimate all possible linear measures of the object in: ■ imperial units ■ SI units Record these estimates on the sketch. Record the measurements on the sketch. In Swedish. Sketch each object. a paper clip. .qxd 12/7/09 2:52 PM Page 14 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. a sunflower seed.

? Explain how you could measure the length in both units. Describe a strategy you would use to estimate and then measure each length. 6.wncp10_1_2-1. Look around the classroom.qxd 12/7/09 2:52 PM Page 15 Assess Your Understanding 1. What referent could you use for 1 km? 3. of the Lion’s Gate Bridge in Vancouver. What are the limitations of the use of calipers? 4. a) the circumference of a cylindrical garbage can b) the thickness of your hand c) the distance between your home and the closest store d) the distance between two cities on a map e) the distance around an oval running track f) the length of an eyelash 5. What referents would you use to estimate the length. 1. a) Identify objects that were built using imperial measures. in both SI units and imperial units. Justify your choice. a) 1 m b) 1 cm c) 1 mm 2. B. Describe a referent you could use for each SI measure.3. Justify your choice.C.2 Math Lab: Measuring Length and Distance 15 . b) Identify objects that were built using SI measures.

You will need a ruler. Hana drove 62 mi. Make Connections Two cars are driven in opposite directions from a Canada/United States border crossing.wncp10_1_2-1.3. or measuring tape that has both SI and imperial units. How could you determine which vehicle travelled farther from the border? Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work on your own. 16 Chapter 1: Measurement .3 12/7/09 2:52 PM Page 16 Relating SI and Imperial Units LESSON FOCUS Convert measurements between SI units and imperial units. metre stick.qxd 1. border crossing during the North American Solar Challenge in July 2005. In one hour.S. The driver of this solar powered car was at a Canada/U. south while Farrin drove 98 km north.

to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. In the first column. ■ Check your answer by measuring the length in imperial units. Estimate the length of 1 in. write the numbers as fractions or mixed numbers. ft.3. Choose 3 different objects in the classroom. In the second column. For each object: ■ Measure its length in SI units. Copy this table. 1mЏ ft.wncp10_1_2-1. B.qxd 12/7/09 2:53 PM Page 17 A. Estimate the length of 1 cm to the nearest fraction of an inch. ■ Check your answer by measuring the length in SI units. Imperial Units to SI Units SI Units to Imperial Units 1 in. m C. Џ m 1 mi. Џ in. Џ cm 1mЏ in. Џ cm 1 yd. write the numbers as decimals to the nearest tenth. ■ Use the completed table in Step B to write the measurement in imperial units. For each object: ■ Measure its length in imperial units. 1 km Џ yd. 1mЏ yd. D.3 Relating SI and Imperial Units 17 . 1 yd. 1. ■ Use the completed table in Step B to write the measurement in SI units. Џ cm 1 cm Џ in. 1 ft. in. Use the results from Step A to complete the table. Choose 3 more objects in the classroom. Look at the SI and imperial scales on the ruler.

wncp10_1_2-1.] . This table shows some approximate relationships between imperial units and SI units. 4 19 m Џ 247 ft. Џ 90 cm 1 yd.3.3 m 1 yd. ϭ 91. 4 3 19 m Џ 61 ft. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING What is this measurement to the nearest foot? 1. Џ 0. 10 1 in. 19 m Џ 19(3 ft. 18 Chapter 1: Measurement What is this measurement to the nearest foot? [Answer: approximately 192 ft.) 4 13 19 m Џ 19 a b ft.44 cm 1 km Џ 6 mi.54 cm 1 yd. Џ 2. Џ 30 cm 1 ft. 100 4 in. 10 1 m Џ 39 in.qxd 12/7/09 2:53 PM Page 18 Each measurement in the imperial system relates to a corresponding measurement in the SI system. 1 m Џ 3 ft.5 cm 1 ft. ϭ 2. 4 A length of 19 m is approximately 62 ft. Example 1 Converting from Metres to Feet A bowling lane is approximately 19 m long. Џ 0. for example.9 m 1 mi. 4 1 So. 1 1 m Џ 3 ft. SOLUTION 1 From the table.6 km We can use the data in the table above to convert between SI and imperial units of measure. 4 Some conversions are exact. SI Units to Imperial Units Imperial Units to SI Units 1 mm Џ 1 cm Џ 4 in. Џ 1. 1 in. A Canadian football field is approximately 59 m wide.

decima.2 km Ͼ 98 km. Mouton suggested that this unit. Who drove farther? SOLUTIONS To compare the distances. Method 2 Convert the distance Farrin drove from kilometres to miles. Џ 1. be successively further divided by 10 to produce these units: centuria. virga.6 km So. 1. south and Farrin drove 98 km north.wncp10_1_2-1. decuria. After meeting in Osoyoos. 10 6 So. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. was the first person to propose a decimal system of measurement.6 km) 62 mi. 5 THE WORLD OF MATH Historical Moment: The Decimal System of Measurement Gabriel Mouton. 1 mi. B. centesima. Takoda drove 114 km north and Winona drove 68 mi. the milliare. he created a unit equal to the length of 1° of longitude on Earth’s surface. or 58 mi. 62 mi.3 Relating SI and Imperial Units 19 .b 10 8 4 98 km Џ 58 mi. Manitoba.2 km Since 99.3. who lived in Lyons. convert one measurement so the units are the same. Hana drove farther. Џ 99. Џ 62(1. C. In 1670. France from 1618 – 1694. Who drove farther? [Answer: Takoda] Method 1 Convert the distance Hana drove from miles to kilometres. Hana drove farther. south. 6 1 km Џ mi. and millesima. Mouton’s milliare corresponds to 1 nautical mile that is used in the shipping and aviation industries today. virgula. Hana drove 62 mi.. 1 milliare 1° Mouton’s ideas were studied at the time but it was more than 100 years later that the French Academy of Sciences adopted a decimal system of measurement. 98 km Џ 98 a mi.qxd 12/7/09 2:53 PM Example 2 Page 19 Converting between Miles and Kilometres After meeting in Emerson.. 10 5 4 Since 58 Ͻ 62.

6 ft. Џ 30 cm 6 ft. 2 in. 10 1 h Џ Multiply each side by 74. Nora knows that she is 5 ft. ϩ 2 in.3. 10 4 Write as 0. ϭ 72 in. And. 2 in. Џ 180 cm So.qxd 12/7/09 Example 3 2:53 PM Page 20 Solving a Problem that Involves Unit Conversions Alex is 6 ft. 6 ft. Џ 185 cm is reasonable. to centimetres. ϭ 6(12 in. 20 Chapter 1: Measurement What other strategy could you use to determine Alex’s height in centimetres? . 74 0.4 1 h 74 a b Џ 74 a b 74 0. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. 7 in. a) What height in centimetres will she list on her driver’s license application? b) Use mental math and estimation to justify that the answer is reasonable. 6 ft.4 74 hЏ 0. 2 in. b) To check: 1 ft. To list his height on his driver’s license application. [Answer: a) 168 cm] 1 ft. to inches. 2 in.4. 6 ft. Let h represent Alex’s height in centimetres.) 6 ft. 2 in. ϭ 72 in. The ratio of h centimetres to 74 in. ϭ 74 in. ϭ 12 in. SOLUTION a) Convert 6 ft. tall. Alex needs to convert this measurement to centimetres.wncp10_1_2-1. Write a proportion to convert 74 in.4 h Џ 185 Alex is approximately 185 cm tall. tall. So. is 4 approximately equal to the ratio of 1 cm to in. a) What is Alex’s height to the nearest centimetre? b) Use mental math and estimation to justify that the answer is reasonable.

Regulations along his route state that any load over 4. So. 1 h Џ 3.3 Relating SI and Imperial Units 21 .3 m. This height is an estimate that is very close to the bridge height. or 11 ft.7952 … ft.wncp10_1_2-1.4829… ft. SOLUTION Write a proportion to convert 3.5 m to feet.5 m is approximately equal to the ratio of 1 ft. 9 in. Let h represent the height of the vehicle in feet.6 m wide..7952… in. 8 in. the load is approximately 4.3 2 – h Џ 11.qxd 12/7/09 2:53 PM Example 4 Page 21 Estimating and Calculating Using Unit Conversions A truck driver knows that her semitrailer is 3. The support beams of a bridge are 11 ft. 137.3 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4.3 hЏ 3.5 m high.3.. Use the conversion: 2. The ratio of h feet to 3.54 cm ϭ 1 in.5 a b Џ 3. 350 cm ϭ 350 in. 1. A truck driver knows that his load is 15 ft. calculate an exact conversion. [Answer: Yes.54 350 cm ϭ 137.5 a b 3. 6. so it 3 should fit under the bridge.5 0. 6 in. high. 350 cm ϭ Converting 3.] Multiply each side by 3.5. To be sure the vehicle will fit. Will the vehicle fit under the bridge? Justify the answer. 2.5 0. high. h 1 3. or 11 ft. or 11 3 2 The vehicle is approximately 11 ft.3 m wide must have wide-load markers and an escort with flashing lights. Does this vehicle need wideload markers? Justify your answer.5 m to 350 cm Convert inches to feet. 12 350 cm ϭ 11. Convert the height of the vehicle in centimetres to inches. so the 2 vehicle will fit under the bridge.5 0. to 0. wide. 1 This measurement is a little less than 11 ft.

a) Convert each measurement. a) 16 in. to metres d) 1650 yd. .3. a) Who ran farther? b) Use unit analysis to verify the conversion. Answer to the nearest tenth. how do you decide which conversion factor to use? Exercises A 4. to kilometres e) 6 mi. Is the odometer accurate? Explain.5 m to the nearest foot c) 10 m to the nearest yard d) 150 km to the nearest mile 6. to centimetres c) 10 yd. A fabric warehouse is selling the same material for $0. to metres c) 5 yd. The Tennessee River is approximately 886 mi. 8. Which river is longer? Justify your answer. USA. Elise sees this road sign: Elise tests the accuracy of her car’s odometer and tracks the distance she drove from that sign to Helena’s city limits. to metres B 7. When might you want to convert: ■ a measurement in SI units to imperial units? ■ a measurement in imperial units to SI units? 2. track.qxd 12/7/09 2:53 PM Discuss the Ideas Page 22 1.93/m. feet. 1 ft. It lists a certain material for $0. What are these dimensions to the nearest tenth of a metre? 22 Chapter 1: Measurement 9. by 60 yd. Her odometer showed 142 km. and the nearest inch iii) 10 000 m to the nearest mile b) Use mental math and estimation to justify that each answer in part a is reasonable. Convert each measurement. The dimensions of a lacrosse field are 110 yd. Michael did seven 110-m hurdle practice races. Jean-Luc ran two laps around a 400-yd. to millimetres 5. Convert each measurement. The Fraser River is approximately 1375 km long. 12. long. On a road trip in Montana. Convert each measurement. a) 1 ft. i) 75 cm to feet and the nearest inch ii) 274 cm to yards.wncp10_1_2-1. When you use unit analysis to verify an answer. What relationships can help you check that an answer is reasonable when you convert between systems of measurement? 3. 5 in. 11. to centimetres b) 4 ft. 10 in. to kilometres f) 2 in. 7 in. Answer to the nearest tenth. a) 25 mm to the nearest inch b) 2. 10. In preparation for les Jeux de la francophonie canadienne. to centimetres b) 2 yd.89/yd. 2 ft. a) Which store has the better price? b) Use mental math and estimation to justify that the answer is reasonable. A retail fabric store advertises a storewide sale.

3 m tall. 2 ft. The tallest structure in Canada is the CN Tower in Toronto. Each 32-ft. piece of casing was welded to the previous piece to prevent the hole from collapsing.471 acres a) How many hectares did each settler receive? b) One hundred sixty acres is a square with a side length of one-half a mile. 50 m What is the maximum number of homes the developer can fit on this land? C 15. During the initial agricultural expansion of the western provinces. a) Determine the height of the CN Tower in feet and the height of the Willis Tower in metres. in inches. of wire are required.qxd 12/7/09 2:53 PM Page 23 13. A basketball player has a maximum reach of 2. While the crew drilled. On a lease site. The imperial unit to measure an area of land is the acre. The rim of a basketball net is mounted 10 ft. an oil company determined that there was an oil reserve 1400 m beneath the surface. It is 553. How many sections of casing did the crew need to reach the oil reserve? 16. 14.5 m. does the player need to jump to reach 6 in. Each roll contains 4 m of wire. of wire are required. it lined the hole with casing. tall. An electrician was hired to run the wires for a surround-sound stereo speaker system. 11 ft. Today. what length of wire in centimetres will she need? If your answer is yes. The tallest structure in the United States is the Willis Tower. How many hectares are in one square mile? What strategies do you know for converting a measure in imperial units to a measure in SI units? Include examples in your explanation. b) Which structure is taller? Explain how you know. For each of 2 speakers. in Chicago. above the rim? Reflect 18. in metres and to the nearest foot. 14 ft. She purchased 2 rolls of 14-gauge speaker wire. It is 1451 ft. c) Determine the difference in the heights of the structures. 8 ft. Canada uses the hectare to measure land area: 1 hectare Џ 2.3. 1. How high. Will the electrician have enough wire? If your answer is no. The developer sketched this plan: road 30 m 60 ft. off the ground. For each of the other 2 speakers. the Canadian government offered 160 acres of land free to settlers who were willing to immigrate to Canada. previously known as the Sears Tower.wncp10_1_2-1. what length of wire in centimetres will be left over? 17. A real-estate developer purchased a 30-m by 50-m plot of land to create a mobile home park.3 Relating SI and Imperial Units 23 .

1 ft. 10 . 6 1 km = — mi. One kilometre or 1 km 1 km = 1000 m 1 km is the approximate distance a person can walk in 15 min. – You used unit analysis to verify conversions. One millimetre or 1 mm 1 mm is the approximate thickness of a dime. or 1’ 1 ft. = 3 ft.3. 1 mile or 1 mi. = 12 in. SI Units of Length 24 Chapter 1: Measurement In Lesson 1. is the approximate distance a person can walk in 20 min. – You used unit analysis to verify conversions. 1 yd. is the approximate distance from a person’s nose to the fingertip of an outstretched arm. – You converted between units within the imperial system. is the approximate length from the mid-joint to the end of a person’s thumb. calipers. 10 . 1 ft. . 1 in. 1 yard or 1 yd. = 1760 yd.5 cm . ■ Unit conversions .2 – You estimated and measured dimensions of objects using both the imperial and SI systems. 4 1 cm = — in. or 1” 1 in. = 30 cm . 1 inch or 1 in. 1 mi. 1 foot or 1 ft. 1 yd. One centimetre or 1 cm 1 cm = 10 mm 1 cm is the approximate width of a child’s finger.qxd 12/7/09 7:21 PM Page 24 CHECKPOINT 1 Concept Development Connections Imperial Units of Length ■ – You developed referents for units of linear measure in the imperial system.wncp10_1_2-1.6 km In Lesson 1. measuring tape. – You used conversion factors and proportional reasoning to solve problems. Measurement instruments: ruler. – You developed personal strategies and used measuring instruments to determine linear measurements. 1 mi. = 2.9 m . One metre or 1 m 1 m = 100 cm = 1000 mm 1 m is the approximate width of a doorway. 1 mi. is the approximate length of a person’s foot. – You used conversion factors and proportional reasoning to solve problems.3 – You established approximate relationships between SI and imperial units of length. string . 1 yd = 0.1 ■ In Lesson 1. = 36 in. = 5280 ft. = 1. 1 m = 39 in.

tall. Who is shorter? How do you know? 1. a) the distance from your elbow to your wrist b) the length of a cell phone c) the width of a twin bed d) the height of the ceiling in the gymnasium 2.wncp10_1_2-1. to yards c) 2 yd. State the referent you used in each case. Sidney is 3 ft. then measure the items in question 1 parts a and b. Measure each item in both SI and imperial units: a) the perimeter of your classroom b) the width of a car c) the circumference of a dinner plate 6. 1. The length of laminate required is equal to the perimeter of the table. What length of laminate is needed? Checkpoint 1 25 . 3. 1 ft. The laminate can only be bought in lengths of whole numbers of feet. A thin strip of wood laminate is to be glued to the edges of a table.3. 11 in. which has dimensions 30 cm by 115 cm.3 7. and the nearest inch e) 13 000 in.qxd 12/7/09 7:21 PM Page 25 Assess Your Understanding 1. to the nearest tenth of a metre f) 1750 mm to feet and the nearest inch 8. a) 13 m to yards and the nearest foot b) 4 ft. feet. Choose the most appropriate imperial unit. Lindsay is 51 in. tall. Convert each measurement. Convert: a) 80 ft.2 5. to the nearest centimetre c) 2 km to miles and the nearest yard d) 25 000 cm to yards.1 1. State the measuring instrument and the unit you would use. to yards and feet b) 3 mi. Use imperial units to estimate each measure. to inches 4. Describe how you would determine the diameter of a marble.

Egypt. were built about 4500 years ago.4 3:07 PM Page 26 Surface Areas of Right Pyramids and Right Cones LESSON FOCUS Solve problems involving the surface areas of right pyramids and right cones.qxd 12/7/09 1. You will need a right pyramid and a ruler with SI units and imperial units. The pyramid above has a square base with a side length of 755 feet. The original height of the pyramid was 481 feet. How could you calculate the area that was once covered with limestone? Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work in a group. grid paper. Archeologists believe that the pyramid was once covered with a white limestone casing. You may need 1-cm grid paper and 1-in.wncp10_1_4. Make Connections The ancient pyramids at Giza. One-half of the group will use imperial units and the other half will use SI units. 26 Chapter 1: Measurement .

A right pyramid is a 3-dimensional object that has triangular faces and a base that is a polygon.wncp10_1_4.qxd 12/7/09 3:07 PM Page 27 A.2 and five square centimetres is 5 cm2. for example. apex triangular face height base When the base of a right pyramid is a regular polygon. C. slant height slant height regular tetrahedron right square pyramid slant height A tetrahedron is a triangular pyramid. Describe the measurements you made and the strategies you used. A regular tetrahedron has 4 congruent equilateral triangular faces.4 Surface Areas of Right Pyramids and Right Cones 27 . B. Then the slant height of the right pyramid is the height of a triangular face. Describe your strategy for estimating. including its base. five square inches is 5 in. The height of the pyramid is the perpendicular distance from the apex to the centre of the base. Did the strategy depend on the type of pyramid? Explain. right pentagonal pyramid The surface area of a right pyramid is the sum of the areas of the triangular faces and the base. We use exponents when we write units for area. the triangular faces are congruent. Estimate the surface area of the pyramid. Compare your strategies with those of another group that measured a different type of pyramid. Determine the surface area of the pyramid. The shape of the base determines the name of the pyramid. The triangular faces meet at a point called the apex. 1.

Each face is a triangle with base 9. A. of the pyramid is: SA ϭ 4A ϩ B SA ϭ 4(40) ϩ 64 SA ϭ 224 The surface area of the pyramid is 224 cm2. of a triangle with base.0 cm)(7.4 cm2 The surface area of the tetrahedron is approximately 140 cm2. h. b. The area. Example 1 Determining the Surface Area of a Regular Tetrahedron Given Its Slant Height Jeanne-Marie measured then recorded the lengths of the edges and slant height of this regular tetrahedron.0 cm 1. 10 cm 8 cm This net shows the faces and base of the pyramid. 28 Chapter 1: Measurement [Answer: 43 m2] .0 cm)(7.0 m The regular tetrahedron has 4 congruent faces. A. The area. What is its surface area to the nearest square centimetre? CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 7. SA.8 cm) 2 SA ϭ 140.qxd 12/7/09 3:07 PM Page 28 This right square pyramid has a slant height of 10 cm and a base side length of 8 cm.wncp10_1_4. of each triangular face is: 1 A ϭ (8)(10) 2 A ϭ 40 The area. and height.3 m SOLUTION 5. 4. the surface area. SA.8 cm 9. Calculate the surface area of this regular tetrahedron to the nearest square metre.8 cm.0 cm and height 7. is: 1 SA ϭ 4 a b (9. A. is: 1 A ϭ bh 2 8 cm The area. of the base is: B ϭ (8)(8) B ϭ 64 10 cm So. of each face is: 1 A ϭ (9.8 cm) 2 The surface area. B.

Calculate the surface area of the pyramid to the nearest square metre. Use the Pythagorean Theorem in right ᭝EFH. Draw the heights on two adjacent triangles.wncp10_1_4. A. G GE ϭ Ί 281 Area.qxd 12/7/09 3:07 PM Example 2 Page 29 Determining the Surface Area of a Right Rectangular Pyramid A right rectangular pyramid has base dimensions 8 ft. SOLUTION There are 4 triangular faces and a rectangular base. of ᭝EBC is: 1 A ϭ (8) 1Ί 281 2 2 A ϭ 4 1Ί 281 2 What is an advantage of using EH ϭ Ί 272 and GE ϭ Ί 281. and a height of 16 ft. FH is the length 8 ft. so FG is 5 ft. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. [Answer: approximately 108 m2] EF is the height of the pyramid. 2 D C H of BC. E Sketch the pyramid and label its vertices. the area of ᭝EAB is 5 1Ί 272 2. which is 16 ft. Opposite triangular 16 ft. FG is the length of DC. F H 4 ft. 10 ft.) 1. 1 In ᭝EFG. A. and a height of 8 m. F 5 ft..4 Surface Areas of Right Pyramids and Right Cones 29 . of ᭝EDC is: 1 A ϭ (10) 1Ί 272 2 2 A ϭ 5 1Ί 272 2 Since ᭝EDC and ᭝EAB are congruent. so FH is 4 ft. EH2 ϭ EF2 ϩ FH2 EH2 ϭ 162 ϩ 42 EH2 ϭ 272 E 16 ft. EH ϭ Ί 272 Area. Calculate the surface area of the pyramid to the nearest square foot. GE2 ϭ EF2 ϩ FG2 GE2 ϭ 162 ϩ 52 GE2 ϭ 281 E 16 ft. 2 Use the Pythagorean Theorem in right ᭝EFG. by 10 ft. A right rectangular pyramid has base dimensions 4 m by 6 m. A B 1 G F In ᭝EFH. faces are congruent. instead of writing these square roots as decimals? (Solution continues.

denoted AL. and each of the other two triangles has area 4 1Ί 281 2 . so 1 Surface area of the pyramid ϭ ( slant height)(perimeter of base) ϩ base area 2 Since any right pyramid with a regular polygon base has congruent triangular faces. Surface area. s l The area.qxd 12/7/09 3:07 PM Page 30 Since ᭝EBC and ᭝EAD are congruent. Area. 4 a ᐉsb ϭ 4 a b ᐉs 2 2 We use AL to represent the lateral area so it is not confused with A.0286… The surface area of the pyramid is approximately 379 square feet. of each triangular face is: 1 A ϭ (base)(height) 2 1 A ϭ ᐉs 2 So. A. 1 AL ϭ a sb (4ᐉ) 2 The term 4ᐉ is the perimeter of the base of the pyramid. the area of ᭝EAD is 4 1Ί 281 2. the area of the 4 triangular faces is: 1 1 Rearrange the numbers and variables. the same formula is true for any of these pyramids. B.wncp10_1_4. of the pyramid is: SA ϭ 2(5) 1Ί 272 2 ϩ 2(4) 1Ί 281 2 ϩ 80 SA ϭ 379. 30 Chapter 1: Measurement 1 ϭ a sb (4ᐉ) 2 The area of the triangular faces of a pyramid is called the lateral area. of the base of the pyramid is: B ϭ (8)(10) B ϭ 80 Each of two triangles has area 5 1Ί 272 2. . which represents the area of a triangular face. SA. Consider this right square pyramid. Each triangular face has base ᐉ and height s. We can determine a formula for the surface area of any right pyramid with a regular polygon base.

A right circular cone is usually called a right cone. apex slant height height One way to derive a formula for the surface area of a right cone is to consider the surface area of a right pyramid with a regular polygon base. for a right cone with slant height s and base radius r: 1 Lateral area ϭ s (perimeter of base) 2 1 r Lateral area ϭ s (circumference of base) 2 1 AL ϭ s (2␲r) 2 s AL ϭ ␲rs 1. 1 Lateral area of a right pyramid ϭ s (perimeter of base) 2 For a right cone.. The height of the cone is the perpendicular distance from the apex to the base. The number of triangular faces increases. the perimeter of the base is the circumference of the circle.qxd 12/7/09 3:07 PM Page 31 Surface Area of a Right Pyramid with a Regular Polygon Base For a right pyramid with a regular polygon base and slant height s. s 1 Surface area ϭ s(perimeter of base)ϩ(base area) 2 A right circular cone is a 3-dimensional object that has a circular base and a curved surface. Visualize the pyramid as the number of sides of the base increases.wncp10_1_4. The lateral area of the right pyramid approaches the lateral area of a right cone. So.4 Surface Areas of Right Pyramids and Right Cones 31 . The slant height of the cone is the shortest distance on the curved surface between the apex and a point on the circumference of the base.. s s s s .

s ϭ Ί 53 SA ϭ 58. 32 Chapter 1: Measurement In Example 3. and a height of 7 ft.3086… The surface area of the cone is approximately 58 square feet. which part of the formula represents the lateral area of the cone? How do you know? . Use the Pythagorean Theorem in right ᭝ACD.qxd 12/7/09 3:07 PM Page 32 Surface Area of a Right Cone Surface area ϭ lateral area ϩ base area s For a right cone with slant height s and base radius r: r SA ϭ ␲rs ϩ Example 3 ␲r2 Determining the Surface Area of a Right Cone A right cone has a base radius of 2 ft. Visualize cutting the cone in half through a diameter of its base. This produces an isosceles triangle with a base that is equal to the diameter of the cone and a height that is equal to the height of the cone. Calculate the surface area of this cone to the nearest square metre. D Substitute: r ϭ 2. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. [Answer: approximately 186 m2 ] Let s represent the slant height. C 2 ft. 7 ft. s 2 ft. s s 2 ft. A right cone has a base radius of 4 m and a height of 10 m. SOLUTION Sketch a diagram.wncp10_1_4. s2 ϭ 72 ϩ 22 A s2 ϭ 49 ϩ 4 s2 ϭ 53 s ϭ Ί 53 Use the formula for the surface area of a right cone: SA ϭ ␲rs ϩ ␲r2 SA ϭ ␲(2) 1Ί 53 2 ϩ ␲(2)2 7 ft. Calculate the surface area of this cone to the nearest square foot.

4. . h s 3 [Answer: approximately 16 in. (14.1578… h B s Solve for h. Substitute: AL ϭ 220 and r ϭ 5 AL ϭ ␲rs 220 ϭ ␲(5)s 220 5␲s ϭ 5␲ 5␲ Divide both sides of the equation by 5␲. use the Pythagorean Theorem in right ᭝ABC. h ϭ Ί 171. 1. h2 ϭ 196.1578… – 25 h2 ϭ 171.1 cm. SOLUTION Sketch a diagram. . Determine the height of the cone to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. 220 5␲ s ϭ 14.wncp10_1_4. Determining an Unknown Measurement Example 4 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING The lateral area of a cone is 220 cm2. Use the formula for the lateral area. 10 cm Let h represent the height of the cone and s the slant height. AL.0827… The height of the cone is approximately 13. The diameter of the cone is 10 cm. A model of the Great Pyramid of Giza is constructed for a museum display.qxd 12/8/09 4:03 PM Page 33 We can use the formula for surface area to determine unknown measurements. of the cone and solve for s. The side length of the base is 50 in.0056…)2 Solve for A 5 cm h2.] 5 The radius of the cone is 5 cm. Determine the height of the model to a tenth of an inch. The surface area of the triangular faces is 3000 square inches. 52 ϩ h2 ϭ s2 25 ϩ h2 ϭ Substitute for s. C h ϭ 13.1578 .0056… sϭ To determine the height of the cone.4 Surface Areas of Right Pyramids and Right Cones 33 .

0 m 8. 34 Chapter 1: Measurement . 13.qxd 12/7/09 3:07 PM Page 34 Discuss the Ideas 1. 15 cm 7. a) Sketch the pyramid.wncp10_1_4.3 cm 11 in. a) What is the lateral area of the volcano to the nearest tenth of a square centimetre? b) The paint for the volcano’s surface costs $1. Determine the surface area of each right pyramid in question 4. What is the area that will be painted? Answer to the nearest square centimetre. The volcano has a base diameter of 32 cm and a slant height of 45 cm. b) 35 cm 8 in. a) 4 in. 14 cm 8 yd. 5. How much will the paint cost? 12. Aiden built a cone-shaped volcano for a school science project. The Great Pyramid at Giza has a square base with side length 755 ft. and an original height of 481 ft. to the nearest square unit.4 m 2. and one jar of paint covers 400 cm2. 15 yd. b) Determine its lateral area to the nearest square foot.0 cm 5. Determine the surface area of each right cone in question 6. A road pylon approximates a right cone with perpendicular height 53 cm and base diameter 18 cm. Determine the lateral area of each right pyramid to the nearest square unit. Determine the surface area of each right rectangular pyramid to the nearest square unit. a) square pyramid b) regular tetrahedron 11. 6 in. The lateral surface of the pylon is to be painted with reflective paint. Determine its original surface area to the nearest square foot. How do you determine the surface area of a right pyramid? 2. How is calculating the surface area of a right pyramid like calculating the surface area of a right cone? How is it different? Exercises A B 4. a) b) 9. a) right square pyramid b) right cone 11. Determine the lateral area of each right cone to the nearest square unit. 6. and the side length of the base is 48 ft.8 m 8 ft. The slant height of a right square pyramid is 73 ft. 10. 9.7 m 24 cm 10 ft. how do you identify its height and its slant height? 3.99/jar. to the nearest square unit. Calculate the surface area of each object to the nearest square unit. 13. 8. When you see a picture of a right pyramid with a regular polygon base. 5 ft.

its surface area.5 cm b) a right pyramid with a base that is a regular pentagon with side length 2. Determine the surface area of the exposed grain to the nearest square foot. To the nearest tenth of a square metre.wncp10_1_4. The cone and pyramid have equal surface areas. Alberta. For each object. and a height of 3 in.7 m and a height of 24. A right pyramid has a surface area of 258 cm2. A right cone has a height of 8 ft.5 cm. 16.0 m and its height is 20. and a slant height of 3 in. 2 A second block is a right cone that has a slant 1 height of 3 in.0 m. What is the height of the cone to the nearest tenth of a centimetre? b) Which block requires the most paint? Reflect What do you need to know to be able to calculate the surface areas of a right pyramid and a right cone? Include labelled diagrams in your explanation. France. and a base radius of 1 in. Determine the surface area of the cone to the nearest square foot.qxd 12/7/09 3:08 PM Page 35 14. by 1 in. The Royal Saskatchewan Museum in Regina has a tipi in its First Nations Gallery. One of the largest pyramids has a base side length of 25. a) right cone b) right square pyramid s s 48 mm SA ‫ 2107 ؍‬mm2 3. what area did each bison hide cover? What assumptions did you make? 18.4 Surface Areas of Right Pyramids and Right Cones 35 . and a height of 8 ft.0 m. and some dimensions are given. has four right square pyramids also with glass faces. The side length of the base of the right pyramid is 35.6 m. The Louvre art museum in Paris. A toy block manufacturer needs to cover its wooden blocks with a non-toxic paint. The tipi approximates a cone with a base diameter of 3. A right cone has a base radius of 4 cm.56 ؍‬m2 17. each triangular face has 2 equal sides with length 7. a) a right pyramid with a base that is a regular hexagon with side length 5.6 m.9 m 20.9 m and a height of 4. 1.4 m and the distance of each vertex from the centre of the base is 2. One block is a right square pyramid with a base 1 length of 2 in. The grain formed a cone-shaped pile that had a diameter of 12 ft. and sewed 15 bison hides to make the cover. a) When the blocks rest on their bases.5 m SA ‫ 5. has a glass square pyramid at its entrance. 15. prepared. 21. and a base circumference of 12 ft. A Cree woman from Chitek Lake tanned. A farmer unloaded grain onto a tarp on the ground. 2 A third block is a right rectangular prism with base dimensions 2 in. SA. the height is 3. The Muttart Conservatory in Edmonton. Determine the surface area of each right pyramid to the nearest tenth of a square unit. Calculate the dimension indicated by the variable to the nearest tenth of a unit. which block is tallest? How do you know? Which pyramid requires more glass to enclose its space? C 19.

5 2:59 PM Page 36 Volumes of Right Pyramids and Right Cones LESSON FOCUS Solve problems involving the volumes of right pyramids and right cones. It is measured in cubic units or capacity units. Look at the objects above. Volume is the amount of space an object occupies. Capacity is the amount of material a container holds. How do you determine the volume of a right prism? How do you determine the volume of a right cylinder? Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work in a group. You will need: ■ ■ a container of sand ■ Chapter 1: Measurement a right pyramid and a right prism with equal bases and equal heights ■ 36 a right cone and a right cylinder with equal bases and equal heights an empty container . It is measured in cubic units. Make Connections Right pyramids and right cones are related to right prisms and right cylinders.wncp10_1_5.qxd 12/7/09 1.

for example. Fill the pyramid with sand.qxd 12/7/09 2:59 PM Page 37 A. Pour the sand from the pyramid into the prism. C. Volumes of a Right Prism and a Right Pyramid The volume of a right prism is: Volume ϭ (base area)(height) V ϭ Ah A The volume of a right pyramid with the same base and the same height is: 1 Volume ϭ (base area)(height) 3 1 V ϭ Ah 3 h A 1.5 Volumes of Right Pyramids and Right Cones 37 . 1 Or. Repeat Steps A to C for the cone and cylinder. four cubic yards is 4 yd.3 and four cubic metres is 4 m3. B.wncp10_1_5. Predict the relationship between the volume of the prism and the volume of the pyramid. How many full pyramids fill the prism? We use exponents when we write units for volume. The volume of a right prism is 3 times the volume of a right pyramid with the same base and the same height. do not overfill. What conclusion can you make about the relationship between the volumes of a right prism and a right pyramid with equal bases and equal heights? D. the volume of a right pyramid is the volume of the right prism with the 3 same base and the same height.

3] 1 In right ᭝ACD. Let h inches represent the height. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1. CD is the side length 2 of the base.qxd 12/8/09 4:06 PM Example 1 Page 38 Determining the Volume of a Right Square Pyramid Given Its Slant Height Calculate the volume of this right square pyramid to the nearest cubic inch. 4 in. 7 ft. Calculate the volume of this right square pyramid to the nearest cubic foot. h2 ϩ 4 ϭ 36 4 in. h2 ϩ 22 ϭ 62 C Solve the equation for h2. Use the formula for the volume of a right pyramid: 1 Volume ϭ (base area)(height) 3 1 V ϭ (4)2 1Ί 32 2 3 V ϭ 30. h ϭ Ί 32 The height is Ί 32 in. so CD ϭ 2 in.wncp10_1_5. h2 ϭ 36 Ϫ 4 h2 ϭ 32 Solve the equation for h. SOLUTION Calculate the height of the pyramid. 2 ft. Use the Pythagorean Theorem in right ᭝ACD to calculate h. A h 6 in.1698… The volume of the pyramid is approximately 30 cubic inches. 38 Chapter 1: Measurement D . [Answer: approximately 9 ft. 6 in.

CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2.7 m and height 6.9 m.9 m3] 8.5 Volumes of Right Pyramids and Right Cones 39 .4 cm by 3.656 The volume of the pyramid is approximately 46.1 cm 3. w ϭ 3. and height h.2.1 V ϭ lwh 3 1 V ϭ (5. 1.6 m by 4.4 cm Use the formula for the volume of right rectangular pyramid. width w. base width w. Volumes of a Right Rectangular Prism and a Right Rectangular Pyramid A right rectangular prism with length l. has volume: 1 V ϭ lwh 3 h h l l w w Example 2 Determining the Volume of a Right Rectangular Pyramid Determine the volume of a right rectangular pyramid with base dimensions 5.1 cm. [Answer: approximately 38. 1 Substitute: l ϭ 5.2 cm and height 8.4.wncp10_1_5.4)(3. and height h.2)(8. SOLUTION Sketch and label a diagram. Answer to the nearest tenth of a cubic metre.2 cm 5.1) 3 V ϭ 46. Answer to the nearest tenth of a cubic centimetre.7 cm3.qxd 12/7/09 2:59 PM Page 39 We can write algebraic formulas for the volumes of right rectangular prisms and right rectangular pyramids with the same base and the same height. Determine the volume of a right rectangular pyramid with base dimensions 3. h ϭ 8. has volume: V ϭ lwh A right rectangular pyramid with base length l.

r. Volumes of a Right Cylinder and a Right Cone A right cylinder with base radius r and height h has volume: V ϭ ␲r2h h r Example 3 A right cone with base radius r and height h has volume: 1 V ϭ ␲r2h 3 h r Determining the Volume of a Cone Determine the volume of this cone to the nearest cubic inch. 1 Or. 13 mm 12 in.5840… The volume of the cone is approximately 679 cubic inches. 40 Chapter 1: Measurement 8 mm [Answer: approximately 218 mm3] How can you determine if your answer is reasonable? .wncp10_1_5. SOLUTION 1 The radius. 18 in. 2 1 r ϭ (12 in. We can write algebraic formulas for the volumes of right cylinders and right cones with the same base and the same height. 1 Substitute: r ϭ 6. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. h ϭ 18 V ϭ ␲r2h 3 1 V ϭ ␲(6)2(18) 3 V ϭ 678. of the base of the cone is the diameter. Use the formula for the volume of a cone. the volume of a right cone is the volume of a right cylinder with the 3 same base and the same height. Determine the volume of this cone to the nearest cubic millimetre.qxd 12/7/09 3:00 PM Page 40 The volume of a right cylinder is 3 times the volume of a right cone with the same base and the same height.) 2 r ϭ 6 in.

and a volume of 205 cubic yards. 615 ϭ 4␲r 2 4␲r 2 615 ϭ 4␲ 4␲ 615 ϭ r2 4␲ Ί 615 ϭr 4␲ Solve for r.5 Volumes of Right Pyramids and Right Cones 41 .wncp10_1_5.9957… The radius of the base of the cone is approximately 7 yd. [Answer: approximately 6 m] 4 yd. 1 3(205) ϭ 3 a ␲r 2(4)b 3 Divide both sides by 4␲.qxd 12/8/09 4:06 PM Example 4 Page 41 Determining an Unknown Measurement A cone has a height of 4 yd. SOLUTION Sketch a diagram. Determine the radius of the base of the cone to the nearest metre. r Use the formula for the volume of a cone.995723336 r ϭ 6. How are the volumes of a right pyramid and right cone related to the volumes of a right prism and right cylinder. Suppose you cannot remember the formula for the volume of a right cone or a right pyramid. h ϭ 4 Solve for r2. respectively? 2. Multiply both sides by 3. ͱ (615/(4 ␲ )) 6. 1 V ϭ ␲r 2h 3 1 2 205 ϭ ␲r (4) 3 Substitute: V ϭ 205. How are the formulas for the volumes of a right cone and a right pyramid alike? How are the formulas different? 3. What strategy could you use to determine the volume? 1. Discuss the Ideas 1. A cone has a height of 8 m and a volume of 300 m3. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4. Determine the radius of the base of the cone to the nearest yard.

a) square pyramid b) rectangular pyramid 12 yd. 6 yd. A regular tetrahedron has base area 68. For each prism in question 4.4 cm by 8. 13. Calculate the volume of each right cylinder to the nearest cubic unit. b) Determine its volume to the nearest cubic yard. A 4. b) What is the volume of the pyramid to the nearest tenth of a cubic centimetre? .0 m2 and height 10. 6. 11. Annika has a wooden right rectangular pyramid. sketch a right pyramid with the same base and same height. Calculate the volume of each right pyramid.0 cm 16 ft. Write the answer to the nearest tenth of a cubic unit. 12. Determine the volume of the monument to the nearest tenth of a cubic metre.6 cm. Its slant height is 1.wncp10_1_5. a) b) 4m 16 m 20 cm 5 cm 7.0 m 11. a) square prism b) rectangular prism a) 2. 6 yd. B 5.qxd 12/7/09 3:00 PM Page 42 Exercises 9. A right cone has slant height 12 yd. For each cylinder in question 6. 10 ft. a) Sketch the tetrahedron. sketch a right cone with the same base and same height.0 m b) 32.8 m. 8.8 cm.2 m. b) Determine its volume to the nearest tenth of a cubic metre. 10. Calculate the volume of each right cone. 3m 3m 42 Chapter 1: Measurement 6 yd.6 m and the side length of its base is 0. Calculate the volume of each cone to the nearest cubic unit. a) Explain how Annika can use these measurements to calculate the volume of the pyramid. Calculate the volume of each right prism. She measures the dimensions of the base as 10. 6m 7 yd. 12 ft. A stone monument has the shape of a square pyramid. a) Sketch the cone.0 cm 9. 8 yd. and base diameter 4 yd. Calculate the volume of each pyramid. and the height as 14.

filled with ice cream.1 m h 5. How much will this dessert cost to produce? c) Suppose the cone had the shape of a right square pyramid with base side length 2 in.5 cm V ‫ 0. An ice cream shop in Bellevue. a) right rectangular prism b) right square pyramid 15. How much ice cream would it hold? 15.2 cm V ‫ 8. the equal sides have length 6 yd. Determine the volume of a right rectangular pyramid with base dimensions 6 ft. Sunil immersed a right plastic cone in a measuring cylinder containing water and determined that the volume of the cone was 33. and a base diameter of 2 in. b) One cubic inch of soft ice cream costs 55¢.0 cm.8 cm long. He measured the diameter of the base of the cone as 4. For each object. Write the answer to the nearest cubic foot.5 m. by 12 ft. 18.912 ؍‬m3 V ‫ 9. Write each answer to the nearest tenth of a unit. and some dimensions are given. Calculate the dimension indicated by the variable. Then whipped topping and sprinkles are added.. 17. b) What is the volume of the tea bag to the nearest cubic centimetre? c) Do you think the volume of tea in the bag is equal to your answer from part b? Explain.5 cm3.5 m. V.4 m 11. and the whipped topping and sprinkles cost 10¢ per dessert. b) Calculate the height of the pyramid to the nearest tenth of a metre. the waffle cone costs 35¢.9 cm x V ‫ 9.5 Volumes of Right Pyramids and Right Cones 43 . How much ice cream can the cone hold? Write the answer to the nearest cubic inch. 16. It is a waffle cone with a height of 5 in. Each triangular face has two equal sides of length 4. c) Calculate the volume of the pyramid to the nearest tenth of a cubic metre.qxd 12/7/09 3:00 PM Page 43 14. its volume. created a new dessert.wncp10_1_5.455 ؍‬m3 3. A right square pyramid has a base side length of 3.88 ؍‬cm3 c) right cylinder d) right cone d r 6. how could Sunil calculate the height of the cone? b) What is the height of the cone to the nearest tenth of a centimetre? 1. a) Calculate the area of the base of the tetrahedron to the nearest square centimetre. For each triangular face. a) Sketch and label the pyramid. and height 5 in. Alberta.7 cm. A tea bag has the shape of a regular tetrahedron. The height of the tetrahedron is approximately 4.461 ؍‬cm3 19. a) The ice cream is level with the top of the cone. a) With these data. Each edge is 5.

5 m. THE WORLD OF MATH Careers: Petroleum Engineer Petroleum engineers work closely with geologists. After a site has been selected for drilling. The engineers estimate the costs of developing a drilling location and its potential profits. A right rectangular pyramid has base dimensions 5 m by 3 m. supported with its apex beneath its base. The tank collects the water run-off for a threestorey parking garage. A right square pyramid has a volume of 111 cubic yards. Their primary job is to analyze drilling data to determine if wells contain significant quantities of oil and gas. 44 Chapter 1: Measurement . An underground tank has the shape of a right cone. a petroleum engineer designs and implements appropriate drilling.qxd 12/7/09 3:00 PM Page 44 C 20. The base has a side length of 6 yd. estimate the recoverable volumes of oil and gas based on seismic data. 22. Determine the slant height of the pyramid to the nearest yard. processing. (1 m3 ϭ 1 kL) a) What is the capacity of this tank to the nearest tenth of a kilolitre? b) How much water is in the tank when the water level is 1 m below the top of the tank? Reflect 21. A horizontal cut is made through the pyramid 2 m from its apex and this smaller right rectangular pyramid is removed. To do this.0 m and a height of 3. The cone has a base diameter of 5. and a height of 10 m. and transportation for the oil or gas. geophysicists. and determine the most efficient methods for storage and transportation to minimize any environmental impact. petroleum engineers must be able to measure lengths and distances accurately.wncp10_1_5. What is the volume of the remaining piece? How are a cone and a pyramid alike? How are they different? Explain how these similarities and differences account for the formulas for the volume of each object. and oilfield operating personnel.

B. How could you estimate the volume of gas the sphere could hold? a compass diameter A. Manitoba. A line segment that joins two points on a sphere and passes through the centre is a diameter. An orange approximates a sphere and the area of its peel represents the surface area of the sphere. which is the centre. A line segment that joins the centre to any point on the sphere is a radius. 1.qxd 12/7/09 1. Measure and record the diameter of the orange in 3 different places. You will need: ■ ■ calipers or a ruler ■ centre an orange rra adi dus ius The sphere above is in Winnipeg.wncp10_1_6. It contains methane and carbon dioxide that is produced during the treatment of waste water.6 Surface Area and Volume of a Sphere 45 .6 3:19 PM Page 45 Surface Area and Volume of a Sphere LESSON FOCUS Solve problems involving the surface area and volume of a sphere. Draw 6 circles with diameter equal to the mean diameter of the orange. Make Connections Construct Understanding TRY THIS A sphere is the set of points in space that are the same distance from a fixed point. Calculate the mean diameter of the orange. Work with a partner.

Use the filled circles and the formula for the area of a circle to estimate the surface area of the orange.qxd 12/7/09 3:19 PM Page 46 C. this is also the formula for the surface area of a sphere with radius r. Surface Area of a Sphere The surface area. r 2r The curved surface area. (Hint: It is easiest to use small pieces of peel). About how many circles did you cover with orange peel? E. Work together to create a formula for determining the surface area of a sphere. SAC . The cylinder has the same diameter as the sphere. F. of a sphere with radius r is: SA ϭ 4␲r2 46 Chapter 1: Measurement r . Continue filling the circles until all the peel has been used. of a cylinder with base radius r and height h is: SAC ϭ 2␲rh When a cylinder has base radius r and height 2r: SAC ϭ 2␲r(2r) SAC ϭ 4␲r2 So. Peel the orange and arrange the peel within the circles. If the curved surface of the cylinder is made from paper. D. and a height equal to its diameter. Compare your answer for part D with those of your classmates. Completely fill one circle before moving to the next one. The surface area of a sphere is related to the curved surface area of a cylinder that encloses it.wncp10_1_6. it can be cut and pasted on the surface of the sphere to cover it. SA.

ͱ(20/(4 ␲ )) 1. SOLUTION Use the formula for the surface area of a sphere.] 10 r Substitute SA ϭ 20.5)2 What happens to the surface area of a sphere when its radius is doubled? SA ϭ 28.2615… (Solution continues. What is the diameter of the lacrosse ball to the nearest tenth of an inch? CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. Solve for r.) ϭ 1.wncp10_1_6. Determine the surface area of a softball to the nearest square inch. SA ϭ 4␲r2 [Answer: approximately 50 in.261566261 r ϭ 1. The radius is: 1 (3 in. 2 Substitute r ϭ 1. [Answer: approximately 8 Use the formula for the surface area of a sphere.2 ] SA ϭ 4␲(1. Determine the surface area of a baseball to the nearest square inch.2743… The surface area of a baseball is approximately 28 square inches.5 in. SA ϭ 4␲r 2 20 ϭ 4␲r 2 20 4␲r 2 ϭ 4␲ 4␲ 20 ϭ r2 4␲ 20 rϭ 4␲ Ί 9 in.) 1. The surface area of a soccer ball is approximately 250 square inches.5. Divide both sides of the equation by 4␲. Example 2 Determining the Diameter of a Sphere The surface area of a lacrosse ball is approximately 20 square inches. The diameter of a softball is approximately 4 in. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1.6 Surface Area and Volume of a Sphere 47 . What is the diameter of a soccer ball to the nearest tenth of an inch? SOLUTION Let r represent the radius of the lacrosse ball.qxd 12/7/09 3:19 PM Example 1 Page 47 Determining the Surface Area of a Sphere The diameter of a baseball is approximately 3 in.

.qxd 12/7/09 3:19 PM Page 48 The diameter is: 2r ϭ 2(1. 10 2 We can use the formula for the surface area of a sphere to develop a formula for the volume of a sphere.2615…) 2r ϭ 2.5231… The diameter of the lacrosse ball is approximately 2 5 1 in. and each square is joined by line segments to the centre of the sphere to form a square pyramid.wncp10_1_6. Volume of sphere ϭ sum of volumes of pyramids 1 Volume of sphere ϭ sum of all the ≥ (base area)(height)¥ 3 The height of a pyramid is the radius of the sphere. The volume of the sphere is the sum of the volumes of the square pyramids. Visualize a sphere covered with very small congruent squares. 1 Volume of sphere ϭ (sum of all the base areas)(r) 3 The sum of all the base areas is the surface area of the sphere: 4␲r2 1 V ϭ (4␲r2)(r) 3 4 V ϭ ␲r 3 3 Volume of a Sphere The volume. of a sphere with radius r is: 4 V ϭ ␲r 3 3 48 Chapter 1: Measurement r . or 2 in. V.

3] The radius.) 2 r ϭ 435 000 mi. What is the approximate volume of the sun? 3. The volume of the sun is approximately 3.447913645 x 10 17 4 V ϭ ␲ (435 000)3 3 4/3x V ϭ 3. hemispheres Why is a globe constructed from two hemispheres? 1. The moon approximates a sphere with diameter 2160 mi.6 Surface Area and Volume of a Sphere 49 .3 × 109 mi. 4 V ϭ ␲r3 3 When a large number is displayed as the product of a power of 10 and a number between 1 and 10. ␲ x435000^3 3. When a sphere is cut in half. [Answer: approximately 5. r.4 × 1017 cubic miles. is: 1 r ϭ (870 000 mi. so it is displayed as the product of a number and a power of 10.4479… × 1017 This number is too large for the calculator display. Substitute r ϭ 435 000.qxd 12/7/09 3:20 PM Page 49 Determining the Volume of a Sphere Example 3 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING The sun approximates a sphere with diameter 870 000 mi.wncp10_1_6. the number is written in scientific notation. two hemispheres are formed. What is the approximate volume of the moon? SOLUTION Use the formula for the volume of a sphere.

qxd 12/7/09 3:20 PM Example 4 Page 50 Determining the Surface Area and Volume of a Hemisphere A hemisphere has radius 8. How is the surface area of the sphere related to the area of the circular face on one hemisphere? 2. b) What is the volume of the hemisphere to the nearest tenth of a cubic centimetre? b) What is the volume of the hemisphere to the nearest tenth of a cubic centimetre? SOLUTION a) SA of a hemisphere ϭ SA of one-half a sphere ϩ area of a circle 8 cm 1 SA ϭ (4␲r2) ϩ ␲r2 2 SA ϭ 2␲r2 ϩ ␲r2 SA ϭ 3␲r2 a) What is the surface area of the hemisphere to the nearest tenth of a square centimetre? [Answers: a) approximately 235.0 V ϭ ␲r 3 3 2 V ϭ ␲(8.1857… The surface area of the hemisphere is approximately 603.0)2 SA ϭ 603.0)3 3 V ϭ 1072.0 cm.8 cm3] Substitute: r ϭ 8. Discuss the Ideas In Example 4a.0 SA ϭ 3␲(8.0 cm.3 cm3.wncp10_1_6. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) What is the surface area of the hemisphere to the nearest tenth of a square centimetre? 4. b) Volume of a hemisphere ϭ volume of one-half a sphere 1 4 V ϭ a ␲r 3b 2 3 2 Substitute: r ϭ 8. why can we write 2␲r2 ϩ ␲r2 as 3␲r2? 1.2 cm2. How is the volume of the sphere related to the volume of the cylinder? How could you use this relationship to help you remember the formula for the volume of a sphere? 50 Chapter 1: Measurement . A sphere is cut in half. Visualize a sphere with radius r that fits in a cylinder with base radius r and height 2r.3302… The volume of the hemisphere is approximately 1072.6 cm2 b) approximately 261. A hemisphere has radius 5.

the volume of Earth that is not part of the inner core. Determine the volume of each sphere in question 3 to the nearest cubic unit. What is the radius of the tennis ball to the nearest tenth of a centimetre? 9. a) 6m b) 9 yd. approximately 12 756 km. a) Determine the surface area of Earth to the nearest square kilometre. The mean diameter of Earth is approximately 12 756 km. 7.wncp10_1_6.4 m. Measure its diameter. A hemisphere has a radius of 8 cm.6 cm 8 ft. A sphere has a surface area of 452 square inches. Calculate its volume and surface area. How many cups of punch can the bowl hold? 14. Use a marble or other sphere. A glass bowl approximates a hemisphere with diameter 20 cm. d) The inner core of Earth has a radius of approximately 1278 km.8 m. Earth approximates a sphere but its diameter varies. a) What is the surface area of the sphere to the nearest square metre? b) What is the capacity of the sphere to the nearest kilolitre? (1 kL ϭ 1 m3) 13. The surface area of a tennis ball is approximately 127 cm2. Determine its surface area and volume to the nearest tenth of a unit. a) Which object has the greater surface area? b) Which object has the greater volume? 12. What is this area in square kilometres? c) Determine the volume of Earth to the nearest thousand cubic kilometres. a) What is the capacity of the bowl to the nearest tenth of a litre? (1000 cm3 ϭ 1 L) b) One cup is 250 mL. 5. The diameter of Earth at the equator is 26 km greater than its mean diameter. A sphere has a diameter of 12 cm. B 6. A sphere has a radius of 8. What is the diameter of the sphere to the nearest inch? 10. 4. 1.6 m 5 cm c) d) 5. Determine the surface area of each sphere to the nearest square unit. Determine the surface area and volume of each hemisphere. to the nearest thousand cubic kilometres. a) b) 1. The gas storage sphere on page 45 has diameter 15.qxd 12/7/09 3:20 PM Page 51 Exercises A 3. Write your answers to the nearest whole unit. Determine the approximate volume of Earth using the polar radius and equatorial radius. crust mantle inner core outer core 8. The diameter of Earth through the North and South poles is 16 km less than its mean diameter.6 Surface Area and Volume of a Sphere 51 . b) About 70% of Earth’s surface is covered in water. 11. Determine.

23. Giselle has a block of wood that measures 14 cm by 12 cm by 10 cm. there are tree houses shaped like spheres. 17. A fitness ball is delivered in a flat package with a hand pump. 19. How many pumps are needed to inflate the ball? Justify your answer. For the inflated balloon and the original balloon: a) How do the circumferences compare? b) How do the surface areas compare? c) How do the volumes compare? Reflect 52 Chapter 1: Measurement What strategies do you have for remembering the formulas for the volume and surface area of a sphere? . A scoop makes a sphere of cookie dough with diameter 5 cm. to a diameter of 28 cm.wncp10_1_6. How many spheres can be glazed? 16. A spherical balloon has a radius of 10 cm. The size of a ball used in sport is often described by the measure of its circumference. b) Determine the surface area of each ball to the nearest square unit. a) What percent of the wood is wasted? b) What assumptions are you making? 22. A hemisphere has a circumference of 47. How many cookies can be made from this pail of dough? C 21. Determine the surface area and volume of the hemisphere to the nearest tenth of a unit. 20. In the rain forests of Vancouver Island. c) Determine the volume of each ball to the nearest cubic unit. A batch of these spheres is to be covered in a sugar glaze.5 cm. The circumference of a ball is the length of the longest circle that can be drawn on the surface of the ball.1 m. d) Which ball is larger? Justify your answer. The pump inflates the ball at a rate of 280 cm3 per pump. It is blown up until its radius is three times the original radius. 2 a) Determine the radius of each ball to the nearest unit. What is the radius of the beach ball when it is at its maximum volume? 24. a) Calculate the volume of the inside of the shell to the nearest tenth of a cubic metre. One spherical shell has outside diameter 3. A beach ball that was deflated to 70% of its maximum volume now has a volume of 420 cubic inches. with diameter 17 cm and height 13 cm. There is enough glaze to cover an area of 4710 cm2. A pail of cookie dough is cylindrical. A volleyball has a circumference of 66 cm 1 and a basketball has a circumference of 29 in. to the tenth of a square metre? 18.15 m. Check your formulas by using them to calculate the surface area and volume of the sphere in question 3c.qxd 12/7/09 3:20 PM Page 52 15. b) What is the difference between the outside and inside surface areas. Derive formulas for the surface area and volume of a sphere in terms of its diameter d.20 m and inside diameter 3. She is making a wooden ball in tech class. The centre of a doughnut is removed and formed to make a sphere of dough with diameter 2.

5 – You described the volume relationships between a right prism and a right pyramid. r Sphere ■ r r r 2 — 3 In Lesson 1.wncp10_1_6.6 – You developed and applied formulas for the surface area and volume of a sphere. Right cone h In Lesson 1. and between a right cylinder and a right cone. Checkpoint 2 53 . Right pyramid with regular polygon base – You determined an unknown dimension given the surface area of a right cone or a right pyramid.4 2r r r r In Lesson 1. Area of net 1 — 3 1 SA ϭ — (slant height)(perimeter of base) ϩ 2 base area ■ s r SA ϭ lateral area ϩ base area SA ϭ ␲rs ϩ ␲r 2 1 — 3 – You developed and applied formulas for the volumes of a right pyramid and a right cone.qxd 12/7/09 7:23 PM Page 53 CHECKPOINT 2 Concept Development Connections Volume Surface Area ■ – You developed and applied formulas for the surface areas of a right pyramid and a right cone. and sufficient other information. – You determined an unknown dimension given the surface area of a sphere and sufficient other information. s h – You determined an unknown dimension given the volume of an object and sufficient other information.

5.wncp10_1_6.5 4. The outside of the hat is to be covered in red crepe paper.1 m 24.7 m 15. radius 8.4951 ؍‬cm3 1. diameter 6.qxd 12/7/09 7:23 PM Page 54 Assess Your Understanding 1.3 cm V ‫8.861 ؍‬ cm3 V ‫ 2. V.3 m 3.4 1. Determine the surface area and volume of each object with the given dimension. a) sphere. A spherical globe has circumference 158 cm.8 cm 7. its volume.7 m 4 ft. and a base diameter of 8 in. The roofing tiles on the tower need to be replaced.7 m 3.8 ؍‬m3 x V ‫ 5.6 6. Determine the volume of each object in question 1 to the nearest cubic unit. For each object. and some dimensions are given. with base side length 15 m and height 12 m. a) right square pyramid b) right cone c) right square pyramid 1.8 km b) hemisphere. A sector of a circle is used to make a hat shaped like a right cone. The cone has a height of 14 in. Determine the surface area of each object to the nearest square unit. Calculate the dimension indicated by the variable to the nearest tenth of a unit. Determine the area that will be covered in crepe paper to the nearest square inch. a) right square pyramid 8 ft. to the nearest square metre. The surface of the globe is to be painted with a high-gloss varnish. 2.2 m 1. 1.5 m c) right cone 12. The top of a clock tower has the shape of a right square pyramid. Write the answers to the nearest tenth of a unit.8 cm h h 7. 3. b) right rectangular pyramid 3. Determine the area that needs to be re-covered. What is the area to be painted to the nearest square centimetre? 54 Chapter 1: Measurement .

Make Connections A farmer is constructing a new grain bin.wncp10_1_7. The farmer knows the dimensions of the bin she wants to build. The farmer’s grain truck can hold 550 cubic feet of barley. The bin she would like to build has a cylindrical body and a cone-shaped roof. 20 ft.7 Solving Problems Involving Objects 55 . How many truckloads are required to fill the bin? 5 ft.7 3:28 PM Page 55 Solving Problems Involving Objects LESSON FOCUS Solve problems involving the surface area and volume of composite objects. 1. 19 ft.qxd 12/7/09 1. How can the farmer determine the amount of material she will need to build the bin? Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Here is a sketch of a grain bin.

calculate the volume of each object. Use the formula for the volume of a right rectangular prism. h ϭ 2. Example 1 Determining the Volume of a Composite Object Determine the volume of this composite object to the nearest tenth of a cubic metre. then add the volumes. identify the distinct objects.9) V ϭ 56. To determine the volume of a composite object.5 cm3] .948 The volume of the composite object is approximately 69. h ϭ 2.347 Use the formula for the volume of a right rectangular pyramid.7)(2.601 Volume of the composite object is: 56. Substitute: l ϭ 6. 56 Chapter 1: Measurement 32.qxd 12/7/09 3:28 PM Page 56 A composite object comprises two or more distinct objects.9 m3.7)(2.wncp10_1_7. w ϭ 2.9.347 ϩ 13.1 m 18.601 ϭ 69.1 V ϭ lwh 3 1 V ϭ (6.9)(2.1) 3 V ϭ 13. w ϭ 2. 2.9 V ϭ lwh V ϭ (6.7 m SOLUTION The object comprises a right rectangular prism and a right rectangular pyramid.0 cm [Answer: approximately 44 786.7.0 cm 2. Determine the volume of this composite object to the nearest tenth of a cubic centimetre. 1 Substitute: l ϭ 6.9.9 m 6.9 m 2. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1.7.9)(2.

h ϭ 4 SA ϭ 3␲(2)2 ϩ 2␲(2)(4) SA ϭ 87. and the curved surface of the cylinder comprise the surface area. 1. Determine the surface area of this composite object.9645… The surface area of the composite object is approximately 88 square feet. Then calculate the sum of the areas of these faces. The cylinder and hemisphere have equal radii. 4m 2 ft.wncp10_1_7. one base of the cylinder.7 Solving Problems Involving Objects 57 . SA ϭ 2␲r2 ϩ ␲r2 ϩ 2␲rh SA ϭ 3␲r2 ϩ 2␲rh Substitute: r ϭ 2. 5m [Answer: 165 m2] SOLUTION The curved surface of the hemisphere. Surface area of composite object is: Area of curved surface of hemisphere ϩ area of base of cylinder ϩ area of curved surface of cylinder Use the algebraic formulas for surface area.qxd 12/7/09 3:28 PM Page 57 To calculate the surface area of a composite object. 5m 5m 4 ft. the first step is to determine the faces that comprise the surface area. Example 2 Determining the Surface Area of a Composite Object Determine the surface area of this composite object to the nearest square foot. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2.

The surface area of the cabane is the sum of the areas of the 4 walls. Use the Pythagorean Theorem in right ᭝PSQ. 5 ft. is: A ϭ 2(3)(2) ϩ 2(5)(2) A ϭ 32 6 ft. 3. plus the areas of the 2 rectangular faces and 2 triangular faces of the roof. in square yards. Determine the surface area of the tool shed to the nearest square foot. is: A ϭ 2(2. P Sketch a triangle to represent a triangular face of the roof. in square yards.52 PQ2 ϭ 6. 3 yd. To determine the surface area of the roof.qxd 12/7/09 7:27 PM Example 3 Page 58 Solving a Problem Related to a Composite Object A cabane à sucre is a composite object formed by a rectangular prism with a right triangular prism as its roof. 4 ft. 2 yd. 2 yd. calculate the width of a rectangular face.2] Q . is: 1 A ϭ 2 a b (3)(2) 2 Aϭ6 Surface area of the cabane à sucre. is: SA ϭ 32 ϩ 25 ϩ 6 ϭ 63 The surface area of the cabane à sucre is 63 square yards. in square yards. A tool shed is formed by a rectangular prism with a triangular prism as its roof. Substitute the known values.5)(5) A ϭ 25 Area of the 2 triangular faces of the roof. SOLUTION 5 yd. 3 ft. Determine the surface area of the cabane à sucre in square yards.wncp10_1_7. 58 Chapter 1: Measurement [Answer: approximately 155 ft.25 PQ ϭ Ί 6. in square yards. PQ2 ϭ 22 ϩ 1. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2 yd.25 PQ ϭ 2. The area of the 4 walls.5 Area of the 2 rectangular faces of the roof. PQ2 ϭ PS2 ϩ SQ2 R S 3 yd.

0 m 1.5 cm 6. a) right cylinder and right cone 4. 17 ft. how do you identify the faces that comprise the surface area? 2. When might you use the Pythagorean Theorem in a calculation of the surface area or volume of a composite object? How do you know your answer is reasonable? Exercises A 3.0 cm 13 ft. 1. Determine the surface area and volume of each composite object. 5 cm B 5.7 Solving Problems Involving Objects 59 . a) right cylinder and hemispheres 5 cm 3 cm b) right square prism and right square pyramid 8. 17 in. When you determine the surface area of a composite object. b) right square prism and right square pyramid 10 ft.5 m c) right square prism and right cylinder 1 in. Write the answers to the nearest tenth of a unit. 1. 1. 10 ft. 2. a) For which composite objects in question 3 could you calculate the volumes without determining any further dimensions? b) Determine the volume of each composite object you identified in part a.0 m 4 in.wncp10_1_7. 5 in.0 m 1 in. 5 in.0 m d) right cone and hemisphere 4 in. 1.qxd 12/7/09 3:28 PM Page 59 Discuss the Ideas 1. Determine the surface area of each composite object to the nearest square unit.

12 ft. a) right cylinder 3 ft.2 b) right cylinder 2. 15 ft.49 per square foot.qxd 12/7/09 3:28 PM Page 60 6. The cone has a slant height of 12 cm and has the same radius as the cylinder.8 cm.0 m 9. 8 ft. Determine the volume of each object to the nearest tenth of a cubic unit. For each object. The materials for the walls and roof of the circular-based bin cost $9. b) Determine the surface area of the rocket to the nearest square centimetre. d) One-third of the interior space of the rocket is used for fuel storage. A rocket has a cylindrical body and a coneshaped nose. Here are two different grain storage bins. . and some dimensions are given. A solid sphere just fits inside a cube that has an edge length equal to the diameter of the sphere. Write each answer to the nearest tenth of a unit. a) a right square prism with a right square pyramid removed h 6 cm total SA ‫ 2.25 per square foot. Determine the surface area of each object in question 10 to the nearest tenth of a square unit. 10 ft. The cylinder is 55 cm long with a radius of 6 cm. How much fuel can the rocket hold? 8.5 m 4.4 cm a) Which storage bin holds more grain? b) Each storage bin has a cement base. Calculate the dimension indicated by the variable. d curved SA ‫ 912 ؍‬in. its surface area. 4 ft. What is the volume of air in the cube to the nearest cubic centimetre? 15 cm 10 cm 10 cm b) a right cylinder with a hemisphere removed 1. a) Sketch and label a diagram of the rocket. 12 in. 60 Chapter 1: Measurement 11. The edge length of the cube is 5. SA. Which bin is cheaper to build? Justify your answer. The materials for the walls and roof of the square-based bin cost $10.731 ؍‬cm2 7.wncp10_1_7. 10. 15 ft. c) Determine the volume of the rocket to the nearest cubic centimetre.

What are the least possible dimensions for the prism to the nearest inch? c) The sculpture in part a is carved from a block of ice with the shape of a right rectangular prism with dimensions 16 in. and a right cone with the same base diameter as the base of the cylinder and a height of 9 in.8 m and an internal radius of 0.0 m. What volume of ice. in cubic inches. by 12 in. The base of the igloo has diameter 4. Reflect 13.7 m by 3. Determine the volume of the sculpture to the nearest cubic inch. Each year. a) One mould forms a sculpture that is a composite object comprising a right cylinder with base diameter 15 in.7 m. by 18 ft. What is the volume of snow in a sculpture that measures 50 ft.qxd 12/7/09 3:29 PM Page 61 C 12. by 6 ft. remains? Which do you find easier to calculate: the surface area of a composite object or its volume? Explain your choice.7 m.? 1. by 15 in.wncp10_1_7. where teams of sculptors create unique artwork from blocks of snow measuring 3. Major attractions at the festival are the snow sculptures that are displayed at Voyageur Park and in neighbourhoods around the city. sculptors transform 450 000 cubic feet of snow into a winter wonderland. b) The sculpture in part a is carved out of a block of ice with the shape of a right square prism. An igloo approximates a hemisphere.7 Solving Problems Involving Objects 61 . The festival also includes an International Snow Sculpting Symposium. with an entrance tunnel that approximates half a right cylinder. An ice sculpture can be made by pouring water into a mould or by carving blocks of ice. it has an external radius of 0. Calculate the surface area of the outside of the igloo and tunnel.. THE WORLD OF MATH Profile: Festival du Voyageur The Festival du Voyageur is an annual event that takes place in Winnipeg every February to celebrate the city’s Francophone and Métis cultural heritage. and height 3 in. The entrance is 0.8 m long.0 m by 3.

■ The surface area of a sphere is related to the curved surface area of the enclosing cylinder. ■ 62 ■ ■ Reflect on the Chapter What is volume? Choose two objects. Chapter 1: Measurement Why do we need a standard system of measurement? ■ What strategies do you have for using a referent to estimate a length? What is surface area? Describe how to determine the surface areas of three different shaped objects. ■ You can determine the surface area of a right pyramid by sketching a labelled diagram of its net and then calculating the area of each triangle and polygon that forms the net. . ■ The volume of a right pyramid or a right cone is 1 the volume of its enclosing right prism or right 3 cylinder. the triangular faces are congruent. ■ The volume of a right pyramid or cone is related to the volume of the enclosing right prism or cylinder. Explain how their volumes are related. ■ For a right pyramid with a regular polygon base and for a right cone. For a right pyramid with a regular polygon base.wncp10_1_7. ■ Converting within and between two systems of measurement allows you to measure lengths using the most appropriate unit from either system.qxd 12/7/09 3:29 PM Page 62 S T U DY G U I D E CONCEPT SUMMARY Big Ideas Applying the Big Ideas ■ You can use proportional reasoning to convert measurements. the surface area is: 1 (slant height)(perimeter of base) ϩ (base area) 2 ■ The surface area of a sphere is equal to the curved surface area of the cylinder that encloses it. ■ The surface area of a right pyramid or cone is the sum of the areas of the faces and the curved surfaces.

3] Choose an appropriate measuring instrument and unit to measure an object. Determine the surface area of this cone. Identify the objects. Use a formula to determine the volume of each object. 1. The units could be imperial or metric. 1.6. [1. 12 ft. ϭ 2(5280 ft. 2 mi. Identify the faces that comprise the surface area. right cone. [1. 3. [1. 1. right cylinder. Convert 2 mi. 1. in 1 mi.1. calipers. 15 ft. right pyramid.) ϭ 10 560 ft. So. You may need to use the Pythagorean Theorem to determine any dimension that is not given. right cylinder.4. or a composite object. Calculate the area of each face. [1. right cone.7] Use the table on page 6.qxd 12/7/09 7:26 PM Page 63 SKILLS SUMMARY Skill Description Example Convert within and between systems of measurement. The measuring device could be a ruler. right pyramid. Add the volumes. sphere.6. Add the areas.8760… The volume is approximately 1018 cubic feet. 1 V ϭ ␲r2h 3 1 V ϭ ␲(9)2(12) 3 V ϭ 1017. 3. or a composite object. 2. 9 ft. Use proportional reasoning to convert. There are 5280 ft. To determine surface area: 1. if necessary. Determine the volume of the cone above. 1. Study Guide 63 . You may need to use the Pythagorean Theorem to determine any dimension that is not given. to feet.7] To determine volume: 1. Which measuring device is most appropriate for measuring the length of your index finger? Which unit would you use? I would use a ruler and measure in centimetres. Use unit analysis to check the conversion. or tape measure.2] Calculate the surface area of a right prism. SA ϭ ␲r2 ϩ ␲rs SA ϭ ␲(9)2 ϩ ␲(9)(15) SA ϭ 678.5840… Surface area is approximately 679 square feet. sphere.wncp10_1_7. Calculate the volume of a right prism.5. 2.

5. a) 13 yd.2 5 ft. to feet b) 5 mi.1 1. The scale of a model airplane is 1 in. . 350 yd. a) right cone b) regular tetrahedron 6. and a height of 10 yd.1 cm 1. Describe a strategy you would use to estimate then measure each length in imperial units and in metric units.6 m 15 mm 6. and inches 4. 460 km N W 3. to 40 in. to millimetres 2 64 Chapter 1: Measurement 5. feet. b) Use a ruler or tape measure to check your estimate. Convert: a) 14 yd. to centimetres 1 d) 8 in. How long is the actual plane? E S 1. Which imperial unit is the most appropriate unit to measure each item? Justify your choice. to inches d) 123 in. Sarah has an average stride length of 27 in. to yards. long. to kilometres c) 1 ft. For each item in question 1a and b: a) Use a referent to estimate its measure.8 m 10. to metres b) 4 mi. and the nearest inch c) 6 km to miles and the nearest yard d) 350 mm to feet and the nearest inch 7.qxd 12/7/09 3:29 PM Page 64 REVIEW 1.0 cm c) right cone d) right rectangular pyramid 22 mm 11.4 9. to yards c) 6 ft. Determine the surface area of the pyramid to the nearest square yard. A right rectangular pyramid has base dimensions 7 yd.4 m 7. 2 ft.3 11. 7.2 m 1. a) the length of your arm b) the width of the classroom c) the distance you ran in gym class 8. How many strides would Sarah take to walk from the northernmost tip to the southernmost tip? 2.wncp10_1_7. The length of Vancouver Island from the north to the south is approximately 460 km. The model is 8 in. by 5 yd. Answer to the nearest tenth. a) the diameter of a car tire b) the length of a car c) the radius of a marble 3 ft. Convert each measurement: a) 261 cm to feet and the nearest inch b) 125 m to yards. feet. Convert each measurement. Determine the surface area of each object to the nearest square unit. 3 in. 7 in.

0 cm. Owen measured its slant height as 7. 2 ft. 26 in.5 m c) right square pyramid d) right cone 5 mm 13 mm 5 ft..wncp10_1_7. a) A solid iron garden ornament has the shape of a right square pyramid. 14. The cone has an interior diameter of 7. What is the area to be coated? Write the answer to the nearest tenth of a square unit. To determine the volume of a cone.5 m 18 in. What was the height of the pyramid? 18.5 m. The side length of the base of the tent is 1.0 m 3. Can Owen determine the volume of the cone with only these measurements? If your answer is yes. Determine the volume of each object to the nearest cubic unit. The pyramid is to be coated with polished white limestone. has a pyramid that is a replica of the Great Pyramid in Egypt. 16. 2 ft. An ice-cream cone is to be coated with chocolate on the inside. Emma used water displacement in a large measuring cylinder to determine that the volume of a right square pyramid was 400 cm3.qxd 12/7/09 3:29 PM Page 65 11. and height 38 ft.C. a) Sketch a diagram of the tent.6 cm.5 cm and an interior height of 10. If your answer is no. Determine the volume of the garden ornament to the nearest cubic inch. B. 2. explain what Owen needs to do to determine the volume. A regular tetrahedron has edge length 10 in. then calculate the volume. a) right rectangular b) right cone pyramid 4. The slant height of the pyramid is 8 in.3 cm and its base diameter as 9. show your solution. What area of limestone is needed to the nearest square foot? 1. She uses 4 poles. b) What is the slant height of the tent to the nearest tenth of a metre? c) What is the lateral surface area of the tent to the nearest square metre? 12. and the side length of the base is 3 in. What is the side length of its base to the nearest inch? Review 65 . Julie is constructing a tent in the shape of a right square pyramid. The Summerhill Pyramid Winery in Kelowna. a) What is the slant height of the tetrahedron to the nearest tenth of an inch? b) What is the surface area of the tetrahedron to the nearest square inch? 13. Emma measured the side of the base as 10 cm. b) Another garden ornament has volume 96 cubic inches. 17. for the edges that form the triangular surfaces.1 m long. It has the same shape and the same height as the ornament in part a. each 2.5 15. The Summerhill pyramid has base side length 60 ft.

27. a) b) 1 4 in.0 cm 9. a) right square prism and right square pyramid 6 cm 6 cm 10. and some dimensions are given. and some dimensions are given. Calculate the dimension indicated by the variable. Write each answer to the nearest whole unit.wncp10_1_7. For each object.14 ؍‬m3 4 ft.qxd 12/7/09 3:29 PM Page 66 19. Sketch a hemisphere with diameter 18 ft. and height 30 cm. The snowball has circumference 18 cm. Determine the surface area and volume of each sphere. 2 6. x Chapter 1: Measurement 26. A handful of snow is compressed into a spherical snowball. V. its surface area. Each cone has base diameter 10 cm and slant height 15 cm. Write the answers to the nearest whole unit. Write the answer to the nearest square centimetre. a) right square pyramid b) right cone 4 mm s s 6 cm 6 cm SA ‫ 231 ؍‬cm2 SA ‫ 671 ؍‬mm2 .5 m 21. b) Determine the surface area of the castle. What is the diameter of the sphere to the nearest tenth of an inch? 23.6 2 ft.86 ؍‬cm3 1. A “gazing ball” is a spherical garden ornament with a mirrored surface that reflects its surroundings. Write the answer to the nearest cubic centimetre.0 m 11 cm 13 cm b) right cylinder and right cones r 9. What is its volume to the nearest cubic inch? 66 2 ft. The surface area of the ball is approximately 314 square inches.0 cm V ‫ 6. There are 4 congruent cones on the top surface of the prism. its volume. SA. Write each answer to the nearest tenth of a unit. a) right cone b) right rectangular pyramid 1. Calculate the dimension indicated by the variable. The surface area of a sphere is approximately 66 square inches. a) Determine the volume of sand required to construct this castle. 20. a) What is the surface area of the hemisphere to the nearest square foot? b) What is the volume of the hemisphere to the nearest cubic foot? 22.7 25. Determine the surface area and volume of each composite object to the nearest whole unit. For each object. V ‫ 4. What is its volume? 24. A sandcastle comprises a right rectangular prism with base dimensions 75 cm by 50 cm. 6 ft.

Which expression represents an approximate measure of 3 cm in inches? 3 A.5 cm 4.1 cm 1.4) 0. A student measured the height of a right square pyramid as 3 in. Write your answers to the nearest tenth of a unit. What is the radius of a hemisphere that has the same surface area as the sphere? Write the answer to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.4 3 D. How are their volumes related? 4. Determine the volume and surface area of each composite object.qxd 12/7/09 3:29 PM Page 67 PRACTICE TEST For questions 1 and 2. a) Which measuring instrument do you think the student used? Justify your answer. ␲r3 D. a) b) 4m 5. 3(0. ␲3r B. B. b) Explain how the student could use these measurements to determine the volume and surface area of the pyramid. B. choose the correct answer: A. A right cylinder and a right cone have the same base radius and the same height.4) 2. Which expression represents the volume of a sphere with radius r? 4 A. A sphere has a radius of 5. 4␲r2 3 r 4 4 C.8 cm 10 m 5.wncp10_1_7. or D 1. Practice Test 67 .4 C. and the side length of its base as 2 in. C.5 cm 6m 15 m 2. ␲r2 3 3 3. 0. 6.0 cm. 1 310.

■ You can use the ratio of the lengths of two sides to determine the measure of one of the acute angles.Math10Se_Chapter 2. ■ You can use the length of one side and the measure of an acute angle to determine the length of another side of the triangle. ■ The ratio of any two sides remains constant even if the triangle is enlarged or reduced.qxd 12/7/09 2 8:19 PM Page 68 Trigonometry BUILDING ON ■ applying the Pythagorean Theorem ■ solving problems using properties of similar polygons ■ solving problems involving ratios BIG IDEAS In a right triangle. NEW VOCABULARY angle of inclination tangent ratio indirect measurement sine ratio cosine ratio angle of elevation angle of depression .

. The structure is a geodesic dome containing 766 triangles.Math10Se_Chapter 2.qxd 12/7/09 8:20 PM Page 69 S C I E N C E W O R L D This building was constructed for the Expo ’86 World Fair held in Vancouver. British Columbia.

1 12/7/09 2:36 PM Page 70 The Tangent Ratio LESSON FOCUS Develop the tangent ratio and relate it to the angle of inclination of a line segment. This ranger’s cabin on Herschel Island. she has to determine the width and height of the roof so that the panels work efficiently. is approximately equal to the latitude of the house.qxd 2. Yukon. What happens to the angle of inclination if the diagram of the house is drawn using a different scale? Angle of inclination You will investigate the relationship between one acute angle in a right triangle and two sides of that triangle. Make Connections The angle of inclination of a line or line segment is the acute angle it makes with the horizontal.Math10Se_Chapter 2. 70 Chapter 2: Trigonometry . has solar panels on its roof. that is. angle of inclination South-facing solar panels on a roof work best when the angle of inclination of the roof. When an architect designs a house that will have solar panels on its roof. the angle between the roof and the horizontal.

Each of you draws a different right triangle that is similar to ᭝ABC. then length of side opposite ∠A tan A ϭ length of side adjacent to ∠A A adjacent B opposite C 2. draw a right ᭝ABC with ∠B ϭ 90°. Measure the sides and angles of each triangle. The tangent ratio for ∠A is written as tan A. How do the ratios compare? F. and a protractor. Calculate the CB ratio of the legs as a decimal. The two shorter sides of a right triangle are its legs. TRY THIS Work with a partner. E. A. D. C The ratio Length of side opposite ∠A : Length of side adjacent to ∠A depends only on the measure of the angle. a ruler. On grid paper. The Tangent Ratio If ∠A is an acute angle in a right triangle. not on how large or small the triangle is. What do you think the value of each ratio depends on? We name the sides of a right triangle in relation to one of its acute angles. B. then the corresponding ratio for BA each of the similar triangles.Math10Se_Chapter 2. Side opposite ЄA B Side adjacent to ЄA A This ratio is called the tangent ratio of ∠A.qxd 12/7/09 2:36 PM Page 71 Construct Understanding Recall that two triangles are similar if one triangle is an enlargement or a reduction of the other.1 The Tangent Ratio 71 . C. You will need grid paper. Label your diagrams with the measures. We usually write the tangent ratio as a fraction.

. tan Z ϭ 2] tan D ϭ 0.qxd 12/7/09 2:36 PM Page 72 The value of the tangent ratio is usually expressed as a decimal that compares the lengths of the sides.5 times.. As the size of ∠A increases. if tan A ϭ 1. in any similar right triangle with ∠A. ¯ tan F ϭ 1.5. what happens to tan A? Example 1 B tan A ‫5.5. E 4 X SOLUTION tan D ϭ length of side opposite ∠D length of side adjacent to ∠D EF tan D ϭ DE tan D ϭ F EF is opposite ∠D. DE is adjacent to ∠D. Determining the Tangent Ratios for Angles Determine tan D and tan F. F 3 D CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1.5 times the length of the side adjacent to ∠A.75 tan F ϭ length of side opposite ∠F length of side adjacent to ∠F tan F ϭ DE EF tan F ϭ 4 3 F 3 adjacent D 4 opposite E How are the values of tan D and tan F related? Explain why this relation will always be true for the acute angles in a right triangle. C .. Example 2 Using the Tangent Ratio to Determine the Measure of an Angle Determine the measures of ∠G and ∠J to the nearest tenth of a degree. Determine tan X and tan Z. The tanϪ1 or InvTan calculator operation does this.. then.1 ؍‬ For example. A This side is 1.3 You can use a scientific calculator to determine the measure of an acute angle when you know the value of its tangent. H 5 G 72 Chapter 2: Trigonometry 4 J .this side.Math10Se_Chapter 2. the length of the side opposite ∠A is 1. 3 4 12 3 opposite D 4 adjacent E Y 6 Z [Answer: tan X ϭ 0.

34019175 Using the Tangent Ratio to Determine an Angle of Inclination CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING solar panel 3. H adjacent 5 opposite 4 M G J 13 38. Determine whether this design for solar panels is the best for Clyde River.qxd 70 cm [Answer: The angle of inclination is approximately 71°. Nunavut. The diagram shows the side view of some solar panels. this is not the best design.8) The latitude of Fort Smith. NWT. B nels The best angle of inclination for the solar panel is the same as the latitude.3° Example 3 HJ is opposite ∠G. Determine the measures of ∠K and ∠N to the nearest tenth of a degree. 12 ft. C 12 ft. which is not equal to the latitude of Fort Smith.25) 51.12/7/09 2:36 PM Page 73 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING SOLUTION In right ᭝GHJ: opposite tan G ϭ adjacent HJ tan G ϭ GH 4 tan G ϭ 5 ∠G Џ 38.65980825 K H opposite 5 adjacent 4 G [Answer: ∠K Џ 34. Determine whether this design for a solar panel is the best for Fort Smith. 9 ft. Justify your answer. the design is the best. Justify your answer. HG is adjacent to ∠G. ∠C is the angle of inclination. has a latitude of approximately 70°.7°. ∠N Џ 55. 60°. 208 cm sola Math10Se_Chapter 2. So. BC is adjacent to ∠C. Draw a right triangle to represent the cross-section of the roof and solar panel.3°] What other strategy could you use to determine ∠J? tan -1 (1. tan C ϭ 2. So.7° opposite tan J ϭ adjacent GH tan J ϭ HJ 5 tan J ϭ 4 ∠J Џ 51. A 9 ft. In ᭝ABC: r pa opposite adjacent AB BC 9 tan C ϭ 12 ∠C Џ 37° N J SOLUTION tan C ϭ 9 tan -1 (0. is approximately 60°.] 2.86989765 The angle of inclination of the solar panel is about 37°. tan -1 (0. Clyde River on Baffin Island.75) 36. AB is opposite ∠C.1 The Tangent Ratio 73 .

CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4. ladder leans against the side of a building with its base 4 ft. How could this affect the calculated measure of ∠R? 1.qxd 12/7/09 Example 4 2:36 PM Page 74 Using the Tangent Ratio to Solve a Problem A 10-ft. Label the vertices of the triangle PQR.2913… tan -1 (Ans) ∠R Џ 66° 66. tan R ϭ Ί 84 4 tan R ϭ 2. How can you use the tangent ratio to determine the measures of the acute angles of a right triangle when you know the lengths of its legs? 74 Chapter 2: Trigonometry . Use the Pythagorean Theorem in right ᭝PQR. Why does the value of the tangent ratio of a given angle not depend on the right triangle you use to calculate it? 2. tan R ϭ PQ QR PQ is opposite ∠R. A support cable is anchored to the ground 5 m from the base of a telephone pole. — instead of PQ ϭ ͱ 84. does the ladder make with the ground? SOLUTION Draw a diagram. from the wall. What angle.Math10Se_Chapter 2. PQ2 ϭ PR2 Ϫ QR2 PQ2 ϭ 102 Ϫ 42 ϭ 84 PQ ϭ Ί 84 Use the tangent ratio in right ᭝PQR. It is attached near the top of the pole. Q Isolate the unknown.42182152 The angle between the ladder and the ground is approximately 66°.2. to the nearest degree. to the nearest degree. QR is adjacent to ∠R. To use the tangent ratio to determine ∠R. PR2 ϭ PQ2 ϩ QR2 R 4 ft. Discuss the Ideas Suppose you used PQ Џ 9.] 10 ft. The cable is 19 m long. does the cable make with the ground? What angle. P [Answer: The angle is approximately 75°. Assume the ground is horizontal and the building vertical. we first need to know the length of PQ.

Describe your solution method. a) tan X ϭ 0. 2.5 8 G 3 9 b) For each triangle in part a.9 cm E H F 2. Determine the measure of each indicated angle to the nearest degree.25 c) tan X ϭ 2. To the nearest degree.0 H 4. determine the measure of ∠X for each value of tan X. a) K 6. 3 5 1 a) tan B ϭ b) tan E ϭ c) tan F ϭ 5 3 4 d) tan G ϭ 4 e) tan H ϭ 1 f) tan J ϭ 25 M a) b) 5. determine the measures of the acute angles to the nearest tenth of a degree. Determine the measure of each indicated angle to the nearest tenth of a degree. a) b) D A 4 7 C E F 6 B 6 c) d) 10 G 7 5 K 8 7.qxd 12/7/09 2:36 PM Page 75 Exercises A B 3.25 d) tan X ϭ 20 A 5. write the tangent ratio for each acute angle. In each triangle. c) To complete part b. N J 6.4 cm D 2 E b) 4 F 8 3 14 6 B 14 c) 4 C J iii) d) 5 9. Use grid paper. then labelling the measures of its legs. did you have to calculate the measures of all 6 acute angles? Explain. Illustrate each tangent ratio by sketching a right triangle.50 J G 9.Math10Se_Chapter 2.4 cm H 3. a) Is tan 60° greater than or less than 1? How do you know without using a calculator? b) Is tan 30° greater than or less than 1? How do you know without using a calculator? 8. a) Why are these triangles similar? i) ii) b) tan X ϭ 1.5 cm 4.1 The Tangent Ratio 75 .

in altitude for every 100 ft.2° Victoria 48.1° Edmonton 53. A birdwatcher sights an eagle at the top of a 20-m tree.5° Fort McMurray 56. At what angle must he incline his camera to take a photograph of the eagle? Give the answer to the nearest degree. The grade or inclination of a road is often expressed as a percent. In a right isosceles triangle.5 2. Determine the measures of all the acute angles in this diagram.8 m c) d) 3.5 5. a) 20% b) 25% c) 10% 5 cm Q 12 cm R 14.7° 15. P 1. it increases 20 ft. d) 15% 12. When a road has a grade of 20%. to the nearest degree.5° Inuvik 68.2 13. 20% grade 20 ft. Calculate the angle of inclination.2° Saskatoon 52.0 m 6. The birdwatcher is lying on the ground 50 m from the tree. The approximate latitudes for several cities in western and northern Canada are shown.4 9. Determine the angle of inclination of each line to the nearest tenth of a degree. 16.2 8. What angles does a diagonal of the rectangle make with the sides of the rectangle? Give the measures to the nearest tenth of a degree. why is the tangent of an acute angle equal to 1? 76 Chapter 2: Trigonometry .5 solar panel 5. to the nearest tenth of a degree. 100 ft.Math10Se_Chapter 2.qxd 12/7/09 2:36 PM Page 76 10. of horizontal distance. of a road with each grade. Sun 4.4° Kamloops 51.4° Whitehorse 60. A rectangle has dimensions 3 cm by 8 cm.0 7. a) b) For which locations might the following roof design be within 1° of the recommended angle for solar panels? Justify your answer. Calgary 51.1 S 11.

a carpenter cuts a stringer to support some stairs. To the nearest degree. For the tangent of an acute angle in a right triangle: a) What is the least possible value? b) What is the greatest possible value? Justify your answers. Each stair rises 7.0 in.qxd 12/7/09 7:35 PM Page 77 17. b) Use the pattern in part a to predict the tangent of the angle at the centre of the spiral for the 100th triangle.Math10Se_Chapter 2. Summarize what you have learned about the tangent ratio and its relationship to the sides and angles of a right triangle.9 cm and YZ ϭ 5. The Pioneer ski lift at Golden. B.5 in. Use the hypotenuse of that triangle as one leg of a new triangle and draw the other leg 1 unit long. at what angle should the carpenter cut the board? 1 1 1 1 1 1 rise 1 tread 1 stringer 11. what is the greatest angle of inclination allowed for a ladder? Reflect 1 1 1 1 a) Determine the tangent of the angle at the centre of the spiral in each of the first 5 triangles.0 in. Start with a right triangle in which each leg is 1 unit long. Justify your answer. A spiral is formed. For safety reasons.1 The Tangent Ratio 77 . 22. In isosceles ᭝XYZ. From a rectangular board. 2. 19. 18. and has a tread of 11. It rises 522 m vertically. What is the angle of inclination of the ski lift? Give the answer to the nearest degree. 7. C 21.0 cm. 1 angle to be cut 1 20. a ladder is positioned so that the distance between its base and the wall is no 1 greater than the length of the ladder. To the 4 nearest degree.C. What angle does the slide make with the ground? Give the answer to the nearest degree. Determine the measures of the angles of the triangle to the nearest tenth of a degree. 23. A Pythagorean spiral is constructed by drawing right triangles on the hypotenuse of other right triangles. is 1366 m long. Continue the process. XY ϭ XZ ϭ 5..5 in. A playground slide starts 107 cm above the ground and is 250 cm long.

. we can use the tangent ratio. you can draw the triangle. We are then measuring the length of a side of a triangle indirectly. F G 33° 4.0 cm H What other measures in the triangle can you calculate? Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work with a partner.1. ∠P ϭ 34. you used the measures of two legs of a right triangle to calculate the measures of the acute angles of the triangle.5°.1 cm. 78 Chapter 2: Trigonometry The tangent ratio is a powerful tool we can use to calculate the length of a leg of a right triangle.2 12/7/09 2:36 PM Page 78 Using the Tangent Ratio to Calculate Lengths LESSON FOCUS Apply the tangent ratio to calculate lengths. In right ᭝PQR. We use direct measurement when we use a measuring instrument to determine a length or an angle in a polygon. Make Connections In Lesson 2. adjacent When we know the measure of an acute angle and the length of a leg. and PQ ϭ 46. . we solve the equation to determine the length of the other leg.qxd 2. We use indirect measurement when we use mathematical reasoning to calculate a length or an angle.Math10Se_Chapter 2. Determine the length of RQ to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. ∠Q ϭ 90°. When you know the length of one leg of a right triangle and the measure of one acute angle. opposite In a right triangle. to write an equation.

) [Answer: VX Џ 8. Determine the length of XY to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.7 cm] A opposite adjacent tan C ϭ B adjacent to ЄC C Use the tangent ratio to write an equation. 30° C SOLUTION Y In right ᭝ABC. 3.2 cm In right ᭝DEF. 5. AB 10 × tan 30° ϭ × 10 10 10 tan 30° ϭ AB tan 30° ϭ Multiply both sides by 10. W opposite tan F ϭ adjacent (Solution continues.qxd 12/7/09 Example 1 2:36 PM Page 79 Determining the Length of a Side Opposite a Given Angle Determine the length of AB to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. DE is opposite ∠F and EF is adjacent to ∠F.773502692 AB is approximately 5. it is understood to be multiplication.0 cm opposite ЄC 70° Z 30° X [Answer: XY Џ 13. Determine the length of VX to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. AB ϭ 5.0 cm] 2.7735… 10tan(30) 5. tan C ϭ A AB BC AB 10 Solve this equation for AB.2 Using the Tangent Ratio to Calculate Lengths 79 . Example 2 How can you determine the length of the hypotenuse in ᭝ABC? Determining the Length of a Side Adjacent to a Given Angle Determine the length of EF to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. AB is the side opposite ∠C and BC is the side adjacent to ∠C. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING B 10 cm 1. E F 2.Math10Se_Chapter 2.5 cm SOLUTIONS CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 20° D X 42° V Method 1 7.8 cm long. We write: 10 × tan 30° as 10 tan 30° When an operation sign is omitted.

Divide both sides by tan 20°.5 tan 20° ϭ EF Solve the equation for EF.5 Solve the equation for EF. c B 80 Chapter 2: Trigonometry b a C .5 tan 70° ϭ 3. Which method to determine EF do you think is easier? Why? How could you determine the length of DF? EF ϭ 9.5 EF tan 20° ϭ EF aEFb Page 80 tan F ϭ EF tan 20° ϭ 3.5 Multiply both sides by EF. A It is often convenient to use the lower case letter to name the side opposite a vertex of a triangle.5 EF ϭ tan 20° EF ϭ 9.6 cm long.qxd 12/7/09 2:36 PM DE EF 3.Math10Se_Chapter 2.5 cm 70° D ∠D ϭ 90° Ϫ 20° ∠D ϭ 70° EF is opposite ∠D and DE is adjacent to ∠D.5) 3.5 EF tan 20° ϭ tan 20° tan 20° 3. tan D ϭ opposite adjacent tan D ϭ EF DE tan 70° ϭ EF 3. 3.6161… 3.5 tan 70° ϭ EF Multiply both sides by 3. 3. Method 2 In right ᭝DEF: E ∠D ϩ ∠F ϭ 90° ∠D ϩ 20° ϭ 90° opposite ЄD F adjacent to ЄD 3.5/tan(20) 9. (EF)(3.5 3.6161… EF is approximately 9.5.616170968 What is the advantage of solving the equation for EF before calculating tan 20°? EF is approximately 9.6 cm long.

Why can you always calculate its hypotenuse? 2.2 Using the Tangent Ratio to Calculate Lengths 81 . Discuss the Ideas 1. Determine the height of the cloud to the nearest metre. At a horizontal distance of 200 m from the base of an observation tower. [Answer: 28 m] 75° S P c ϭ 250 m tan P ϭ opposite adjacent p tan P ϭ c tan 75° ϭ p 250 Solve the equation for p. At a horizontal distance of 250 m from the searchlight. SOLUTION C Sketch and label a diagram to represent the information in the problem. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING line of sight searchlight 75° 3. side CS is opposite ∠P and SP is adjacent to ∠P.0127… The cloud is approximately 933 m high. How can you use the tangent ratio to determine the length of a leg in a right triangle? 2. Suppose you know or can calculate the lengths of the legs in a right triangle.Math10Se_Chapter 2. Assume the ground is horizontal. Multiply both sides by 250. the angle between the ground and the line of sight to the cloud is 75°.qxd 12/7/09 Example 3 2:36 PM Page 81 Using Tangent to Solve an Indirect Measurement Problem A searchlight beam shines vertically on a cloud. line of sight 8° s p In right ᭝CSP. the angle between the ground and the line of sight to the top of the tower is 8°. How high is the tower to the nearest metre? The diagram is not drawn to scale. p 250 tan 75° ϭ a b 250 250 250 tan 75° ϭ p Why can we draw a right triangle to represent the problem? p ϭ 933.

Determine the length of each indicated side to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. One end of the wire is 15.3 m from a wall. a) r P Q 15° 1.4 m from the base of the tower. The angle between the wire and the level ground is 56°.qxd 12/7/09 2:36 PM Page 82 Exercises A B 3.5 cm R b) 7.Math10Se_Chapter 2. A a) b) D 6. It shines on the helicopter and the angle the beam makes with the ground is 43°. a searchlight is 200 m from the point where the helicopter will land.5 cm a) N p b) 64° 8.4 cm S U u 61° T V c) 2. How far up the wall does the ladder reach to the nearest tenth of a metre? J 4.4 m N 7. How high is the helicopter at this point to the nearest metre? .0 cm G F K d) 59° m 8. A helicopter is descending vertically. The base of a ladder is on level ground 1.3 m W 5. A guy wire helps to support a tower.0 cm c) 35° 2. The ladder leans against the wall. On the ground.0 cm 43° g M 56° 15. P 4.2 cm v 71° 1. Determine the length of each indicated side to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. The angle between the ladder and the ground is 71°. How high up the tower does the wire reach to the nearest tenth of a metre? E 27° B H d C 5.0 cm b 3. Determine the length of each indicated side to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.4 cm 32° W 82 v X Chapter 2: Trigonometry 8.7 cm R S Q r c) U V 72° 23° T 1.

the angle between the ground and Claire’s line of sight to the top of the tower was 81°. a) F G b) J K 36° 2. At a certain point. 5) and B(Ϫ4. Describe your strategy.3°.9 cm 42° M H 10. About how high is the balloon? What assumptions are you making? C 191 m 81° 11. Determine the length of the hypotenuse of each right triangle to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. ∠P ϭ 58°.0 cm long. Determine the measure of the acute angle between AB and the y-axis. Determine the area of ᭝PQR to the nearest tenth of a square centimetre. the shorter diagonal. is 6. Janelle sees a large helium-filled balloon anchored to the roof of a store. The angle between one longer side of a rectangle and a diagonal is 34°. Reflect 13. To the nearest metre. QS. ∠R ϭ 90°. Ϫ2).5°. b) Draw a line through the points C(1. a) Sketch and label the rectangle.Math10Se_Chapter 2.qxd 12/7/09 2:36 PM Page 83 9. Claire knows that the Calgary Tower is 191 m high. and ∠QPT is 56. About how far is Liam from a point on the ground vertically below the statue? How do you know? 15. Determine the measures of all the angles and the lengths of the sides of the kite to the nearest tenth. 2. On a coordinate grid: a) Draw a line through the points A(4. One shorter side of the rectangle is 2. Determine the measure of the acute angle between CD and the x-axis. Liam is lying on the ground near the building. about how far was Claire from the tower? Why is this distance approximate? 14. is about 77 m. Describe your strategy. ∠QRT is 26. In kite PQRS. the angle between the ground and her line of sight to the balloon is 30°. Summarize what you have learned about using the tangent ratio to determine the length of a side of a right triangle. b) What is the length of the rectangle to the nearest tenth of a centimetre? 12. and PR ϭ 7.1 cm.7 cm 5. Ϫ5). 4) and D(4. from the ground to the top of the Golden Boy statue. Q T P R S 16.2 Using the Tangent Ratio to Calculate Lengths 83 . In ᭝PQR. When she is 100 m from the store. The angle between the ground and his line of sight to the top of the building is 52°.3 cm. The height of the Manitoba Legislature Building.

You will need: ■ ■ a measuring tape or 2 metre sticks ■ a piece of heavy cardboard big enough for you to attach the paper protractor ■ a drinking straw ■ glue ■ adhesive tape ■ a needle and thread ■ a small metal washer or weight ■ Chapter 2: Trigonometry scissors ■ 84 an enlarged copy of a 180° protractor grid paper . Make Connections Tree farmers use a clinometer to measure the angle between a horizontal line and the line of sight to the top of a tree. How can they then use the tangent ratio to calculate the height of the tree? Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. They measure the distance to the base of the tree.3 Measuring an Inaccessible Height LESSON FOCUS Determine a height that cannot be measured directly.Math10Se_Chapter 2.qxd 12/7/09 2:36 PM Page 84 MATH LAB 2.

One of you stands near the object on level ground.3 Math Lab: Measuring an Inaccessible Height 85 . a totem pole. C. Attach the weight to the other end of the thread. with the weight hanging down. Secure the thread to the back of the cardboard with tape. 2.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 85 A. D. for example. B. With your partner. a tree. ■ Tape the drinking straw along the baseline of the protractor for use as a sighting tube. Make a drinking straw clinometer: ■ Glue or tape the paper protractor to the cardboard. ■ Use the needle to pull the thread through the cardboard at the centre of baseline of the protractor. Hold the clinometer as shown. choose a tall object whose height you cannot measure directly. a flagpole.Math10Se_Chapter 2. Your partner measures and records your distance from the object. Carefully cut it out. or a building.

J. Your partner records the acute angle indicated by the thread on the protractor. F. What other strategy could you use to determine the height of the object? I.6 m 10. Does the height of your eye affect the measurements? The final result? Explain. The diagram is not drawn to scale.0 m from the base of a tree. Your partner measures and records how far your eye is above the ground. Use the information in the diagram to calculate the height of a totem pole observed with a drinking-straw clinometer. A tree farmer stood 10. Compare your results with those of your partner. Determine the height of the tree to the nearest tenth of a metre. She used a clinometer to sight the top of the tree. Keep your clinometer for use in the Review. Label: I your distance from the object I the vertical distance from the ground to your eyes I the angle of inclination of the straw H. 2. Assess Your Understanding 1. Use your measurements and the tangent ratio to calculate the height of the object.0 m 12° . Repeat Steps B to G. 86 Chapter 2: Trigonometry 40° 3.6 m above the ground. 1.qxd 12/10/09 6:44 PM How does the acute angle between the thread and the straw relate to the angle of inclination of the straw? Page 86 E. The diagram is not drawn to scale. Give the answer to the nearest metre. Change places with your partner.Math10Se_Chapter 2. The tree farmer held the clinometer 1. Look at the top of the object through the straw. Explain how the angle shown on the protractor of your clinometer is related to the angle of inclination that the clinometer measures. Sketch a diagram with a vertical line segment representing the object you want to measure. G. The angle shown on the protractor scale was 40°.

qxd 12/7/09 7:38 PM Page 87 CHECKPOINT 1 Concept Development Connections Similar Right Triangles ABC ~ Corresponding angles are equal.0 b B tan B = B B adjacent C to B Determine an angle given two legs. 40 50 tan B = ■ 8.5 or P = 90 – Q P = 50 opposite tan P = adjacent p tan 50 = 8 p = 8 tan 50 p = 9. XYZ Corresponding sides are proportional.2 – You showed how to determine the length of a leg in a right triangle when you know the measures of an acute angle and the other leg.9 p= R opposite adjacent 8 p 8 tan 40 p = 9.3 – You applied the tangent ratio to a real-world measurement problem. ■ – You applied what you know about similar right triangles to develop the concept of the tangent ratio.5 ■ A opposite adjacent opposite Determine a side given an angle and a leg.0 tan 50 = In Lesson 2.5 3 C B Z B Y C Y 5 Z 7.1 opposite adjacent b 10 C p Q tan Q = tan 40 = b = 10 tan 50 b = 11. In Lesson 2. Tangent Ratio tan B = In Lesson 2. – You used the tangent ratio to determine an acute angle in a right triangle when you know the lengths of the legs.5 Checkpoint 1 87 . X A A X 4. A A 3 B 5 opposite adjacent tan B = 3 5 tan B = 0.6 B = 31 P C 10.Math10Se_Chapter 2.

A hiker saw a hoodoo on a cliff at Willow Creek in Alberta’s badlands. The hiker was 9. What is the angle between the ground and the line of sight from an observer at the beginning of the landing strip? Give the measure to the nearest tenth of a degree.1 m from the base of the cliff. a) b) A D F c) G 16 2 cm 6 cm B 4 cm 8 cm H E 20 J C 2. Determine the measure of each indicated angle to the nearest degree.2 4.2 cm 61° 10. About how high was the top of the hoodoo above the level ground? 88 Chapter 2: Trigonometry p T 56° R .1 1. Why does the tangent of an angle increase as the angle increases? 3. the angle between the level ground and the line of sight to the top of the hoodoo was 69°.8 cm 27° s N Q 5. From that point.3 cm V 6.Math10Se_Chapter 2. a) n K M P b) S c) 5. Determine the length of each indicated side to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. 2. A small plane is flying at an altitude of 1000 m and is 5000 m from the beginning of the landing strip.qxd 12/7/09 7:38 PM Page 88 Assess Your Understanding 2.

C.4 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 89 The Sine and Cosine Ratios LESSON FOCUS Develop and apply the sine and cosine ratios to determine angle measures. includes spiral tunnels. You can see a long train passing under itself after it comes out of a tunnel before it has finished going in.. Here is a diagram of the track before the tunnels were constructed. The diagram is not drawn to scale.6 km Hector 297 m Field How could you determine the angle of inclination of the track? 2.. 6. B. B.4 The Sine and Cosine Ratios 89 . Make Connections The railroad track through the mountains between Field. and Hector.qxd 2. They were built in the early 1900s to reduce the angle of inclination of the track between the two towns. Visualize the track straightened out to form the hypotenuse of a right triangle.Math10Se_Chapter 2.C.

Measures of Sides Ratios Triangle Hypotenuse Side opposite Side adjacent Side opposite ∠A Side adjacent to ∠A ∠A to ∠A Hypotenuse Hypotenuse ᭝ABC ᭝ADE ᭝AFG ᭝AHJ C.Math10Se_Chapter 2. Label your diagram with the measures. each ratio involves the hypotenuse. A. as in the diagram above. how do the ratios compare? G. There are two other ratios we can form to compare the sides of the triangle. Complete a table like the one in Step B for your triangles. Draw another set of nested right triangles that are not similar to those in Step A.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 90 Construct Understanding We defined the tangent ratio for an acute angle in a right triangle. Examine the nested right triangles below. What do you think the value of each ratio depends on? 90 Chapter 2: Trigonometry . You will need grid paper. and a protractor. a ruler. TRY THIS Work with a partner. Measure the sides and angles of each triangle. How are the other acute angles in each triangle related? How do you know? How are the triangles related? B. D. E. For each set of triangles. Copy and complete this table. H 5 F 5 D 12 5 B 5 A 4 9 6 3 C 4 E 4 G 4 J ∠A is common to each triangle. F.

and cosine are called the primary trigonometric ratios. then in any similar right triangle... cos A ϭ 0.. These ratios are called the sine ratio and the cosine ratio.7 times.7 times the length of the hypotenuse. For example. What happens to sin A as ∠A gets closer to 0°? .4 The Sine and Cosine Ratios 91 . then sin A ϭ length of side opposite ∠A length of hypotenuse C hypotenuse opposite ЄA The Cosine Ratio If ∠A is an acute angle in a right triangle. This side is 0. What happens to cos A as ∠A gets closer to 0°? This side is 0.this side. and not on the size of the triangle. then cos A ϭ B adjacent to ЄA A length of side adjacent to ∠A length of hypotenuse The tangent..” The values of the sine and cosine that compare the lengths of the sides are often expressed as decimals.7 2.5 times the length of the hypotenuse. The Sine Ratio If ∠A is an acute angle in a right triangle. A . If sin A ϭ 0. The branch of math that deals with the relations between the sides and angles of triangles is called trigonometry.this side. the length of the side opposite ∠A is 0.7. sine.. the ratios that relate each leg to the hypotenuse depend only on the measure of the acute angle.5 times. then in any similar right triangle.5. The sine ratio for ∠A is written as sin A and the cosine ratio for ∠A is written as cos A..Math10Se_Chapter 2.. A sin A ϭ 0.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 91 In a right triangle.. The word trigonometry comes from three Greek words “tri ϩ gonia ϩ metron” that together mean “three angle measure. in right ᭝ABC.5 If cos A ϭ 0. the length of the side adjacent to ∠A is 0.

CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING E 12 cm D 5 cm 13 cm F b) Determine sin D and cos D to the nearest hundredth. DF is the hypotenuse.Math10Se_Chapter 2. [Answers: a) HJ. cos G Џ 0. 1. identify the side opposite ∠D and the side adjacent to ∠D.qxd 12/7/09 Example 1 2:37 PM Page 92 Determining the Sine and Cosine of an Angle a) In ᭝DEF. b) Determine sin G and cos G to the nearest hundredth.3846… sin D Џ 0. SOLUTION H a) In right ᭝DEF. How are these values related to sin D and cos D? cos D ϭ 0.47. use sinϪ1 or InvSin When you know its cosine.88 ] sin D ϭ 0.38 cos D ϭ adjacent hypotenuse DE DF 12 cos D ϭ 13 cos D ϭ DE is adjacent to ∠D. EF is opposite ∠D and DE is adjacent to ∠D. DF is the hypotenuse. HG b) sin G Џ 0. DF is the hypotenuse. identify the side opposite ∠G and the side adjacent to ∠G. use cosϪ1 or InvCos .9230… cos D Џ 0. b) sin D ϭ EF DF 5 sin D ϭ 13 J E adjacent opposite 15 D hypotenuse 17 F opposite hypotenuse sin D ϭ 8 G EF is opposite ∠D. a) In ᭝GHJ.92 You can use a scientific calculator to determine the measure of an angle: ■ ■ 92 Chapter 2: Trigonometry When you know its sine. Determine sin F and cos F.

So.qxd 12/7/09 Example 2 2:37 PM Page 93 Using Sine or Cosine to Determine the Measure of an Angle Determine the measures of ∠G and ∠H to the nearest tenth of a degree. cos G ϭ cos -1 (6/14) 64. How are cos G and sin H related? Explain why this relationship occurs. Determine the measures of ∠K and ∠M to the nearest tenth of a degree.3769…° ∠G ϩ ∠H ϭ 90° ∠G ϭ 90° Ϫ ∠H The angle sum of any triangle is 180°.6° and ∠H is approximately 25.6230…° ∠H ϭ 25. GH is the hypotenuse. N GK is opposite ∠H.4 The Sine and Cosine Ratios 93 . ∠G ϭ 90° Ϫ 25.0°] sin H ϭ sin -1 (6/14) 25.3769…° ∠G is approximately 64. So. [Answer: ∠K Џ 22. GH is the hypotenuse. In right ᭝GHK: adjacent cos G ϭ hypotenuse GK GH 6 cos G ϭ 14 GK is adjacent to ∠G.37693353 ∠H ϭ 25.0°. 6 G SOLUTIONS CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING K 14 H M Method 1 Determine the measure of ∠H first.6230…° Method 2 Determine the measure of ∠G first. so the two acute angles in a right triangle have a sum of 90°.4°.6230…° ∠G ϩ ∠H ϭ 90° The two acute angles have a sum of 90°. opposite hypotenuse GK GH 6 sin H ϭ 14 8 K 3 In right ᭝GHK: sin H ϭ 2.Math10Se_Chapter 2.3769…° ∠G ϭ 64.62306647 ∠G ϭ 64. 2. ∠M Џ 68. ∠H ϭ 90° Ϫ 64.

Assume the ground is horizontal. 3. The plane’s radar shows that it is 8000 ft. 5000 ft. from the target site. The angle of elevation of an object above the horizontal is the angle between the horizontal and the line of sight from an observer. and the length of a leg or the measure of an acute angle. 8000 ft. sin -1 (5000/8000) ∠R Џ 39° 38. What is the angle of elevation of the plane measured from the target site. Discuss the Ideas angle of elevation horizontal 1. Why is it important to draw a sketch before you start to solve a problem? 3. [Answer: approximately 44°] ∠R is the angle of elevation of the plane. At a certain time. Why are the values of the sine of an acute angle and the cosine of an acute angle less than 1? 94 Chapter 2: Trigonometry . When can you use the sine ratio to determine the measure of an acute angle in a right triangle? When can you use the cosine ratio? 2. Determine the angle of elevation of the plane measured from the observer. Altitude is measured vertically. RA is the hypotenuse. R X AX is the altitude of the plane. RA is the distance from the target site to the plane. to the nearest degree? CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING SOLUTION A Draw a diagram to represent the situation.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 94 We can use the sine or cosine ratio to solve problems that can be modelled by a right triangle when we know the length of the hypotenuse. An observer is sitting on a dock watching a float plane in Vancouver harbour. to the nearest degree.Math10Se_Chapter 2.68218745 The angle of elevation of the plane is approximately 39°. Example 3 Using Sine or Cosine to Solve a Problem A water bomber is flying at an altitude of 5000 ft. the plane is 300 m above the water and 430 m from the observer. In right ᭝ARX: AX RA 5000 sin R ϭ 8000 sin R ϭ AX is opposite ∠R.

Math10Se_Chapter 2.5 2.6 M H G G D c) 1. Determine the sine and cosine of each angle to the nearest hundredth. Determine the measure of each indicated angle to the nearest degree. a) In each triangle below: ■ ■ ■ a) Name the side opposite ∠A. 5 3 a) sin B ϭ b) cos B ϭ 5 8 1 4 c) sin B ϭ d) cos B ϭ 4 9 10.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 95 Exercises 8. a) 57° b) 5° c) 19° d) 81° 6.64 6 11 d) cos X ϭ 7 9 B 9 X Y 9.5 H E c) d) 3. Name the side adjacent to ∠A. i) Q R V 24 24 A 25 T 8 6 24 A 7 10 H T 5 U ii) G b) 18 K S c) d) Z 5 A W 2 10 B b) For each triangle in part a.2 2. determine sin A and cos A to the nearest hundredth.25 c) sin X ϭ b) cos X ϭ 0.9 2. 5.3 J 6 P K 11 16 P 2.4 The Sine and Cosine Ratios R 95 . a) b) 7. For each ratio below. Describe your strategy. a) b) B 9 2.4 7 D F 4 J 10 K d) N M 2. To the nearest degree. Determine the measure of each indicated angle to the nearest degree.1 F E 5 C C Q 2. Use the sine or cosine ratio to determine the measure of each acute angle to the nearest tenth of a degree. A 4. sketch two different right triangles and label their sides. determine the measure of each ∠X. a) sin X ϭ 0. Name the hypotenuse.

1 m above the ground.Math10Se_Chapter 2. What is the measure of the angle between a diagonal and the longest side of the rectangle? Give the answer to the nearest degree. A ladder is 6. The top of the silo can be reached by a spiral staircase that circles the silo once.6 cm long. A rope that supports a tent is 2. A die is made up of two plates that stamp together. Include examples in your explanation. a tool and die maker must set the milling machine at the precise angle. 96 Chapter 2: Trigonometry .2 m from the wall. Use a calculator to determine: i) sin 90° ii) sin 0° iii) cos 90° iv) cos 0° b) Sketch a right triangle. What is the angle of inclination of the track to the nearest tenth of a degree? Hector 13 500 m 297 m Field 12. C 17. It leans against a wall.5 m long. Use the sketch to explain the results in part a. She works from blueprints that show the dimensions of the design.8 cm long and each diagonal is 5. Reflect Explain when you might use the sine or cosine ratio instead of the tangent ratio to determine the measure of an acute angle in a right triangle. Sketch a right isosceles triangle. a) Calculate: i) sin 10° ii) sin 20° iii) sin 40° iv) sin 50° v) sin 60° vi) sin 80° b) Why does the sine of an angle increase as the angle increases? 16. A rectangle is 4. such as bottle caps. A cylindrical silo is 37 ft. high and has a diameter of 14 ft. What is the angle of inclination of the rope to the nearest degree? 14. Explain why the cosine of each acute angle is equal to the sine of the angle. 15. The base of the ladder is 1. To cut the material for a die. Suppose the railroad track through the spiral tunnels from Field to Hector were straightened out. THE WORLD OF MATH Careers: Tool and Die Maker A tool and die maker constructs tools and prepares dies for manufacturing common objects. The rope is attached to the tent at a point that is 2.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 96 11.4 m long. The diagram is not drawn to scale. What is the angle of inclination of the ladder to the nearest tenth of a degree? 13. What is the angle of inclination of the staircase to the nearest degree? 18. a) We have defined the sine and cosine ratios for acute angles. It would look like the diagram below. A tool and die maker uses trigonometry to construct a die.

How could you determine the distance between the transit and the survey pole? survey pole pond survey stake 110 m transit 46. How can the surveyor use these measures and her knowledge of trigonometry in a right triangle to calculate the lengths that cannot be measured directly? Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work with a partner.Math10Se_Chapter 2. Make Connections A surveyor can measure an angle precisely using an instrument called a transit. The diagram shows measurements taken by surveyors.qxd 2.5° 2.5 Using the Sine and Cosine Ratios to Calculate Lengths 97 . A measuring tape is used to measure distances.5 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 97 Using the Sine and Cosine Ratios to Calculate Lengths LESSON FOCUS Use the sine and cosine ratios to determine lengths indirectly.

Example 1 Using the Sine or Cosine Ratio to Determine the Length of a Leg Determine the length of BC to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.2)(BC) 5. 98 Chapter 2: Trigonometry . Determine the length of PQ to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. The sine and cosine ratios can be used to calculate the length of the hypotenuse when the measure of one acute angle and the length of one leg are known.4 cm B adjacent to ЄC C adjacent cos C ϭ hypotenuse opposite ЄC 50° 5. 5.3 cm long.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 98 We can use the sine ratio or cosine ratio to write an equation that we can solve to calculate the length of a leg in a right triangle when the measure of one acute angle and the length of the hypotenuse are known.34249557 BC ϭ 3.2 cos 50° ϭ BC Multiply both sides by 5.2 cm hypotenuse R 67° Q A [Answer: PQ Џ 9.2 5.2 cos C ϭ Solve this equation for BC.2. AC is the hypotenuse and BC is adjacent to the known ∠C. Choose the ratio that compares the adjacent side to the hypotenuse. P SOLUTION In right ᭝ABC. (5. 10.2cos(50) 3.Math10Se_Chapter 2.2 cm 1.3424… How could you have used the sine ratio to solve this problem? BC is approximately 3. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING B C 50° A 5. Use the cosine ratio to write an equation.2 cos 50° ϭ 5.6 cm] BC AC BC cos 50° ϭ 5.

f sin 55° ϭ Multiply both sides by f. The sine ratio compares the opposite side to the hypotenuse.8 Divide both sides by sin 55°.3 cm long.8/sin(55) f ϭ 8. F 55° K 6.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 99 Using Sine or Cosine to Determine the Length of the Hypotenuse Example 2 Determine the length of DE to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.8 cm e f hypotenuse D Use the sine ratio to write an equation.Math10Se_Chapter 2. 2. Determine the length of JK to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.8 sin 55° ϭ f sin E ϭ Solve for f.5 Using the Sine and Cosine Ratios to Calculate Lengths 99 .6 cm SOLUTION In right ᭝DEF. E CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2.8 ϭ sin 55° sin 55° fϭ 6.8 cm 65° M D 7. DE is the hypotenuse and DF is opposite the known ∠E. Use lower case letters to label the lengths of the sides.301267204 DE is approximately 8.3012… 8. 6.8 sin 55° 6.8 f f f sin 55° ϭ 6. opposite hypotenuse e sin E ϭ f 6. f sin 55° 6. adjacent E F d 55° J [Answer: JK Џ 8.4 cm] opposite 6.

86) TP TP cos 67. In right ᭝PST.86 ϭ cos 67.86 cos 67.86/cos(67.05460841 The distance from the transit to the survey pole is approximately 54.Math10Se_Chapter 2. The horizontal distance between the plane and the radar station is 35. 100 Chapter 2: Trigonometry How could you use the sine ratio instead of the cosine ratio to solve Example 3? How could you use the tangent ratio? . How could the surveyor determine the distance from the transit to the survey pole to the nearest hundredth of a metre? CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING survey pole valley survey 67.86 m SOLUTION Label a diagram to represent the problem.3° 20.5°.3° TP ϭ 54.6 km T cos T ϭ [Answer: 42.3° cos 67. the angle of elevation of an approaching airplane is 32. P ce an d ire t dis qu re Use the cosine ratio to write an equation.05 m.3° ϭ 20.86 Multiply both sides by TP.86 TP Solve this equation for TP. 32.86 m TS TP cos 67.5° 35.3° stake transit 20. How far is the plane from the radar station to the nearest tenth of a kilometre? The required distance is the hypotenuse of right ᭝PST.3°. TP cos 67. (TP)(20.3° ϭ Divide both sides by cos 67.0546… TP ϭ 20.3° 20.2 km] adjacent hypotenuse cos T ϭ 67. TP is the hypotenuse and TS is adjacent to ∠T.3) 54.qxd 12/7/09 Example 3 10:44 PM Page 100 Solving an Indirect Measurement Problem A surveyor made the measurements shown in the diagram.3° ϭ 20.6 km. TP cos 67. 3. From a radar station.3° S 20.

a) K 5. To the nearest tenth of a metre.Math10Se_Chapter 2.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Discuss the Ideas Page 101 1.6 cm 30.3 cm 6. a) b) X 50° U w a) V M N 4.5 m measured from the ground. Determine the length of each indicated side to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.5 cm E c) 55° r K 25° R S n 4.0 cm b) H 30° 3.2 cm m Y x Z 57° W J j c) d) T P N P 3.5 cm 8. Determine the length of each indicated side to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.4 cm 8. how far up the wall of an apartment building can the ladder reach? B f D E 23° a 11.5 m 77° F C E F A 2. 5.5 Using the Sine and Cosine Ratios to Calculate Lengths 101 . Determine the length of each indicated side to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.8 cm 6. The angle of inclination of the ladder is 77°.8 cm 28° f C c F Q G 42° 4. What are the advantages of using a trigonometric ratio instead of an accurate drawing to solve a measurement problem? 2.5 cm M b) 72° D G j m N c) H 62° 41° 4. When would you use the sine ratio to determine the length of a side of a right triangle? When would you use the cosine ratio? Exercises A B 3. A fire truck has an aerial ladder that extends 30.0 cm 13.2 cm d) D 51° B d) J 6.

The angle between the ship’s path and the line of sight to the lighthouse is then 28.Math10Se_Chapter 2. the navigator sees the lighthouse at Langara Point. • The angle between these sides is 55°. To the nearest tenth of a kilometre. An airplane approaches an airport.9 cm E D Reflect 102 76° Chapter 2: Trigonometry A C 3. Its angle of elevation measured from the airport is 19. Include examples.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 102 7.23 m gorge sloping ceiling 58. A surveyor makes the measurements shown in the diagram to determine the distance from C to E across a gorge. What is the height of the triangle? b) Determine the area of the lot to the nearest square foot. measured along the attic ceiling? b) What is the greatest height of the bookcase? Give the answers to the nearest centimetre. a) Use the 250-ft. The angle of inclination of the attic ceiling is 40°. B C 18. side as the base of the triangle. At a certain time.6 K cm 63° E N M b) What strategies did you use to complete part a? What other strategies could you have used instead? C 13. At a certain point. long. EF ϭ 4.5 cm. D C 11.8 cm J 5. Explain when you might use the sine or cosine ratio instead of the tangent ratio to determine the length of a side in a right triangle. A survey of a building lot that has the shape of an acute triangle shows these data: • Two intersecting sides are 250 ft. how far is the plane from the airport? 10. and DE ϭ 3. due south of the ship. i) ii) C D 34° 8. The base of the bookcase is 3. 12. The ship then sails 3.5 km due east.5° E 40° a) To the nearest tenth of a metre. A bookcase is built against the sloping ceiling of an attic. 14. ∠D ϭ ∠E ϭ 90°. To the nearest metre. In trapezoid CDEF. B 25.5°. it is 939 m high. A ship is sailing off the north coast of the Queen Charlotte Islands. and 170 ft. ∠C ϭ 60°.5 cm. what is the distance from C to E? b) How could the surveyor calculate the distance from C to D? 8. What is the perimeter of the trapezoid to the nearest millimetre? Describe your strategy. .24 m long.24 m a) What is the length of the top of the bookcase. how far is the ship from the lighthouse? 9.5°. Calculate the dimensions of this rectangle to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. a) Determine the perimeter of each shape to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.

5 8.Math10Se_Chapter 2.1 sin B = cos A = Checkpoint 2 103 .5 B adjacent hypotenuse 4. XYZ Corresponding angles are equal.qxd 12/7/09 7:43 PM Page 103 CHECKPOINT 2 Concept Development Connections Similar Right Triangles ABC ~ ■ – You applied what you know about similar right triangles to develop the sine and cosine ratios.0 4.5 Z C B 6. – You showed how to determine the length of the hypotenuse when you know the measure of an acute angle and the length of one leg.5 c= cos 65 c = 10. Sine and Cosine Ratios opposite hypotenuse adjacent cos C = hypotenuse sin C = opposite A hypotenuse Determine an angle given one leg and the hypotenuse. A A c 7 In Lesson 2.4 B 5 Z 4 3 Y Y ■ – You showed how to determine the length of a leg in a right triangle when you know the measure of an acute angle and the length of the hypotenuse.7 B = 44 sin B = adjacent hypotenuse 7 cos A = 10 cos A = 0. A 10 C B adjacent to C C Determine a side given an angle and a side.0 65 b 50 B C opposite hypotenuse 7 sin B = 10 sin B = 0. X A C X 7. Corresponding sides are proportional.6 cos B = B C opposite hypotenuse b sin 50 = 8 b = 8 sin 50 b = 6.5 cos 65 = c c cos 65 = 4. A – You used the sine or cosine ratio to determine an acute angle in a right triangle when you know the lengths of one leg and the hypotenuse.5 In Lesson 2.7 A = 46 C 4.5 4.

4 km due west. A ship is sailing off the south coast of the Queen Charlotte Islands.4 1.5°. from the road to a loading dock. P U R a) b) c) 20° n 65° N 10. The angle between the ship’s path and the line of sight to the beacon is 41.5 cm M 2.qxd 12/7/09 7:43 PM Page 104 Assess Your Understanding 2. A factory manager plans to install a 30-ft. Determine the length of each indicated side to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. What is the angle of inclination of the conveyor to the nearest degree? 3.5 4.0 cm r T v V W . the navigator sees the beacon at Cape St.Math10Se_Chapter 2. a) b) P 8 cm Q 4 cm 9 cm S c) T J 9. How far is the ship from the beacon? 104 Chapter 2: Trigonometry 50° 9. 2. a) Calculate the cosine of each angle: i) 10° ii) 20° iii) 30° iv) 40° v) 50° vi) 60° vii) 70° viii) 80° b) Explain why the cosine of an angle decreases as the angle increases. long conveyor that rises 7 ft.0 cm Q 8. James. At a certain point. Determine the measure of each indicated angle to the nearest degree. The ship then sails 2.0 cm S 5. due north of the ship.5 cm 6 cm R K U 11.

long. above the sidewalk level. The ramp is about 3 ft. How could you determine the angle of inclination of the ramp? Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work with a partner.qxd 2. from the level ground to the door of the house. Determine whether Anwar’s design will comply with the building code. the extended ramp allows entry to the bus at about 4 in. ■ The horizontal distance from the start of the ramp at the sidewalk to the door is 20 ft. 3 in. BC.6 12/7/09 7:43 PM Page 105 Applying the Trigonometric Ratios LESSON FOCUS Use a primary trigonometric ratio to solve a problem modelled by a right triangle.Math10Se_Chapter 2. ■ The building code states that the angle of inclination of the ramp must be less than 5°. 2. Anwar is designing a wheelchair accessibility ramp for his sister.6 Applying the Trigonometric Ratios 105 . He knows these data: ■ The ramp will rise 1 ft. Make Connections Double-decker buses with wheelchair access ramps are used in Victoria. When the bus is lowered.

00 XZ ϭ Ί 136 XZ ϭ 11. Solving a triangle means to determine the measures of all the angles and the lengths of all the sides in the triangle.5°.00 ϩ 100. Give the measures to the nearest tenth.02 XZ2 ϭ 36. Solve this triangle.0 cm 6.7 cm. We can use any of the three primary trigonometric ratios to do this. ∠K Џ 57. Y 7.0 cm.0 cm M 11.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 106 When we calculate the measures of all the angles and all the lengths in a right triangle. Give the measures to the nearest tenth.6619… XZ is approximately 11. 1.0 cm X N Z SOLUTIONS Method 1 Determine the length of XZ first.02 ϩ 10. we solve the triangle.00 XZ2 ϭ 136.0 cm K 10. ∠N Џ 32.Math10Se_Chapter 2. XZ2 ϭ 6. R adjacent to ЄP opposite ЄP Q Example 1 tan P ϭ opposite adjacent sin P ϭ opposite hypotenuse cos P ϭ hypotenuse P adjacent hypotenuse Solving a Right Triangle Given Two Sides CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Solve ᭝XYZ. 106 Chapter 2: Trigonometry [Answers: KN Џ 13.5°] . Use the Pythagorean Theorem in right ᭝XYZ.

0362…° The acute angles in a right triangle have a sum of 90°.0 cos 30.0 cos Z ϭ Ί 136 ∠Z ϭ 30.0362…° The acute angles in a right triangle have a sum of 90°. ∠X is approximately 59.9637…° XZ ϭ 11. YZ XZ 10. tan Z ϭ Since YZ is adjacent to ∠Z and XY is opposite ∠Z.0 tan Z ϭ 10. use the cosine ratio. cos Z ϭ adjacent hypotenuse Since YZ is adjacent to ∠Z and XZ is the hypotenuse.9637…° ϭ XZ Since YZ is adjacent to ∠Z and XZ is the hypotenuse.6 tan Z ϭ tan -1 (0.9637…° So.0 tan Z ϭ 0.0°.0 XZ ϭ cos 30. Multiply both sides by XZ.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 107 Determine the measure of ∠Z. use the tangent ratio.9637…° 10. Determine the length of XZ. use the cosine ratio. 2.0 Solve the equation for XZ.6 Applying the Trigonometric Ratios 107 . ∠X ϭ 90° Ϫ ∠Z ∠X ϭ 59.6614… XZ is approximately 11.9637…° ϭ 10.7 cm.9637565 ∠Z ϭ 30. Determine the measure of ∠Z in right ᭝XYZ. cos Z ϭ XZ cos 30. Which other trigonometric ratio could you have used in Method 1? Why might it be better to use this ratio? Method 2 Determine the angle measures first. cos Z ϭ adjacent hypotenuse YZ XZ 10. Divide both sides by cos 30.Math10Se_Chapter 2. opposite adjacent XY YZ 6.6) 30.9637…° cos Z ϭ So. ∠X ϭ 90° Ϫ ∠Z ∠X ϭ 59.0° and ∠Z is approximately 31.

0 fϭ sin 25° f ϭ 11. Give the measures to the nearest tenth where necessary. What is the advantage of determining the unknown angle before the unknown sides? .0 cm [Answers: ∠J ϭ 51°.0. Solve this triangle.Math10Se_Chapter 2.8 cm. sin E ϭ opposite hypotenuse sin E ϭ e f sin 25° ϭ 5.qxd 12/7/09 Example 2 2:37 PM Page 108 Solving a Right Triangle Given One Side and One Acute Angle Solve this triangle.0 5.7 cm. F 25° G E SOLUTION 9. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING D 5.0 cm Label a diagram. Determine the measure of ∠D first. Use the sine ratio to calculate the length of DE.1 cm. Multiply both sides by f. In right ᭝DEF: 39° D H 5.0 cm 2.0 5. Give the measures to the nearest tenth where necessary. HJ Џ 14.8310… DE is approximately 11. use the tangent ratio. GH Џ 11.0 f f sin 25° ϭ 5. Divide both sides by sin 25°. Multiply both sides by 5. 108 Chapter 2: Trigonometry Solve the equation for f.3 cm] f F ∠D ϩ ∠E ϭ 90° J d ∠D ϭ 90° Ϫ 25° 25° E ∠D ϭ 65° Determine the length of EF.7225… EF is approximately 10. d ϭ 10.0 tan 65° ϭ d DF is adjacent to ∠D. Solve the equation for d. Since EF is opposite ∠D and tan D ϭ opposite adjacent d tan D ϭ e d tan 65° ϭ 5.

4 ft. AB BC sin 22.5°) 91. What is the length of this veneer to the nearest centimetre? CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3.5°.5°) 8(BD) ϭ 91. BC sin A ϭ Multiply both sides by 15. in right ᭝ABC. the perimeter of the octagon is: 8(BD) ϭ 8(30 sin 22.6 Applying the Trigonometric Ratios 109 . Since the surface of the table is a regular octagon. to the nearest foot.8440… 8(30 sin 22. then BD ϭ 2(15 sin 22.5° C 15 cm In each triangle.Math10Se_Chapter 2.5° [Answer: approximately 12 ft.84402377 The length of veneer required is approximately 92 cm. measured through the centre of the window.qxd 12/7/09 Example 3 2:37 PM Page 109 Solving a Problem Using the Trigonometric Ratios A small table has the shape of a regular octagon.5° ϭ BC Since BC ϭ 15 sin 22.5°). 2. ∠A ϭ 22. measured through the centre of the table.] 22.5° and AB ϭ 15 cm Solve the equation for BC. the angle at the centre is: B D 360° Ϭ 8 ϭ 45° 30 cm The line segment from the centre of the octagon to the centre of each side of the octagon bisects each central angle and is perpendicular to the side. There is a strip of wood veneer around the edge of the table. Determine the length of the wood moulding material that forms the frame of the window. The distance from one vertex to the opposite vertex.5° And. calculate the perimeter of the surface of the table.5° ϭ 15 15 sin 22. congruent isosceles triangles are formed by drawing line segments from the centre of the surface to each vertex. So. The distance from one vertex to the opposite vertex. and BD ϭ 30 sin 22. is approximately 4 ft. A window has the shape of a regular decagon. cm A 15 45° 15 cm 22. is approximately 30 cm. 30 cm SOLUTION To determine the length of veneer.

Math10Se_Chapter 2. When we solve a right triangle. First commissioned in 2001. solar panels. sometimes we determine the measure of an unknown angle before we determine the length of an unknown side and sometimes we reverse these calculations. How would you decide which measure to calculate first? 2. a City of Edmonton power company. a traditional ceremony of the Blackfoot that renews their relationship with the life forces of nature. and hydroelectric projects. Weather Dancer 1 is a 900 KW wind turbine situated on Piikani Nation land in southern Alberta. Can we solve a right triangle if we are given only the measures of the two acute angles? Explain. How could you use trigonometry to determine the length of a blade of a wind turbine? Discuss the Ideas 1. It was named in honour of Okan (Sun Dance). 110 Chapter 2: Trigonometry .qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 110 THE WORLD OF MATH Profile: Renewable Energy Aboriginal and northern communities are committed to developing sustainable energy from sources such as wind turbines. Weather Dancer 1 generates 9960 MWh of carbon-dioxide free power each year. geothermal. it was developed and is run as a joint venture by the Piikani Indian Utility Corporation and EPCOR.

4° z 55° 8.0 cm 4.3 cm 62° Z E B B c 10.7 cm 5. 2. which strategy would you use? Why? A 3.7 cm m P 4. To determine the measure of each indicated angle. which trigonometric ratio would you use? Why? a) b) A 8.9 cm c) C G J F c) d) G X Y d) 6.6 cm s Q R 7. M a) 37° U b) W 33° T m 5. b) Determine the horizontal distance the ramp will take up.0 cm D a) b) E f 5.6 Applying the Trigonometric Ratios 111 .8 cm 3.0 cm 2. To determine the length of each indicated side. Solve each right triangle. Give the measures to the nearest tenth. Determine the length of each indicated side to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.5 cm N X Y V b) P r Q c) d) Z C 9.8 cm E H 10.0 cm B 4. An architect draws this diagram of a wheelchair entrance ramp for a building.7 cm 5.8 cm 8.5 cm 4. Which trigonometric ratio did you use? Why? a) K 71° M S B 6.4 cm 13.7 cm 29° 52° A d) Y 7. Give the measures to the nearest centimetre.0 cm F 11.6 cm R c) D A C D 80 cm a) Determine the length of the ramp.3 cm k 6.0 cm J 3.qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 111 Exercises 5.Math10Se_Chapter 2.5 cm H N Z K 5.1 cm 11.9 cm 47° 12.

8 cm 2. a) What is the area of the base. 112 G 28° 9.Math10Se_Chapter 2.6 cm 13. to the nearest cubic inch? C 15. how high should the sprayer be placed above the crops to ensure that all the crops are watered? 16. Give the measures to the nearest tenth. To irrigate crops.C. E J H A B 1.4°. Chapter 2: Trigonometry 10 . A helicopter leaves its base. high. Determine the perimeter and area of each shape. and flies 35 km due west to pick up a sick person. Reflect F 1. How tall is the totem pole to the nearest foot? 12. is approximately 2 in. a farmer uses a boom sprayer pulled by a tractor. B. A candle has the shape of a right prism whose bases are regular polygons with 12 sides. the distance from one vertex to the opposite vertex. It then flies 58 km due north to a hospital. The candle is 5 in. measured through the centre of the base. how far is it from its base to the nearest kilometre? b) When the helicopter is at the hospital. a) What is the angle of inclination of the road to the nearest degree? b) How far does a car travel horizontally when it travels 15 m along the road? Give the answer to the nearest tenth of a metre.4 cm 50° D C 14. A roof has the shape of an isosceles triangle with equal sides 7 m long and base 12 m long. The nozzles are 50 cm apart and spray at an angle of 70°. a) When the helicopter is at the hospital. .qxd 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 112 8. a) b) C cm 45° D 11.8 cm 50° How does the information you are given about a right triangle determine the steps you take to solve the triangle? Include examples with your explanation. the angle of elevation of the top of the pole is 83. Give the measures to the nearest tenth. Twenty feet from the base of the totem pole. To the nearest centimetre. Determine the perimeter of this rhombus to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. Determine the perimeter and area of this isosceles trapezoid.7 10. On each base.. to the nearest square inch? b) What is the volume of wax in the candle. A road rises 1 m for every 15 m measured along the road. a) What is the measure of the angle of inclination of the roof to the nearest degree? b) What is the measure of the angle at the peak of the roof to the nearest degree? 5. what is the measure of the angle between the path it took due north and the path it will take to return directly to its base? Write the angle to the nearest degree. The world’s tallest totem pole is in Alert Bay. home of the Nimpkish First Nation.

Each of the tropical and temperate pyramids is 24 m high and the side length of its base is 26 m. When more than one right triangle is involved.7 Solving Problems Involving More than One Right Triangle 113 .qxd 2. Draw right triangles on your sketch that would help you determine the angle between the edges of the pyramid at its apex. 2. each representing a different climatic zone. How do you think the architects determined the angles at which to cut the glass pieces for each face at the apex of the pyramid? Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work with a partner. we have to decide which triangle to start with. Label its height and base with the measurements above. Make Connections The Muttart Conservatory in Edmonton has four climate-controlled square pyramids. How could you use trigonometry to help you determine this angle? We can use trigonometry to solve problems that can be modelled using right triangles.7 12/7/09 2:37 PM Page 113 Solving Problems Involving More than One Right Triangle LESSON FOCUS Use trigonometry to solve problems modelled by more than one right triangle. Sketch a square pyramid.Math10Se_Chapter 2.

W C B 47° Use the sine ratio in ᭝ABD. In right ᭝ABD.2 BD ϭ sin 47° BD ϭ 5. AD is opposite ∠ABD and BD is the hypotenuse.7427… sin 47° ϭ A 4. In right ᭝BCD. sin B ϭ opposite hypotenuse sin B ϭ 26° AD BD 4. CD is adjacent to ∠BDC and BD is the hypotenuse.Math10Se_Chapter 2.qxd 12/7/09 Example 1 2:38 PM Page 114 Calculating a Side Length Using More than One Triangle Calculate the length of CD to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.2 4.2 cm D 8. 114 Chapter 2: Trigonometry A 4. Calculate the length of XY to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. 47° 26° Y A 4.2 BD BD sin 47° ϭ 4. So.2 cm D Solve for BD. Divide both sides by sin 47°.1 cm] The length of CD cannot be determined in one step because we know only the measure of one angle in ᭝BCD.2 cm.7427… Explain how you could calculate all the unknown sides and angles of quadrilateral ABCD.2 cm D Solve for CD. 74 2 47° 8 c m 26° cos D ϭ adjacent hypotenuse cos D ϭ CD BD CD 5. use ᭝ABD to calculate the length of BD. Multiply both sides by 5.7427…)cos 26° ϭ CD cos 26° ϭ CD ϭ 5. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING C B 1. Multiply both sides by BD. Use the cosine ratio in ᭝BCD.7427… (5.1615… CD is approximately 5. C B 5. .4 cm 22° 20° SOLUTION X Z [Answer: XY Џ 3.

a surveyor angle of elevation measured the angle of 30° elevation of the top of 15° another building and the 20 m angle of depression of angle of depression the base of that building. The height of the building is represented by PR. tan Q ϭ opposite adjacent tan Q ϭ SR QS tan 15° ϭ 20 QS QS tan 15° ϭ 20 QS ϭ Solve the equation for QS. 31° 42° PR ϭ PS ϩ SR In ᭝PQS. Determine the height of the taller building to the nearest tenth of a metre. We cannot calculate PR in one step because it is not a side of a right triangle. Determine the height of the taller building to the nearest tenth of a metre. so SR ϭ QT ϭ 20 m. 39 m P [Answer: Approximately 65. A surveyor stands at a window on the 9th floor of an office tower. So. The surveyor sketched this plan of her measurements. The surveyor sketches this plan of his measurements. SOLUTION Draw and label a diagram. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. Divide both sides by tan 15°. He uses a clinometer to measure the angles of elevation and depression of the top and the base of a taller building.) 2.6410… (Solution continues.qxd 12/7/09 Example 2 7:45 PM Page 115 Solving a Problem with Triangles in the Same Plane From the top of a 20-m high building. horizontal 20 tan 15° angle of depression QS ϭ 74. Multiply both sides by QS. use right ᭝QRS to calculate the length of SQ.7 Solving Problems Involving More than One Right Triangle 115 .Math10Se_Chapter 2. we know only the measure of ∠PQS. The angle of depression of an object below the horizontal is the angle between the horizontal and the line of sight from an observer.0 m] 30° S 15° Q 20 m 20 m R T Use the tangent ratio in ᭝QRS. QSRT is a rectangle.

6410… (74. and another fire due south of the tower at an angle of depression of 2°. R 5° SOLUTION Label a diagram.1 m high.0940… So. How far apart are the fires to the nearest foot? The diagram is not drawn to scale. a fire ranger horizontal observes one fire due west of the tower at an angle of depression of 5°.0940… The taller building is approximately 63. 5° observation tower. 2° horizontal 2° 88° 85° 90 ft.0940… ϩ 20 ϭ 63. Multiply both sides by 74. Sometimes the right triangles we solve are not in the same plane. PR ϭ PS ϩ SR Suppose you did not evaluate a decimal equivalent for QS. T W 116 Chapter 2: Trigonometry S .6410… Solve the equation for PS. angle of depression. opposite tan Q ϭ adjacent tan Q ϭ tan 30° ϭ PS QS PS 74.qxd 12/7/09 2:38 PM Page 116 Use the tangent ratio in ᭝PQS. What expression would you need to use to determine the length of PS? PR ϭ 43.Math10Se_Chapter 2.6410…) tan 30° ϭ PS PS ϭ 43. Example 3 Solving a Problem with Triangles in Different Planes angle of From the top of a 90-ft. depression.

Solve Example 3 using your calculator only once. A communications tower is 35 m tall. From a point due north of the tower. measures the angle of elevation of the top of the tower as 50°. How far apart are the students to the nearest metre? The diagram is not drawn to scale.Math10Se_Chapter 2. Use the tangent ratio in right ᭝RTW. RT. TW and TS. TW and TS. 35 m 90 tan 85° ϭ WT WT ϭ 1028.7047… 50° Use the tangent ratio in right ᭝RTS. 2. Tannis measures the angle of elevation of the top of the tower as 70°. Solve for WT.7047…2 ϩ 2577. opposite adjacent WT tan R ϭ RT WT tan 85° ϭ 90 tan R ϭ CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3.7047…2 ϩ 2577. To calculate the distance WS between the fires.2627…2 ϭ 2774.9805… The distance between the fires is approximately 2775 ft. use the Pythagorean Theorem. who is due east of the tower. SW2 ϭ WT2 ϩ TS2 SW2 ϭ 1028. of the fires from the base of the tower.7 Solving Problems Involving More than One Right Triangle 117 .2627…2 SW ϭ ͱ1028. to the fires from the base of the tower is 90°. first calculate the distances. Multiply both sides by 90. Multiply both sides by 90. opposite adjacent TS tan R ϭ RT TS tan 88° ϭ 90 70° Tannis Leif tan R ϭ [Answer: About 32 m] Solve for TS. Since the angles of depression are 5° and 2° respectively. so the angle between the lines of sight.qxd 12/7/09 2:38 PM Page 117 The fires are due south and due west of the tower. Explain why this might be more efficient and accurate than calculating intermediate lengths. and the lines of sight are 85° and 88° respectively.2627… In right ᭝STW. the angles between the tower. 90 tan 88° ϭ TS TS ϭ 2577. Her brother Leif.

how do you decide where to begin? Exercises A B 3. What is the height of each tree to the nearest metre? 35° J F 60° J 4. calculate the length of GH to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. determine the length of JK to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.0 cm 20° 40° V 8 cm 4 cm 10 cm 15° 60° 5.Math10Se_Chapter 2. 5.5 m .5 cm D c) G 3. calculate the measure of each ∠XYZ to the nearest tenth of a degree. In each quadrilateral. In each triangle. the arid pyramid has 4 congruent triangular faces. What is the measure of each of the three angles in the face? Give the measures to the nearest degree.0 cm K 35° 30° X 5 cm U D Y 17 cm 3 cm Z C 15 cm T d) X 6 cm Y 12 cm Z K d) 6. When you have to solve a problem that involves two right triangles. Two trees are 80 m apart. a) 20° G 46° b) E H A 66° 4. What do you have to think about when you draw a diagram with triangles in three dimensions? 2.4 cm 52° H 64° D H 118 25° 80 m Chapter 2: Trigonometry 7.5 m. From a point halfway between the trees.0 cm Z Y X 3 cm W 6 cm Z B J M K c) c) 3.5 m 19.qxd 12/7/09 2:38 PM Discuss the Ideas Page 118 1. In each diagram. a) b) N A J K a) b) Y 17 cm X 3. At the Muttart Conservatory.2 cm E 4. 20. The base of each face has length 19.9 cm C F G 42° 59° 3. the angles of elevation of the tops of the trees are measured.5 m and the slant height of the pyramid is 20.

What is the distance between the carvings to the nearest tenth of a metre? 16° 40° 16 ft. The angle of elevation of the top of this tower is 25°.qxd 12/7/09 9:39 PM Page 119 8.5 cm by 2.0 m 12.8 cm. and measured the angle of elevation of the top of the dome as 53°. From the top of the shorter tower. has a domed tower at its centre. 2.0 m from the base of the pole. The student drew the sketch below. Troy stood due east of the tower and measured the angle of elevation of the top of the dome as 61°. 9. the angle of depression of the base of the taller tower is 35°. Two office towers are 50 m apart. a student measured the angles of elevation and depression of the top and base of a nearby tree. A student wanted to know the distance between two particular carvings on a spirit pole. 25° 35° 50 m 10. From a window on the second floor of her house.7 Solving Problems Involving More than One Right Triangle 119 . What strategy did you use? Could you have determined the angle measures a different way? Explain. 45° 35° 15. She measured the angle of elevation of each carving 15. a) What is the horizontal distance between the student and the tree? b) How tall is the tree? Give the measures to the nearest foot. above the ground. 40 m from a point directly beneath the dome. The Legislative Building in Wascana Park. a) How high is the top of the dome? b) How far is Troy from a point directly beneath the dome? c) How far apart are Janelle and Troy? Give the measures to the nearest metre. Regina. A rectangle has dimensions 5.Math10Se_Chapter 2. Janelle stood due south of the tower. The student knows that she made the measurements 16 ft. 11. Determine the height of each tower to the nearest metre. Determine the measures of the angles at the point where the diagonals intersect.

5 m from Connor.0 m and 8. They are attached at the same point on the ground.2 m.0 m 60° a) How far from the base of the tower are the wires attached on the ground? b) What is the angle of inclination of the shorter guy wire? c) How far apart are the points where the guy wires are attached to the tower? Give the measures to the nearest tenth. a) Sketch and label the pyramid. The angle between Monique’s lines of sight to Connor and to the base of the tower was 40. 15.5 cm 7. The longer wire has an angle of inclination of 60°. At the Muttart Conservatory. A surveyor drew the sketch below to show the measurements he took to determine the width and depth of a gorge. Give the measures to the nearest metre. GH. 14.qxd 12/7/09 7:49 PM Page 120 13.0 m 8.7 m and the slant height of the pyramid is 27. She has a clinometer and a measuring tape. Two of these guy wires are 10.0 m long.8 cm a) Determine the width. 22° E 56 m G F 41° H 16. Describe how she can calculate the height of the cliff. From a point on the ground. b) What is the height of the pyramid to the nearest tenth of a metre? . 10.Math10Se_Chapter 2. of the gorge. the shorter diagonal is 6.8 cm long. a) Sketch a diagram. C 17. Monique was 3. A communications tower has many guy wires supporting it. of the gorge. b) Determine the depth. The surveyor cannot cross the river. b) Determine the length of the longer diagonal to the nearest millimetre. Connor measured the angle of elevation of the top of the clock tower as 59. GF. a) Determine the measures of the four angles of the kite to the nearest tenth of a degree. In the kite below. A surveyor wants to determine the height of a cliff on the other side of the river from where she is standing. The Gastown Steam clock in Vancouver has been chiming since 1977.6°.5°. 4. the tropical pyramid has 4 congruent triangular faces. b) Determine the height of the tower to the nearest tenth of a metre. The line joining them formed a right angle with the line joining Connor and the base of the tower. 120 Chapter 2: Trigonometry 18. The base of each face has length 25.

How far from the top of the tower is the guy wire attached to the tower? 21. the angle between the body diagonal and a diagonal of the base of the prism? Give the measures to the nearest tenth. is the only ancient comprehensive material on astronomy that survives today. and wrote in Greek. His other major works were Geographia. Determine the height of one of these pyramids. he extended the tables of trigonometric ratios started by Hipparchus of Bythnia (190 – 120 BCE) and studied triangles. long. From this point. and one strut that is 60 in.0 cm E 4. was a mathematician. Ptolemy’s first major work. A geodesic dome is constructed by bolting together many pentagonal pyramids. the angle of elevation of the top of the tower is 59°. He lived in Alexandria in Roman Egypt. who died in 161 CE. A communications tower is supported by guy wires.0 cm H 20. each 54 in. THE WORLD OF MATH Historical Moment: Claudius Ptolemy Claudius Ptolemy. Harmonics. and Optics. As part of his interest in astronomy. G 2. a) What is the length of the body diagonal in this rectangular prism? b) What is the measure of ∠AFH.0 cm Reflect F Summarize the different steps used to solve right triangle problems. 2.7 Solving Problems Involving More than One Right Triangle 121 . the Almagest. One guy wire is anchored at a point that is 8.qxd 12/7/09 2:38 PM Page 121 19. an astronomer.9 m from the base of the tower and has an angle of inclination of 36°. long.Math10Se_Chapter 2. and a geographer. body diagonal A B D C 3. Each triangular face of a pyramid is formed with two struts.

Math10Se_Chapter 2. ■ You can use the ratio of the lengths of two sides to determine the measure of one of the acute angles. ■ You can solve problems that involve more than one right triangle by applying the trigonometric ratios to one triangle at a time. ■ You can use the length of one side and the measure of an acute angle to determine the length of another side of the triangle. sine ratio. or cosϪ1 — on a scientific calculator can be used to determine the measure of the angle. sine ratio. or cosine ratio to create an equation. You can then solve this equation to determine the unknown side length. why was it important to be able to sketch the situation to show the given information? . the related inverse operation — tanϪ1. and tangent ratios? ■ Reflect on the Chapter When you used the trigonometric ratios to solve a problem. cosine. ■ You can use the definition of the tangent ratio. ■ You can use the primary trigonometric ratios to solve problems that can be represented using right triangles. ■ The size of the triangle does not affect the value of any trigonometric ratio of an acute angle in the triangle.qxd 12/7/09 2:38 PM Page 122 S T U DY G U I D E CONCEPT SUMMARY Big Ideas Applying the Big Ideas In a right triangle: This means that: ■ The ratio of any two sides remains constant if the triangle is enlarged or reduced. ■ If the tangent ratio. sinϪ1. 122 Chapter 2: Trigonometry ■ How were the properties of similar triangles used to establish the meaning of the sine. or cosine ratio of an angle is known.

tan A ϭ [2. to determine the measure of acute ∠A when you are given: [2.Math10Se_Chapter 2. Use cosϪ1 on a scientific calculator to determine the measure of ∠A.1. to determine the length of the hypotenuse QP when you are given: [2. Solve the equation for the unknown length. Determine the length of a side.3. sin P ϭ opposite hypotenuse 2. Then. cos A ϭ adjacent hypotenuse AB AC 15 cos A ϭ 17 cos A ϭ ∠A Џ 28° In right ᭝PQR. sin P ϭ QR QP sin 40° ϭ 7 QP 3.4] ■ the length of the adjacent leg. or use the Pythagorean Theorem. In right ᭝ABC. Identify the trigonometric ratio to use. AC 1.1. or 0. Substitute the known values.9 Study Guide 123 .4] opposite adjacent sin A ϭ opposite hypotenuse cos A ϭ adjacent hypotenuse Determine the measure of an angle. 2.0 P 40° R 1. then write an equation.53 15 tan A ϭ In ᭝ABC above.5] Example the length of the leg QR Q 7. 2. QP ϭ 7 sin 40° QP Џ 10. ■ the measure of ∠P and ■ C 17 8 B A 15 opposite adjacent BC tan A ϭ BA 8 ¯ tan A ϭ . Determine cos A using the given lengths. 2.qxd 12/7/09 2:38 PM Page 123 SKILLS SUMMARY Skill Description Calculate a trigonometric ratio.2. if you need to determine the length of the leg PR: 4. 2. Use a trigonometric ratio. 2. AB ■ the length of the hypotenuse.

The angle between this side and a diagonal is 64°.2 cm 1. . What is the height of the tree to the nearest tenth of a metre? 3.5 m long when the angle between the sun’s rays and the ground is 29°.1 1. a) Determine the length of each indicated side to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. 31. A road rises 15 m for each 150 m of horizontal distance.2 5. Determine each indicated angle to the nearest degree. Include a sketch that shows all the measurements you made or calculated. What other strategy could you have used to determine each length? 6.Math10Se_Chapter 2. What is the angle of inclination of the road to the nearest degree? 4. A tree casts a shadow that is 31. b) Determine the length of a diagonal. i) ii) J N P 42° p k 29° 9. the angle of elevation of the top of the tower is 73°. How tall is the tower to the nearest metre? 124 Chapter 2: Trigonometry 2. Sketch a triangle to show that tan 45° ϭ 1. Aidan knows that the observation deck on the Vancouver Lookout is 130 m above the ground. a) Determine the length of the rectangle. At a point 100 m from the base of the Eiffel tower. How far is Aidan from the base of the Lookout to the nearest metre? 2.5 cm G D 2.9 cm K b) Use the Pythagorean Theorem to determine the length of the hypotenuse of each triangle in part a. Explain your strategy.7 cm Q M 63° 1. Use your drinking-straw clinometer to measure the height of your gymnasium to the nearest tenth of a metre. He measures the angle between the ground and his line of sight to the observation deck as 77°. The shorter side of a rectangle is 5.5 m 2.7 cm. 7.qxd 12/7/09 2:38 PM Page 124 REVIEW 2. a) Is tan 20° greater than or less than 1? b) Is tan 70° greater than or less than 1? c) How could you answer parts a and b if you did not have a calculator? Sketch a right triangle to illustrate your answer.3 10. Describe the triangle. 8. State the answers to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. C a) b) 7 cm 10 cm E F H 3.

A ship is sailing off the west shore of Hudson Bay.5°. a) What is the value of each ratio? i) sin D ii) sin B iii) cos B iv) cos D b) How are the ratios in part a related? Explain why this relationship occurs. CD ϭ 12 cm. What was the angle of inclination of the pole to the nearest tenth of a degree? 52° N m d) Q P r 65° S 1. Determine the measure of ∠C in this trapezoid.9 cm R 14.7 cm T V 3.9 cm J c) M 3.5 11.Math10Se_Chapter 2. Determine the measure of each indicated angle to the nearest degree. How far is the ship from Arviat? State the answer to the nearest tenth of a kilometre. and BD ϭ 13 cm.4 2.0 cm 4. 17. Determine the dimensions of this rectangle to the nearest tenth of a centimetre.qxd 12/7/09 2:38 PM Page 125 2. Describe your strategy. A 2 cm B 16. Determine the length of each indicated side to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. 5 cm C cm 6 cm 3. The ship then sails due north until the angle between the path of the ship and the line of sight to Arviat is 48. Which trigonometric ratio did you use each time? Explain why. a) b) R 3 cm U a) S 10 cm E 8.0-m telephone pole was blown off its vertical position.7 cm 13. The top of the pole was then 9 m above the ground. Sketch and label right ᭝BCD with BC ϭ 5 cm. 33° F b) G e H 48° k K 5. the ship is 4. At a certain point.2 30° D Review 125 . a 10.7 cm W 12. During a storm. 15. Which trigonometric ratio did you use each time? Explain why.5 km due east of the town of Arviat. Give your answer to the nearest tenth of a degree.

She observes smoke due east at an angle of depression of 5° and due west at an angle of depression of 4°. A fire ranger is at the top of a 90-ft.8 m G 6.7 22.2 cm H 5. AB? b) What is the length. 20.Math10Se_Chapter 2.8 cm R Chapter 2: Trigonometry 90 ft.7 cm P 54° Q 126 14.1 cm J 23. observation tower. the Leaning Tower of Pisa currently leans 13 ft. Determine the perimeter and area of each shape. State the measures to the nearest tenth. .4 cm A 2. tall.qxd 12/7/09 2:38 PM Page 126 21. a) b) 56° 4° 5° 4.7 cm H D J 4. Give the measures to the nearest tenth. How far apart are the fires to the nearest foot? The diagram is not drawn to scale.4 cm C 38° 4. In Italy.8 cm K 3. The diagram shows a parking space.6 m 2. 2. a) C b) E F 3. In the diagram below.2 cm c) B 60° E K D 27° a) What is the length. The tower is 183 ft. What is its angle of inclination to the nearest tenth of a degree? 2. BD? Give the measures to the nearest tenth of a metre. a) KJ b) HK c) ∠HKJ Give the measures to the nearest tenth. determine each measure.6 18. M 19. G 10. Solve each right triangle. off the vertical. Cars are parked at an angle to the street.

B. truck bed 1. tan P decreases B. or D 1. For safety. Use a diagram to explain why sin B = sin Y. and DF ϭ 7. ∠E ϭ 90°. 1 is true. In right ᭝PQR.Math10Se_Chapter 2. What is the shortest possible length of the ramp to the nearest centimetre? Explain why. 49° 37° 50 m 1. The angle of elevation is 37° and the student holds the clinometer 1.qxd 12/7/09 7:51 PM Page 127 PRACTICE TEST For questions 1 and 2. In right ᭝DEF. Solve this triangle. choose the correct answer: A. The truck bed is 1. A ramp is used to load a snowmobile onto the back of a pickup truck. R 3 cm 4 cm P 5 cm C. A student uses a clinometer to measure the angle of elevation of a sign that marks the point on a tower that is 50 m above the ground. the angle of inclination of the ramp should be less than 40°.5 m Practice Test 127 .8 cm.5 m above the ground. B. C. For ᭝PQR. 4. She then measures the angle of elevation of the top of the tower as 49°. cos P increases 3. The diagram is not drawn to scale. cos P decreases D. sin P decreases C. with ∠Q ϭ 90°. Determine the height of the tower to the nearest tenth of a metre. 3 are true. Q D.3 m ramp 6. All are true. 2 are true. State the measures to the nearest tenth. 2. Triangle ABC is similar to ᭝XYZ and ∠A ϭ ∠X ϭ 90°. ∠F ϭ 63°. how many of these statements are true? tan Q ϭ 3 4 sin P ϭ 3 5 sin Q ϭ 3 5 tan P ϭ 4 3 A.3 m above the ground. 5. which statement is true? As ∠P increases: A.

Draw a labelled diagram of your ramp that shows all required lengths and angle measures. that is.Project1. ■ ■ 128 Measurement Project Determine the minimum length of ramp required. A ramp should be at least 915 mm wide. Most building codes require the slope of an access ramp to be no greater than 1:12. the ramp must be 12 cm long. ■ Measure or use trigonometry to determine the height of the doorway above the ground. . PART A: DESIGN Choose a doorway to your school or to a building in your neighbourhood for which a wheelchair ramp could be constructed.qxd 12/7/09 6:41 PM Page 62 PROJECT MEASUREMENT R a m p I t U p ! It Up! Ramp N ew public buildings should be accessible by all. an access ramp must be provided. Slopes of 1:15 or 1:20 are preferable. for a rise of 1 cm. Older buildings are often retro-fitted with ramps to provide easy access. and if entry involves steps.

525 m2. Give details of all the conversions between systems of measure.5 m by 1. ■ Design and cost your ramp to meet the requirements above with a landing at the top and bottom. Assume that the ramp surface will be strandboard. EXTENSION Access ramps may have level landings with an area of at least 1. ■ Research.5 m Landing 129 . so your ramp surface should have a non-slip coating. then estimate the cost of covering the ramp surface with non-slip paint or other material. ■ Cost estimates for the construction in both wood and concrete. Outdoor ramps can become slippery in wet or cold weather. Continuous handrail Ramp not steeper than 1:12 m 0m 0 10 1. then estimate. then estimate. ■ Research.qxd 12/7/09 6:41 PM Page 63 PART B: COST ESTIMATES A ramp may be constructed from wood or concrete. the cost of constructing your ramp using lumber from your local supplier.83 m require a handrail. PROJECT PRESENTATION Your completed project should include: ■ Your diagram. the cost of constructing your ramp using concrete. ■ Research.Project1. Ramps that rise more than 15 cm or have a horizontal distance of more than 1. These landings are often at the top and bottom. long ramps may change direction. but a long ramp may have a landing as a rest spot. or plywood. Because of space consideration. with all supporting calculations. or particleboard. with calculations and explanations to support your design.

and the volume of the cone is 224 cubic yards. On the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in Tacoma. One right square pyramid has base side length 10 cm and height 8 cm. What is the distance between the two cities to the nearest kilometre? 3.00 m 15 ft. Determine the surface area and volume of the hemisphere to the nearest tenth of a millimetre. B. to the nearest cubic inch? 11.. The perimeter of the pen is 70 ft. On the Alex Fraser Bridge in Delta.0 m 3. A hemisphere has radius 20 in.5 cm. a) regular b) right cone tetrahedron 5. .qxd 12/7/09 6:23 PM Page 32 CUMULATIVE REVIEW 1 1. Washington. Describe how to calculate the height of the cone to the nearest yard.C. 12. This composite object is a rectangular pyramid on top of a rectangular prism. Does the pyramid with the greater volume also have the greater surface area? Justify your answer. to the nearest square inch? b) Which object has the greater volume? How much greater is it. 130 Chapters 1 and 2 13. Another right square pyramid has base side length 8 cm and height 13 cm. Determine the volume of the cone in question 6. Determine the lateral area of the pyramid to the nearest square inch. Determine the surface area of each object to the nearest square unit. the maximum height of the road above The Narrows is 510 ft. The diameter of the base of a right cone is 12 yd. The height of a right square pyramid is 40 in. Determine the surface area and volume of the composite object to the nearest unit. It costs $2. a) 9 yd. a) Which object has the greater surface area? How much greater is it. to the nearest metre c) 5 km to the nearest mile d) 160 cm to feet and the nearest inch 5. a) What is the perimeter of the pen in yards and feet? b) The fencing material is sold by the yard.. A sphere has radius 17 in. 4. 9.Math10_CumReview(1-2). 5. Andrea is constructing a pen for her dog. The map distance between Edmonton and Calgary is 6.0 m 14. A map of Alberta has a scale of 1:4 250 000. the maximum height of the road above the Fraser River is 154 m. Which road is higher above the water? How much higher is it? Chapters 1 and 2 7. 8. The base of a hemisphere has a circumference of 30.8 m 6. 10. Convert each measurement. 7 ft.0 m 12.0 m 5. What will be the cost of this material before taxes? 2. Describe how you would determine the radius of a cylindrical pipe in both imperial units and SI units.6 m 6. to the nearest centimetre b) 11 000 000 in.5 mm. and the side length of the base is 48 in.49/yd.21 m 8. to the nearest cubic unit.

Determine the angle of inclination of each line AB to the nearest tenth of a degree.5 A 15. The rope sloped upward and the average angle between the rope and the horizontal was 6.3 A 19.8 m 44° 7. Write the measures to the nearest tenth. To the nearest degree. Determine the height of the tree to the nearest yard. ladder leans against a wall. A basketball court is rectangular with diagonal length approximately 106 ft. A helicopter is 15 km due east of its base when it receives a call to pick up a stranded snowboarder. Solve each right triangle. Write the measures to the nearest tenth. a) b) 6. Barry lies on the ground at this point and uses a clinometer to measure the angle of elevation of the top of the tree as 52°. Barry is collecting data on the heights of trees. from the base of a tree. Jay Cochrane walked a tightrope between the Niagara Fallsview Hotel and the Skylon Tower in Niagara Falls.1 3. He measures a horizontal distance of 20 yd. Jay walked a horizontal distance of 1788 ft. P b) C y S 7 29 cm 14 cm E 19 D 21 cm R x Q Cumulative Review 131 . determine the vertical distance he travelled.qxd 12/7/09 6:23 PM Page 33 2 14.4 cm R P 66° T 21. A 12-ft. 22. Determine the measure of each indicated angle to the nearest tenth of a degree. The angle between a diagonal and a longer side is 28°.Math10_CumReview(1-2). The base 1 of the ladder is 42 ft. what is the measure of the angle between the path the helicopter took flying south and the path it will take to fly directly to its base? Write the angle to the nearest degree. B B 7. Determine the dimensions of the basketball court to the nearest foot. a) S b) M N 15. The person is on a mountain 9 km due south of the helicopter’s present location. To the nearest foot. a) W 17 Y 15 X 18.7 10. 16. from the wall. 17. When the helicopter picks up the snowboarder. Determine the length of each indicated side and the measures of all the angles in this diagram. what is the measure of the angle between the ladder and the wall? 20.4°. He began at the hotel.

NEW VOCABULARY prime factorization greatest common factor least common multiple perfect cube. and a rectangle diagram can be used to represent them.wncp10_3_1.qxd 12/7/09 5:11 PM 3 Page 2 Factors and Products BUILDING ON ■ determining factors and multiples of whole numbers to 100 ■ identifying prime and composite numbers ■ determining square roots of rational numbers ■ adding and subtracting polynomials multiplying and dividing polynomials by monomials ■ BIG IDEAS ■ Arithmetic operations on polynomials are based on the arithmetic operations on integers. index factoring by decomposition perfect square trinomial difference of squares . radical. ■ Multiplying and factoring are inverse processes. and have similar properties. cube root radicand.

located in western Manitoba.qxd 12/7/09 5:11 PM Page 3 AERIAL PHOTO OF MANITOBA The Dominion Land Survey divides much of western Canada into 1-mile square sections.wncp10_3_1. This photo shows canola fields around Shoal Lake. .

the patterns are 12 beads long and 40 beads long. and least common multiples of whole numbers. Compare your number to your partner’s number. What are the factors of this number? What are some multiples of this number? B. List some powers of 2. Yukon.1 5:11 PM Page 134 Factors and Multiples of Whole Numbers LESSON FOCUS Determine prime factors. A.qxd 12/7/09 3. They are on display in the MacBride museum in Whitehorse. How many beads long must a belt be for it to be created using either pattern? Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. What are some multiples the two numbers have in common? Which multiple is the least? D.wncp10_3_1. The origins of these belts are unknown. Pick a number from each list and multiply them to create a different number. Make Connections In the belts above. Which factors do the two numbers have in common? Which factor is the greatest? C. greatest common factors. Make another list of powers of 3. How can you use the product of powers from Step A to determine the greatest factor and the least multiple that the numbers have in common? 134 Chapter 3: Factors and Products .

19. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING SOLUTIONS 1. 3 · 11 · 2 · but 4 and 25 can be factored further. Determining the Prime Factors of a Whole Number Write the prime factorization of 3300. The prime factors of 12 are 2 and 3. 2. The first 10 prime numbers are: 2. 3. and 12. Begin by dividing 3300 by the least prime factor. 23. 3. The prime factors of 3300 are 2. Write the prime factorization of 2646. 3. and 11. Divide by this prime factor until it is no longer a factor. 13. Example 1 The prime factorization of a natural number is the number written as a product of its prime factors.wncp10_3_1. Method 1 [Answer: 2 · 33 · 72] 3300 Draw a factor tree.qxd 12/7/09 5:11 PM Page 135 When a factor of a number has exactly two divisors. 17. or 22 · 3 · 52 · 11 100 · 2 · 25 5 · 5 What other factor trees could you draw? Method 2 Use repeated division by prime factors. the factor is a prime factor. or 22 · 3 · 52 · 11 3. we use a dot to represent the multiplication operation: 12 ϭ 2 · 2 · 3. Both 3 and 11 are prime factors. or 22 · 3 Every composite number can be expressed as a product of prime factors. 6. or 22 × 3 To avoid confusing the multiplication symbol with the variable x. 3300 Ϭ 2 ϭ 1650 1650 Ϭ 2 ϭ 825 825 Ϭ 3 ϭ 275 275 Ϭ 5 ϭ 55 55 Ϭ 5 ϭ 11 11 Ϭ 11 ϭ 1 Could we have divided by the prime factors in a different order? If so. 5. The prime factorization of 3300 is: 2 · 2 · 3 · 5 · 5 · 11. 4. The prime factorization of 3300 is: 2 · 2 · 3 · 5 · 5 · 11. 3. 7. write 12 as a product of its prime factors: 2 × 2 × 3. 5. 1 and itself. 11.1 Factors and Multiples of Whole Numbers 135 . For example. so we can factor again. and 11. 33 · Write 3300 as a product of 2 factors. Both 33 and 100 are composite 3 · 11 · 4 numbers. 5. To determine the prime factorization of 12. 29 Natural numbers greater than 1 that are not prime are composite. the factors of 12 are 1. which order do you think is best? Why? The prime factors of 3300 are 2. Continue to divide each quotient by a prime factor until the quotient is 1. which is 2.

the greatest common factor is 6. or 23. Start with the greatest factor. 138 198 is not divisible by 138. Record the factors as a “rainbow. Determine the greatest common factor of 126 and 144. The factors of 138 are: 1. 69. 138 ϭ 2 · 3 · 23 198 ϭ 2 · 3 · 3 · 11 The greatest common factor is 2 · 3. we can determine their greatest common factor. which is 6. Determining the Greatest Common Factor Determine the greatest common factor of 138 and 198.” 138 Ϭ 1 ϭ 138 138 Ϭ 2 ϭ 69 138 138 Ϭ 3 ϭ 46 1 2 3 6 23 46 69 138 138 Ϭ 6 ϭ 23 Since 23 is a prime number. 2. 46. Example 2 Page 136 For 2 or more natural numbers. Highlight the factors that appear in each prime factorization. 198 is divisible by 6: 198 Ϭ 6 ϭ 33 The greatest common factor is 6. 3. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING SOLUTIONS 2. Method 3 Write the prime factorization of each number. 3.wncp10_3_1. 198 Ϭ 1 ϭ 198 198 Ϭ 2 ϭ 99 198 Ϭ 3 ϭ 66 198 Ϭ 6 ϭ 33 198 Ϭ 9 ϭ 22 198 1 2 3 6 9 11 18 22 33 66 99 198 198 Ϭ 11 ϭ 18 There are no more factors of 198 between 11 and 18. and 6. Method 2 Check to see which factors of 138 are also factors of 198. 6. 136 Chapter 3: Factors and Products How would you determine the greatest common factor of 3 numbers? . 69. So. there are no more factors of 138. The common factors of 138 and 198 are: 1. 23.qxd 12/7/09 5:11 PM The greatest common factor of two or more numbers is the greatest factor the numbers have in common. Method 1 [Answer: 18] Use division facts to determine all the factors of each number. 46. 2.

Determine the least common multiple of 28. … The least common multiple of 18. So. and 30. 1st copy 2nd copy 1st copy 3rd copy 2nd copy The shortest chain possible is 12 cubes long. some multiples of 26 are: 26 · 1 ϭ 26 26 · 2 ϭ 52 26 · 3 ϭ 78 26 · 4 ϭ 104 For 2 or more natural numbers. 36. 160. 60. and so on. 4. 180. The multiples of 30 are: 30. 42. 150. we can determine their least common multiple.1 Factors and Multiples of Whole Numbers 137 . 60. 180. 180. that is. 80. and 30 is 180. 60. 180. We can determine the least common multiple of 4 and 6 by combining identical copies of each smaller chain to create two chains of equal length. The least common multiple of two or more numbers is the least number that is divisible by each number. 90. and 63. 120. Multiples of 18 are: 18. 20.) 3. 2. 90. Method 2 Check to see which multiples of 30 are also multiples of 18 and 20. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING SOLUTIONS 3. … 20 divides exactly into: 60. 150. 126. the least common multiple of 4 and 6 is 12. 5. 20.wncp10_3_1. … Multiples of 20 are: 20. For example. and 30 is 180. 120. 120. Example 3 Determining the Least Common Multiple Determine the least common multiple of 18. 180. 120. … Multiples of 30 are: 30. 20. … The least common multiple of 18. 40. 144. 140. 180. 72. [Answer: 252] Method 1 List the multiples of each number until the same multiple appears in all 3 lists. 90. 108. 100. (Solution continues. 3.qxd 12/7/09 5:11 PM Page 137 To generate multiples of a number. 1. … 18 divides exactly into: 90. 54. 162. multiply the number by the natural numbers.

So.qxd 12/8/09 4:08 PM Page 138 Method 3 Write the prime factorization of each number. 18 ϭ 2 · 3 · 3 ϭ 2 · 32 20 ϭ 2 · 2 · 5 ϭ 22 · 5 30 ϭ 2 · 3 · 5 The greatest power of 3 in any list is 32. So. 20. (Solution continues. Sketch the square and rectangles.? Assume that the squares cannot be cut. the side length of the square must be a multiple of 40.wncp10_3_1. by 36 in. Sketch the rectangle and squares. b) What is the side length of the largest square that could be used to tile a rectangle that measures 8 in. b) What is the side length of the largest square that could be used to tile a rectangle that measures 16 cm by 40 cm? Assume that the squares cannot be cut. and 30 is 180. So. SOLUTION a) In the square. Sketch the rectangle and squares. Sketch the square and rectangles. a) What is the side length of the smallest square that could be tiled with rectangles that measure 8 in. by 36 in. [Answers: a) 72 in. the side length of the square must be a common multiple of 16 and 40. 16 cm 40 cm The shorter side of each rectangle measures 16 cm. Highlight the greatest power of each prime factor in any list. b) 4 in. Example 4 Solving Problems that Involve Greatest Common Factor and Least Common Multiple a) What is the side length of the smallest square that could be tiled with rectangles that measure 16 cm by 40 cm? Assume the rectangles cannot be cut. The least common multiple is the product of the greatest power of each prime factor: 22 · 32 · 5 ϭ 4 · 9 · 5 ϭ 180 The least common multiple of 18. the side length of the square must be a multiple of 16.) 138 Are there any pairs of numbers for which the least common multiple and greatest common factor are the same number? Explain.? Assume the rectangles cannot be cut. Chapter 3: Factors and Products CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4.] . The greatest power of 2 in any list is 22. The longer side of each rectangle measures 40 cm. The greatest power of 5 in any list is 5. arrange all the rectangles with the same orientation.

40 cm 16 cm The longer side of the rectangle measures 40 cm.qxd 12/7/09 5:11 PM Page 139 The side length of the smallest square will be the least common multiple of 16 and 40. Discuss the Ideas 8 cm 8 cm 1. 16 ϭ 2 · 2 · 2 · 2 40 ϭ 2 · 2 · 2 · 5 The greatest common factor is: 2·2·2ϭ8 The largest square has side length 8 cm. the side length of the square must be a factor of 16. 80 cm The side length of the smallest square is 80 cm.1 Factors and Multiples of Whole Numbers 139 . the side length of the square must be a factor of 40. How can you use the prime factorization of a number to determine all the factors of that number? 3. would the answer change if the rectangles could be oriented in any direction? Explain. 80 cm 16 ϭ 24 40 ϭ 23 · 5 The least common multiple is: 24 · 5 ϭ 80 In Example 4a. Write the prime factorization of each number. b) The shorter side of the rectangle measures 16 cm. So. What strategies can you use to determine the prime factorization of a whole number? 2. The side length of the largest square will be the greatest common factor of 16 and 40. Highlight the prime factors that appear in both lists.wncp10_3_1. the side length of the square must be a common factor of 16 and 40. Why is it helpful to write the prime factorization of 16 and 40 as a product of powers in part a and as an expanded product in part b? Write the prime factorization of each number. So. So. Highlight the greatest power of each prime factor in either list.

120 c) 81. 714 d) 220. 960. Write each number as a product of its prime factors. When is the product of two numbers equal to their least common multiple? 15. How could you use the greatest common factor to simplify a fraction? Use this strategy to simplify these fractions. 420 b) 120. a) 20. 275. 60 d) 38. 8. a) 12. a) 46. 19. 27 12. 45 c) 45. 32. How could you use the least common multiple to add. Determine the greatest common factor of each set of numbers a) 150.12 m? Explain. 42 e) 32. One band has 42 members. a) 6 b) 13 c) 22 d) 31 e) 45 f) 27 4. 216 d) 180.qxd 12/7/09 5:11 PM Page 140 Exercises A 3. What is the greatest number of columns in the array? 14. 224 e) 160. 36. 210. 38 b) 15. 18. 20. . 45 f) 28. 1400 c) 126. A developer wants to subdivide this rectangular plot of land into congruent square pieces. 44 c) 12. a) 45 b) 80 c) 96 d) 122 e) 160 f) 195 B 6. a) 40 b) 75 c) 81 d) 120 e) 140 f) 192 5. 650 185 340 a) b) c) 325 380 900 840 1225 2145 d) e) f) 1220 2750 1105 16. 84 b) 64.48 m by 15. or divide fractions? Use this strategy to evaluate these fractions. 30 d) 15. Explain the difference between determining the greatest common factor and the least common multiple of 12 and 14. 52 11. Use powers to write each number as a product of its prime factors. Determine the least common multiple of each set of numbers. 672 f) 220. 308. Two marching bands are to be arranged in rectangular arrays with the same number of columns. 860 13. Determine the greatest common factor of each pair of numbers. the other has 36 members. a) What are the dimensions of the smallest square that could be tiled using an 18-cm by 24-cm tile? Assume the tiles cannot be cut. 484. 24. b) Could the tiles in part a be used to cover a floor with dimensions 6. 25. Do all whole numbers have at least one prime factor? Explain. Determine the least common multiple of each pair of numbers. List the prime factors of each number. 14 b) 21.wncp10_3_1. List the first 6 multiples of each number. 546. a) 600 b) 1150 c) 1022 d) 2250 e) 4500 f) 6125 7. subtract. 140 Chapter 3: Factors and Products 3200 m 2400 m 18. 988 10. Explain why the numbers 0 and 1 have no prime factors. What is the side length of the largest possible square? 9. 9 11 8 11 a) ϩ b) ϩ 14 16 15 20 5 1 9 5 4 c) Ϫ d) ϩ ϩ 24 22 10 14 21 9 7 5 3 5 7 e) ϩ Ϫ f) Ϫ ϩ 25 15 8 5 18 3 3 4 11 2 g) Ϭ h) Ϭ 5 9 6 7 17.

Marcia says that she knows that 61 is a prime number because she tried dividing 61 by all the natural numbers up to and including 7. One acre of land is a rectangle measuring 66 feet by 660 feet. This makes it almost impossible to decipher the code without knowing the original numbers that were multiplied to encipher the message. Do the rectangles for 1 acre fit exactly into a section? Justify your answer. and none of them was a factor. Do the rectangles for 2 1 acre fit exactly into a quarter section? Justify your answer. One way to generate a key is to multiply two large prime numbers. A bar of soap has the shape of a rectangular prism that measures 10 cm by 6 cm by 3 cm. Cryptographers use a key to encode and decode messages. 22. What is the edge length of the smallest cube that could be filled with these soap bars? Describe strategies you would use to determine the least common multiple and the greatest common factor of a set of numbers.wncp10_3_1.1 Factors and Multiples of Whole Numbers 141 . THE WORLD OF MATH Math Fact: Cryptography Cryptography is the art of writing or deciphering messages in code. [1 mile ϭ 5280 feet] b) A quarter section is a square with 1 side length mile. c) What is the side length of the smallest square into which the rectangles for 1 acre will fit exactly? Reflect C 21. The Dominion Land Survey is used to divide much of western Canada into sections and acres. Do you agree with Marcia? Explain. mathematicians announced they had factored a 274-digit number as the product of a 120-digit prime number and a 155-digit prime number. 353 –1 5 = 9736915051844164425659589830765310381017746994454460344424676734039701450849424662984652946941 8789179481605188614420406622642320616708178468189806366368550930451357370697905234613513066631 78231611242601530501649312653193616879609578238789980474856787874287635916569919566643 = p120 x p155 = 1350952613301126518307750496355908073811210311113827323183908467597440721656365429201433517381 98057636666351316191686483 x 7207443811113019376439358640290253916138908670997078170498495662717 8573407484509481161087627373286704178679466051451768242073072242783688661390273684623521 c274 = 6 3. In 2006. a) A section is a square with side length 1 mile.qxd 12/7/09 5:11 PM Page 141 20.

Perfect Cubes.2 5:15 PM Page 142 Perfect Squares. What is the area of one face of the cube? Why is this number a perfect square? What is the volume of the cube? This number is called a perfect cube. 142 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . Make Connections The edge length of the Rubik’s cube is 3 units. and Their Roots LESSON FOCUS Identify perfect squares and perfect cubes.qxd 12/7/09 3. Kubiks were temporary structures built in Barcelona. Hungary.wncp10_3_2. and Lisbon in 2007. Why do you think it has this name? Competitors solve a Rubik’s cube in the world championships in Budapest. Berlin. in October 2007. then determine square roots and cube roots.

Use the tiles to model all the perfect squares from 1 to 100. Area = 25 square units The square root of a number n. 3. C. 5 units We write: Ί 25 ϭ 5 25 is a perfect square and 5 is its square root.wncp10_3_2. Sketch each model on isometric dot paper and record the corresponding perfect cube. is a positive number whose square is n. Use the cubes to model all the perfect cubes from 1 to 100. You will need: 100 congruent square tiles. Perfect Cubes. Which numbers from 1 to 100 are perfect squares and which are perfect cubes? D.2 Perfect Squares. 100 linking cubes. B. Take turns to choose a number between 101 and 200. grid paper. denoted Ί n. A. Determine if it is a perfect square or a perfect cube. and isometric dot paper. Join with another group of students. E. How could you determine if a given number is a perfect square? How could you determine if a given number is a perfect cube? Any whole number that can be represented as the area of a square with a whole number side length is a perfect square. and Their Roots 143 .qxd 12/7/09 5:15 PM Page 143 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work in a group. Suppose you did not have tiles or cubes available. Sketch each model on grid paper and record the corresponding perfect square. The side length of the square is the square root of the area of the square.

So. 1296 2 So. 30 Ͻ Ί1296 Ͻ 40 1296 is about halfway between 900 and 1600. denoted 3 n . The cube root of a number n. Example 1 Determining the Square Root of a Whole Number Determine the square root of 1296. is a number Ί whose cube is n. the square root of 1296 is 36. the square root of 1296 is 36.qxd 12/7/09 5:15 PM Page 144 Any whole number that can be represented as the volume of a cube with a whole number edge length is a perfect cube. but close) Try 36: 362 ϭ 1296 So. The edge length of the cube is the cube root of the volume of the cube. [Answer: 42] Method 1 Write 1296 as a product of its prime factors. it can be represented as the area of a square. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING SOLUTIONS 1. Use guess and test to refine the estimate. 1296 ϭ 2 · 2 · 2 · 2 · 3 · 3 · 3 · 3 ϭ (2 · 2)(2 · 2)(3 · 3)(3 · 3) Rearrange the factors in 2 equal groups. Determine the square root of 1764.wncp10_3_2. ϭ (2 · 2 · 3 · 3)(2 · 2 · 3 · 3) ϭ 36 · 36 Since 1296 is the product of two equal factors. Chapter 3: Factors and Products 2 3 36 36 Area = 1296 144 What if the prime factors cannot be grouped into pairs? What can you say about the number? 3 . Group the factors in pairs. Ί1296 is about halfway between 30 and 40. 2 3 3 2 Method 2 Estimate: 302 ϭ 900 and 402 ϭ 1600 900 Ͻ 1296 Ͻ 1600 So. 6 units Volume ‫؍‬ 216 cubic units Ί We write: 3 216 ϭ 6 216 is a perfect cube and 6 is its cube root. Try 35: 352 ϭ 1225 (too small.

with index 2. index 3 radical 1728 radicand 3. but close) Try 12: 123 ϭ 1728 Can a whole number be both a perfect square and a perfect cube? Explain. the cube root of 1728 is 12. ϭ (2 · 2 · 3)(2 · 2 · 3)(2 · 2 · 3) ϭ 12 · 12 · 12 Since 1728 is the product of three equal factors. 1728 ϭ 2 · 2 · 2 · 2 · 2 · 2 · 3 · 3 · 3 Rearrange the factors in ϭ (2 · 2 · 2)(2 · 2 · 2)(3 · 3 · 3) 3 equal groups. Perfect Cubes. it can be represented as the volume of a cube. [Answer: 14] Method 1 Write 1728 as a product of its prime factors. How could you use this strategy to show a number is not a perfect cube? Volume ‫8271 ؍‬ 12 12 12 Method 2 Estimate: 103 ϭ 1000 and 203 ϭ 8000 1000 Ͻ 1728 Ͻ 8000 So. Ί Use guess and test to refine the estimate.wncp10_3_2. So. So. Ί1296 is a radical with radicand 1296. So. 10 Ͻ 3 1728 Ͻ 20 Ί 1728 is closer to 1000 than to 8000. but the index on a square root is implied and often not written.2 Perfect Squares. the cube root of 1728 is 12. Group the factors in sets of 3. The square Ί root can be written as 2 1296. Determine the cube root of 2744. Try 11: 113 ϭ 1331 (too small. In Example 1.qxd 12/8/09 4:41 PM Example 2 Page 145 Determining the Cube Root of a Whole Number Determine the cube root of 1728. and Their Roots 145 . 3 1728 is closer to 10 than to 20. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING SOLUTIONS 2.

Explain the process used. The surface area of the cube is 1734 square inches.wncp10_3_2. A cube has volume 12 167 cubic feet. What strategies can you use to determine the square root of a perfect square? What strategies can you use to determine the cube root of a perfect cube? Exercises A B 4. To calculate the surface area. Discuss the Ideas 1. SA ϭ 6(17 · 17) SA ϭ 6(289) SA ϭ 1734 e Volume ‫ 3194 ؍‬in. What strategy could you use to determine that a number is not a perfect square? Not a perfect cube? 3. or neither. a perfect cube. of a cube is equal to the cube root of its volume.2 17 in.3 Area of one face ‫ 982 ؍‬in. of a cube is the sum of the areas of its 6 congruent square faces. Determine the cube root of each number. What is the surface area of the cube? SOLUTION [Answer: 3174 square feet] Sketch a diagram.qxd 12/7/09 5:15 PM Example 3 Page 146 Using Roots to Solve a Problem A cube has volume 4913 cubic inches. Use factoring to determine whether each number is a perfect square. a) 196 b) 256 c) 361 d) 289 e) 441 6. The edge length e. What is the surface area of the cube? CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. SA. first determine the edge length of the cube. Ί e ϭ 3 4913 e ϭ 17 The surface area. a) 225 b) 729 c) 1944 d) 1444 e) 4096 f) 13 824 5. Explain the process used. a) 343 b) 512 c) 1000 d) 1331 e) 3375 146 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . Determine the square root of each number. What strategies might you use to determine if a number is a perfect square or a perfect cube? 2.

b) Suppose the surface area of the tent is 90 square feet. A cube has surface area 6534 square feet. Local customers were asked to predict when the ice cube would melt enough for a ball above the ice cube to fall through it.qxd 12/7/09 5:15 PM Page 147 7. 8 x ft. 17. Perfect Cubes. 5x ft. Do not include the floor.2 14. Is it possible to construct a cube with 2000 interlocking cubes? Justify your answer. x ft. The prism has a square cross-section and height 10 ft. Determine the dimensions of a cube for which its surface area is numerically the same as its volume. What are its length and width? 8. Manitoba.2 Perfect Squares.wncp10_3_2. Determine the edge length of each cube. In February 2003. During the Festival du Voyageur in Winnipeg. b) Determine the edge length of a cube with volume 64x6y3.3 Volume ‫ 526 51 ؍‬ft. What is its volume? x ft. and Their Roots 147 . Calculate the value of x. a) b) Volume ‫ 2385 ؍‬in. Determine the side length of each square. a) Write an expression for the surface area of this tent. Each team begins with a 1440-cubic foot rectangular prism of snow. Write 3 numbers that are both perfect squares and perfect cubes. teams compete in a snow sculpture competition. 16. 10. Which pairs of perfect cubes have a sum of 1729? Reflect How is determining the square root of a number similar to determining its cube root? How are the strategies different? 3. Determine all the perfect square whole numbers and perfect cube whole numbers between each pair of numbers: a) 315 Ϫ 390 b) 650 Ϫ 750 c) 800 Ϫ 925 d) 1200 Ϫ 1350 13. a) Determine the side length of a square with area 121x4y2. 11. a) b) Area = 484 mm2 Area = 1764 yd.3 9. the Battlefords Chamber of Commerce in Saskatchewan placed a cage containing a 64-cubic foot ice cube along Yellowhead Highway. 12. What was the surface area of the cube? C 15. 18.

2 – You used factors and multiples to determine perfect square whole numbers and their square roots. Properties of Whole Numbers Factors Perfect Squares one of the identical factors Square Root numbers with 3 identical factors Perfect Cubes factors shared by a set of numbers factors that are prime numbers Common Factors Prime Factors Greatest Common Factor one of the identical factors a number written in terms of its prime factors Cube Root 148 Prime Factorization Chapter 3: Factors and Products In Lesson 3.qxd 12/7/09 5:15 PM Page 148 CHECKPOINT 1 Concept Development Connections ■ Least Common Multiple – You applied whole number properties and operations to determine prime factors. Multiples numbers with 2 identical factors In Lesson 3. Common Multiples multiples of all numbers in a set ■ – You used factors and multiples to determine perfect cube whole numbers and their cube roots.wncp10_3_2.1 . – You used prime factors to determine greatest common factor (GCF) and least common multiple (LCM).

320 d) 208. Checkpoint 1 149 . Determine the cube root of each number. 66 4. 1550 3. 120. The Mayan used several different calendar systems. 368. 20. 15. 64 f) 50. 3. one system used 365 days. Determine whether each number is a perfect square. a) 1260 b) 4224 c) 6120 d) 1045 e) 3024 f) 3675 2. 32. 205. 24. Its surface is to be painted. a) 40. a perfect cube.2 6.wncp10_3_2. Between each pair of numbers.qxd 12/7/09 5:16 PM Page 149 Assess Your Understanding 3. A cube has a volume of 2197 m3. 32 c) 18. 55. Use the least common multiple to help determine each answer. 56. 1225. Which different strategies could you use? a) 400 b) 784 c) 576 d) 1089 e) 1521 f) 3025 7. Use powers to write each number as a product of its prime factors. 9 8 5 13 4 7 a) ϩ b) Ϫ c) Ϭ 10 3 3 11 5 7 5. Determine the greatest common factor of each set of numbers. 56 b) 84. a) 400 – 500 b) 900 – 1000 c) 1100 – 1175 10. a) 12. 30 d) 30. or neither.1 1. 48. 528 e) 856. Determine the square root of each number. identify all the perfect squares and perfect cubes that are whole numbers. 1200. Suppose the first day of both calendars occurred on the same day. Determine the least common multiple of each set of numbers. 1368 f) 950. Which different strategies could you use? a) 1728 b) 3375 c) 8000 d) 5832 e) 10 648 f) 9261 8. 40 e) 49. Each can of paint covers about 40 m2. How many cans of paint are needed? Justify your answer. another system used 260 days. 144 c) 145. After how many days would they again occur on the same day? About how long is this in years? Assume 1 year has 365 days. a) 2808 b) 3136 c) 4096 d) 4624 e) 5832 f) 9270 9. 21 b) 12.

Make Connections Diagrams and models can be used to represent products. write the multiplication sentence it represents. What multiplication sentences are represented above? What property do the diagrams illustrate? Construct Understanding The variable algebra tile can represent any variable we like.qxd 12/7/09 3. 150 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . It is usually referred to as the x-tile.wncp10_3_3. Sketch all the ways you can arrange these tiles to form a rectangle. Beside each sketch. THINK ABOUT IT You may need algebra tiles.3 5:28 PM Page 150 Common Factors of a Polynomial LESSON FOCUS Model and record factoring a polynomial.

The third way: 4m ϩ 12 ϭ 4(m ϩ 3) is complete. 3(2 Ϫ 5a) ϭ 6 Ϫ 15a Factor a number by writing it as a product of factors. The greatest common factor of 4m and 12 is 4. neither 1 nor 2 is the greatest common factor of 4m and 12. The dimensions of each rectangle represent the factors of the polynomial. 28 ϭ (4)(7) Factor a polynomial by writing it as a product of factors.wncp10_3_3. (4)(7) ϭ 28 Expand an expression to form a product. we factor the polynomial. The diagrams above show that there are 3 ways to factor the expression 4m ϩ 12. Factoring and expanding are inverse processes. Compare multiplying and factoring in arithmetic and algebra.qxd 12/7/09 5:28 PM Page 151 Each set of tiles below represents the polynomial 4m ϩ 12.3 Common Factors of a Polynomial 151 . In Arithmetic In Algebra Multiply factors to form a product. 6 Ϫ 15a ϭ 3(2 Ϫ 5a) 3. That is. the polynomial cannot be factored further. that is. ■ 1(4m ϩ 12) ϭ 4m ϩ 12 length 4m + 12 width 1 ■ 4m + 12 2(2m ϩ 6) ϭ 4m ϩ 12 2 · 2 length 2m + 6 · width 2 ■ 4(m ϩ 3) ϭ 4m ϩ 12 (2m + 6) 2 · (m + 3) length m + 3 width 4 When we write a polynomial as a product of factors. We say that 4m ϩ 12 is factored fully when we write 4m ϩ 12 ϭ 4(m ϩ 3). The first two ways: 4m ϩ 12 ϭ 1(4m ϩ 12) and 4m ϩ 12 ϭ 2(2m ϩ 6) are incomplete because the second factor in each case can be factored further.

a) 3g ϩ 6 b) 8d ϩ 12d 2 [Answers: a) 3(g ϩ 2) b) 4d(2 ϩ 3d)] SOLUTIONS a) 6n ϩ 9 Method 1 Arrange algebra tile in a rectangle.qxd 12/7/09 5:28 PM Example 1 Page 152 Using Algebra Tiles to Factor Binomials Factor each binomial. The dimensions of the rectangle are 3 and 2n ϩ 3. So. Factor each binomial. 6c ϩ 4c2 ϭ 2c(3) ϩ 2c(2c) Use the distributive property to write the sum as a product. 6c ϭ 2 · 3 · c 4c2 ϭ 2 · 2 · c · c The greatest common factor is 2c. 6c ϩ 4c2 ϭ 2c (3 ϩ 2c) Method 2 Use the greatest common factor. Write each term as a product of 2c and another monomial. Factor each term of the binomial. 6n ϩ 9 ϭ 3(2n ϩ 3) Method 2 Use a factor tree. 6c ϩ 4c2 ϭ 2c(3 ϩ 2c) 152 Chapter 3: Factors and Products How can you check that your answer is correct? . 6n ϩ 9 ϭ 3(2n ϩ 3) 6n + 9 3 · (2n + 3) b) 6c ϩ 4c2 Method 1 Use algebra tiles.wncp10_3_3. a) 6n ϩ 9 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING b) 6c ϩ 4c2 1.

Write each term as a product of the greatest common factor and another monomial. 5 Ϫ 10z Ϫ 5z2 ϭ 5(1) Ϫ 5(2z) Ϫ 5(z2) Use the distributive property to write the expression as a product. Example 2 Factoring Trinomials Factor the trinomial 5 Ϫ 10z Ϫ 5z2. There are 5 equal groups and each group contains the trinomial 1 Ϫ 2z Ϫ z2. Arrange five 1-tiles. Instead. why should you always use the distributive property to expand the product? ϭ 5 Ϫ 10z Ϫ 5z2 This trinomial is the same as the original trinomial. we can sometimes arrange the tiles into equal groups. Factor each term of the trinomial. 2. 5 Ϫ 10z Ϫ 5z2 ϭ 5(1 Ϫ 2z Ϫ z2) Method 2 Use the greatest common factor. 10 negative z-tiles. and 5 negative z2-tiles into equal groups. the factors are 5 and 1 Ϫ 2z Ϫ z2. 5 Ϫ 10z Ϫ 5z2 ϭ 5(1 Ϫ 2z Ϫ z2) Check: Expand 5(1 Ϫ 2z Ϫ z2) ϭ 5(1) Ϫ 5(2z) Ϫ 5(z2) When you have factored an expression. 5ϭ5 10z ϭ 2 · 5 · z 5z2 ϭ 5 · z · z The greatest common factor is 5.qxd 12/7/09 5:28 PM Page 153 When a polynomial has negative terms or 3 different terms. SOLUTIONS 5 Ϫ 10z Ϫ 5z2 [Answer: 6(1 Ϫ 2z ϩ 3z2)] Method 1 Use algebra tiles. so the factors are correct.wncp10_3_3. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Verify that the factors are correct. So. we cannot remove a common factor by arranging the tiles as a rectangle. 3. Factor the trinomial 6 Ϫ 12z ϩ 18z2 Verify that the factors are correct.3 Common Factors of a Polynomial 153 .

154 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . How is using an algebra tile model to multiply a polynomial by a monomial like using an area model to multiply two whole numbers? 2. 12x3y ϭ 2 · 2 · 3 · x · x · x · y 20xy2 ϭ 2 · 2 · 5 · x · y · y 16x2y2 ϭ 2 · 2 · 2 · 2 · x · x · y · y The greatest common factor is: 2 · 2 · x · y ϭ 4xy Write each term as a product of the greatest common factor and another monomial. Verify that the factors are correct. Ϫ20c4d Ϫ 30c3d2 Ϫ 25cd SOLUTION [Answer: Ϫ5cd(4c3 ϩ 6c2d ϩ 5)] Ϫ12x3y Ϫ 20xy2 Ϫ 16x2y2 Factor each term of the trinomial. so the factors are correct. How are the strategies used to factor a polynomial like those used to determine the prime factorization of a whole number? 3. Example 3 Factoring Polynomials in More than One Variable Factor the trinomial. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Ϫ12x3y Ϫ 20xy2 Ϫ 16x2y2 3. Can every binomial be factored? Explain. In Example 3. we usually ensure that the first term inside the brackets is positive. Factor the trinomial.wncp10_3_3. Discuss the Ideas 1. Verify that the factors are correct. ϭ 4xy(Ϫ3x2 Ϫ 5y Ϫ 4xy) What other strategies could you use? ϭ 4xy(Ϫ1)(3x2 ϩ 5y ϩ 4xy) ϭ Ϫ4xy(3x2 ϩ 5y ϩ 4xy) Check: Expand Ϫ4xy(3x2 ϩ 5y ϩ 4xy) ϭ (Ϫ4xy)(3x2) ϩ (Ϫ4xy)(5y) ϩ (Ϫ4xy)(4xy) ϭ Ϫ12x3y Ϫ 20xy2 Ϫ 16x2y2 This trinomial is the same as the original trinomial.qxd 12/7/09 5:28 PM Page 154 Another strategy used in factoring polynomials is to identify and factor out any common factors. When we factor a polynomial that has negative terms. the common factor Ϫ1 was removed because every term was negative. Ϫ12x3y Ϫ 20xy2 Ϫ 16x2y2 ϭ 4xy(Ϫ3x2) Ϫ 4xy(5y) Ϫ 4xy(4xy) Write the expression as a product.

3 Common Factors of a Polynomial 155 . What do you notice? 12.wncp10_3_3. a) 5y ϩ 10 b) 6 ϩ 12x2 c) 9k ϩ 6 d) 4s2 ϩ 14s f) 3h ϩ 7h2 e) y ϩ y2 8. write the polynomial they represent and identify its factors. Use algebra tiles to factor each trinomial. Sketch the tiles you used. b) 27n ϩ 36 Ϫ 18n3 a) 5 ϩ 15m2 Ϫ 10m3 c) 6v4 ϩ 7v Ϫ 8v3 d) Ϫ3c2 Ϫ 13c4 Ϫ 12c3 2 Ϫ 12x4 e) 24x ϩ 30x f) s4 ϩ s2 Ϫ 4s 11. b) 48s3 Ϫ 12 a) 9b2 Ϫ 12b3 d) 3x2 ϩ 6x4 c) Ϫa2 Ϫ a3 3 Ϫ 12y e) 8y f) Ϫ7d Ϫ 14d4 b) Factor the polynomial. then identify the greatest common factor. m2 6. Why can you not use algebra tiles? Check by expanding. Factor each binomial. Simplify each expression by combining like terms. Sketch the tiles you used. 5. Suppose you are writing each term of a polynomial as the product of a common factor and a monomial. Write a correct solution. b) 4 Ϫ 6y Ϫ 8y2 a) 3x2 ϩ 12x Ϫ 6 2 Ϫ 14 c) Ϫ7m Ϫ 7m d) 10n Ϫ 6 Ϫ 12n2 e) 8 ϩ 10x ϩ 6x2 f) Ϫ9 ϩ 12b ϩ 6b2 10. Factor each trinomial. Factor the terms in each set. a) i) 6 ϩ 15n ii) 6 Ϫ15n iii) 15n Ϫ 6 iv) Ϫ15n + 6 ii) m2 ϩ 4m b) i) 4m ϩ m2 2 iv) m2 Ϫ 4m iii) 4m Ϫ m B 7. a) b) c) 9. then factor. c) Compare the factors with the dimensions of the rectangle. a) Here are a student’s solutions for factoring polynomials. For each arrangement of algebra tiles. Identify the errors in each solution. Use algebra tiles to factor each binomial. a) Write the polynomial these algebra tiles represent. 15n b) 4m. Use the greatest common factors from question 5 to factor each expression. a) 6. a) x2 ϩ 6x Ϫ 7 Ϫ x2 Ϫ 2x ϩ 3 b) 12m2 Ϫ 24m Ϫ 3 ϩ 4m2 Ϫ 13 c) Ϫ7n3 Ϫ 5n2 ϩ 2n Ϫ n2 Ϫ n3 Ϫ 12n 3. When is the monomial 1? When is the monomial Ϫ1? 14. Why can you not use algebra tiles? Check by expanding.qxd 12/7/09 5:28 PM Page 155 Exercises A 4. i) Factor: 3m2 ϩ 9m3 Ϫ 3m Solution: 3m2 ϩ 9m3 Ϫ 3m ϭ 3m(m ϩ 3m2) ii) Factor: Ϫ16 ϩ 8n Ϫ 4n3 Solution: Ϫ16 ϩ 8n Ϫ 4n3 ϭ Ϫ4(4 ϩ 2n ϩ n2) b) What should the student have done to check his work? 13.

a) How many diagonals can be drawn from one vertex of a pentagon? A hexagon? b) Suppose the polygon has n sides. 22. How many diagonals can be drawn from one vertex? c) The total number of diagonals of a polygon n2 3n with n sides is Ϫ . i) 4s2t2. Is one form of the formula more efficient to use than the other? Explain. If a polynomial factors as a product of a monomial and a polynomial. A cylindrical bar has base radius r and height h. b) Simplify the fraction. h r a) Write an expression for the surface area of the silo. Factor the expression. b) Write an expression for the volume of the silo. Check by expanding. how can you tell when you have factored it fully? Chapter 3: Factors and Products . A formula for the surface area. b) Use both forms of the formula to calculate the surface area of a cone with base radius 9 cm and slant height 15 cm. a) Factor the terms in each set. and a hemispherical top. Is one form of the formula more efficient to use than the other? Explain. i) 4s2t2 ϩ 12s2t3 ϩ 36st2 ii) 12s2t3 Ϫ 4s2t2 Ϫ 36st2 iii) Ϫ3a3b Ϫ 9a4b ϩ 8a2b iv) 9a4b ϩ 3a3b Ϫ 8a2b v) 36x2y4 ϩ 12x3y2 ϩ 12x4y3 vi) Ϫ36x2y4 Ϫ 12x4y3 Ϫ 12x3y2 16. 12s2t3. then identify the greatest common factor. 2 2 Explain why it is reasonable. b) Use both forms of the formula to calculate the surface area of a cylinder with base radius 12 cm and height 23 cm. Which form of the expression will you use? Explain why. a) Write an expression for the fraction of the total surface area that will be painted. Determine the surface area of the silo when its base radius is 6 m and the height of the cylinder is 10 m. Is n2 Ϫ n always an integer? Justify your answer. Which form of the expression will you use? Explain why. 12x4y3. SA. 9a4b iii) 12x3y2. C 21.wncp10_3_3. 8a2b. Suppose n is an integer. A silo has a cylindrical base with height h and radius r. 18. Factor this formula. a) 25xy ϩ 15x2 Ϫ 30x2y2 b) 51m2n ϩ 39mn2 Ϫ 72mn c) 9p4q2 Ϫ 6p3q3 ϩ 12p2q4 d) 10a3b2 ϩ 12a2b4 Ϫ 5a2b2 e) 12cd2 Ϫ 8cd Ϫ 20c2d f) 7r3s3 ϩ 14r2s2 Ϫ 21rs2 17. 20. 36x2y4 b) Use the greatest common factors from part a to factor each trinomial. of a cylinder with base radius r and height h is: SA ϭ 2␲r2 ϩ 2␲rh a) Factor this formula. Use the values of the radius and height from part a to calculate the volume of the silo. Factor each trinomial. 36st2 ii) 3a3b. of a cone with slant height s and base radius r is: SA ϭ ␲r2 ϩ ␲rs a) Factor this formula. A formula for the surface area. Only the curved surface of a cylindrical bar is to be painted. Reflect 156 19. A diagonal of a polygon is a line segment joining non-adjacent vertices.qxd 12/7/09 5:28 PM Page 156 15. SA. Factor the expression.

Use 1 x2-tile. use additional x. Use only positive tiles. and a number of x-tiles and 1-tiles.4 Modelling Trinomials as Binomial Products LESSON FOCUS Explore factoring polynomials with algebra tiles. ■ ■ Arrange the tiles to form a rectangle. For each rectangle. 12 × 13 ϭ (10 ϩ 2)(10 ϩ 3) ϭ 10(10 ϩ 3) ϩ 2(10 ϩ 3) ϭ 10(10) ϩ 10(3) ϩ 2(10) ϩ 2(3) ϭ 100 ϩ 30 ϩ 20 ϩ 6 ϭ 156 How could you use an area model to identify the binomial factors of a trinomial? Construct Understanding TRY THIS You will need algebra tiles. Choose a different number of x-tiles and 1-tiles and repeat until you have 4 different multiplication sentences.wncp10_3_4. Make Connections 10 3 10 100 30 2 20 6 We can use an area model and the distributive property to illustrate the product of two 2-digit numbers. If you cannot make a rectangle.qxd 12/7/09 5:26 PM Page 157 MATH LAB 3.and 1-tiles as necessary. A. sketch the tiles and write the multiplication sentence it represents.4 Math Lab: Modelling Trinomials as Binomial Products 157 . 3.

Suppose you must use 1 x2-tile and twelve 1-tiles. Suppose you must use 2 x2-tiles and 9 x-tiles. you are seeing Taylor polynomials in action. b) 3w2 ϩ 5w ϩ 2 c) 2f 2 ϩ 3f ϩ 2 a) 2s2 ϩ 7s ϩ 3 2 ϩ 10h ϩ 6 2 ϩ 2n ϩ 1 e) 4n f) 6k2 ϩ 11k ϩ 3 d) 2h 3. When you use the square root key on a scientific calculator. Sketch each rectangle. Which of the following trinomials can be represented by a rectangle? Use algebra tiles to check your answers. ■ ■ Arrange the tiles to form a rectangle. Use additional x. sketch the tiles and write the corresponding multiplication sentence. Share your work with a classmate.qxd 12/7/09 5:26 PM Page 158 B. The square root of a number between 0 and 2 can be approximated using this polynomial: 5 1 1 1 Ί x Џ 1 ϩ (x Ϫ 1) Ϫ (x Ϫ 1)2 ϩ (x Ϫ 1)3 Ϫ (x Ϫ 1)4 2 8 16 128 Use the polynomial to estimate the value of Ί 1. 158 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . 1685Ϫ1731. Which of the following trinomials can be represented by a rectangle? Use algebra tiles to check. Use 2 or more x2-tiles and a number of x-tiles and 1-tiles. Repeat with different numbers of tiles until you have 4 different multiplication sentences. What patterns do you see in the products and factors? Assess Your Understanding 1. Taylor polynomials are used to determine approximate values. Which numbers of x-tiles could you use to form a rectangle? 4.and 1-tiles if necessary.5. b) d2 ϩ 7d ϩ 10 c) m2 ϩ 7m ϩ 7 a) y2 ϩ 4y ϩ 3 2 ϩ 14r ϩ 14 2 ϩ 6t ϩ 6 e) t f) p2 ϩ 9p ϩ 2 d) r 2. Sketch each rectangle. Use a calculator to determine how many digits of your answer are correct. Which numbers of 1-tiles could you use to form a rectangle? THE WORLD OF MATH Math Fact: Taylor Polynomials A certain type of polynomial is named for the English mathematician Brook Taylor. C. For each rectangle.wncp10_3_4.

without sketching a rectangle. then sketch a rectangle to determine their product. ■ Use the patterns you identified. Take turns to write two binomials.5 Polynomials of the Form x2 + bx + c 159 . Write a multiplication sentence that relates the factors to the final product.5 5:31 PM Page 159 Polynomials of the Form x2 + bx + c LESSON FOCUS Use models and algebraic strategies to multiply binomials and to factor trinomials.wncp10_3_5.qxd 12/7/09 3. 3. Make Connections How is each term in the trinomial below represented in the algebra tile model above? (c ϩ 3)(c ϩ 7) ϭ c2 ϩ 10c ϩ 21 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. (c ϩ 4)(c ϩ 2) (c ϩ 4)(c ϩ 3) (c ϩ 4)(c ϩ 4) (c ϩ 4)(c ϩ 5) ■ Describe a pattern that relates the coefficients of the terms in the factors to the coefficients in the product. ■ Sketch a rectangle to illustrate each product. ■ Describe a strategy you could use to multiply two binomials.

h 11 h (h)(h) = h2 (h)(11) = 11h 5 (5)(h) = 5h (5)(11) = 55 So. So. (h ϩ 11)(h ϩ 5) ϭ h2 ϩ 5h ϩ 11h ϩ 55 ϭ h2 ϩ 16h ϩ 55 Combine like terms. (c + 5)(c + 3) ϭ c2 ϩ 8c ϩ 15 Use an area model. then fill in the rectangle with tiles.qxd 12/7/09 5:31 PM Page 160 When two binomials contain only positive terms. and fifteen 1-tiles.wncp10_3_5. Place tiles to represent each dimension. This strategy shows that there are 4 terms in the product. Divide the rectangle into 4 smaller rectangles and calculate the area of each. Use algebra tiles. (h ϩ 11)(h ϩ 5) ϭ h2 ϩ 5h ϩ 11h ϩ 55 160 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . c 111 c 1 1 1 1 1 The tiles that form the product are: 1 c2-tile. here are two strategies to determine the product of the binomials. To expand: (h ϩ 11)(h ϩ 5) Sketch a rectangle with dimensions h ϩ 11 and h ϩ 5. To expand: (c ϩ 5)(c ϩ 3) Make a rectangle with dimensions c ϩ 5 and c ϩ 3. These terms are formed by applying the distributive property and multiplying each term in the first binomial by each term in the second binomial. Note that (h ϩ 11)(h ϩ 5) ϭ (h ϩ 5)(h ϩ 11) since both products represent the area of the same rectangle. 8 c-tiles.

ϭ x2 Ϫ 2x Ϫ 8 Method 2 Use the distributive property. 2 Ϫ 2x Ϫ 8 ϭx b) (8 Ϫ b)(3 Ϫ b) Use the distributive property. a) (c ϩ 3)(c Ϫ 7) SOLUTIONS b) (5 Ϫ s)(9 Ϫ s) a) (x Ϫ 4)(x ϩ 2) [Answers: a) c2 Ϫ 4c Ϫ 21 b) 45 Ϫ 14s ϩ s2] Method 1 Use a rectangle diagram. (8 Ϫ b)(3 Ϫ b) ϭ 8(3 Ϫ b) ϩ (Ϫb)(3 Ϫ b) ϭ 8(3) ϩ 8(Ϫb) ϩ (Ϫb)(3) ϩ (Ϫb)(Ϫb) ϭ 24 Ϫ 8b Ϫ 3b ϩ b2 ϭ 24 Ϫ 11b ϩ b2 How do the constant terms in the binomial factors relate to the middle term and the last term in the trinomial product? How can you use these relationships to determine the product? 3. We cannot determine the product using an area model because a negative area does not exist. We can also use the distributive property. a) (x Ϫ 4)(x ϩ 2) b) (8 Ϫ b)(3 Ϫ b) 1.qxd 12/7/09 5:31 PM Page 161 When binomials contain negative terms. Expand and simplify. Multiplying Two Binomials Example 1 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Expand and simplify. 2 x 2 x (x)(x) = x –4 (–4)(x) = –4x (x)(2) = 2x (–4)(2) = –8 (x Ϫ 4)(x ϩ 2) ϭ x2 ϩ (Ϫ4x) ϩ 2x ϩ (Ϫ8) Combine like terms.5 Polynomials of the Form x2 + bx + c 161 .wncp10_3_5. it is not easy to determine their product using algebra tiles. (x Ϫ 4)(x ϩ 2) ϭ x(x ϩ 2) ϩ (Ϫ4)( x ϩ 2) ϭ x(x) ϩ x(2) ϩ (Ϫ4)(x) ϩ (Ϫ4)(2) ϭ x2 ϩ 2x Ϫ 4x Ϫ 8 Combine like terms. but we can use a rectangle diagram.

first determine two numbers whose sum is b and whose product is c. 162 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . Place the v2-tile in the top left.qxd 12/7/09 5:31 PM Page 162 Factoring and multiplying are inverse processes. When a trinomial contains only positive terms. we may use algebra tiles to factor it. How does the use of algebra tiles for factoring relate to the area model for multiplication? So. each of which has x as its first term. These numbers are the constant terms in two binomial factors. Look at the numbers in the trinomial and the binomial. How could you complete this factorization? Factoring a Trinomial To determine the factors of a trinomial of the form x2 ϩ bx ϩ c. v2 ϩ 12v ϩ 20 ϭ (v ϩ 2)(v ϩ 10) 20 is the product of 2 and 10. v2 ϩ 12v ϩ 20 ϭ (v ϩ 2)(v ϩ 10) We say that the factors of v2 ϩ 12v ϩ 20 are v ϩ 2 and v ϩ 10. arrange the tiles that represent these terms in a rectangle.wncp10_3_5. then arrange the v-tiles to the right and beneath this tile so the 1-tiles fit in the space that is left. 12 is the sum of 2 and 10. We can use this to factor a trinomial. For example: to factor v2 ϩ 12v ϩ 20.

wncp10_3_5. Ϫ7 Ϫ5 Ϫ 7 ϭ Ϫ12 The factors that have a sum of Ϫ12 are Ϫ5 and Ϫ7. z2 Ϫ 12z ϩ 35 ϭ (z Ϫ 5)(z Ϫ 7) Does the order in which the binomial factors are written affect the solution? Explain. x2 Ϫ 2x Ϫ 8 ϭ (x ϩ 2)(x Ϫ 4) b) z2 Ϫ 12z ϩ 35 Find two integers whose sum is Ϫ12 and whose product is 35. the factors have the same sign. list pairs of factors of Ϫ8. 8 [Answers: a) (x Ϫ 7)(x Ϫ 1) b) (a ϩ 9)(a Ϫ 2)] Ϫ1 ϩ 8 ϭ 7 1. Write these integers as the second terms in the binomials. the factors have different signs. To determine the integers. then add the factors in each pair.qxd 12/7/09 5:31 PM Example 2 Page 163 Factoring Trinomials Factor each trinomial. there will be two binomial factors. Ϫ8 Ϫ2. a) x2 Ϫ 8x ϩ 7 SOLUTION b) a2 ϩ 7a Ϫ 18 a) x2 Ϫ 2x Ϫ 8 Since factoring and expanding are inverse processes. Why do we list all the factors for the given product rather than all the numbers that have the given sum? 3. Factors of ؊8 Sum of Factors Ϫ1. 35 1 ϩ 35 ϭ 36 Ϫ1. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) x2 Ϫ 2x Ϫ 8 b) z2 Ϫ 12z ϩ 35 2. They will have the form: (x ϩ an integer)(x ϩ an integer) The two integers in the binomials have a sum of Ϫ2 and a product of Ϫ8. Factors of 35 Sum of Factors 1. 4 1 Ϫ 8 ϭ Ϫ7 Ϫ2 ϩ 4 ϭ 2 2. 7 5 ϩ 7 ϭ 12 Ϫ5. Factor each trinomial. Ϫ35 Ϫ1 Ϫ 35 ϭ Ϫ36 5. Ϫ4 2 Ϫ 4 ϭ Ϫ2 The factors that have a sum of Ϫ2 are 2 and Ϫ4.5 Polynomials of the Form x2 + bx + c 163 . Since the product is positive. Since the product is negative.

Example 3 Factoring a Trinomial Written in Ascending Order Factor: Ϫ24 Ϫ 5d ϩ d2 SOLUTIONS Method 1 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. the terms are written in order from the term with the greatest exponent to the term with the least exponent. The integers are Ϫ8 and 3. The trinomials in Example 2 are written in descending order. For Example 2b. that is. d2 Ϫ 5d Ϫ 24 ϭ (d Ϫ 8)(d ϩ 3) 164 Chapter 3: Factors and Products Is the answer obtained in Method 1 equivalent to that obtained in Method 2? Does the order we write the terms of the binomial matter? Why or why not? . the terms are written in ascending order. Ϫ24 Ϫ 5d ϩ d2 ϭ (Ϫ8 ϩ d)(3 ϩ d) Method 2 Rewrite the polynomial in descending order. Ϫ24 Ϫ 5d ϩ d2 ϭ d2 Ϫ 5d Ϫ 24 Find two integers whose product is Ϫ24 and whose sum is Ϫ5. expand (z Ϫ 5)(z Ϫ 7). So. the factors are correct. (z Ϫ 5)(z Ϫ 7) ϭ z(z Ϫ 7) – 5(z Ϫ 7) ϭ z2 Ϫ 7z Ϫ 5z ϩ 35 ϭ z2 Ϫ 12z ϩ 35 Since this trinomial is the same as the original trinomial. Factor: Ϫ30 ϩ 7m ϩ m2 [Answer: (Ϫ3 ϩ m)(10 ϩ m)] Ϫ24 Ϫ 5d ϩ d2 The binomials will have the form: (an integer ϩ d)(an integer + d) Find two integers whose product is Ϫ24 and whose sum is Ϫ5.wncp10_3_5. When the order of the terms is reversed.qxd 12/7/09 5:31 PM Page 164 We should always check that the binomial factors are correct by expanding the product. The integers are Ϫ8 and 3.

So. t2 ϩ 4t Ϫ 32 ϭ (t Ϫ 4)(t ϩ 8) And. Since the coefficient of the first term is negative. When we compare factors of a trinomial. so (x ϩ a)(x ϩ b) ϭ (x ϩ b)(x ϩ a). Similarly.5 Polynomials of the Form x2 + bx + c 165 . Multiply the factors. so the factors are correct. Ϫ5h2 Ϫ 20h ϩ 60 [Answer: Ϫ5(h Ϫ 2)(h ϩ 6)] SOLUTION Ϫ4t2 Ϫ 16t ϩ 128 The greatest common factor is 4. c. b. for any integer a. and d? 3. use –4 as the common factor. Factor.wncp10_3_5. so x ϩ a ϭ a ϩ x. How is representing the product of two binomials similar to representing the product of two 2-digit numbers? 2. Ϫ4t2 Ϫ 16t ϩ 128 ϭ Ϫ4(t Ϫ 4)(t ϩ 8) Since factoring and expanding are inverse processes. it is important to remember that the order in which we add terms does not matter. Factoring a Trinomial with a Common Factor and Binomial Factors Example 4 Factor. How does a rectangle diagram relate binomial multiplication and trinomial factoring? 3. What other ways can you write the trinomial as a product of 3 factors? Ϫ4t2 Ϫ 16t ϩ 128 ϭ Ϫ4(t2 ϩ 4t Ϫ 32) Two numbers with a sum of 4 and a product of Ϫ32 are Ϫ4 and 8. check that the factors are correct. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Ϫ4t2 Ϫ 16t ϩ 128 4. For the multiplication sentence x2 ϩ ax ϩ b ϭ (x ϩ c)(x ϩ d).qxd 12/7/09 5:31 PM Page 165 A trinomial that can be written as the product of two binomial factors may also have a common factor. Ϫ4(t Ϫ 4)(t ϩ 8) ϭ Ϫ4(t2 ϩ 4t Ϫ 32) ϭ Ϫ4t2 Ϫ 16t ϩ 128 This trinomial is the same as the original trinomial. the order in which we multiply terms does not matter. Discuss the Ideas 1. what relationships exist among a.

a) (w ϩ 3)(w ϩ 2) ϭ w2 ϩ w ϩ 6 b) (x ϩ 5)(x ϩ ) ϭ x2 ϩ x ϩ 10 c) (y ϩ )(y ϩ ) ϭ y2 ϩ 12y ϩ 20 11. iii) Use the rectangle to factor the trinomial. a) b) c) b) Use the results of part a to factor each trinomial. Sketch the tiles you used. a) Use algebra tiles to factor each trinomial. a) c) b) d) 5. a) (m ϩ 5)(m ϩ 8) b) (y ϩ 9)(y ϩ 3) c) (w ϩ 2)(w ϩ 16) d) (k ϩ 13)(k ϩ 1) d) 10. Check by expanding. ii) v2 ϩ 4v ϩ 4 i) v2 ϩ 2v ϩ 1 2 ϩ 6v ϩ 9 iv) v2 ϩ 8v ϩ 16 iii) v b) What patterns do you see in the algebra tile rectangles? How are these patterns shown in the binomial factors? c) Write the next 3 trinomials in the pattern and their binomial factors. ii) w2 ϩ 5w ϩ 6 i) v2 ϩ 3v ϩ 2 iv) t2 ϩ 7t ϩ 10 iii) s2 ϩ 10s ϩ 9 2 ϩ 7y ϩ 12 vi) h2 ϩ 8h ϩ 15 v) y B 8. 9.wncp10_3_5.qxd 12/7/09 5:31 PM Page 166 Exercises 7. ii) Arrange the tiles to form a rectangle. Sketch the rectangle. A a b Product ab Sum a؉b i) 2 3 ii) 6 5 iii) 9 10 iv) 10 7 v) 12 7 vi) 15 8 4. Write the multiplication sentence that each set of algebra tiles represents. a) (b ϩ 2)(b ϩ 5) b) (n ϩ 4)(n ϩ 7) c) (h ϩ 8)(h ϩ 3) d) (k ϩ 1)(k ϩ 6) 6. Sketch and label a rectangle to illustrate each product. b) m2 ϩ 10m ϩ 16 a) x2 ϩ 10x ϩ 24 2 ϩ 13p ϩ 12 d) s2 ϩ 12s ϩ 20 c) p f) h2 ϩ 8h ϩ 12 e) n2 ϩ 12n ϩ 11 2 ϩ 7q ϩ 6 h) b2 ϩ 11b ϩ 18 g) q 166 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . a) Find two integers with the given properties. Multiply each pair of binomials. Copy and complete. For each set of algebra tiles below: i) Write the trinomial that the algebra tiles represent. Use algebra tiles to determine each product. Factor. Sketch the tiles you used.

Explain your strategy. Sketch a rectangle diagram to illustrate each product. How can you determine the binomial factors? 3. i) (t ϩ 4)(t ϩ 7) ii) (t Ϫ 4)(t Ϫ 7) iii) (t Ϫ 4)(t ϩ 7) iv) (t ϩ 4)(t Ϫ 7) b) i) Why are the constant terms in the trinomials in parts i and ii above positive? ii) Why are the constant terms in the trinomials in parts iii and iv above negative? iii) How could you determine the coefficient of the t-term in the trinomial without expanding? Reflect 19. Find other examples like this. In this lesson. a) Simplify each pair of products. Find an integer to replace ٗ so that each trinomial can be factored. but different signs. Find an integer to replace ٗ so that each trinomial can be factored. i) h2 Ϫ 10h Ϫ 24 ii) h2 ϩ 10h Ϫ 24 iii) h2 Ϫ 10h ϩ 24 iv) h2 ϩ 10h ϩ 24 b) In part a. Suppose a trinomial of the form x2 ϩ ax ϩ b is the product of two binomials. Factor. you used algebra tiles to multiply two binomials and to factor a trinomial when all the terms were positive. i) (x ϩ 1)(x ϩ 2) and 11 · 12 ii) (x ϩ 1)(x ϩ 3) and 11 · 13 b) What are the similarities between the two answers for each pair of products? 17. Expand and simplify. a) How could you use algebra tiles to expand (r Ϫ 4)(r ϩ 1)? Sketch the tiles you used. a) (g Ϫ 3)(g ϩ 7) b) (h ϩ 2)(h Ϫ 7) c) (11 Ϫ j)(2 Ϫ j) d) (k Ϫ 3)(k ϩ 11) e) (12 ϩ h)(7 Ϫ h) f) (m Ϫ 9)(m ϩ 9) g) (n Ϫ 14)(n Ϫ 4) h) (p ϩ 6)(p Ϫ 17) 13. b) t2 ϩ 15t Ϫ 54 a) b2 ϩ 19b Ϫ 20 d) n2 Ϫ 5n Ϫ 24 c) x2 ϩ 12x Ϫ 28 2 Ϫ a Ϫ 20 f) y2 Ϫ 2y Ϫ 48 e) a h) a2 Ϫ 12a ϩ 36 g) m2 Ϫ 15m ϩ 50 15.wncp10_3_5.5 Polynomials of the Form x2 + bx + c 167 . a) m2 Ϫ 7m Ϫ 60 ϭ (m Ϫ 5)(m Ϫ 12) b) w2 Ϫ 14w ϩ 45 ϭ (w ϩ 3)(w Ϫ 15) c) b2 ϩ 9b Ϫ 36 ϭ (b ϩ 3)(b Ϫ 12) 18. a) Factor each trinomial. a) 4y2 Ϫ 20y Ϫ 56 c) 4x2 ϩ 4x Ϫ 48 e) Ϫ5n2 ϩ 40n Ϫ 35 b) Ϫ3m2 Ϫ 18m Ϫ 24 d) 10x2 ϩ 80x ϩ 120 f) 7c2 Ϫ 35c ϩ 42 C 22. a) Expand each product. Explain your strategy. Factor. in which all 4 trinomials of the form h2 ± bh ± c can be factored. then write it as a trinomial. Check by expanding. Find and correct the errors in each expansion. all the trinomials have the same numerical coefficients and constant terms. Check by expanding. 23. Find and correct the errors in each factorization. How many integers can you find each time? b) h2 Ϫ h ϩ ٗ a) r2 ϩ r ϩ ٗ 2 ϩ 2b ϩ ٗ d) z2 Ϫ 2z ϩ ٗ c) b f) g2 Ϫ 3g ϩ ٗ e) q2 ϩ 3q ϩ ٗ 21.qxd 12/7/09 5:31 PM Page 167 12. b) How could you use algebra tiles to factor t2 ϩ t Ϫ 6? Sketch the tiles you used. How many integers can you find each time? a) x2 ϩ ٗx ϩ 10 b) a2 ϩ ٗa Ϫ 9 c) t2 ϩ ٗt ϩ 8 d) y2 ϩ ٗy Ϫ 12 e) h2 ϩ ٗh ϩ 18 f) p2 ϩ ٗp Ϫ 16 20. a) (r Ϫ 13)(r ϩ 4) ϭ r(r ϩ 4) Ϫ 13(r ϩ 4) ϭ r2 ϩ 4r Ϫ 13r ϩ 52 ϭ r2 ϩ 9r ϩ 52 b) (s Ϫ 15)(s Ϫ 5) ϭ s(s Ϫ 15) ϩ 15(s ϩ 5) ϭ s2 Ϫ 15s ϩ 15s ϩ 75 ϭ s2 ϩ 75 14. b) Ϫ16 Ϫ 6g ϩ g2 a) 12 ϩ 13k ϩ k2 2 c) 60 ϩ 17y ϩy d) 72 Ϫ z Ϫ z2 16. Factor.

168 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . we use the same strategies as for the binomials in Lesson 3.6 5:34 PM Page 168 Polynomials of the Form ax2 + bx + c LESSON FOCUS Extend the strategies for multiplying binomials and factoring trinomials. 2x2 ϩ 15x ϩ 7 2x2 ϩ 5x ϩ 2 6x2 ϩ 7x ϩ 2 5x2 ϩ 4x ϩ 4 2x2 ϩ 9x ϩ 10 5x2 ϩ 11x ϩ 2 To multiply two binomials where the coefficients of the variables are not 1. Make Connections Which trinomial is represented by the algebra tiles shown above? How can the tiles be arranged to form a rectangle? Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work with a partner. You will need algebra tiles.qxd 12/7/09 3.wncp10_3_6. For which of these trinomials can the algebra tiles be arranged to form a rectangle? For those that can be represented by a rectangular arrangement.5. write the multiplication sentence.

4 3d 2 4d (4d)(3d) = 12d 2 (2)(3d) = 6d (4d)(4) = 16d (2)(4) = 8 The area of the larger rectangle is the sum of the areas of the smaller rectangles. d d d d 11 d d d 1 1 1 1 So. Place tiles to represent each dimension. The tiles that form the product represent 12d 2 ϩ 22d ϩ 8. To expand: (3d ϩ 4)(4d ϩ 2). Make a rectangle with dimensions 3d ϩ 4 and 4d ϩ 2. (3d ϩ 4)(4d ϩ 2) ϭ 12d 2 ϩ 16d ϩ 6d ϩ 8 ϭ 12d 2 ϩ 22d ϩ 8 3.wncp10_3_6.6 Polynomials of the Form ax2 + bx + c 169 . draw a rectangle with dimensions 3d ϩ 4 and 4d ϩ 2. Divide the rectangle into 4 smaller rectangles then calculate the area of each. So. then fill the rectangle with tiles.qxd 12/7/09 5:34 PM Example 1 Page 169 Multiplying Two Binomials with Positive Terms Expand: (3d ϩ 4)(4d ϩ 2) CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1. (3d ϩ 4)(4d ϩ 2) ϭ 12d 2 ϩ 22d ϩ 8 Method 2 Use an area model. Expand: (5e ϩ 3)(2e ϩ 4) [Answer: 10e2 ϩ 26e ϩ 12] SOLUTIONS Method 1 Use algebra tiles.

Divide the rectangle into 4 smaller rectangles and label each one. it can be difficult to model their product with algebra tiles. Example 2 Multiplying Two Binomials with Negative Coefficients Expand and simplify: (Ϫ2g ϩ 8)(7 Ϫ 3g) CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. 7 –2g 8 –3g (–2g)(7) = –14g (–2g)(–3g) = 6g2 (8)(7) = 56 (8)(–3g) = –24g (Ϫ2g ϩ 8)(7 Ϫ 3g) ϭ Ϫ14g ϩ 6g2 ϩ 56 Ϫ 24g ϭ 6g2 Ϫ 14g Ϫ 24g ϩ 56 ϭ 6g2 Ϫ 38g ϩ 56 Method 2 Use the distributive property.wncp10_3_6. Draw a rectangle with dimensions (Ϫ2g) ϩ 8 and 7 ϩ (Ϫ3g). (ax ϩ b)(cx ϩ d) ϭ acx2 ϩ adx ϩ bcx ϩ bd cx ax b d (ax)(cx) = acx2 (ax)(d) = adx (b)(cx) = bcx (b)(d) = bd When binomials contain negative terms. Write (Ϫ2g ϩ 8)(7 Ϫ 3g) as [(Ϫ2g) ϩ 8][7 ϩ (Ϫ3g)]. (Ϫ2g ϩ 8)(7 Ϫ 3g) ϭ (Ϫ2g)(7 Ϫ 3g)ϩ 8(7 Ϫ 3g) ϭ Ϫ14g ϩ 6g2 ϩ 56 Ϫ 24g ϭ Ϫ38g ϩ 6g2 ϩ 56 ϭ 6g2 Ϫ 38g ϩ 56 170 Chapter 3: Factors and Products Which terms of the binomial factors determine the value of each term in the trinomial? How can you use this to simplify the calculation? .qxd 12/7/09 5:34 PM Page 170 This rectangle diagram shows the relationship between the coefficients in the product and the coefficients in the factors for (ax ϩ b)(cx ϩ d). Expand and simplify: (6t Ϫ 9)(7 Ϫ 5t) SOLUTIONS [Answer: Ϫ30t2 ϩ 87t Ϫ 63] Method 1 Use a rectangle diagram. We can use the distributive property to determine their product.

cannot be factored. 2x + 3 x+1 This algebra-tile model illustrates how the terms in the two binomial factors are related to the terms in the trinomial.wncp10_3_6. first arrange the tiles to attempt to form a rectangle. for example 2x2 ϩ x ϩ 1. to factor 2x2 ϩ 5x ϩ 3. arrange the tiles that represent these terms in a rectangle. When we use algebra tiles to factor a trinomial with negative terms.6 Polynomials of the Form ax2 + bx + c 171 . You cannot add pairs of opposite x-tiles to form a rectangle. 3. 2x2 ϩ 5x ϩ 3 ϭ (2x ϩ 3)(x ϩ 1) 2x2 is the product of the 1st terms in the binomials. 3x2 ϩ 5x Ϫ 2 ϭ (3x Ϫ 1)(x ϩ 2) Some trinomials. What do you know about a polynomial for which you can never form a rectangle? So. we may have to use the Zero Principle and add pairs of opposite tiles to form a rectangle. Place them so that all the positive x-tiles are together. For example. we need two x-tiles. add one positive x-tile and one negative x-tile. For example. So. To complete the rectangle.qxd 12/7/09 5:34 PM Page 171 We can use algebra tiles to factor a trinomial when its terms are positive. to model the factoring of the trinomial 3x2 ϩ 5x Ϫ 2. 2x2 ϩ 5x ϩ 3 ϭ (2x ϩ 3)(x ϩ 1) 5x is the sum of these products: 2x(1) ϩ 3(x) 2x2 ϩ 5x ϩ 3 ϭ (2x ϩ 3)(x ϩ 1) 3 is the product of the 2nd terms in the binomials.

the binomials could be: (h ϩ 1)(4h ϩ 9) or (2h ϩ 1)(2h ϩ 9) or (h ϩ 9)(4h ϩ 1) or (2h ϩ 9)(2h ϩ 1) or (h ϩ 3)(4h ϩ 3) or (2h ϩ 3)(2h ϩ 3) Check which of the 6 binomial products above has its h-term equal to 20h.qxd 2/26/10 10:29 AM Page 172 We can use the patterns on page 171 and logical reasoning to factor without algebra tiles. we can estimate which factors of the coefficients of the trinomial to try first. Example 3 Factoring a Trinomial Using Logical Reasoning Factor. so the 2nd terms in the binomial are factors of 9. So. the binomials have the form (h ϩ b)(4h ϩ d) (2h ϩ b)(2h ϩ d) or The constant term in the trinomial is 9. which are 1 and 4. or 2 and 2.wncp10_3_6. or 3 and 3. which are 1 and 9. find factors of the form (ah ϩ b)(ch ϩ d). CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) 4h2 ϩ 20h ϩ 9 b) 6k2 Ϫ 11k Ϫ 35 3. by looking carefully at the relative sizes of the coefficients. The coefficient of h2 is 4.) 172 Chapter 3: Factors and Products In Example 3a. (h ϩ 1)(4h ϩ 9) ϭ 4h2 ϩ 13h ϩ 9 (2h ϩ 1)(2h ϩ 9) ϭ 4h2 ϩ 20h ϩ 9 This is the correct trinomial so we need not check any further. so the coefficients of the 1st terms in the binomial are factors of 4. So. 4h2 ϩ 20h ϩ 9 ϭ (2h ϩ 1)(2h ϩ 9) (Solution continues. why did we not need to list or check the negative factors of 4? . a) 4g2 ϩ 11g ϩ 6 SOLUTIONS b) 6m2 Ϫ 7m Ϫ 10 a) Method 1 [Answers: a) (4g ϩ 3)(g ϩ 2) b) (6m ϩ 5)(m Ϫ 2)] 4h2 ϩ 20h ϩ 9 To factor this trinomial. Factor. Often.

why did we not need to list or check the negative factors of 6? The constant term in the trinomial is Ϫ35. This is the correct combination of factors. so the 2nd terms in the binomial are factors of Ϫ35. b) Method 1 6k2 Ϫ 11k Ϫ 35 Find factors of the form (ak ϩ b)(ck ϩ d). So. or 3 and 3.6 Polynomials of the Form ax2 + bx + c 173 . (2k ϩ 5)(3k Ϫ 7) ϭ 6k2 ϩ k Ϫ 35 (2k Ϫ 7)(3k ϩ 5) ϭ 6k2 Ϫ 11k Ϫ 35 This is the correct trinomial so we need not check any further. or Ϫ1 and 35. 4h 9 2h 9 1h 1 2h 1 4h ϩ 9h ϭ 13h 2h ϩ 18h ϭ 20h So. is greater than the coefficients of the other two terms. 4h2 ϩ 20h ϩ 9 ϭ (2h ϩ 9)(2h ϩ 1) Form the products.wncp10_3_6. The coefficient of the middle term of the trinomial. or 5 and Ϫ7. so try combinations of the lesser factors first. The coefficient of the middle term of the trinomial. try combinations of 2 and 3 with combinations of ±5 and ±7. that is. The factors of 9 are 9 and 1. so try the greater factors. then add. The factors of 4h2 are 4h and 1h. 20. which are 1 and 6. so the coefficients of the 1st terms in the binomial are factors of 6. which are 1 and Ϫ35. Ϫ11. Arrange the factor combinations vertically. or 2h and 2h. or Ϫ5 and 7. 6k2 Ϫ 11k Ϫ 35 ϭ (2k Ϫ 7)(3k ϩ 5) (Solution continues. with mental math. In Example 3b. or 2 and 3. The coefficient of k2 is 6.) 3.qxd 12/7/09 5:34 PM Page 173 Method 2 4h2 ϩ 20h ϩ 9 Use number sense and reasoning. is between the coefficients of the other two terms. the binomials could be: (2k ϩ 5)(3k Ϫ 7) (2k Ϫ 5)(3k ϩ 7) or or (2k Ϫ 7)(3k ϩ 5) (2k ϩ 7)(3k Ϫ 5) or Check if any of the 4 binomial products above has its k-term equal to Ϫ11k.

Notice that the coefficients of the h-terms have the product: 3(8) ϭ 24 This is equal to the product of the coefficient of the h2-term and the constant term: 6(4) ϭ 24 So. Ϫ10k ϩ 21k ϭ 11k 10k Ϫ 21k ϭ Ϫ11k 6k2 Ϫ11k Ϫ 35 ϭ (2k Ϫ 7)(3k ϩ 5) Another method of factoring is factoring by decomposition.qxd 12/7/09 5:34 PM Page 174 Method 2 6k2 Ϫ 11k Ϫ 35 Use number sense and mental math. The factors of 6k2 are 1k and 6k. 12 2 ϩ 12 ϭ 14 3. is between the coefficients of the other terms. or Ϫ1 and 35. with guess and test. 6 Why don’t we need to list the negative factors of 24? 4 ϩ 6 ϭ 10 The two coefficients that have a sum of 11 are 3 and 8. Arrange the factor combinations vertically: 2k 7 2k Ϫ7 Form the products. We remove a common factor from the 1st pair of terms. Ϫ11. then determining a common binomial factor from the two pairs of terms formed. 24 1 ϩ 24 ϭ 25 2. then add. so try factors of these coefficients that would be in the middle if the factors were listed in numerical order. Factoring by decomposition is factoring after writing the middle term of a trinomial as a sum of two terms. Factors of 24 Sum of Factors 1. The factors of Ϫ35 are 1 and Ϫ35.wncp10_3_6. or 7 and Ϫ5. Consider the binomial product: (3h ϩ 4)(2h ϩ 1) We can use the distributive property to expand: (3h ϩ 4)(2h ϩ 1) ϭ 3h(2h ϩ 1) ϩ 4(2h ϩ 1) ϭ 6h2 ϩ 3h ϩ 8h ϩ 4 ϭ 6h2 ϩ 11h ϩ 4 To factor 6h2 ϩ 11h ϩ 4 by decomposition. and from the 2nd pair of terms: 6h2 ϩ 3h ϩ 8h ϩ 4 ϭ 3h(2h ϩ 1) ϩ 4(2h ϩ 1) Each product has the common binomial factor 2h ϩ 1. we reverse the steps above. or 2k and 3k. so we write the trinomial 6h2 ϩ 11h ϩ 4 as 6h2 ϩ 3h ϩ 8h ϩ 4. The coefficient of the middle term of the trinomial. to factor 6h2 ϩ 11h ϩ 4. 6h2 ϩ 11h ϩ 4 ϭ (2h ϩ 1)(3h ϩ 4) 174 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . 8 3 ϩ 8 ϭ 11 4. or Ϫ7 and 5. we decompose the h-term and write it as a sum of two terms whose coefficients have a product of 24. 3k Ϫ5 3k 5 This is the correct combination of factors.

3s2 ϩ 2s Ϫ 15s Ϫ 10 ϭ s(3s ϩ 2) Ϫ 5(3s ϩ 2) Each product has a common binomial factor. 10 5.6 Polynomials of the Form ax2 + bx + c 175 . Ϫ30 Ϫ1.) 3. Ϫ15 Ϫ2. 6 Sum of Factors 1 Ϫ 30 ϭ Ϫ29 Ϫ1 ϩ 30 ϭ 29 2 Ϫ 15 ϭ Ϫ13 Ϫ2 ϩ 15 ϭ 13 3 Ϫ 10 ϭ Ϫ7 Ϫ3 ϩ 10 ϭ 7 5 Ϫ 6 ϭ Ϫ1 Ϫ5 ϩ 6 ϭ 1 The two coefficients are 2 and Ϫ15. Factor. there are none.wncp10_3_6. Factors of ؊30 1. 30 2. Remove a common factor from the 1st pair of terms. So. The product of the coefficient of s2 and the constant term is: 3(Ϫ10) ϭ Ϫ30 Write Ϫ13s as the sum of two terms whose coefficients have a product of Ϫ30. a) 8p2 Ϫ 18p Ϫ 5 SOLUTION a) 3s2 b) 24h2 Ϫ 20h Ϫ 24 Ϫ 13s Ϫ 10 [Answers: a) (2p Ϫ 5)(4p ϩ 1) b) 4(2h Ϫ 3)(3h ϩ 2)] Check for common factors. (Solution continues. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) 3s2 Ϫ 13s Ϫ 10 b) 6x2 Ϫ 21x ϩ 9 4. 3s2 ϩ 2s Ϫ 15s Ϫ 10 ϭ (3s ϩ 2)(s Ϫ 5) So. and from the 2nd pair of terms: When we write the middle term as the sum of two terms. so write the trinomial 3s2 Ϫ 13s Ϫ 10 as 3s2 ϩ 2s Ϫ 15s Ϫ 10. could we write 3s2 Ϫ 15s ϩ 2s Ϫ 10 instead? Justify your answer. Ϫ10 Ϫ3. Ϫ6 Ϫ5. 3 is a common factor. 15 3. 6x2 Ϫ 21x ϩ 9 ϭ 3(2x2 Ϫ 7x ϩ 3) Factor 2x2 Ϫ 7x ϩ 3.qxd 12/7/09 5:34 PM Example 4 Page 175 Factoring a Trinomial by Decomposition Factor. 3s2 Ϫ 13s Ϫ 10 ϭ (3s ϩ 2)(s Ϫ 5) b) 6x2 Ϫ 21x ϩ 9 Check for common factors.

How are the strategies for multiplying binomial factors of the form (ax ϩ b)(cx ϩ d) like the strategies you used in Lesson 3. 3 2ϩ3ϭ5 Ϫ2. In Example 4b. How can you tell when a trinomial cannot be factored? 4. multiply them.qxd 12/7/09 5:34 PM Page 176 The product of the coefficient of x2 and the constant term is: 2(3) ϭ 6 Write Ϫ7x as the sum of two terms whose coefficients have a product of 6. 2x2 Ϫ 7x ϩ 3 ϭ (2x Ϫ 1)(x Ϫ 3) And.wncp10_3_6. 2x2 Ϫ 1x Ϫ 6x ϩ 3 ϭ (2x Ϫ 1)(x Ϫ 3) So.5 for products of the form (x ϩ a)(x ϩ b)? How are they different? 2. Discuss the Ideas 1. and from the 2nd pair of terms: 2x2 Ϫ 1x Ϫ 6x ϩ 3 ϭ x(2x Ϫ 1) Ϫ 3(2x Ϫ 1) Each product has a common binomial factor. How can you use logical reasoning to reduce the number of possible combinations of coefficients you have to consider in the guess-and-test or the decomposition methods of factoring a trinomial? 176 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . Factors of 6 Sum of Factors 1. 6 1ϩ6ϭ7 Ϫ1. the factors are correct. multiply: 3(2x Ϫ 1)(x Ϫ 3) ϭ 3(2x2 Ϫ 6x Ϫ x ϩ 3) ϭ 3(2x2 Ϫ 7x ϩ 3) ϭ 6x2 Ϫ 21x ϩ 9 Since this trinomial is the same as the original trinomial. 6x2 Ϫ 21x ϩ 9 ϭ 3(2x Ϫ 1)(x Ϫ 3) To check that the factors are correct. Remove a common factor from the 1st pair of terms. so write the trinomial 2x2 Ϫ 7x ϩ 3 as 2x2 Ϫ 1x Ϫ 6x ϩ 3. Ϫ6 Ϫ1 Ϫ 6 ϭ Ϫ7 2. How can you use the coefficients of a trinomial to determine the coefficients of its binomial factors? 3. Ϫ3 Ϫ2 Ϫ 3 ϭ Ϫ5 When would you use decomposition to factor a trinomial? The two coefficients are Ϫ1 and Ϫ6.

Use algebra tiles to determine each product. a) (5 ϩ f)(3 ϩ 4f) b) (3 Ϫ 4t)(5 Ϫ 3t) c) (10 Ϫ r)(9 ϩ 2r) d) (Ϫ6 ϩ 2m)(Ϫ6 ϩ 2m) e) (Ϫ8 Ϫ 2x)(3 Ϫ 7x) f) (6 Ϫ 5n)(Ϫ6 ϩ 5n) 10. iii) Use the rectangle to factor the trinomial.qxd 12/7/09 5:34 PM Page 177 Exercises A B 5. a) (2v ϩ 3)(v ϩ 2) b) (3r ϩ 1)(r ϩ 4) c) (2g ϩ 3)(3g ϩ 2) d) (4z ϩ 3)(2z ϩ 5) e) (3t ϩ 4)(3t ϩ 4) f) (2r ϩ 3)(2r ϩ 3) 7. Copy and complete each statement.6 Polynomials of the Form ax2 + bx + c 177 . Write the multiplication sentence that each set of algebra tiles represents. a) b) c) d) 9. i) 3t2 ϩ 4t ϩ 1 ii) 3t2 ϩ 8t ϩ 4 iii) 3t2 ϩ 12t ϩ 9 iv) 3t2 ϩ 16t ϩ 16 b) What patterns do you see in the algebra-tile rectangles? How are these patterns shown in the binomial factors? c) Write the next 3 trinomials in the pattern and their binomial factors. a) Use algebra tiles to factor each polynomial. Expand and simplify. b) 2a2 ϩ 11a ϩ 12 a) 2y2 ϩ 5y ϩ 2 2 ϩ 13k ϩ 15 d) 2m2 Ϫ 11m ϩ 12 c) 2k f) 2m2 + 15m ϩ 7 e) 2k2 Ϫ 11k ϩ 15 2 ϩ 15g ϩ 18 h) 2n2 + 9n Ϫ 18 g) 2g 3.wncp10_3_6. Factor. 12. Sketch the rectangle. Sketch the tiles you used. a) (2w ϩ 1)(w ϩ 6) ϭ 2w 2 ϩ ٗw ϩ 6 b) (2g Ϫ 5)(3g Ϫ 3) ϭ 6g 2 ϩ ٗ ϩ ٗ c) (Ϫ4v Ϫ 3)(Ϫ2v Ϫ 7) ϭ ٗ ϩ ٗ ϩ 21 c) d) 6. What patterns do you see in the trinomials and their factors? ii) 2n2 Ϫ 13n ϩ 6 a) i) 2n2 ϩ 13n ϩ 6 2 ϩ 11n Ϫ 6 ii) 2n2 Ϫ 11n Ϫ 6 b) i) 2n ii) 2n2 Ϫ 7n ϩ 6 c) i) 2n2 ϩ 7n + 6 13. a) b) 8. ii) Arrange the tiles to form a rectangle. Factor. a) (3c ϩ 4)(5 ϩ 2c) b) (1 Ϫ 7t)(3t ϩ 5) c) (Ϫ4r Ϫ 7)(2 Ϫ 8r) d) (Ϫ9 Ϫ t)(Ϫ5t Ϫ 1) e) (7h ϩ 10)(Ϫ3 ϩ 5h) f) (7 Ϫ 6y)(6y Ϫ 7) 11. Check by expanding. Expand and simplify. For each set of algebra tiles below: i) Write the trinomial that the algebra tiles represent.

Product Sum i) 15 16 ii) 24 14 iii) 15 8 iv) 12 7 v) 12 13 vi) 24 11 b) Use the results of part a to use decomposition to factor each trinomial. Find an integer to replace ٗ so that each trinomial can be factored.qxd 12/7/09 5:34 PM Page 178 14. Factor. Find all the trinomials that begin with 9m2. Which strategies can you use to factor a trinomial? Give an example of when you might use each strategy to factor a trinomial. a) Factor.wncp10_3_6. i) 3v2 ϩ 16v ϩ 5 ii) 3m2 ϩ 14m ϩ 8 iv) 4a2 ϩ 7a ϩ 3 iii) 3b2 ϩ 8b ϩ 5 v) 4d2 ϩ 13d ϩ 3 vi) 4v2 ϩ 11v ϩ 6 15. a) Find two integers with the given properties. Explain why the first trinomial can be factored and the second one cannot be factored. b) 3y2 Ϫ 13y Ϫ 10 a) 5a2 Ϫ 7a Ϫ 6 2 ϩ 19s Ϫ 4 d) 14c2 Ϫ 19c Ϫ 3 c) 5s f) 8r2 Ϫ 14r ϩ 3 e) 8a2 ϩ 18a Ϫ 5 2ϩdϪ5 h) 15e2 Ϫ 7e Ϫ 2 g) 6d 16. i) 4r 2 Ϫ r Ϫ 5 ii) 2t 2 ϩ 10t ϩ 3 2 ϩ 4y Ϫ 2 iv) 2w 2 Ϫ 5w ϩ 2 iii) 5y vi) 2f 2 Ϫ f ϩ 1 v) 3h2 Ϫ 8h Ϫ 3 b) Choose two trinomials from part a: one that can be factored and one that cannot be factored. 23. Factor. if possible. and can be factored. and can be factored? Explain. Are there any other trinomials that begin with 3n2. a) 14y 2 Ϫ 13y ϩ 3 c) 10r 2 Ϫ 33r Ϫ 7 e) 4x 2 ϩ 4x Ϫ 15 g) 9t 2 ϩ 12t ϩ 4 i) 24c 2 ϩ 26c Ϫ 15 b) d) f) h) j) 10p2 Ϫ 17p Ϫ 6 15g 2 Ϫ g Ϫ 2 9d2 Ϫ 24d ϩ 16 40y 2 ϩ y Ϫ 6 8x 2 ϩ 14x Ϫ 15 20. a) 6u2 ϩ 17u Ϫ 14 ϭ (2u Ϫ 7)(3u ϩ 2) b) 3k2 Ϫ k Ϫ 30 ϭ (3k Ϫ 3)(k ϩ 10) c) 4v2 Ϫ 21v ϩ 20 ϭ (4v Ϫ 4)(v ϩ 5) 17. How many integers can you find each time? b) 4h2 ϩ ٗh ϩ 25 a) 4s2 ϩ ٗs ϩ 3 2 ϩ ٗy Ϫ 9 d) 12t 2 ϩ ٗt ϩ 10 c) 6y f) ٗf 2 ϩ 2f ϩ ٗ e) 9z2 ϩ ٗz ϩ 1 C 21. i) 3n2 ϩ 11n ϩ 10 ii) 3n2 Ϫ 11n ϩ 10 iii) 3n2 ϩ 13n ϩ 10 iv) 3n2 Ϫ 13n ϩ 10 v) 3n2 ϩ 17n ϩ 10 vi) 3n2 Ϫ 17n ϩ 10 b) Look at the trinomials and their factors in part a. end with ϩ10. 22. Find and correct the errors in each factorization. 15g2 ϩ 17g Ϫ 42 ϭ 15g2 Ϫ 18g ϩ 35g Ϫ 42 ϭ 3g(5g Ϫ 6) ϩ 7(5g ϩ 6) ϭ (3g ϩ 7)(5g ϩ 6) 18. Check by expanding. Factor. Chapter 3: Factors and Products . end with ϩ16. a) Factor each trinomial. a) 20r2 ϩ 70r ϩ 60 c) 18h2 ϩ 15h Ϫ 18 e) 12m2 Ϫ 52m Ϫ 40 Reflect 178 b) 15a2 Ϫ 65a ϩ 20 d) 24u2 Ϫ 72u ϩ 54 f) 24g 2 Ϫ 2g Ϫ 70 19. Find and correct the errors in this solution of factoring by decomposition.

Computer graphics artists use their knowledge of algebra and geometry to help produce visually attractive and entertaining material.qxd 12/7/09 5:34 PM Page 179 CHECKPOINT 2 Concept Development Connections ■ Type of Factor Patterns Relating Factors and the Product Example Monomial x Polynomial The monomial factor is the greatest common factor of the terms of the product polynomial. = 6x2 + 11x – 10 ■ In Lesson 3.3 ■ = 6x2 – 4x + 15x – 10 In Lesson 3. = 5x(x – 2y + 3) 2 = x – 6x – 16 (ax + b)(cx + d) (3x – 2)(2x + 5) = (ac)x2 + (ad + bc)x + bd In Lesson 3.5 to multiply binomials and to factor trinomials of the form ax2 ؉ bx ؉ c. Checkpoint 2 179 .6 – You extended the strategies from Lesson 3. ■ In Lesson 3. To create an image in virtual space. 5x2 – 10xy + 15x (x + a)(x + b) (x + a)(x + b) (x + 2)(x – 8) =x2 + (a + b)x + ab 2 =x + 2x – 8x – 16 (ax + b)(cx + d) – You applied an area model for the product of whole numbers to develop models and strategies to determine common factors in the terms of a polynomial.5 – You used diagrams and algebraic strategies to multiply binomials and to factor trinomials of the form x2 ؉ bx ؉ c. the artist may take measurements from a model and make many calculations to ensure the objects look and move realistically on the screen. you may have seen special effects created by a computer graphics artist. THE WORLD OF MATH Careers: Computer Graphics Artist If you have played a video game or been to a movie recently.wncp10_3_6.4 – You used algebra tiles to multiply binomials and to factor trinomials.

Choose x-tiles and 1-tiles to make a rectangle. write the polynomial they represent and identify its factors. 4. Check by expanding.5 5. Use an area model or a rectangle diagram to illustrate each product. a) Factor each polynomial. b) n2 Ϫ n Ϫ 30 a) s2 ϩ 11s ϩ 30 d) Ϫ11 Ϫ 10t ϩ t2 c) 20 Ϫ 9b ϩ b2 2 ϩ 13z ϩ 30 e) z f ) Ϫk2 ϩ 9k Ϫ 18 7. Factor. Sketch the tile arrangement that illustrates the factors. Sketch the tiles you used.qxd 12/7/09 5:35 PM Page 180 Assess Your Understanding 3. Use 1 x2-tile. Sketch your arrangement and write the multiplication sentence it represents. Factor each trinomial. Use 2 or more x2-tiles. Use algebra tiles when you can. Choose x-tiles and 1-tiles to make a rectangle. a) (x + 1)(x + 4) b) (d Ϫ 2)(d ϩ 3) c) (x Ϫ 4)(x Ϫ 2) d) (5 Ϫ r)(6 ϩ r) e) (g ϩ 5)(g Ϫ 1) f ) (2 Ϫ t)(10 Ϫ t) 6. 3. a) 3x2 ϩ 15x Ϫ 42 c) Ϫ24 Ϫ 11m Ϫ m2 180 Chapter 3: Factors and Products b) Ϫ2y2 ϩ 22y Ϫ 48 d) 50 Ϫ 23y Ϫ y2 . 3. For each set of algebra tiles.4 3.wncp10_3_6.3 1. Expand and simplify. a) b) 2. i) 4a ϩ 8 ii) 3c Ϫ 6 2 Ϫ5v iv) 2x2 ϩ 14x ϩ 6 iii) Ϫ2v 2 ϩ 15r Ϫ 3 vi) 15a3 Ϫ 3a2b Ϫ 6ab2 v) Ϫ3r vii) 12 Ϫ 32x ϩ 8x2 viii) 12x2y Ϫ 8xy Ϫ 16y b) For which polynomials in part a could you not use algebra tiles? Explain why you could not use them. Sketch your arrangement and write the multiplication sentence it represents.

publishing work on trigonometry and what he viewed as his most elegant. but his hobby was mathematics. Check by expanding. b) 3v 2 ϩ v Ϫ 10 a) 2j 2 ϩ 13j ϩ 20 d) 9h2 ϩ 18h ϩ 8 c) 5k2 Ϫ 23k ϩ 12 2 Ϫ 2y Ϫ 1 f) 6 Ϫ 23u ϩ 20u2 e) 8y THE WORLD OF MATH Historical Moment: François Viète François Viète (1540–1603) was a lawyer who worked at the court of Henri III and Henri IV of France.wncp10_3_6. deciphering messages intercepted between enemies of the king. In addition to offering legal advice. He was one of the first people to use letters to represent numbers. he was a cryptanalyst. written toward the end of the sixteenth century but not published until 1631.6 8.qxd 12/7/09 5:35 PM Page 181 3. In his work Prior Notes on Symbolic Logistic. He applied his algebra to many different fields of mathematics. Factor each trinomial. a) (2c ϩ 1)(c ϩ 3) c) (3f Ϫ 4)(3f ϩ 1) e) (5 Ϫ 3r)(6 ϩ 2r) b) (Ϫm ϩ 5)(4m Ϫ 1) d) (6z Ϫ 1)(2z Ϫ 3) f) (Ϫ4 Ϫ 2h)( Ϫ2 Ϫ 4h) 9. Expand and simplify. he showed how to operate on symbolic quantities and derived many algebraic results. the analysis of equations. Checkpoint 2 181 .

■ Draw a rectangle diagram to determine the product (a Ϫ b ϩ 2)(c ϩ d Ϫ 3). Draw a rectangle diagram to determine the product (a ϩ b ϩ 2)(c ϩ d ϩ 3). Make Connections The art work above was a design for a stained glass panel. How could you use the length and width of each small rectangle to determine the area of the large rectangle without first finding its overall length and width? Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work with a partner.wncp10_3_7.7 5:17 PM Page 182 Multiplying Polynomials LESSON FOCUS Extend the strategies for multiplying binomials to multiplying polynomials.qxd 12/7/09 3. The distributive property can be used to perform any polynomial multiplication. Each term of one polynomial must be multiplied by each term of the other polynomial. 182 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . ■ Would the product have been different if you reversed the order of the factors? Explain. ■ Use a different strategy to check the products.

[Answers: a) 3k3 Ϫ 2k2 Ϫ 29k Ϫ 28 b) Ϫ10t4 ϩ 24t3 Ϫ 25t2 ϩ 10t Ϫ 3] (2h ϩ 5)(h2 ϩ 3h Ϫ 4) ϭ (2h)(h2 ϩ 3h Ϫ 4) ϩ 5(h2ϩ 3h Ϫ 4) ϭ (2h)(h2) ϩ (2h)(3h) ϩ2h(Ϫ4) ϩ 5(h2) ϩ 5(3h) ϩ 5(Ϫ4) ϭ 2h3 ϩ 6h2 Ϫ 8h ϩ 5h2 ϩ 15h Ϫ 20 ϭ 2h3 ϩ 6h2 ϩ 5h2 Ϫ 8h ϩ 15h Ϫ 20 Combine like terms. a) (3k ϩ 4)(k2 Ϫ 2k Ϫ 7) SOLUTION b) (Ϫ2t2 ϩ 4t Ϫ 3)(5t2 Ϫ2t ϩ1) a) Use the distributive property. and why? Ϫ12f 4 ϩ 15f 3 ϩ 7f 2 Ϫ 16f ϩ 12 One way to check that a product is likely correct is to substitute a number for the variable in both the trinomial product and its simplification. ϭ 2h3 ϩ 11h2 ϩ 7h Ϫ 20 b) Use the distributive property. Which strategy for recording the products of terms do you prefer. the product is likely correct. Multiply each term in the trinomial by each term in the binomial. Multiply each term in the 1st trinomial by each term in the 2nd trinomial. In Example 1a. substitute h ϭ 1. (2h ϩ 5)(h2 ϩ 3h Ϫ 4) ϭ 2h3 ϩ 11h2 ϩ 7h Ϫ 20 Left side: (2h ϩ 5)(h2 ϩ 3h Ϫ 4) ϭ [2(1) ϩ 5][(1)2 ϩ 3(1) Ϫ 4] ϭ (7)(0) ϭ0 Right side: 2h3 ϩ 11h2 ϩ 7h Ϫ 20 ϭ 2(1)3 ϩ 11(1)2 ϩ 7(1) Ϫ 20 ϭ 2 ϩ 11 ϩ 7 Ϫ 20 ϭ0 Since the left side equals the right side.7 Multiplying Polynomials 183 .wncp10_3_7. Expand and simplify. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) (2h ϩ 5)(h2 ϩ 3h Ϫ 4) b) (Ϫ3f 2 ϩ 3f Ϫ 2)(4f 2 Ϫ f Ϫ 6) 1. (Ϫ3f 2 ϩ 3f Ϫ 2)(4f 2 Ϫ f Ϫ 6): Ϫ3f 2(4f 2 Ϫ f Ϫ 6): Ϫ12f 4 ϩ 3f 3 ϩ 18f 2 3f(4f 2 Ϫ f Ϫ 6): 12f 3 Ϫ 3f 2 Ϫ 18f Ϫ2(4f 2 Ϫ f Ϫ 6): Add: Ϫ8f 2 ϩ 2f ϩ 12 Both solutions to parts a and b use the distributive property. Write the terms in a list. Align like terms.qxd 12/7/09 5:17 PM Example 1 Page 183 Using the Distributive Property to Multiply Two Polynomials Expand and simplify. If both expressions are equal. 3. the product is likely correct.

ϭ 12x2 Ϫ 17xy Ϫ 15x ϩ 6y2 Ϫ 10y 184 Chapter 3: Factors and Products Look at the factors and product in part a. ϭ 12x2 Ϫ 9xy Ϫ 8xy Ϫ 15x ϩ 6y2 Ϫ 10y Combine like terms. a) (2r ϩ 5t)2 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING b) (3x Ϫ 2y)(4x Ϫ 3y ϩ 5) 2. ϭ 4r2 ϩ 20rt ϩ 25t2 b) (3x Ϫ 2y)(4x Ϫ 3y ϩ 5) ϭ 3x(4x Ϫ 3y Ϫ 5) Ϫ 2y(4x Ϫ 3y ϩ 5) ϭ 3x(4x) ϩ 3x(Ϫ3y) ϩ 3x(Ϫ5) Ϫ 2y(4x) Ϫ 2y(Ϫ3y) Ϫ 2y(5) ϭ 12x2 Ϫ 9xy Ϫ 15x Ϫ 8xy ϩ 6y2 Ϫ 10y Collect like terms. How could you write the product without using the distributive property? . the product is likely correct. Expand and simplify. Example 2 Multiplying Polynomials in More than One Variable Expand and simplify. (Ϫ3f 2 ϩ 3f Ϫ 2)(4f 2 Ϫ f Ϫ 6) ϭ Ϫ12f 4 ϩ 15f 3 ϩ 7f 2 Ϫ 16f ϩ 12 Left side: (Ϫ3f 2 ϩ 3f Ϫ 2)(4f 2 Ϫ f Ϫ 6) ϭ [(Ϫ3)(1)2 ϩ 3(1) Ϫ 2) [(4(1)2 Ϫ (1) Ϫ 6] ϭ (Ϫ2)(Ϫ3) ϭ6 Right side: Ϫ12f 4 ϩ 15f 3 ϩ 7f 2 Ϫ 16f ϩ 12 ϭ Ϫ12(1)4 ϩ 15(1)3 ϩ 7(1)2 Ϫ 16(1) ϩ12 ϭ Ϫ12 ϩ 15 ϩ 7 Ϫ 16 ϩ 12 ϭ6 Since the left side equals the right side.wncp10_3_7.qxd 12/7/09 9:01 PM Page 184 In Example 1b. substitute f ϭ 1. a) (4k Ϫ 3m)2 SOLUTION b) (2v Ϫ 5w)(3v ϩ 2w Ϫ 7) a) (2r ϩ 5t)2 ϭ (2r ϩ 5t)(2r ϩ 5t) [Answers: a) 16k2 Ϫ 24km ϩ 9m2 b) 6v2 Ϫ 11vw Ϫ 14v Ϫ 10w2 ϩ 35w ] ϭ 2r(2r ϩ 5t) ϩ 5t(2r ϩ 5t) ϭ 2r(2r) ϩ 2r(5t) ϩ 5t(2r) ϩ 5t(5t) ϭ 4r2 ϩ 10rt ϩ 10rt ϩ 25t2 Combine like terms.

When you substitute a number for a variable to check that a polynomial product is correct.qxd 12/7/09 5:17 PM Example 3 Page 185 Simplifying Sums and Differences of Polynomial Products Expand and simplify. Then combine like terms. b) (3x ϩ y Ϫ 1)(2x Ϫ 4) Ϫ (3x ϩ 2y)2 a) (4m ϩ 1)(3m Ϫ 2) ϩ 2(2m Ϫ 1)(Ϫ3m ϩ 4) SOLUTION b) (6h ϩ k Ϫ 2)(2h Ϫ 3) Ϫ (4h Ϫ 3k)2 Use the order of operations. How is the process for multiplying polynomials with more than 2 terms like multiplying binomials? How is it different? 2. 3. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) (2c Ϫ 3)(c ϩ 5) ϩ 3(c Ϫ 3)(Ϫ3c ϩ 1) 3. Multiply before adding and subtracting.7 Multiplying Polynomials 185 . What strategies can you use to check that you have correctly multiplied two polynomials? 3. Expand and simplify.wncp10_3_7. would 0 be a suitable number to substitute? Would 9 be a suitable number? Explain. a) (2c Ϫ 3)(c ϩ 5) ϩ 3(c Ϫ 3)(Ϫ3c ϩ 1) [Answers: a) 17m Ϫ 10 b) Ϫ4h2 Ϫ 22h ϩ 26hk Ϫ 3k ϩ 6 Ϫ 9k2] ϭ 2c(c ϩ 5) Ϫ 3(c ϩ 5) ϩ 3[c(Ϫ3c ϩ 1) Ϫ 3(Ϫ3c ϩ 1)] ϭ 2c2 ϩ 10c Ϫ 3c Ϫ 15 ϩ 3[Ϫ3c2 ϩ c ϩ 9c Ϫ 3] ϭ 2c2 ϩ 7c Ϫ 15 ϩ 3[Ϫ3c2 ϩ 10c Ϫ 3] ϭ 2c2 ϩ 7c Ϫ 15 Ϫ 9c2 ϩ 30c Ϫ 9 ϭ Ϫ7c2 ϩ 37c Ϫ 24 b) (3x ϩ y Ϫ 1)(2x Ϫ 4) Ϫ (3x ϩ 2y)2 ϭ 3x(2x Ϫ 4) ϩ y(2x Ϫ 4) Ϫ 1(2x Ϫ 4) Ϫ (3x ϩ 2y)(3x ϩ 2y) ϭ 6x2 Ϫ 12x ϩ 2xy Ϫ 4y Ϫ 2x ϩ 4 Ϫ [3x(3x ϩ 2y) ϩ 2y(3x ϩ 2y)] ϭ 6x2 Ϫ 14x ϩ 2xy Ϫ 4y ϩ 4 Ϫ [9x2 ϩ 6xy ϩ 6xy ϩ 4y2] ϭ 6x2 Ϫ 14x ϩ 2xy Ϫ 4y ϩ 4 Ϫ [9x2 ϩ 12xy ϩ 4y2] ϭ 6x2 Ϫ 14x ϩ 2xy Ϫ 4y ϩ 4 Ϫ 9x2 Ϫ 12xy Ϫ 4y2 ϭ Ϫ3x2 Ϫ 14x Ϫ 10xy Ϫ 4y ϩ 4 Ϫ 4y2 Discuss the Ideas 1.

a) Expand and simplify. a) (r2 ϩ 3r ϩ 2)(4r2 ϩ r ϩ 1) b) (2d2 ϩ 2d ϩ 1)(d2 ϩ 6d ϩ 3) c) (4c2 Ϫ 2c Ϫ 3)(Ϫc2 ϩ 6c ϩ 2) d) (Ϫ4n2 Ϫ n ϩ 3)(Ϫ2n2 ϩ 5n Ϫ 1) 14. a) (x ϩ 2y)(x Ϫ 2y Ϫ 1) b) (2c Ϫ 3d)(c ϩ d ϩ 1) c) (a Ϫ 5b)(a ϩ 2b Ϫ 4) d) (p Ϫ 2q)(p ϩ 4q Ϫ r) 11. i) (x ϩ 2y)(x Ϫ 2y) ii) (3r Ϫ 4s)(3r ϩ 4s) iii) (5c ϩ 3d)(5c Ϫ 3d) iv) (2v Ϫ 7w)(2v ϩ 7w) b) What patterns do you see in the factors and products in part a? Use these patterns to expand and simplify each product without using the distributive property. Expand and simplify. Write. Expand and simplify. (2r Ϫ 3s)(r Ϫ 5s ϩ 6) ϭ 2r(r Ϫ 5s ϩ 6) Ϫ 3s(r Ϫ 5s ϩ 6) ϭ 2r2 Ϫ 5rs ϩ 12r Ϫ 3rs Ϫ 15s2 Ϫ 18s ϭ 2r2 Ϫ 8rs ϩ 12r Ϫ 33s2 12. (3g2 ϩ 4g Ϫ 2)(Ϫg2 Ϫ g ϩ 4) ϭ Ϫ3g4 Ϫ 3g3 ϩ 12g2 Ϫ 4g3 ϩ 4g2 ϩ 8g ϩ 2g2 ϩ 2g ϩ 8 ϭ Ϫ3g4 ϩ 5g3 ϩ 6g2 ϩ 10g ϩ 8 15. 13. Find and correct the errors in this solution. Expand and simplify. Substitute a number for the variable to check each product. i) (p ϩ 3q)(p ϩ 3q) ii) (2s Ϫ 7t)(2s Ϫ 7t) iii) (5g ϩ 4h)(5g ϩ 4h) iv) (10h Ϫ 7k)(10h Ϫ 7k) 7. i) (2x ϩ y)(2x ϩ y) ii) (5r ϩ 2s)(5r ϩ 2s) iii) (6c ϩ 5d)(6c ϩ 5d) iv) (5v ϩ 7w)(5v ϩ 7w) v) (2x Ϫ y)(2x Ϫ y) vi) (5r Ϫ 2s)(5r Ϫ 2s) vii) (6c Ϫ 5d)(6c Ϫ 5d) viii) (5v Ϫ 7w)(5v Ϫ 7w) b) What patterns do you see in the factors and products in part a? Use these patterns to expand and simplify each product without using the distributive property. i) (11g ϩ 5h)(11g Ϫ 5h) ii) (25m Ϫ 7n)(25m ϩ 7n) 186 Chapter 3: Factors and Products 8. Expand and simplify. The area of the base of a right rectangular prism is x2 ϩ 3x ϩ 2. Expand and simplify. Find and correct the errors in this solution. a) (3y Ϫ 2)(y2 ϩy Ϫ 8) b) (4r ϩ1)(r2 Ϫ 2r Ϫ 3) c) (b2 ϩ 9b Ϫ 2)(2b Ϫ1) d) (x2 ϩ 6x ϩ1)(3x Ϫ 7) 9. then simplify an expression for the volume of the prism.qxd 12/7/09 9:01 PM Page 186 Exercises A 4. a) (2z ϩ y)(3z ϩ y) b) (4f Ϫ 3g)(3f Ϫ4g ϩ1) c) (2a ϩ 3b)(4a ϩ 5b) d) (3a Ϫ 4b ϩ 1)(4a Ϫ 5b) e) (2r ϩ s)2 f) (3t Ϫ 2u)2 B 6. a) (3s ϩ 5)(2s ϩ 2) ϩ (3s ϩ 7)(s ϩ 6) b) (2x ϩ 3)(5x ϩ 4) ϩ (x Ϫ 4)(3x Ϫ 7) c) (3m ϩ 4)(m Ϫ 4n) ϩ (5m Ϫ 2)(3m Ϫ 6n) d) (4y Ϫ 5)(3y ϩ 2) Ϫ (3y ϩ 2)(4y Ϫ 5) e) (3x Ϫ 2)2 Ϫ (2x ϩ 6)(3x Ϫ 1) f) (2a ϩ 1)(4a Ϫ 3) Ϫ (a Ϫ 2)2 . Expand and simplify. a) (x ϩ y)(x ϩ y ϩ 3) b) (x ϩ 2)(x ϩ y ϩ 1) c) (a ϩ b)(a ϩ b ϩ c) d) (3 ϩ t)(2 ϩ t ϩ s) 10. a) Expand and simplify.wncp10_3_7. Expand and simplify. a) (g ϩ 1)(g2 ϩ 2g ϩ 3) b) (2 ϩ t ϩ t2)(1 ϩ 3t ϩ t2) c) (2w ϩ 3)(w2 ϩ 4w ϩ 7) d) (4 ϩ 3n ϩ n2)(3 ϩ 5n ϩ n2) 5. The height of the prism is x ϩ 7.

a) 2a(2a Ϫ 1)(3a ϩ 2) b) Ϫ3r(r Ϫ 1)(2r ϩ 1) c) 5x2(2x Ϫ 1)(4x Ϫ 3) d) Ϫxy(2x ϩ 5)(4x Ϫ 5) e) 2b(2b Ϫ c)(b ϩ c) f) y2(y2 ϩ 1)(y2 Ϫ 1) 20.wncp10_3_7. A box with no top is made from a piece of cardboard 20 cm by 10 cm. Simplify each polynomial. a) 5x + 8 x+5 6x + 2 3x 18. A cube has edge length 2x ϩ 3. Expand and simplify. Write a polynomial to represent the area of each shaded region.7 Multiplying Polynomials 187 . b) 2x – 2 x x+1 x–2 20 cm 10 cm C x x Let x centimetres represent the side length of each square cut out. a) (3x ϩ 4)(x Ϫ 5)(2x ϩ 8) b) (b Ϫ 7)(b ϩ 8)(3b Ϫ 4) c) (2x Ϫ 5)(3x ϩ 4)2 d) (5a Ϫ 3)2(2a Ϫ 7) e) (2k Ϫ 3)(2k ϩ 3)2 22. a) the length of the box b) the width of the box c) the area of the base of the box d) the volume of the box 17. Expand and simplify. a) (x Ϫ 2)3 c) (4a Ϫ 3b)3 b) (2y ϩ 5)3 d) (c ϩ d)3 19. a) Write then simplify an expression for the volume of the cube. Each shape is a rectangle.qxd 12/7/09 5:17 PM Page 187 16. a) (x ϩ y ϩ 1)3 b) (x Ϫ y Ϫ 1)3 c) (x ϩ y ϩ z)3 d) (x Ϫ y Ϫ z)3 Reflect What strategies do you know for multiplying two binomials? How can you use or adapt those strategies to multiply two trinomials? Include examples in your explanation. Write a polynomial to represent each measurement. 21. Expand and simplify. b) Write then simplify an expression for the surface area of the cube. Expand and simplify. 3. Equal squares are cut from each corner and the sides are folded up. Simplify each polynomial.

What binomial represents the side length of the plot in metres? What trinomial represents the area of the plot in square metres? Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work with a partner. 1 ha ϭ 10 000 m2 So. (x ϩ 1)2 (x Ϫ 1)2 (2x ϩ 1)2 (2x Ϫ 1)2 188 Chapter 3: Factors and Products (x ϩ 2)2 (x Ϫ 2)2 (3x ϩ 1)2 (3x Ϫ 1)2 (x ϩ 3)2 (x Ϫ 3)2 (4x ϩ 1)2 (4x Ϫ 1)2 . ■ Determine each product. Make Connections The area of a square plot of land is one hectare (1 ha). one side of the plot has length Ί 10 000 m ϭ 100 m Suppose the side length of the plot of land is increased by x metres.8 5:19 PM Page 188 Factoring Special Polynomials LESSON FOCUS Investigate some special factoring patterns.wncp10_3_8. You may need algebra tiles.qxd 12/7/09 3.

then factor the polynomials. or (a Ϫ b)2 We can use these patterns to factor perfect square trinomials. Write a strategy for factoring polynomials of this type. The square of the 1st term in the binomial Twice the product of the first and second terms in the binomial The square of the 2nd term in the binomial (a ϩ b)2 ϭ a2 ϩ 2ab ϩ b2 Perfect Square Trinomial The area model of a perfect square trinomial results in a square. 3. or (a ϩ b)2 And.8 Factoring Special Polynomials 189 . a perfect square trinomial is: a2 ϩ 2ab ϩ b2 ϭ (a ϩ b)(a ϩ b).qxd 12/7/09 ■ ■ 5:19 PM Page 189 What patterns do you see in the trinomials and their factors above? How could you use the patterns to factor these trinomials? 9x2 Ϫ 12x ϩ 4 4x2 ϩ 20x ϩ 25 Write two more polynomials that have the same pattern. In factored form. a2 Ϫ 2ab ϩ b2 ϭ (a Ϫ b)(a Ϫ b).wncp10_3_8. Here is a square with side length a ϩ b: a b a a2 ab b ab b2 Its area is: (a ϩ b)2 ϭ (a ϩ b)(a ϩ b) ϭ a(a ϩ b) ϩ b(a ϩ b) ϭ a2 ϩ ab ϩ ab ϩ b2 ϭ a2 ϩ 2ab ϩ b2 We say that a2 ϩ 2ab ϩ b2 is a perfect square trinomial.

Factor each trinomial.wncp10_3_8. the factors are correct.7. SOLUTION a) 36x2 ϩ 12x ϩ 1 a) 4x2 ϩ 12x ϩ 9 b) 16 Ϫ 56x ϩ 49x2 Arrange algebra tiles to form a rectangle. the trinomial is a perfect square and its factors are: (2 Ϫ 5x)(2 Ϫ 5x). a) 4x2 ϩ 12x ϩ 9 b) 4 Ϫ 20x ϩ 25x2 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1. Verify by multiplying the factors. 4x2 ϩ 12x ϩ 9 ϭ (2x ϩ 3)2 To verify. We can use the inverse process to factor trinomials of this form. the operations in the binomial factors must be subtraction.qxd 12/7/09 5:19 PM Example 1 Page 190 Factoring a Perfect Square Trinomial Factor each trinomial. multiply: (2x ϩ 3)(2x ϩ 3) ϭ 2x (2x ϩ 3) ϩ 3(2x ϩ 3) ϭ 4x2 ϩ 6x ϩ 6x ϩ 9 ϭ 4x2 ϩ 12x ϩ 9 Since this trinomial is the same as the original trinomial. We can use the strategy of logical reasoning or decomposition. In Lesson 3. how are a. [Answers: a) (6x ϩ 1)2 b) (4 Ϫ 7x)2] The rectangle is a square with side length 2x + 3. the factors are correct. or (2 Ϫ 5x)2 To verify. Verify by multiplying the factors. multiply: (2 Ϫ 5x)(2 Ϫ 5x) ϭ 2(2 Ϫ 5x) Ϫ 5x(2 Ϫ 5x) ϭ 4 Ϫ 10x Ϫ 10x ϩ 25x2 ϭ 4 Ϫ 20x ϩ 25x2 Since this trinomial is the same as the original trinomial. you multiplied two binomials in two variables. and c related? . So. b) 4 Ϫ 20x ϩ 25x2 The 1st term is a perfect square since 4 ϭ (2)(2) The 3rd term is a perfect square since 25x2 ϭ (5x)(5x) The 2nd term is twice the product of 5x and 2: 20x ϭ 2(5x)(2) Since the 2nd term is negative. b. 190 Chapter 3: Factors and Products When ax2 ϩ bx ϩ c is a perfect square trinomial.

b) 10c2 Ϫ cd Ϫ 2d 2 a) 5c2 Ϫ 13cd ϩ 6d 2 SOLUTION b) 3p2 Ϫ 5pq Ϫ 2q2 a) 2a2 Ϫ 7ab ϩ 3b2 Use logical reasoning. b) 10c2 Ϫ cd Ϫ 2d2 Use decomposition.wncp10_3_8. 1a Ϫ1b 1a Ϫ3b 2a Ϫ3b 2a Ϫ1b Ϫ3ab Ϫ 2ab ϭ Ϫ5ab Form the products. the factors are correct. multiply: (2a Ϫ b)(a Ϫ 3b) ϭ 2a(a Ϫ 3b) Ϫ b(a Ϫ 3b) ϭ 2a2 Ϫ 6ab Ϫ ab ϩ 3b2 ϭ 2a2 Ϫ 7ab ϩ 3b2 Since this trinomial is the same as the original trinomial.qxd 12/7/09 5:19 PM Example 2 Page 191 Factoring Trinomials in Two Variables Factor each trinomial. Verify by multiplying the factors. then use guess and test to determine which combination of products has the sum of Ϫ7ab. Factor each trinomial. 2 So.) 3. the operations in the binomial factors will be addition and subtraction. Since the 3rd term in the trinomial is negative. the operations in the binomial factors will be the same. [Answers: a) (5c Ϫ 3d)(c Ϫ 2d) b) (3p ϩ q)(p Ϫ 2q)] The two binomials will have the form: (?a Ϫ ?b)(?a Ϫ ?b) List the possible factors of 2a2 and 3b2. 2a2 Ϫ 7ab ϩ 3b2 ϭ (2a Ϫ b)(a Ϫ 3b) i i To verify. Ϫ1ab Ϫ 6ab ϭ Ϫ7ab This is the correct combination of factors. these operations will be subtraction. Verify by multiplying the factors. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) 2a2 Ϫ 7ab ϩ 3b2 2. Since the 3rd term in the trinomial is positive. Since the 2nd term is negative. The two binomials will have the form: (?c ϩ ?d)(?c Ϫ ?d) The product of the coefficients of c2 and d2 is: 10(Ϫ2) ϭ Ϫ20 Write Ϫ1cd as a sum of two terms whose coefficients have a product of Ϫ20. then add.8 Factoring Special Polynomials 191 . (Solution continues.

the factors are correct. So. look for 2 integers whose product is Ϫ25 and whose sum is 0. This is a difference of squares because x2 ϭ (x)(x) and 25 ϭ (5)(5). Ϫ10 Ϫ2. 5 Page 192 Sum of Factors 1 Ϫ 20 ϭ Ϫ19 Ϫ1 ϩ 20 ϭ 19 2 Ϫ 10 ϭ Ϫ8 Ϫ2 ϩ 10 ϭ 8 4 Ϫ 5 ϭ Ϫ1 Ϫ4 ϩ 5 ϭ 1 The two coefficients are 4 and Ϫ5. multiply: (5c ϩ 2d)(2c Ϫ d) ϭ 5c(2c Ϫ d) ϩ 2d(2c Ϫ d) ϭ 10c2 Ϫ 5cd ϩ 4cd Ϫ 2d2 ϭ 10c2 Ϫ cd Ϫ 2d2 Since this trinomial is the same as the original trinomial. 192 Chapter 3: Factors and Products . We can think of it as a trinomial with a middle term of 0. Another example of a special polynomial is a difference of squares. 10c2 Ϫ cd Ϫ 2d2 ϭ (5c ϩ 2d)(2c Ϫ d) To verify.wncp10_3_8. Ϫ20 Ϫ1. 10 4.qxd 12/7/09 5:19 PM Factors of Ϫ20 1. 20 2. Ϫ5 Ϫ4. write a2 Ϫ b2 as a2 ϩ 0ab Ϫ b2. That is. The two integers are 5 and Ϫ5. Remove a common factor from the 1st pair of terms. A difference of squares is a binomial of the form a2 Ϫ b2. and from the 2nd pair of terms: 10c2 ϩ 4cd Ϫ 5cd Ϫ 2d2 ϭ 2c(5c ϩ 2d) Ϫ d(5c ϩ 2d) Remove the common binomial factor. So. x2 Ϫ 25 ϭ (x ϩ 5)(x Ϫ 5) This pattern is true for the difference of any two squares. so write the trinomial 10c2 Ϫ cd Ϫ 2d 2 as 10c2 ϩ 4cd Ϫ 5cd Ϫ 2d 2. We write x2 Ϫ 25 as x2 Ϫ 0x Ϫ 25. Consider the binomial x2 Ϫ 25. To factor this trinomial.

ϭ 5(x2 Ϫ 4y2)(x2 ϩ 4y2) The 1st binomial is also a difference of squares.wncp10_3_8. Remove this common factor. Factor each binomial. ϭ 5[(x2)2 Ϫ (4y2)2] Write these terms in binomial factors.8 Factoring Special Polynomials 193 . But the terms have a common factor 5. 25 Ϫ 36x2 ϭ (5)2 Ϫ (6x)2 ϭ (5 ϩ 6x)(5 Ϫ 6x) Write these terms in binomial factors. 5x4 Ϫ 80y4 ϭ 5(x4 Ϫ 16y4) Now write each term in the binomial as a perfect square. each term of the binomial is not a perfect square. ϭ 5(x + 2y)(x Ϫ 2y)(x2 ϩ 4y2) 3. Does a sum of squares factor? Explain. a) 81m2 Ϫ 49 SOLUTION b) 162v4 Ϫ 2w4 a) 25 Ϫ 36x2 [Answers: a) (9m Ϫ 7)(9m ϩ 7) b) 2(3v Ϫ w)(3v ϩ w)(9v2 ϩ w2)] Write each term as a perfect square. a) 25 Ϫ 36x2 b) 5x4 Ϫ 80y4 3.qxd 12/7/09 5:19 PM Page 193 Difference of Squares A difference of squares has the form a2 Ϫ b2. a2 Ϫ b2 ϭ (a Ϫ b)(a ϩ b) a a+b a–b a b b a–b b b Example 3 Factoring a Difference of Squares CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Factor each binomial. b) 5x4 Ϫ 80y4 As written. In factored form.

Why can you use the factors of a trinomial in one variable to factor a corresponding trinomial in two variables? Exercises A 4. x x y y b) Cut the L-shaped piece into 2 congruent pieces. or neither. a difference of squares. Let x represent the side length of the square. a) 25 Ϫ t2 b) 16m2 ϩ 49n2 c) 4x2 Ϫ 24xy ϩ 9y2 d) 9m2 Ϫ 24mn ϩ 16n2 6. Factor each trinomial. a) (x ϩ 2)2 c) (5 ϩ d)2 e) (x ϩ 2)(x Ϫ 2) g) (5 ϩ d)(5 Ϫ d) b) (3 Ϫ y)2 d) (7 Ϫ f )2 f) (3 Ϫ y)(3 ϩ y) h) (7 Ϫ f )(7 ϩ f ) 5. Expand and simplify. Write an expression for the area of the piece that remains. 8. b) 9 ϩ 30n ϩ 25n2 a) 4x2 Ϫ 12x ϩ 9 2 c) 81 Ϫ 36v ϩ 4v d) 25 ϩ 40h ϩ 16h2 e) 9g2 ϩ 48g ϩ 64 f) 49r2 Ϫ 28r ϩ 4 194 Chapter 3: Factors and Products What are the dimensions of this rectangle. Let y represent the side length of the cut-out square.wncp10_3_8. . Write an expression for the area of the cut-out square. then arrange as shown below. Factor each binomial. B 7. Why is it useful to identify the factoring patterns for perfect square trinomials and difference of squares binomials? 3. Identify each polynomial as a perfect square trinomial. Verify by multiplying the factors. How do the area models and rectangle diagrams support the naming of a perfect square trinomial and a difference of squares binomial? 2. in terms of x and y? What is the area of this rectangle? c) Explain how the results of parts a and b illustrate the difference of squares. Cut a smaller square from one corner.qxd 12/7/09 5:19 PM Page 194 Discuss the Ideas 1. i) a2 ϩ 10a ϩ 25 ii) b2 Ϫ 12b ϩ 36 iii) c2 ϩ 14c ϩ 49 iv) d 2 Ϫ 16d ϩ 64 v) e2 ϩ 18e ϩ 81 vi) f 2 Ϫ 20f ϩ 100 b) What patterns do you see in the trinomials and their factors in part a? Write the next 4 trinomials in the pattern and their factors. a) Cut out a square from a piece of paper. Write an expression for the area of the square. b) b2 Ϫ 121 a) x2 Ϫ 49 d) 36 Ϫ c2 c) 1 Ϫ q2 9. a) Factor each trinomial.

a) Identify each expression as a perfect square trinomial.wncp10_3_8. a) Find an integer to replace ٗ so that each trinomial is a perfect square. a) x4 Ϫ 13x2 ϩ 36 b) a4 Ϫ 17a2 ϩ 16 c) y4 Ϫ 5y2 ϩ 4 21. b. How many possibilities can you find? 17. a) y 2 ϩ 7yz ϩ 10z2 c) 12s 2 Ϫ 7su ϩ u2 e) 10r 2 ϩ 9rs Ϫ 9s 2 b) 4w2 Ϫ 8wx Ϫ 21x2 d) 3t2 Ϫ 7tv ϩ 4v 2 f) 8p2 ϩ 18pq Ϫ 35q2 16. Factor each binomial. Simplify your answer. i) (x2 ϩ 5)2 ii) Ϫ100 ϩ r2 iii) 81a2b2 Ϫ 1 iv) 16s 4 ϩ 8s 2 ϩ 1 b) Which expressions in part a can be factored? Factor each expression you identify. Reflect C 19. It is surrounded by a circular flower bed with radius R centimetres. How is factoring a difference of squares like factoring a trinomial? How is it different? Include examples in your explanation. a difference of squares. 20. Factor. Factor each trinomial. Explain your strategy. A circular fountain has a radius of r centimetres. 3x + 5 2x – 1 12.8 Factoring Special Polynomials 195 . Determine the area of the shaded region. 3. Find consecutive integers a. Verify by multiplying the factors. a) 8d 2 Ϫ 32e 2 1 b) 25m2 Ϫ n2 4 c) 18x 2y 2 Ϫ 50y 4 d) 25s2 ϩ 49t 2 e) 10a2 Ϫ 7b2 x2 y2 f) Ϫ 16 49 Explain how a difference of squares binomial is a special case of a trinomial. Factor each trinomial. 15. Which trinomials are perfect squares? a) 4x 2 ϩ 28xy ϩ 49y 2 b) 15m2 ϩ 7mn Ϫ 4n2 c) 16r 2 ϩ 8rt ϩ t2 d) 9a2 Ϫ 42ab ϩ 49b2 2 ϩ 25hk ϩ 12k2 f) 15f 2 Ϫ 31fg ϩ 10g2 e) 12h 13. 18.qxd 12/7/09 5:19 PM Page 195 10. For each binomial that cannot be factored. Factor. a) Sketch and label a diagram. if possible. i) x2 ϩ ٗx ϩ 49 ii) 4a2 ϩ 20ab ϩ ٗb2 iii) ٗc2 Ϫ 24cd ϩ 16d 2 b) How many integers are possible for each trinomial in part a? Explain why no more integers are possible. Use mental math to determine (199)(201). Justify your answers. explain why. or neither. b) 25s 2 Ϫ 64t 2 a) 9d 2 Ϫ 16f 2 c) 144a2 Ϫ 9b2 d) 121m2 Ϫ n2 2 Ϫ 49m2 e) 81k f) 100y 2 Ϫ 81z 2 g) v2 Ϫ 36t 2 h) 4j 2 Ϫ 225h2 11. and c so that the trinomial ax2 ϩ bx ϩ c can be factored. Factor fully. b) 8z2 ϩ 8yz ϩ 2y 2 a) 8m2 Ϫ 72n 2 c) 12x2 Ϫ 27y 2 d) 8p2 ϩ 40pq ϩ 50q 2 2 Ϫ 6uv ϩ 9v 2 f) Ϫ18b2 ϩ 128c2 e) Ϫ24u 14. b) How can you use the difference of squares to determine an expression for the area of the flower bed? c) Use your expression from part b to calculate the area of the flower bed when r ϭ 150 cm and R ϭ 350 cm.

binomials. and have similar properties.qxd 12/7/09 5:23 PM Page 196 S T U DY G U I D E CONCEPT SUMMARY Big Ideas Applying the Big Ideas This means that: ■ Factors and multiples can be found for both whole numbers and polynomials. ■ We multiply factors to determine their product. we expand. ■ Reflect on the Chapter Explain how a rectangle diagram is used to multiply and factor whole numbers and to multiply and factor polynomials. We factor a polynomial by writing it as a product of its factors. the factors can be constant terms. monomials. ■ ■ Algebra tiles or a rectangle diagram can represent a product of polynomials. Multiplying and factoring are inverse processes. 196 Chapter 3: Factors and Products ■ Describe how the operations of addition. Include examples in your description. or trinomials. subtraction. and a rectangle diagram can be used to represent them. ■ ■ Arithmetic operations on polynomials are based on the arithmetic operations on whole numbers.wncp10_BM. Why can the rectangle diagram be used for both multiplying and factoring? . When we multiply the factors. and multiplication on whole numbers are similar to these operations on polynomials. ■ For trinomials.

3] Multiply binomials of the form (x ϩ a)(x ϩ b) and (ax ϩ b)(cx ϩ d). [3. Look at the terms and determine their greatest common factor. Look for common factors first.wncp10_BM. [3. or a perfect cube.4. 3. Use the prime factors to determine GCF and LCM.5.8] Look for common factors first. 4225 is a perfect square and Ί 4225 is: 5 · 13 ϭ 65 4225 is not a perfect cube because the factors do not occur in sets of 3.5. Multiply the factors to verify.7] Factor special polynomials. Multiply the factors to verify. [3.6] Factor polynomials of the form x2 ϩ bx ϩ c and ax2 ϩ bx ϩ c. 3x2y Ϫ 21xy ϩ 30y2 ϭ 3y(x2 Ϫ 7x ϩ 10y) Use algebra tiles.qxd 12/7/09 9:02 PM Page 197 SKILLS SUMMARY Skill Description Example Determine prime factors.2] Since the factors occur in pairs.6] Multiply polynomials. and least common multiple (LCM). (3d ϩ 2)(4d Ϫ 5) ϭ 12d 2 Ϫ 15d ϩ 8d Ϫ 10 ϭ 12d 2 Ϫ 7d Ϫ 10 [3. 3.4.1] The LCM of 64 and 60 is: 26 · 5 ϭ 320 Use prime factors to check for perfect Determine whether a number is a perfect square squares and perfect cubes. using powers where possible. 5x2 Ϫ 9x Ϫ 2 ϭ 5x2 Ϫ 10x ϩ x Ϫ 2 ϭ 5x(x Ϫ 2) ϩ 1(x Ϫ 2) ϭ (x Ϫ 2)(5x ϩ 1) Use the distributive property to multiply each term in the first polynomial by each term in the second polynomial. Use algebra tiles. diagrams. As a product of prime factors: 64 ϭ 26 and 80 ϭ 24 · 5 The GCF of 64 and 80 is: 24 ϭ 16 [3. Express a whole number as the product of its prime factors. greatest common factor (GCF). 4225 ϭ 52 · 132 [3. Determine common factors for a polynomial. (x Ϫ 4)(3x3 ϩ 5x Ϫ 2) ϭ 3x4 ϩ 5x2 Ϫ 2x Ϫ 12x3 Ϫ 20x ϩ 8 ϭ 3x4 Ϫ 12x3 ϩ 5x2 Ϫ 22x ϩ 8 [3. and the distributive property to multiply. 3. 3. 25x2 Ϫ 49y2 ϭ (5x ϩ 7y)(5x Ϫ 7y) 4x2 ϩ 16xy ϩ 16y2 ϭ 4(x ϩ 2y)(x ϩ 2y) Study Guide 197 . Factor a perfect square trinomial and a difference of squares binomial. diagrams. Multiply the factors to verify. and symbols to factor.

If a red bead occurs every 6th bead on one strand. 180 b) 245. 309 c) 200.wncp10_BM. 160. 90. Simplify. what is the least number of beads each strand can have? 5.3 8. a) 256 b) 324 c) 729 d) 1298 e) 1936 f) 9261 9. 130. then write the number as a product of its factors. 500 d) 180. Is each number a perfect square. Determine the prime factors of each number. 250. or neither? Determine the square root of each perfect square and the cube root of each perfect cube. a) Volume ‫؍‬ 1728 cm3 b) Volume ‫؍‬ 2744 ft. 320.1 1. a) 120. Determine the least common multiple of each set of numbers. a) 594 b) 2100 c) 4875 d) 9009 2.qxd 12/7/09 5:23 PM Page 198 REVIEW b) 3. What is the perimeter of the square? 10. 240. 884 3. A cube has surface area 11 616 cm2. 385 c) 176. How do you know that the volume of each cube is a perfect cube? Determine the edge length of each cube. every 4th bead on the second strand. How did you use the greatest common factor or the least common multiple? 1015 2475 a) b) 1305 3825 6656 7 15 c) d) ϩ 7680 36 64 5 3 28 12 e) Ϭ f) Ϫ 9 4 128 160 3. 368 d) 484. 280. Each strand begins and ends with a red bead. How do you know that the area of each square is a perfect square? Determine the side length of each square. 340 4.2 198 Chapter 3: Factors and Products Area = 1024 cm2 7. 140 b) 120. What is the edge length of the cube? . A square has area 18 225 square feet.2 6. and every 10th bead on the third strand. 496. a) 70. A necklace has 3 strands of beads. Determine the greatest common factor of each set of numbers. a perfect cube. a) Area = 784 in.

Use algebra tiles to determine each product. For which binomials could you use algebra tiles to factor? Explain why you could not use algebra tiles to factor the other binomials. 21. a) 8m Ϫ 4m2 b) Ϫ3 ϩ 9g2 c) 28a2 Ϫ 7a3 d) 6a2b3c Ϫ 15a2b2c2 e) Ϫ24m2n Ϫ 6mn2 f) 14b3c2 Ϫ 21a3b2 12. Sketch the tiles to show how you used them. Sketch a rectangle diagram to illustrate each product. If your answer is no. Sketch the tiles for each trinomial that can be arranged as a rectangle. Suppose you have one x2-tile and five 1-tiles. Check by expanding. and can be factored? If your answer is yes. Find and correct the errors in each factorization. Expand and simplify. Verify that the factors are correct. a) (g ϩ 5)(g Ϫ 4) b) (h ϩ 7)(h ϩ 7) c) (k Ϫ 4)(k ϩ 11) d) (9 ϩ s)(9 Ϫ s) e) (12 Ϫ t)(12 Ϫ t) f) (7 ϩ r)(6 Ϫ r) g) (y Ϫ 3)(y Ϫ 11) h) (x Ϫ 5)(x ϩ 5) 19. a) Factor each trinomial. Sketch the tiles for each trinomial that can be arranged as a rectangle. Use algebra tiles. Factor each binomial. a) u2 Ϫ 12u ϩ 27 ϭ (u ϩ 3)(u ϩ 9) b) v2 Ϫ v Ϫ 20 ϭ (v Ϫ 4)(v ϩ 5) c) w2 ϩ 10w Ϫ 24 ϭ (w ϩ 4)(w ϩ 6) 3.5 18. a) 8x2 Ϫ 12x b) 3y3 Ϫ 12y2 ϩ 15y c) 4b3 Ϫ 2b Ϫ 6b2 d) 6m3 Ϫ 12m Ϫ 24m2 14.qxd 12/7/09 5:23 PM Page 199 3. a) 12 ϩ 6g Ϫ 3g2 b) 3c2d Ϫ 10cd Ϫ 2d c) 8mn2 Ϫ12mn Ϫ 16m2n d) y4 Ϫ 12y2 ϩ 24y e) 30x2y Ϫ 20x2y2 ϩ10x3y2 f) Ϫ8b3 ϩ 20b2 Ϫ 4b 13. end with ϩ12. list the trinomials and their factors.6 22. i) m2 ϩ 7m ϩ 12 ii) m2 ϩ 8m ϩ 12 iii) m2 ϩ 13m ϩ 12 iv) m2 Ϫ 7m ϩ 12 v) m2 Ϫ 8m ϩ 12 vi) m2 Ϫ 13m ϩ 12 b) Look at the trinomials and their factors in part a. a) (h ϩ 4)(2h ϩ 2) b) (j ϩ 5)(3j ϩ 1) c) (3k ϩ 2)(2k ϩ 1) d) (4m ϩ 1)(2m ϩ 3) Review 199 . b) n2 Ϫ 4n Ϫ 45 a) q2 ϩ 6q ϩ 8 2 d) k2 Ϫ 9k Ϫ 90 c) 54 Ϫ 15s ϩ s f) 12 Ϫ 7y ϩ y2 e) x2 Ϫ x Ϫ 20 20. Factor each trinomial. Are there any other trinomials that begin with m2. Verify that the factors are correct.3 11. a) 15p2q ϩ 25pq2 Ϫ 35q3 ϭ 5(3p2q ϩ 5pq2 Ϫ 7q3) b) Ϫ12mn ϩ 15m2 ϩ18n2 ϭ Ϫ3(Ϫ4mn ϩ 15m2 ϩ 18n2) 3. Find and correct the errors in each factorization. Use algebra tiles. Factor. b) x2 ϩ 7x ϩ 10 a) x2 ϩ 8x ϩ 12 d) x2 ϩ 8x ϩ 15 c) x2 ϩ 4x ϩ 1 16. explain why there are no more trinomials. Factor each polynomial. What is the fewest number of x-tiles you need to arrange the tiles in a rectangle? 3.4 15.wncp10_BM. b) 3g2 ϩ 4g ϩ 1 a) 2k2 ϩ 3k ϩ 2 d) 7h2 ϩ 5h ϩ 1 c) 2t2 ϩ 7t ϩ 6 17.

qxd 12/7/09 5:23 PM Page 200 23. Write your answer in simplest form. 3. iii) Use the rectangle to factor the trinomial. Expand and simplify. b) n2 ϩ 10n ϩ 25 a) m2 Ϫ 14m ϩ 49 d) 16 Ϫ 40q ϩ 25q2 c) 4p2 ϩ 12p ϩ 9 2 ϩ 28r ϩ 49 e) 4r f) 36 Ϫ 132s ϩ 121s2 34. For each set of algebra tiles below: i) Write the trinomial that the algebra tiles represent. Simplify the expression. Expand and simplify. b) Write an expression for the product of the 3 integers.wncp10_BM. a) (2r ϩ 7)(3r ϩ 5) b) (9y ϩ 1)(y Ϫ 9) c) (2a Ϫ 7)(2a Ϫ 6) d) (3w Ϫ 2)(3w Ϫ 1) e) (4p ϩ 5)(4p ϩ 5) f) (Ϫy ϩ 1)(Ϫ3y Ϫ 1) 25. Check by multiplying the factors. Expand and simplify. Check the product by substituting a number for the variable. Find and correct the errors in each factorization. Factor each trinomial. Sketch a rectangle diagram to illustrate each product. Factor each trinomial. a) 81 Ϫ 4b2 c) 64g2 Ϫ 16h2 b) 16v2 Ϫ 49 d) 18m2 Ϫ 2n2 33. a) (5a ϩ 1)(4a ϩ 2) ϩ (a Ϫ 5)(2a Ϫ 1) b) (6c Ϫ 2)(4c ϩ 2) Ϫ (c ϩ 7)2 31. Sketch the tiles. Check the product by substituting a number for the variable. a) 6m2 ϩ 5m Ϫ 21 ϭ (6m Ϫ 20)(m ϩ 1) b) 12n2 Ϫ 17n Ϫ 5 ϭ (4n Ϫ 1)(3n ϩ 5) c) 20p2 Ϫ 9p Ϫ 20 ϭ (4p ϩ 4)(5p Ϫ 5) 3. Determine the area of the shaded region. a) (c ϩ 1)(c2 ϩ 3c ϩ 2) b) (5 Ϫ 4r)(6 ϩ 3r Ϫ 2r2) c) (Ϫj2 ϩ 3j ϩ 1)(2j ϩ 11) d) (3x2 ϩ 7x ϩ 2)(2x Ϫ 3) 28. a) Write an expression for each of the next two consecutive even integers. b) 6c2 Ϫ 13c Ϫ 5 a) 4k2 Ϫ 7k ϩ 3 d) 6a2 Ϫ 31a ϩ 5 c) 4b2 Ϫ 5b Ϫ 6 2 ϩ 9x Ϫ 4 f) 21x2 ϩ 8x Ϫ 4 e) 28x 26.8 32. Which strategy did you use each time? a) g2 ϩ 6gh ϩ 9h2 b) 16j2 Ϫ 24jk ϩ 9k2 c) 25t2 ϩ 20tu ϩ 4u2 d) 9v2 Ϫ 48vw ϩ 64w2 35. 2x + 5 x+3 . a) (m2 ϩ 3m ϩ 2)(2m2 ϩ m ϩ 5) b) (1 Ϫ 3x ϩ 2x2)(5 ϩ 4x Ϫ x2) c) (Ϫ2k2 ϩ 7k ϩ 6)(3k2 Ϫ 2k Ϫ 3) d) (Ϫ3 Ϫ 5h ϩ 2h2)(Ϫ1 ϩ h ϩ h2) 30. Expand and simplify. Suppose n represents an even integer. ii) Arrange the tiles to form a rectangle. Check by expanding. a) b) 24. Expand and simplify. a) (4m Ϫ p)2 b) (3g Ϫ 4h)2 c) (y Ϫ 2z)(y ϩ z Ϫ 2) d) (3c Ϫ 4d)(7 Ϫ 6c ϩ 5d) 200 Chapter 3: Factors and Products 29. Factor.7 27. Factor.

For the number 64.qxd 12/7/09 5:23 PM Page 201 PRACTICE TEST For questions 1 and 2. end with ϩ3. Write all the trinomials that begin with 8t 2. How do you know you have found all the trinomials? Practice Test 201 . using the strategy indicated. a) Use algebra tiles: (2c ϩ 5)(3c ϩ 2) b) Use an area model: (9 ϩ 4r)(8 ϩ 6r) c) Use a rectangle diagram: (4t Ϫ 5)(3t ϩ 7) 6. and can be factored. B. Simplify the expression. or D 1. 9. 20 45 50 4. a) (2p Ϫ 1)(p2 ϩ 2p Ϫ 7) b) (e ϩ 2f )(2f 2 ϩ 5f ϩ 3e 2) c) (3y ϩ 2z)(y ϩ 4z) Ϫ (5y Ϫ 3z)(2y Ϫ 8z) 7. (2x ϩ 2)(x ϩ 3) C. Look at the numbers in question 3. 2. then determine the least common multiple and the greatest common factor of the 3 numbers. (2x ϩ 3)(x ϩ 2) D. A right square prism with dimensions r by r by 2r ϩ 1 is removed from the cube. b) c2 Ϫ 13c ϩ 22 a) f 2 ϩ 17f ϩ 16 2 ϩ 9t Ϫ 28 d) 4r 2 ϩ 20rs ϩ 25s2 c) 4t e) 6x 2 Ϫ 17xy ϩ 5y2 f) h2 Ϫ 25j 2 8. choose the correct answer: A. a) What would you have to multiply each number by to produce a number that is: i) a perfect square? ii) a perfect cube? b) Why is there more than one answer for each of part a? 5. The factorization of the trinomial 2x2 ϩ 7x ϩ 6 is: A. which statement is not true? A. Write an expression for the volume that remains. Expand and simplify. It has only one factor. Write each number below as a product of its prime factors. B. C. (2x ϩ 6)(x ϩ 1) 3. For which trinomials could you use algebra tiles? Explain. Its prime factor is 2. D. A cube has edge length 2r ϩ 1.wncp10_BM. Expand and simplify. Sketch a diagram to illustrate each strategy. (2x ϩ 1)(x ϩ 6) B. C. Factor each polynomial. It is a perfect square. It is a perfect cube.

and rational exponents. is rational. ■ The exponent laws can be extended to include powers with rational and variable bases.qxd 12/7/09 5:37 PM 4 Page 202 Roots and Powers BUILDING ON ■ determining the square root of a positive rational number ■ applying the exponent laws for powers with integral bases and whole number exponents BIG IDEAS ■ Any number that can be written as m the fraction .wncp10_4_1. NEW VOCABULARY irrational number real number entire radical mixed radical . ■ Exponents can be used to represent roots and reciprocals of rational numbers. where m and n n are integers. n 0.

to Fairbanks.wncp10_4_1. . Alaska. Yukon.qxd 12/7/09 5:37 PM Page 203 Y U K O N Q U E S T This is a sled dog race from Whitehorse.

Make Connections Since 32 ϭ 9. We write: 3 ϭ 3 27 Ί Since 34 ϭ 81. We write: 3 ϭ Ί 9 Since 33 ϭ 27. We write: 3 ϭ 4 81 Ί How would you write 5 as a square root? A cube root? A fourth root? 204 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers index n x radicand radical . 3 is the cube root of 27.1 Estimating Roots LESSON FOCUS Explore decimal representations of different roots of numbers. 3 is a fourth root of 81.qxd 12/7/09 5:37 PM Page 204 MATH LAB 4. 3 is a square root of 9.wncp10_4_1.

wncp10_4_1. How can you tell if the value of a radical is not a rational number? What strategies can you use to estimate the value of the radical? 4. Ί Use a strategy similar to that in Steps A and B to estimate a value for 4 20 . Estimate the value of Ί 20. Use the strategies from Steps A to C to determine the value of each radical. A. Radical Value Is the Value Exact or Approximate? Ί 16 4 Exact Ί 27 5.4 9 Exact 16 81 Ί 0.1 Math Lab: Estimating Roots 205 .64 Choose 3 different radicals. Square your estimate. You will need a calculator to check your estimates. Keep revising your estimate until the square of the estimate is within 1 decimal place of 20. Use this value to revise your estimate. Write the two consecutive perfect fourth powers closest to 20.64 ΊϪ0. Estimate the value Ί of 3 20. B. Write the two consecutive perfect cubes closest to 20. Keep revising your estimate until the cube of the estimate is within 1 decimal place of 20.64 3 Ί 16 3 Ί 27 Ί 81 3 16 3 Ί 0.64 3 4 Ί 16 4 Ί 27 Ί 81 4 16 4 Ί 0. Write the two consecutive perfect squares closest to 20. D. Copy and complete this table. Use this value to revise your estimate. C.1962 Approximate Ί 4 or 0.qxd 12/7/09 9:36 PM Page 205 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. E. Cube your estimate. Extend then complete the table for these radicals. How can you tell if the value of a radical is a rational number? What strategies can you use to determine the value of the radical? F.

Evaluate each radical.qxd 12/7/09 5:37 PM Page 206 Assess Your Understanding 1.125 Ί h) 4 625 3. 2. as in part a? c) When a radicand is negative: i) Which types of radicals can be evaluated or estimated? ii) Which types of radicals cannot be evaluated or estimated? 5. What strategy did you use? a) Ί 8 Ί e) 3 15 Ί b) 3 9 4 f) Ί17 Ί c) 4 10 g) Ί 19 d) Ί 13 Ί h) 3 20 4. For each number below.25 Ί g) 3 0. b) Identify the radicand and index for each radical.9 f) 0. Estimate the value of each radical to 1 decimal place. write an equivalent form as: i) a square root ii) a cube root iii) a fourth root a) 2 b) 3 c) 4 d) 10 e) 0. Justify your answer. a) Ί 36 Ί 125 3 e) 27 Ί b) 3 8 Ί c) 4 10 000 5 d) Ί Ϫ32 f) Ί 2. a) What happens when you attempt to determine the square root of a number such as –4? Explain the result. b) For which other radical indices do you get the same result with a negative radicand. 3 206 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers 7 = 1. a) Give 4 examples of radicals.2 n 6.912 931 182 772 389 101 199 116 839 548 760 282 862 439 050 345 875 766 210 647 640 447 234 276 179 230 756 007 525 441 477 285 709 904 541 913 958 790 759 227 944 615 293 864 212 013 147 486 695 712 445 614 039 888 169 681 471 379 702 626 745 446 612 044 061 147 761 416 391 806 241 578 673 927 453 141 892 781 075 667 871 691 066 794 229 608 191 383 758 219 601 042 802 155 946 150 300 697 613 551 307 287 191 167 449 608 313 771 081 504 584 906 733 629 612 655 131 887 183 073 974 740 458 182 893 551 185 633 773 547 212 430 828 593 092 438 654 681 098 440 938 923 431 110 568 208 310 066 222 313 508 685 604 140 201 133 691 676 872 961 909 991 081 229 243 112 174 410 739 919 535 437 911 589 068 649 306 417 647 062 891 485 738 710 386 488 768 546 101 412 787 971 783 309 636 271 779 870 721 786 … . Choose values of n and x so that Ίx is: a) a whole number b) a negative integer c) a rational number d) an approximate decimal Verify your answers. c) Explain the meaning of the index of each radical.wncp10_4_1. Use a different index for each radical.

Make Connections The formulas for the area and circumference of a circle involve ␲.qxd 12/7/09 4. The room below the rotunda in the Manitoba Legislative Building is the Pool of the Black Star. which is not a rational number because it cannot be written as a quotient of integers.25 Ί 64 9 0. These are rational numbers.24 Ί3 1 Ί9 Ί2 4 Ί 12 A.2 Irrational Numbers 207 .82 3 Ί8 0. It has a circular floor. How are radicals that are rational numbers different from radicals that are not rational numbers? 4.5 Ί Ϫ32 5 These are not rational numbers. 3 Ί 0. Ί 100 5 6 Ί 0.2 5:39 PM Page 207 Irrational Numbers LESSON FOCUS Identify and order irrational numbers.wncp10_4_2. What other numbers are not rational? Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner.

Write 3 other radicals that are not rational numbers. ␲. the radical is the exact value of the irrational number.653 This is close enough to represent on a number line. If we do not have a calculator.6 Ί Test: (Ϫ3. Why are they rational? D. Ί Guess: 3 Ϫ50 Џ Ϫ3.7. we use perfect powers to estimate the value. and so on are rational numbers. Ί 81. Ί 5. –4 3 –50 –3 Since (Ϫ3. Ί 2 and 3 Ϫ50 . We can approximate the location of an irrational number on a number line. Which of these radicals are rational numbers? Which are not rational numbers? How do you know? Ί 1.44. Write 3 other radicals that are rational numbers. Ί 3 we know that ΊϪ27 ϭ Ϫ3 and 3 Ϫ64 ϭ Ϫ4. to locate 3 Ϫ50 on a number line. Rational numbers have decimal representations that either terminate or repeat. so mark a Ί point to the right of Ϫ3.656 Guess: 3 Ϫ50 Џ Ϫ3. The decimal representation of an irrational number neither terminates nor repeats. 3 ͱ(-50) ͱ(2) x 1.653. Ί 5 64 4 3 C. Why are they not rational? Radicals that are square roots of perfect squares.7)3 ϭ Ϫ50.7 on the number line. 208 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers . cube roots of perfect cubes. An irrational number cannot be written in the form When an irrational number is written as a radical. For example.wncp10_4_2. ΊϪ27. n 0. We can use the Ί square root and cube root keys on a calculator to determine approximate values of these irrational numbers.684031499 There are other irrational numbers besides radicals.414213562 –3.qxd 12/8/09 4:15 PM Page 208 B. Irrational Numbers m .7 Ί Test: (Ϫ3. for example. for example.7)3 ϭ Ϫ50. where m and n n are integers.6)3 ϭ Ϫ46. then 3 Ϫ50 is slightly greater than Ϫ3.

6. Tell whether each number is rational or irrational. This diagram shows how these number systems are related. 5 Its decimal form is Ϫ0. Ί 9.21 b) Ί14 is irrational since 14 is not a perfect square. c) 1. Ί 27 is rational since 27 is a perfect cube. 3 Ϫ5 Ί Ί 3 (Solution continues. Explain how you know.) 4.qxd 12/7/09 5:39 PM Example 1 Page 209 Classifying Numbers Tell whether each number is rational or irrational.wncp10_4_2. Ί b) 3 Ϫ30 [Answers: a) rational b) irrational c) rational] The decimal form of Ί14 neither repeats nor terminates. Explain how you know. 3 8 3 a) Ϫ b) Ί14 c) 27 5 Ί CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1. the rational numbers and irrational numbers form the set of real numbers. 3 c) 8 8 Ί 27 ϭ 3 or 0. Real Numbers Rational numbers Integers Whole numbers Irrational numbers Natural numbers Example 2 Ordering Irrational Numbers on a Number Line Use a number line to order these numbers from least to greatest. Ί 16 49 SOLUTION a) 3 a) Ϫ is rational since it is written as a quotient of integers. Ί 18.6. which terminates. 4 27.2 Irrational Numbers 209 . which is a repeating decimal 3 8 2 Together. Ί 13.

4 27.2795… 4 Ϫ5 is between the perfect cubes Ϫ1 and Ϫ8. Ί 2 .242640687 Ί 18 ϭ 4. Ί 11 ] 3 ͱ(13) x Ί 13 ϭ 2.wncp10_4_2.qxd 12/7/09 5:39 PM Page 210 SOLUTION CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 13 is between the perfect cubes 8 and 27.7099… –1. 3 3 Ί8 3 Ί 13 ↓ 2 Ί 27 ↓ ? ↓ 3 Ί 2. 4 30. and is closer to 16.279507057 Ί 27 ϭ 2. 3 ͱ( -5) x ΊϪ5 ϭ Ϫ1. ΊϪ1 ΊϪ5 3 3 ↓ Ϫ1 ↓ ? ΊϪ8 3 ↓ Ϫ2 Use a calculator. Ί 9 . 4 ͱ(27) x 2. 3 6. Ί 16 Ί 18 Ί 25 ↓ ? ↓ 5 ↓ 4 Use a calculator. 3 13. Use a number line to order these numbers from least to greatest. 2. Ί 18 210 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers How can you order a set of irrational numbers if you do not have a calculator? . 4 30 Ί Ί Ί Use a calculator. 3 6 . 4 3 –2 –5 0 3 27 13 18 9 5 Ί Ί Ί From least to greatest: 3 Ϫ5 . 3 Ϫ2. and is closer to 16. ͱ(18) 4. Ί Ί Ί [Answer: 3 Ϫ2 .709975947 3 Mark each number on a number line.2426… Ί9 ϭ 3 27 is between the perfect fourth powers 16 and 81. and is closer to 8. 4 4 Ί 16 4 Ί 27 ↓ 2 Ί 81 ↓ ? ↓ 3 Use a calculator.351334688 3 18 is between the perfect squares 16 and 25.3513… 2. and is closer to Ϫ8. Ί 11 .

Sketch a number line for each irrational number and label its approximate location.12. 3 98.16. b) 4 16 Ί 4 d) 9 f) 1. Identify which numbers are irrational and which are rational. 3 500.25 4. 3 150 Ί Ί Ί 11. 7. Tell whether each number is rational or irrational.25 a) Ί12 Ί c) 3 Ϫ100 Ί e) Ί1. 4 9. 0. Ί Ί Ί a) 3 70. provide examples to explain why. 4 100. . Explain your reasoning. How can you determine whether the decimal form of a radical represents its exact value? Exercises A 3. –5. 3 400 b) Ί 89. 3 8. a) Ί 5 Ί Ί Ί b) 3 12 c) 4 25 d) 3 Ϫ12 10. Ϫ13. 3 Ϫ10 . b) Write each number that follows in the correct set.247 448 71 rational or irrational? Explain. Write a number that is: a) a rational number but not an integer b) a whole number but not a natural number c) an irrational number d) 300 4. v) Some rational numbers are natural numbers. ͱ(150) 12.wncp10_4_2. How can you verify your answer? Ί 40.4. b) For each statement in part a that is false. Ϫ2. 7 3 9. Use a number line to order these numbers from least to greatest. iii) All whole numbers are natural numbers. i) All natural numbers are integers. Ί 75. 2 6 Ί 0. a) 8 b) 64 c) 30 12. 3 Ϫ150 . 1 7 Ί Ί . a) Sketch a diagram to represent the set of rational numbers and the set of irrational numbers. Ί 98. Ί 4 5 99 13.1538.2 Irrational Numbers 211 . b) Is the number Ί 150 rational or irrational? Explain. a) Why are Ί 49 and 4 16 rational numbers? Ί 3 b) Why are Ί 21 and Ί 36 irrational numbers? 6. 4 250.24744871 a) Is the number 12. Ί 4.15. 10. Ϫ2. For which numbers will the cube root be irrational? Use 2 different strategies to justify your answers. 3 300 Ί Ί Ί B 5. a) Which of the following statements are true? Explain your reasoning.qxd 12/7/09 5:39 PM Page 211 Discuss the Ideas 1. Ί 0.34. Use a number line to order these numbers from least to greatest. ϪΊ 3. 2. Look at this calculator screen. Ί 50. Use a number line to order the irrational numbers in each set from greatest to least. ii) All integers are rational numbers. How do you determine whether a radical represents a rational or an irrational number? Use examples to explain. How do you use irrational numbers when you calculate the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle with legs 5 cm and 3 cm? 14. Classify each number below as: a) a natural number b) an integer c) a rational number d) an irrational number 4 Ί Ί . 4 5. Ϫ14 123 Ί . iv) All irrational numbers are roots. Ϫ . 15. 17 8. 3 27.

a) Can the square root of a rational number be irrational? Show your reasoning. 20.qxd 12/7/09 5:39 PM Page 212 16. 4. from Chapter 1. Write the value of 2 to the nearest tenth. The ratio 17. Reflect 212 Describe strategies you can use to determine if a radical represents a rational number or an irrational number. cube roots. Chapter 4: Roots and Powers . Justify your answer. 19. 1 ϩ Ί5 a) Use a calculator. c) Measure other rectangles in your classroom. V cubic units s Provide a value of V for which s is: a) irrational b) rational 18. a) Create a diagram to show how these number systems are related: irrational numbers. and fourth roots are all rational numbers. Support your strategies with examples. 23. sketch and label a right triangle or explain why it is not possible to create a triangle. 2 Use the dimensions of the Great Pyramid of Giza. Determine whether the perimeter of each square is a rational number or an irrational number. integers.wncp10_4_2. a) a square with area 40 cm2 b) a square with area 81 m2 C Ί n a 21. 1 ϩ Ί5 : 1 is called the golden ratio. Suppose you know that b is a rational number and that a and b have no common factors. Show that the ratio of its base side length to its height approximates the golden ratio. Do any of these rectangles approximate a golden rectangle? Justify your answer. b) Use the number from part a as the length in inches of a rectangle. rational numbers. b) Can the square root of an irrational number be rational? Show your reasoning. is a golden rectangle. What can you say about the prime factorizations of a and b? 22. and natural numbers. 24. a) All sides have rational number lengths. It has the property that the ratio of 1 ϩ Ί5 its length to width is to 1. This diagram shows a cube with volume V cubic units and edge length s units. 3 Ϫ64 . Draw a golden rectangle. 3. c) Exactly 1 side has a rational number length. d) No sides have rational number lengths. The golden rectangle appears in art and architecture. 16. Describe strategies to generate numbers with the property that their square roots. For each description. in Greece. Ϫ7. Ί 60. Ί 9. whole numbers. 0 Ί 5 b) Choose 3 more numbers that would be appropriate for each number system in your diagram. The shape 2 of the front of the Parthenon.91919. page 26. Write each number below in your diagram. b) Exactly 2 sides have rational number lengths. Include these numbers.

Draw an isosceles right triangle with legs 2 cm long. Label the lengths of the sides on the triangle. draw an isosceles right triangle with legs 1 cm long. and vice versa. The smallest triangle is a right isosceles triangle with legs 1 unit long.3 Mixed and Entire Radicals 213 . B. Write the length of the hypotenuse as a radical. Label the lengths of the sides on the triangle. Write the length of the hypotenuse as a radical. Make Connections 3 in many different ways: 12 100 400 We can name the fraction 1 4 5 20 30 120 3 How do you show that each fraction is equivalent to ? 12 1 3 Why is the simplest form of ? 4 12 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. You will need 1-cm grid paper and a calculator. A.wncp10_4_3.3 5:41 PM Page 213 Mixed and Entire Radicals LESSON FOCUS Express an entire radical as a mixed radical. On grid paper. 4.qxd 12/7/09 4. This quilt represents a Pythagorean spiral.

Draw isosceles right triangles with legs: 3 cm long. 3. Explain why the triangle in Step B is an enlargement of the triangle in Step A. Ί Ί n where n is a natural number. What is the scale factor of the enlargement? How is the length of the hypotenuse in the larger triangle related to the corresponding length in the smaller triangle? D. equivalent expressions for any number have the same value. 4 cm long. Which form of the radical makes the relationships easier to see? Just as with fractions.wncp10_4_3. and 24. 4. Ί 24 ϭ Ί 4 • 6 ϭ Ί4 · Ί6 ϭ 2 · Ί6 ϭ 2Ί6 214 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers We read 2Ί 6 as “2 root 6. the factors of 24 are: 1. 3 8 • 27 is equivalent to 3 8 · 3 27 because: Ί 8 • 27 ϭ 3 216 Ί 3 ϭ6 and Ί 8 · 3 27 ϭ 2 · 3 Ί 3 ϭ6 Multiplication Property of Radicals Ί ab ϭ n a · n b . For example. For each triangle. ■ Ί 16 • 9 is equivalent to Ί 16 · Ί 9 because: Ί 16 • 9 ϭ Ί 144 and Ί 16 · Ί 9 ϭ 4 · 3 ϭ 12 ■ ϭ 12 Ί Ί Ί Similarly. but have factors that are perfect squares or perfect cubes. and a and b are real numbers We can use this property to simplify square roots and cube roots that are not perfect squares or perfect cubes. one of which is 4. 6. write the length of the hypotenuse in 2 different ways.” .qxd 12/7/09 5:41 PM Page 214 C. and 5 cm long. Describe any relationships in the lengths of the sides of the triangles. 12. Rewrite 24 as the product of two factors. 2. E. ■ We can simplify Ί 24 because 24 has a perfect square factor of 4. 8.

ϭ Ί (2 • 2) • (2 • 2) • 5 b) 3 108 Ί c) 4 128 Ί a) Ί 80 ϭ Ί 8 • 10 ϭ Ί2 • 2 • 2 • 5 • 2 1. Ί Rewrite 24 as the product of two factors. then simplify. Ί 24 ϭ 3 8 • 3 Ί 3 ϭ3 8 ·3 3 Ί Ί ϭ 2 ·3 3 Ί Ί ϭ 23 3 ■ We read 2 3 3 as “2 cube root 3. look for factors that appear twice. we cannot simplify 4 24 because 24 has no factors (other than 1) Ί that can be written as a fourth power. b) 3 144 Ί a) Ί 80 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING c) 4 162 Ί a) Ί 63 SOLUTION Write each radical as a product of prime factors. Ί ϭ 4 (3 • 3 • 3 • 3) • 2 Ί Ί ϭ 4 3 • 3 • 3 • 3· 4 2 Ί ϭ 34 2 4. look Ί for factors that appear 4 times. [Answers: a) 3Ί 7 b) 3 3 4 c) 2 4 8 ] Ί Ί Since Ί 80 is a square root. Example 1 Simplifying Radicals Using Prime Factorization Simplify each radical.” Ί However. Ί Ί ϭ3 2 • 2 • 2 ·3 2 • 3 • 3 Ί ϭ 2 ·3 2 • 3 • 3 Ί ϭ 2 3 18 Ί Ί c) 4 162 ϭ 4 81 • 2 Ί ϭ4 3 • 3 • 3 • 3 • 2 Since 4 162 is a fourth root.3 Mixed and Entire Radicals 215 . look Ί for factors that appear 3 times. ϭ Ί2 • 2 · Ί2 • 2 · Ί5 ϭ 2 · 2 · Ί5 ϭ 4Ί 5 Ί Ί b) 3 144 ϭ 3 12 • 12 Ί ϭ3 2 • 2 • 3 • 2 • 2 • 3 Ί ϭ 3 (2 • 2 • 2) • 2 • 3 • 3 Since 3 144 is a cube root. one of which is 8. we can simplify 3 24 because 24 has a perfect cube factor of 8.wncp10_4_3. We can also use prime factorization to simplify a radical.qxd ■ 12/9/09 3:42 PM Page 215 Similarly. Simplify each radical.

such as 200. 13. if possible. 10. 16. 2. 26 There are no perfect square factors other than 1. 2. 20. 200 Since 4. 8. Ί 32 ϭ 4 16 • 2 Ί 4 Ί Ί ϭ 4 16 · 4 2 Ί ϭ 2 ·4 2 Ί ϭ 24 2 216 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers a) Ί 30 Ί b) 3 32 Ί c) 4 48 [Answers: a) cannot be simplified Ί b) 2 3 4 c) 2 4Ί3] . we write the radicand as a product of 2 factors. 4. c) The factors of 32 are: 1. 8. Example 2 Writing Radicals in Simplest Form Write each radical in simplest form. and 100 are perfect squares. so write 32 as 16 · 2. 50. Ί 40 ϭ 3 8 • 5 Ί 3 Ί Ί ϭ3 8 ·3 5 Ί ϭ 2 ·3 5 Ί ϭ 23 5 b) The factors of 26 are: 1. a) The factors of 40 are: 1. Ί 200 ϭ Ί 4 • 50 Ί 200 ϭ Ί 25 • 8 Ί 200 ϭ Ί 100 • 2 ϭ Ί 4 · Ί 50 ϭ Ί 25 · Ί 8 ϭ Ί 100 · Ί 2 ϭ 2Ί 50 ϭ 5Ί 8 ϭ 10Ί 2 10Ί 2 is in simplest form because the radical contains no perfect square factors other than 1. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) 3 40 Ί 2. 10. 25. 2. 40 The greatest perfect cube is 8 ϭ 2 · 2 · 2.qxd 12/7/09 5:41 PM Page 216 Some numbers.wncp10_4_3. 8. have more than one perfect square factor. 5. 20. 2. where n is the index of the radical. we can simplify Ί 200 in these ways. So. 40. Write each radical in simplest form. The factors of 200 are: 1. 25. one of which is the greatest perfect nth power. To write a radical of index n in simplest form. 5. 100. if possible. Ί 26 cannot be simplified. 32 The greatest perfect fourth power is 16 ϭ 2 · 2 · 2 · 2. b) Ί 26 c) 4 32 Ί SOLUTION Look for perfect nth factors. so write 40 as 8 · 5. 4. 4.

How can you determine if an entire radical can be written as a mixed radical? 2. Writing Mixed Radicals as Entire Radicals Example 3 Write each mixed radical as an entire radical. and 34 2 are mixed radicals. Ί Ί Ί Radicals of the form a n x such as 4 Ί 5.qxd 12/7/09 5:41 PM Page 217 Radicals of the form n x such as Ί 80. 3 144 . a) 7Ί 3 b) 2 3 4 Ί c) 2 5 3 Ί 5 [Answers: a) Ί 147 b) 3 32 c) Ί 96 ] Ί ϭ Ί 48 b) Write 3 as: Ί 3 • 3 • 3 ϭ 3 27 Ί 3 3 3 2 ϭ 3 27 · 3 2 Ί Ί Ί ϭ 3 27 • 2 Ί ϭ Ί 54 3 c) Write 2 as: Ί 2 • 2 • 2 • 2 • 2 ϭ 5 32 Ί 5 How would rewriting mixed radicals as entire radicals help you to order a set of mixed radicals with the same index? 25 2 ϭ 5 32 · 5 2 Ί Ί Ί ϭ 5 32 • 2 Ί ϭ 5 64 Ί Discuss the Ideas 1. and so on. and 4 162 are entire radicals. Write each mixed radical as an entire radical.3 Mixed and Entire Radicals 217 . How do you use the Multiplication Property of Radicals to write it in simplest form? 4. for example. 2 ϭ Ί 2 • 2. 3 ϭ Ί 3 • 3. Similarly. any number can be written as the cube root of its cube. b) 3 3 2 Ί a) 4Ί 3 c) 25 2 Ί SOLUTION a) Write 4 as: Ί 4 4 ϭ Ί 16 • 4Ί 3 ϭ Ί 16 · Ί 3 Use the Multiplication Property of Radicals. 23 18 . We use this strategy to write a mixed radical as an entire radical.wncp10_4_3. Any number can be written as the square root of its square. 4 ϭ Ί 4 • 4. ϭ Ί 16 • 3 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. Ί Ί Ί Entire radicals were rewritten as mixed radicals in Examples 1 and 2. Suppose an entire radical can be simplified. or the fourth root of its perfect fourth power.

a) List all the perfect cubes up to 1000. Write each mixed radical as an entire radical. a) 3Ί 2 b) 4Ί 2 c) 6Ί 5 d) 5Ί 6 e) 7Ί 7 f) 23 2 Ί g) 33 3 Ί h) 43 3 Ί i) 5 3 2 Ί j) 23 9 Ί 13. Write each radical in simplest form. B 7.2 8. a) Ί 90 b) Ί 73 c) Ί 108 d) Ί 600 e) Ί 54 f) Ί 91 g) Ί 28 h) Ί 33 i) Ί 112 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers Ί a) 4 48 Ί b) 4 405 Ί c) 4 1250 does not. a) Can every mixed radical be expressed as an entire radical? b) Can every entire radical be expressed as a mixed radical? Give examples to support your answers. T 16. and their square roots. A square has an area of 54 square inches.wncp10_4_3. C 1 A 2 B E 6 b) Use algebra to verify that Ί 45 ϭ 3Ί 5. Write each radical in simplest form. D 3 a) 3 16 Ί b) 3 81 Ί c) 3 256 Ί d) 3 128 Ί e) 3 60 Ί f) 3 192 Ί g) 3 135 Ί h) 3 100 Ί i) 3 500 Ί j) 3 375 Ί 12. Write the answer as a radical in simplest form. Write each radical in simplest form. Write the edge length of the cube as a radical in simplest form. Area: 252 ft. Determine the perimeter of the square. a) Use the diagram to explain why Ί 45 ϭ 3Ί 5. a) Use the diagram to explain why Ί 40 ϭ 2Ί 10.qxd 12/7/09 9:46 PM Page 218 Exercises 11. Write each mixed radical as an entire radical. Express the side length of this square as a radical in simplest form. but rewriting Ί 50 as Ί 10 · Ί 5 10. b) List all the perfect fourth powers up to 1000. Explain why rewriting Ί 50 as Ί 25 · Ί 2 helps you simplify Ί 50. a) 5Ί 2 b) 6Ί 2 c) 7Ί 2 d) 8Ί 2 e) 5Ί 3 f) 6Ί 3 g) 7Ί 3 h) 8Ί 3 6. 4. A 3. Write each mixed radical as an entire radical. a) Ί 8 b) Ί 12 c) Ί 32 d) Ί 50 e) Ί 18 f) Ί 27 g) Ί 48 h) Ί 75 5. Ί a) 6 4 3 Ί b) 7 4 2 c) 3 5 4 Ί d) 4 5 3 Ί . 218 17. Ί d) 4 176 18. if possible. 9. List all the perfect squares up to 400. Write each radical in simplest form. and their fourth roots. 14. A cube has a volume of 200 cm3. b) Use algebra to verify that Ί 40 ϭ 2Ί 10. if possible. P 6 Q 3 R 1 S2 15. and their cube roots.

What patterns do you see in the results? Write the next 2 radicals in each list.wncp10_4_3. Simplify the radicals in each list. without using a calculator. determine a decimal approximation for each radical. The quilt on page 213 is made from right triangles. 6Ί 5 1 c) 7Ί 3. and when you write a mixed radical as an entire radical? Use examples to support your explanation. 6Ί 2 1 b) 4Ί 7 . 5Ί 6 . 4. b) i) What pattern do you see in the lengths? ii) Use this pattern to predict the length of the hypotenuse of the 50th triangle. Here is a student’s solution for writing 8 3 2 as an entire radical. then write the correct solution. 21. This pattern continues. 3Ί 17 23. A student simplified Ί 96 as shown: Ί 96 ϭ Ί 4 · Ί 48 ϭ 2 · Ί 48 ϭ 2 · Ί8 · Ί6 ϭ 2 · 4 · Ί6 ϭ 8Ί 6 Identify the errors the student made. page 77. 1 1 a) Ί 4 1 1 1 Ί 20. What strategy did you use each time? 1 1 a) 9Ί 2 . 8Ί 3 . with its other leg 1 unit long. Calculate the side length and area of each of the two smaller squares. b) 3 27 Ί 3 c) Ί 8 Ί 27 000 Ί 27 000 000 d) 3 24 Ί Ί 800 3 Ί 80 000 3 Ί 24 000 Ί 24 000 000 C 24.3 Mixed and Entire Radicals 219 . 25. 1 1 1 1 22.qxd 12/7/09 5:42 PM Page 219 19. The largest square in this diagram has side length 8 cm. Arrange in order from greatest to least. 4Ί 5 .4142. 8Ί 3 . you determined the tangents of the angles at the centre of the spiral. Write the radicals in simplest form. The hypotenuse of this triangle is one leg of the second triangle. 2Ί 6 . Ί 103 . iii) How many of the first 100 triangles have hypotenuse lengths that can be written as mixed radicals? Justify your answer. Write each length as an entire radical. 9Ί 2 . In Chapter 2. 2Ί 13 . Reflect Ί 400 3 Ί 40 000 1 a) Calculate the length of the hypotenuse of each triangle. a) i) Ί 200 ii) Ί 20 000 b) i) Ί 8 ii) Ί 18 iii) Ί 32 iv) Ί 50 How do you use the index of a radical when you simplify a radical. then write a correct solution. 83 2 ϭ 8 · 3 2 Ί Ί Ί Ί ϭ 32 ·32 Ί ϭ 32•2 Ί ϭ34 Identify an error the student made. The first triangle is a right isosceles triangle with legs 1 unit long. Given that Ί 2 Џ 1.

2 –7 Integers -31 -5 Whole Numbers – You determined that some radicals can be represented as rational numbers and other radicals cannot.wncp10_4_3.qxd 12/8/09 5:25 PM Page 220 CHECKPOINT 1 Concept Development Connections ■ In Lesson 4. 2 3 –5 – You identified conditions for which a radical has a rational number value. 0 Natural Numbers 3 5 25 In Lesson 4.2 ■ In Lesson 4.3 1.3 – You defined mixed radicals and entire radicals. Irrational Numbers 6 5 4 382 4 3 ■ – You defined irrational numbers. and estimated the values of radicals that are irrational. Real Numbers Rational Numbers 42 3 8 3 –2. and represented these numbers and rational numbers as the set of real numbers. and used factoring to simplify radicals.1 – You applied what you know about square roots to explore decimal approximations of cube roots and fourth roots. 220 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers .

Sketch a square. Write each number in the correct place on your diagram. a) Draw a diagram to illustrate the real number system. where possible.5 3 v) 0 vi) 14 vii) Ί 7 viii) ␲ b) Choose 1 more number for each section of your diagram. 4. terminate.3 9.1 16 5. Write a set of instructions for simplifying the radical. sketch a number line and label its approximate location. Rewrite each mixed radical as an entire radical. Ί Ί Ί a) Ί 19 b) 3 Ϫ20 c) 4 30 d) 3 36 Ί 6. Choose one radical from question 9 that can be simplified.5 iv) Ϫ4. 11. b) The perimeter of the square is an irrational number. a) 3 Ί 7 b) 2 3 4 c) 7Ί 3 d) 24 12 e) 33 10 f) 6 Ί 11 Ί Ί Ί Checkpoint 1 221 . Estimate the value of each radical to 2 decimal places. Justify your answers. Evaluate each radical. a) Sketch a number line and mark each number on it. For each irrational number. How can you do this without using the root keys on a calculator? Ί Ί Ί a) Ί 10 b) 3 15 c) 4 9 d) 5 23 3. Tell whether each number is rational or irrational.qxd 12/7/09 5:42 PM Page 221 Assess Your Understanding 4.1 1. if possible.wncp10_4_3. Write each radical in simplest form. Ί Ί Ί Ί i) Ί 32 ii) 3 72 iii) 4 100 iv) 3 50 v) Ί 65 vi) 4 60 b) Order the numbers in part a from greatest to least.2 4. How did you use the index of the radical in your work? Ί Ί Ί a) Ί 81 b) 3 Ϫ125 c) 4 256 d) 5 243 2. 4. or neither? Ί Justify your answer. 8. 1 i) 3 ii) Ϫ42 iii) 4. Describe your strategies. Ί Ί Ί a) Ί 45 b) 3 96 c) Ί 17 d) 4 48 e) 3 80 Ί f) 4 50 10. 121 Ί Ί a) Ί 11 b) 3 16 c) 3 Ϫ16 d) Ί 121 e) f) Ί 12. Does the decimal representation of 4 60 repeat. Write the numbers below in the appropriate places on your diagram. 7. Label its area so that: a) The perimeter of the square is a rational number.

4 5:44 PM Page 222 Fractional Exponents and Radicals LESSON FOCUS Relate rational exponents and radicals. how can you estimate a value for 0. The expression 100(0. A. 1 1 x x2 1 12 ϭ 4 1 42 x 1 ϭ 1 8 9 16 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers 64 25 222 27 125 x3 .871 ϭ 0. and hot chocolate contain caffeine. Make Connections 1 Coffee.wncp10_4_4.870 ϭ 1. 1 Given that 0. Use a calculator to complete the second column. tea.87)2 1 represents the percent of caffeine left in your body h after you 2 drink a caffeine beverage.qxd 12/7/09 4. Copy then complete each table.87 and 0.87 2? Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner.

1 D. xn ϭ n x 4. Write the next 3 lines in each table. 1 1 1 1 Similarly.wncp10_4_4.4 Fractional Exponents and Radicals 223 . 53 · 53 · 53 ϭ 5 3 1 1 ϩ ϩ 3 3 ϭ 51 1 3 Ί Ί Ί Ί and 3 5 · 3 5 · 3 5 ϭ 3 125 ϭ5 ϭ5 5 ϭ3 5 Ί These examples indicate that: ■ ■ 1 Raising a number to the exponent is equivalent to taking the square root of 2 the number. 1 What do you think the exponent means? Confirm your 3 prediction by trying other examples on a calculator. In grade 9. 52 ϭ Ί 5. B. Powers with Rational Exponents with Numerator 1 1 Ί When n is a natural number and x is a rational number. 1 Raising a number to the exponent is equivalent to taking the cube root of 3 the number. What does a n mean? Explain your reasoning. and so on.qxd 12/7/09 5:44 PM Page 223 Continue the pattern. We can extend this law to powers with fractional exponents with numerator 1: 1 1 1 52 · 52 ϭ 52 ϩ 1 2 and Ί 5 · Ί 5 ϭ Ί 25 ϭ 51 1 2 ϭ5 ϭ5 1 5 and Ί 5 are equivalent expressions. What do you think a 4 and a 5 mean? Use a calculator to test your predictions for different values of a. that is. you learned that for powers with integral bases and whole number exponents: am · an ϭ am ϩ n To multiply powers with the same base. ■ ■ ■ 1 1 C. What conclusions can you make? 1 What do you think the exponent means? Confirm your 2 prediction by trying other examples on a calculator. For each table: What do you notice about the numbers in the first column? Compare the numbers in the first and second columns. add the exponents.

for example. then square the result. 3 3 3 2 1.qxd 12/7/09 5:44 PM Example 1 Page 224 Evaluating Powers of the Form a 1 n Evaluate each power without using a calculator. 83 ϭ 8 3 1 2 3 2 or 83 ϭ 8 2 3 So. or as 2 · .49 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1 1 3 1. we extend the exponent law (am)n ϭ amn so that it applies when m and n are rational numbers. Why do we use brackets to evaluate when the exponent is a fraction.5 2 c) Ϫ2 d) ] 3 b) 0. then take the cube root of the result. 8 ϭ 2 2 1 3 1 ϭ (82)3 Ί ϭ Q3 8 R 2 Take the cube root of 8. so we can 1 1 0. 4 2 d) a b 9 c) (Ϫ64) 1 1 a) 10003 b) 0. but not when the exponent is a decimal? 32^0.2 ϭ . The root and power can be evaluated in any order. 5 1 We can evaluate 32 5 and 320.252 SOLUTION c) (Ϫ8) The denominator of the exponent is the index of the radical.2 interpret powers with decimal exponents. 1 3 1 2 a) 27 b) 0.7 1 3 1 3 Ί9 4 How could you check your answers? 2 3 A fraction can be written as a terminating or repeating decimal.49 ϭ Ί 0. Evaluate each power without using a calculator.2 32^(1/5) 2 2 2 To give meaning to a power such as 83. 2 ϭ 18 2 So. Ί ϭ 3 82 Square 8.2 on a calculator to show that both expressions have the same value. 1 3 a) 27 ϭ Ί 27 ϭ3 3 1 3 1 2 c) (Ϫ64) ϭ Ί Ϫ64 4 2 d) a b ϭ 9 ϭ Ϫ4 ϭ 1 16 4 d) a b 81 [Answers: a) 10 b) 0. 0. so 32 ϭ 32 5 . 224 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers .wncp10_4_4.49 ϭ 0. 2. 2 3 8 ϭ 3 64 Ί ϭ4 ϭ4 These examples illustrate that the numerator of a fractional exponent represents a power and the denominator represents a root. 2 1 1 We write the exponent as · 2.

a) Write 265 in radical form in 2 ways.7080.wncp10_4_4.] 4 (Solution continues. n 5 Ί 35 ϭ 32 The index of the radical is 2.008 4 3 1 2 b) 27 ϭ 27 b) (Ϫ27) 3 c) 814 1 4 3 ϭ Q3 27 R Ί ϭ 34 ϭ 81 4 3 d) 0.751. b) 27 3 d) 1.0 4 2 1 3 2 ϭ Q Ί 0. m n Use Qn a R ϭ a . Ί m Q3 25 R 2 ϭ Ί 25 2 3 Evaluating Powers with Rational Exponents and Rational Bases Example 3 Evaluate. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4 3 3. x m n 1 m n Ί ϭ Qn x R x n ϭ 1x m 2 n m and m 1 Ί ϭ n xm Rewriting Powers in Radical and Exponent Form Example 2 2 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) Write 403 in radical form in 2 ways.) 4. Evaluate. Ί b) Write Ί 65 and Q4 19 R 3 in Ί SOLUTION m n Qn exponent form.2 [Answers: a) 0. 194 ] b) Use Ί a ϭ a . .23 ϭ 0.04 R 3 ϭ 0.4 a) 0. 2 2.qxd 12/7/09 5:44 PM Page 225 Powers with Rational Exponents ϭ 1x 2 When m and n are natural numbers.001 b) 81 c) 27 d) 0.04 ϭ 0.4 3 2 a) 0. b) Write Ί 35 and Q3 25 R 2 in exponent form.04 2 c) (Ϫ32)0. a) Use a ϭ Ί a R or Ί a . .01 SOLUTION 3 2 1 a) 0.81. 2 3 Q3 m n m [Answers: a) Q5Ί 26 R or 5 262 Ί 2 40 ϭ Ί 40 R or Ί 40 2 3 2 5 m n m 3 b) 62 .4 Fractional Exponents and Radicals 225 . and x is a rational number.

4 ϭ 2.01(9) b ϭ 0.8^1.277096874 ϭ Q5 Ϫ32 R 2 Ί ϭ (Ϫ2)2 ϭ4 The powers in parts a to c were evaluated by taking the root first.4 ϭ 0. of a mammal with body mass m kilograms. (Ϫ32) Page 226 4 2 or 10 5 ϭ (Ϫ32) d) 1. but a calculator to evaluate part b? . Use the formula b ϭ 0. Evaluate the power first.01m 3 to estimate the brain mass.81.4 2. 1..01m . 226 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers Why did we use mental math to evaluate part a.qxd 12/7/09 5:44 PM c) The exponent 0.4 So. 0. a) Substitute: m ϭ 27 [Answers: a) approximately 0. Estimate the brain mass of each animal.01(200)^(2/3) 0. a) a husky with a body mass of 27 kg CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2 4.09 kg.01 (200)3 Use a calculator. Applying Rational Exponents Example 4 2 Biologists use the formula b ϭ 0.01m 3 to estimate the brain mass of each animal.4 2 5 Use a calculator. Which strategy is more efficient? Justify your answer.64 kg b) approximately 0.81.09 The brain mass of the husky is approximately 0.03 kg] 2 b ϭ 0.341995189 The brain mass of the polar bear is approximately 0.01 (27)3 b ϭ 0. b kilograms.34 kg. b) a polar bear with a body mass of 200 kg a) a moose with a body mass of 512 kg SOLUTION b) a cat with a body mass of 5 kg 2 3 Use the formula b ϭ 0. b ϭ 0.wncp10_4_4.2770.. b) Substitute: m ϭ 200 2 b ϭ 0.01 Q3 27 R 2 Ί Use the order of operations.01(3)2 b ϭ 0. Evaluate each power by raising the base to the exponent first. ϭ S(Ϫ32) 5 T 1 2 1.

Evaluate each power without using a calculator. Write the edge length of the cube as a radical and as a power. Write an equivalent form for each number 1 using a power with exponent . When a is a rational number and m and n are natural numbers.5 0. 2 3 Ί f) 5 (Ϫ2. 4 .5 iii) (Ϫ32)0.5 ii) 810. m what does a n represent? Exercises 11.5 c) a b 8 2 d) 0.5)3 Ί 4b 14. Evaluate each power without using a calculator.25 1. a) 9 2 3 2 2 27 3 b) a b 8 d) 0. a b 4 3 2 16.75 iv) 350. 1 2 b) 83 a) 80 c) 83 3 4 e) 83 f) 83 B a) 4 b) (Ϫ10) 3 5 c) 2. b) 810.5 3 0.36 c) (Ϫ27)3 2 3 1. a) 2 b) 4 c) 10 d) 3 e) 5 15. a) Evaluate. Write each radical as a power. Write each radical as a power.211.5 e) (Ϫ64) 3 4 2 f) a b 25 13.6 vi) a b 4 b) Which powers in part a could you have evaluated without a calculator? How can you tell before you evaluate? 4. A 3.wncp10_4_4.2 a) 36 b) 48 1 2 1 5 c) (Ϫ30) 6.4 Fractional Exponents and Radicals 227 . Evaluate each power without using a calculator.5 3 2 3 1 2 Ί 4.8 v) 1. 4 .75 0.5 R 2 a) Ί3.25 a) 1000. Arrange these numbers in order from least to greatest.75 5 5 Ϫ e) a b 9 5 3 12.3 3 2 9. Evaluate each power without using a calculator. Describe your strategy.83 f)1. A cube has a volume of 350 cm3. Write each power as a radical. 10.2 c) 1024 d) (Ϫ32)0. a) Ϫ1 b) 2 c) 3 d) Ϫ4 e) 4 5 d) 83 9 5 a b 5 c) e) a 4 5. 8. 1 what does an represent? 2.qxd 12/7/09 5:44 PM Page 227 Discuss the Ideas 1. Ί a) Ί 39 b) 4 90 3 5 c) Ί 29 d) Ί 100 7. then write the 3 answer as a radical.8) 5 3 3 2. 2 3 a) 48 b) (Ϫ1. Write an equivalent form for each number 1 using a power with exponent . then write the 2 answer as a radical. Write each power as a radical. i) 161. 1 2 a) 16 b) 36 1 5 1 2 c) 64 1 3 d) 32 e) (Ϫ27) 1 3 Ί a8b 3 3 1 3 d) f) (Ϫ1000) 4. 1 3 Ί 4 Ί b) Q3 Ϫ1. When a is a rational number and n is a natural number. Write each power as a radical.

7.2 42 10 4. Mean distances in millions of kilometres 18. 58 108 149 228 778 1420 2880 4520 Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune The diagram is not drawn to scale.3213.3213. SA square metres.. m Reflect In the power x n . Write a correct solution. c) After how many hours does 50% of the caffeine remain? Explain how you know. Which student is correct? Explain. 21. m and n are natural numbers and x is a rational number.24.2 times. The mean distance of Earth from the sun is about 149 million kilometres. each equal to the tenth root of 3. of a certain species of fir tree can be estimated from the formula 2 3 h ϭ 35d . where T is the period in Earth days and R is the mean distance from the planet to the sun in millions of kilometres.2 m.2514…)2 ϭ 1. 3. h metres.096m0. 19. What does the numerator m represent? What does the denominator n represent? Use an example to explain your answer. Karen said: No.5 h. Earth or Mars? Justify your answer. 3 2 1.2R2. So the statement means that 42 factors. Johannes Kepler developed a formula to calculate the time it takes each planet to orbit the sun (called the period).3213. 2 b) Use the expression above to determine the percent of caffeine that remains after 1.5)5 a) Show that this expression and the expression on page 222 give the same result. Luc said: It means 3. The height. of a person’s body is SA ϭ 0. A formula for the approximate surface area. Which planet has the longer period. Two students discussed the meaning of the statement 3. where m is the person’s mass in kilograms. to the nearest whole number. Calculate the surface area of a child with mass 40 kg. Here is a student’s solution for evaluating a power. multiplied together will equal about 132.5661… Identify the errors the student made.96 ϭ Q3 1.2 multiplied by itself 4.2 .. you can’t multiply a number 4.qxd 12/7/09 5:44 PM Page 228 17. where d metres is the diameter at the base. for the percent 1 of caffeine that remains after h. 20.2 times is about 132. m What must be true about x for x n to be a rational number? 228 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers . Use the formula to determine the approximate height of a fir tree with base diameter 3.wncp10_4_4.2 ϭ 132. Here is an expression for the percent of caffeine that remains in your body n hours after you drink a caffeine beverage: n 100(0. In the late 1500s. The mean distance of Mars from the sun is about 228 million kilometres.96 R 2 Ί ϭ (1.2 can be written as 3. The 3 formula is T Џ 0. Sun C 22.2.

List 5 possible pairs of lengths and widths for this rectangle.5 Negative Exponents and Reciprocals 229 . Scientists can calculate the speed of a dinosaur from its tracks.wncp10_4_5. Make Connections A rectangle has area 1 square foot. Alberta.qxd 12/7/09 4. What is the relationship between the possible lengths and widths? 1 square foot 4. These tracks were found near Grand Cache.5 5:47 PM Page 229 Negative Exponents and Reciprocals LESSON FOCUS Relate negative exponents to reciprocals.

so the numbers and are also reciprocals. E. 5Ϫ2 and 52 are reciprocals. Apply these properties. 230 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers . Cut the grid in half and discard one piece. Use patterns to extend the second and third columns of the table to Cut 13.qxd 12/7/09 5:47 PM Page 230 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. D. 1 1 and ϭ 52 So.wncp10_4_5. 5Ϫ2 · 52 ϭ 5Ϫ2 ϩ 2 ϭ 50 ϭ1 Since the product of 5Ϫ2 and 52 is 1. Compare the areas for each pair of powers in the table: Ϫ1 Ϫ2 ■ 2 and 21 ■ 2 and 22 ■ 2Ϫ3 and 23 What relationships do you notice? Two numbers with a product of 1 are reciprocals. C. A. 1 1 Since 4 · ϭ 1. 5Ϫ2 ϭ 25 This suggests the following definition for powers with negative exponents. the numbers 4 and are reciprocals. 5Ϫ2 ϭ 2 5 5Ϫ2 1 That is. Determine the area of the grid in square units and as a power of 2. · ϭ 1. 4 4 2 3 2 3 Similarly. Cut out a 16 by 16 grid. Record your results in a table like this: Cut Area (units2) Start 256 Area as a Power of 2 1 2 3 B. Repeat Step B until the paper cannot be cut further. In the table. record the area of the remaining piece in square units and as a power of 2. You will need grid paper and scissors. 3 2 3 2 We define powers with negative exponents so that previously developed properties such as am · an ϭ am ϩ n and a0 ϭ 1 still apply.

Evaluate each power. and order does not matter 3 3 when we multiply. the rational exponent in the power 8 indicates these operations at the right. cube root.3Ϫ4 SOLUTION a) 3Ϫ2 ϭ ϭ 1 32 Ϫ3 3 4 Ϫ Ϫ b) a b ϭ a b 4 3 1 9 1 49 c) Ϫ0. reciprocal ↓2 ↓↓ 2 Ϫ 3 Ϫ 3 8 square cube root 2 1 Since the exponent Ϫ is the product: (Ϫ1) a b (2). xϪn is the reciprocal of xn.4567901 0.2962…] [Answers: a) 3 c) 0.) 4. 2 Ϫ 3 a) 8 3 9 Ϫ2 b) a b 16 (Solution continues. 1 1 That is.5 Negative Exponents and Reciprocals 231 . 0.3^-4 123.3Ϫ4 ϭ 123. 10 Ϫ3 b) a b a) 7Ϫ2 3 Ϫ3 c) (Ϫ1. x ϶ 0 Evaluating Powers with Negative Integer Exponents Example 1 Evaluate each power.4567… We can apply the meaning of rational exponents and negative exponents to evaluate powers with negative rational exponents. xϪn ϭ xn and x Ϫn ϭ xn.qxd 12/7/09 5:47 PM Page 231 Powers with Negative Exponents Why can’t x be 0? When x is any non-zero number and n is a rational number. For example. Example 2 Evaluating Powers with Negative Rational Exponents Evaluate each power without using a calculator.wncp10_4_5. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3 Ϫ3 Ϫ b) a b 4 a) 3Ϫ2 1. we can apply the three operations of reciprocal.3Ϫ4 64 ϭϪ 27 b) 27 1000 Use a calculator. and square in any order.5) c) 0.

1 2 2 1 ϭ 4 ϭ [Answers: a) Square the result. In the formula. [Answer: approximately 1.25 m 5 7 Ϫ 3 6 7 5 Ϫ 3 6 v ϭ 0.2 m/s] s f SOLUTION 5 Use the formula: v ϭ 0. and f is the foot length in metres.25 5 Ϫ v ϭ 0. Ί9b 16 3 Take the square root.00 m 3.25)^(-7/6) v ϭ 0. Use the formula v ϭ 0.25) 7 Ϫ 6 7 6 7 Ϫ 6 0.8 m/s.155 (1)3 (0. 2 3 8 ϭ 1 A3 8 B 2 Ί Take the cube root. Evaluate each power without using a calculator. 1 32 6 b) ] 5 3 3 9 Ϫ2 16 2 b) a b ϭ a b 16 9 ϭa Write with a positive exponent. Use the measurements in the diagram to estimate the speed of the dinosaur. v is the speed in metres per second.155 s f to estimate the speed of a dinosaur when s ϭ 1.3. 232 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers 0. Applying Negative Exponents Example 3 Paleontologists use measurements from fossilized dinosaur tracks and the formula CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 0.155 s 3f Substitute: s ϭ 1 and f ϭ 0.25) v ϭ 0.155 (0.7811… The dinosaur travelled at approximately 0.781151051 What is the speed of the dinosaur in kilometres per hour? . 1 5 25 Ϫ2 Ϫ 4 a) 16 b) a b 36 Write with a positive exponent.155 s f to estimate the speed at which the dinosaur travelled. s is the distance between successive footprints of the same foot.qxd 12/7/09 5:47 PM Page 232 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING SOLUTION 2 Ϫ 3 1 a) 8 ϭ 2. 1.155(0.wncp10_4_5. 4 3 ϭab 3 64 ϭ 27 What other strategies could you use to evaluate the powers? Cube the result.5 and f ϭ 0.

Write each power with a positive exponent. and what is different. The interest rate for the savings account is 2.032 Michelle invest on January 1st? 10.5 Negative Exponents and Reciprocals 233 . a) 2 Ϫ3 Ϫ5 ϭa Ϫ2 b) 3 c) (Ϫ7) a) 3Ϫ2 b) 2Ϫ4 1 Ϫ3 d) a b 3 2 Ϫ2 e) a b Ϫ 3 c) (Ϫ2)Ϫ5 1 f) Ϫ3 5 B 9. Evaluate the powers in each pair without a calculator. P dollars. describe the relationship between am and aϪm. a) 27 4 Ϫ 3 b) 16Ϫ1. 5.wncp10_4_5. Write a correct solution. 1 Ϫ3 Ϫ b) a b ϭ (Ϫ2) 2 1 4 ϭ5 5 1 c) ϭ 32 3 a) d) 1 Ϫ2 ϭ 4 4 4. 6. The money. Why is there usually more than one way to determine the value of a power m Ϫ n? of the form a Use examples to justify your answer. Michelle wants to invest enough money on January 1st to pay her nephew $150 at the end of each year for the next 10 years. When m is an integer. Given that 2 ϭ 1024. The savings account pays 3. Identify any errors in the solution. Evaluate each power without using a calculator.4 3 4 9 f) a b 4 Ϫ 5 2 14. 5 5 64 Ϫ3 64 3 Ϫ b ϭa b a 125 125 13.09 1 Ϫ 3 Ϫ Ϫ e) (Ϫ0. Write each power with a positive exponent. How much must 0.5% compounded annually. Ϫ3 6 Ϫ4 1 Ϫ2 2 Ϫ a) a b b) a b c) a b 5 2 3 8. what is 2 10 Ϫ10 ? 11. 1 1 a) b) c) 4 d) Ϫ3 9 5 4. Copy then complete each equation. that Michelle must invest today is given by the formula 150 31 Ϫ1. Suppose you want an amount of $3000 in 5 years. you must invest now is given by the formula: P ϭ 3000(1. the bank pays you interest. P dollars.027) Ϫ g) 9 3 2 1 2 2 3 d) (Ϫ64) Ϫ f) 32 1 3 2 5 Ϫ h) 0.qxd 12/10/09 6:40 PM Page 233 1.032Ϫ10 4 Pϭ . Discuss the Ideas 2.2% compounded annually. Use a power with a negative exponent to write an equivalent form for each number. Evaluate each power without using a calculator. When you save money in a bank.04 3 2 Ί 125 b 3 64 5 4 5 ϭab 5 1024 ϭ 3125 7. This interest is added to your investment and the resulting amount also earns interest. How much must you invest now to have $3000 in 5 years? 12. Here is a student’s solution for evaluating a power. The money. Evaluate each power without using a calculator. Ϫ a) 4 c) 27 1 2 Ϫ b) 0.5 2 Ϫ 3 8 d) a b Ϫ 27 81 e) a b 16 Ϫ c) 32Ϫ0. b) 24 and 2Ϫ4 a) 42 and 4Ϫ2 1 Ϫ1 c) 6 and 6 d) 43 and 4Ϫ3 Describe what is similar about the answers. We say the interest compounds.025)Ϫ5. Exercises A 3.

qxd 12/7/09 5:47 PM Page 234 15. F newtons. This T-shirt shows the first 100 digits of ␲. Research to find the diameters of Earth and the moon. 16. Calculate the gravitational force with this new value of r. which was many more digits than any previous manual calculations. The intensity. Today. Which is greater. How many times as great as 3 is 3 ? Express your answer as a power and in standard form. Throughout history. There is a gravitational force. Explain what a negative exponent means. where M is the mass of Earth in kilograms. ␲.wncp10_4_5. a) What is the gravitational force between Earth and the moon? b) The value r is actually the distance between the centres of Earth and the moon.67 × 10Ϫ11)MmrϪ2. but did provide motivation for some discoveries that have been influential in modern mathematics. The mass of the moon is approximately 7. 16 ϭ 24 8 ϭ 23 4 ϭ 22 b) Extend the patterns in part a downward. This had no practical value. a Ϫ5 3 18. an early computer calculated ␲ to 2000 digits. Use examples to demonstrate your thinking. 21. Write the next 5 rows in the pattern. and r is the distance between Earth and the moon in metres. between Earth and the moon. at a distance d centimetres from the source is given by the formula I ϭ 100d Ϫ2. In 1949. The mass of Earth is approximately 5. I.9736 × 1024 kg. and accuracy of supercomputers. The intensity of light at its source is 100%. 234 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers . and even a home computer can be programmed to calculate ␲ to millions of digits in a few hours.349 × 1022 kg. 1 c) Explain how this pattern shows that aϪn ϭ n . calculating digits of ␲ is a test of the power. m is the mass of the moon in kilograms. was not proved irrational until the 18th century. Computers have calculated ␲ to more than 6 billion digits. THE WORLD OF MATH Math Fact: Computers and ␲ The most famous irrational number of all. Is it always true that the value of the power will be less than 1? Use an example to explain. 17. The mean distance between them is approximately 382 260 km. 2Ϫ5 or 5Ϫ2? Verify your answer. 19. This force is given by the formula F ϭ (6. many mathematicians have spent much time manually calculating the decimal digits of ␲. A number is raised to a negative exponent. a) Identify the patterns in this list. What do you know about the sign of the exponent in each case? Justify your answers. b) 3x Ͻ 1 c) 3x ϭ 1 a) 3x Ͼ 1 Reflect C 20. speed. Use the formula to determine the intensity of the light 23 cm from the source.

– You applied the exponent law for multiplying powers to justify why a power with a negative rational exponent is written as a reciprocal.4 – You used patterns to explain a meaning for an exponent of the 1 form . am = an + m 1 n When m = 1 1 .wncp10_4_5.5 – You used patterns to explain a meaning for a negative exponent. n – You applied the exponent law for the power of a power to justify 1 why a power with exponent is n the nth root of the base of the power. When m = –n (a n )n = an = a1 =a m an = ■ When n is a rational number m ■ 1 and an = (a m )n a = 1m an Reciprocal of a fraction m an = ( n a )m m an = n a m m –n m a b –n b = a m n In Lesson 4. a–n = an + (–n) = a0 =1 Definition of a radical Definition of a reciprocal a–n = 1 n a 1 an = n a 1 an m In Lesson 4. n an . Checkpoint 2 235 .qxd 12/7/09 5:48 PM Page 235 CHECKPOINT 2 Concept Development Connections (am)n = amn an .

Q3 3 R 4 Ί Ί 6. Suppose you want $5000 in 3 years. where T is the circulation time in seconds and m is the body mass in kilograms. The money.qxd 12/7/09 5:48 PM Page 236 Assess Your Understanding 4. then calculate the edge length. 3. 2 1 49 1. Write the edge length of the cube as a radical and as a power.5 a) 16 4 b) 490. a) 3 4 b) Ί 9 c) 4Ί18 d) QΊ10 R 3 Ί e) Q3ΊϪ10 R 2 4.5 v) 1Ϫ1252 vi) a b 125 b) Evaluate each radical in part a without using a calculator.029)Ϫ3 How much must you invest now to have $5000 in 3 years? 236 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers . 3 3. Evaluate each power without using a calculator.5Ϫ2 c) 1Ϫ10002 1 Ϫ2 e) a b 10 f) 1Ϫ0. An AudioCube creates sounds and musical patterns. 2 3 3 2. 33 . a) Write each power as a radical. Arrange these numbers in order from least to greatest. if possible. Evaluate each power without using a calculator. The circulation time is the average time it takes for all the blood in the body to circulate once and return to the heart. The interest rate for a savings account is 2. you must invest now is given by the formula: P ϭ 5000(1.4 1. QΊ3R 5.wncp10_4_5. 5. P dollars. Each cube exchanges musical information wirelessly with nearby cubes.5 c) (Ϫ64)3 d) a b 9 2. 2 Ϫ4 a) a b 3 1 1 Ϫ2 d) a b 4 b) 0. The volume of an AudioCube is 421 875 mm3.9% compounded annually. Estimate the circulation time for a mammal with mass 85 kg. The circulation time for a 1 mammal can be estimated from the formula T Џ 17. 4.4m 4 .0082 Ϫ 2 3 Ϫ 4 3 8. Write each radical in exponent form. Explain why you could not evaluate some radicals.5 7. 2 3 i) 353 ii) 322 5 e) (Ϫ8)3 2 iii) 1Ϫ32 2 5 2 1 3 8 3 iv) 4001.

Make Connections Recall the exponent laws for integer bases and whole number exponents. and why? 4.qxd 12/7/09 4. b 0 b b 0 What other types of numbers could be a base? An exponent? How would you use the exponent laws to evaluate an expression with these numbers? Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work on your own.6 Applying the Exponent Laws 237 . Product of powers: Quotient of powers: Power of a power: Power of a product: Power of a quotient: am · an ϭ am ϩ n am Ϭ an ϭ am Ϫ n.6 6:07 PM Page 237 Applying the Exponent Laws LESSON FOCUS Apply the exponent laws to simplify expressions. Then we can use the exponent laws to help calculate the radius. If you used the same strategy. We can use a measuring cylinder to determine the volume of a sphere.wncp10_4_6. What is the value of a a6b 9 Ϫ2 b when a ϭ Ϫ3 and b ϭ 2? a5b 8 Compare strategies with a classmate. Which strategy is more efficient. find a different strategy. a (am)n ϭ amn (ab)m ϭ ambm a m am a b ϭ m.

Explain the reasoning.4Ϫ2 (1.32 3 Ϫ4 2 3 23 b) ≥ aϪ b ¥ · ≥ aϪ b ¥ 2 2 First use the power of a power law: For each power.35 ϭ 0. multiply the exponents.3 Use the product of powers law: When the bases are the same.43)(1. Example 1 Simplifying Numerical Expressions with Rational Number Bases Simplify by writing as a single power.49 (Solution continues.) 238 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers 1 Ϫ 4 3 94 [Answers: a) 1 0. Explain your reasoning. Use the quotient of powers law. add the exponents. It is a convention to write a simplified power with a positive exponent.4Ϫ2 Use the product of powers law.3 c) 5 · 0.85 1 c) 1.4 3 ϩ 4 ϭ 1.47 ϭ 1. Simplify by writing as a single power.43)(1. 3 122 132 3 Ϫ4 2 3 23 3 1Ϫ42 1 22 Ϫ Ϫ aϪ b ¥ · ≥ aϪ b ¥ ϭ a b · a b 2 2 2 2 Then use the product of powers law.qxd 12/7/09 6:07 PM Page 238 We can use the exponent laws to simplify expressions that contain rational number bases. Ϫ3 a) 0. 2 2 Ϫ ϭa b 3 c) (1.82 · 0. ϭ 1.47 Ϫ (Ϫ2) ϭ 1.3 (1.44) 3 Ϫ4¥ 2 ≥ 3 2¥ 3 b) aϪ b · aϪ b 2 2 ≥ d) ± 7 2 3 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1.3(Ϫ3) ϩ 5 ϭ 0.44) 1.3 · 0.4Ϫ2 1. 3 Ϫ8 3 6 3 Ϫ4 2 3 23 Ϫ Ϫ aϪ b ¥ · ≥ aϪ b ¥ ϭ a b · a b 2 2 2 2 3 Ϫ2 Ϫ ϭa b 2 Write with a positive exponent.5Ϫ3)Ϫ5 1.5 5 7 SOLUTION Ϫ3 5 5 a) 0.3Ϫ3 · 0.4Ϫ2 1. 0.510 ≥ ≥ d) 94 • 9 d) 9 4 ] 4 14 Ϫ b) a b 5 . a) 0.8Ϫ7 6 ≤ 1 73 • 5 3 4 2 Ϫ3 4 4 Ϫ5 aϪ b ¥ Ϭ ≥ aϪ b ¥ 5 5 b) ≥ c) 1.wncp10_4_6.

2. a) (x 3y 2)(x 2yϪ4) CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 5 3 b) 10a b 2a2b Ϫ2 SOLUTION a) (x 3y 2)(x 2yϪ4) ϭ x 3 · y 2 · x 2 · yϪ4 ϭ x 3 · x 2 · y 2 · yϪ4 ϭ x 3 ϩ 2 · y 2 ϩ (Ϫ4) ϭ x 5 · yϪ2 1 ϭ x5 · 2 y x5 ϭ 2 y b) 10a 5b 3 10 a 5 b 3 ϭ · a 2 · b Ϫ2 2a 2bϪ2 2 ϭ 5 · a5 Ϫ 2 · b3 Ϫ (Ϫ2) ϭ 5 · a3 · b5 ϭ 5a3b5 x3y2 means x3 · y2 Use the product of powers law. what other strategy could you use? Which strategy is more efficient? 2 6 ϭ 73 ± ≤ 6 3 Use the quotient of powers law. Explain the reasoning. Write with a positive exponent.6 Applying the Exponent Laws 239 . Explain your reasoning. ϭ 17 2 7 2 6 6 Ϫ 3 3 ϭ 17 2 4 6 Ϫ 3 Use the power of a power law. 4. Simplify.qxd 12/8/09 5:49 PM 6 2 73 ± d) 1 3• 7 7 5 3 ≤ Use the product of powers law. 6 2 73 ϭ± 7 Page 239 1 5 ϩ 3 3 ≤ In part d.wncp10_4_6. 4 Ϫ a b (6) 3 ϭ7 Ϫ 24 ϭ7 3 ϭ 7Ϫ8 1 ϭ 8 7 Write with a positive exponent. Example 2 Simplifying Algebraic Expressions with Integer Exponents Simplify. a) m4nϪ2 · m2n3 6x 4yϪ3 b) 14xy 2 [Answers: a) m6n b) 3x 3 ] 7y 5 Use the quotient of powers law.

c) 12xϪ5y 2 1 1 3 3 3x 2y ϭ (2 ) · a1 · b2 ϭ 2ab2 1 3 1 3 b) ( x 2y 2)(x 2yϪ1) ϭ x 2 · x 2 · y 2 · yϪ1 Use the product of powers law. Explain the reasoning. 1 1 a bab 2 2 ·b 1 2b4 a2 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers Ϫ 1 2 50x 2y 4 2x 4y 7 1 2 b [Answers: a) 125a6b3 2 4 aϪ2 b 3 ϭ · 2 · 1 2 a b3 ϭ 1 b) (x 3y 2)(xϪ1y 2) Write with a positive exponent.qxd 12/7/09 6:07 PM Page 240 Simplifying Algebraic Expressions with Rational Exponents Example 3 Simplify. 1 3 6 3 a) (8a b ) CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1 3 ( x 2y 2)(x 2yϪ1) b) 2 c) 4a Ϫ2b 3 ± d) 1 2a2b 3 100a 1 Ϫ 25a5b 2 ≤ 1 2 3. 2 b Write with a positive exponent. ϭ± 25 a5 Ϫ1 Use the quotient of powers law.wncp10_4_6. 1 ϭ 4 • a1Ϫ5 • b 1 ϭ 4 1 1Ϫ 42 a b 2 1 4 Ϫ2 ϭ 42 · a ϭ2·a ϭ 240 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 • aϪ4 • b 2 1 d) a ·b Use the power of a power law. 2 ϭ 2 · a(Ϫ2) Ϫ 2 · b 3 Ϫ 1 3 1 ϭ 2 · aϪ4 · b 3 Write with a positive exponent. 3 a) 125a 4b 2 2 2 3 Ϫ SOLUTION 1 3 6 3 5 1 3 a) (8a b ) ϭ 8 · 1 3a b a 3 · 1 6a b b 3 Using the power of a power law. 1 3 d) ± 100a 1 Ϫ 25a5b 2 ≤ 2b a4 1 2 1 100 a1 1 ≤ 2 • • Simplify inside the brackets first. 4y 3 x 11 2 d) 5 xy 3 2 ] b) x2 y . 3 ϩ ϭ x2 ϭ x 2y 2 c) 4a Ϫ2b 3 1 2a2b 3 1 2 · y 2 ϩ (Ϫ1) c) Use the quotient of powers law. Simplify. Explain your reasoning.

5Ϫ3 a) 0. how do you know which exponent law to apply first? Exercises Write all powers with positive exponents. Discuss the Ideas 1. Substitute V ϭ 425. What is the radius of the sphere to the nearest tenth of a metre? SOLUTION The volume V of a sphere with radius r is given by the 4 formula: V ϭ ␲r3.52 · 0. A cone with height and radius equal has volume 18 cm3.52 c) d) 0.6 Applying the Exponent Laws 241 .6640… Use the power of a power law. take the cube root of each side 4␲ CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4. then solve for r. Write as a single power.664088405 3 ͱ(1275/(4 x The radius of the sphere is approximately 4. Simplify. b) 0. What are the radius and height of the cone to the nearest tenth of a centimetre? [Answer: approximately 2.qxd 12/7/09 6:07 PM Example 4 Page 241 Solving Problems Using the Exponent Laws A sphere has volume 425 m3. 3 4 3 Multiply each side by 3. x4 a) 2 x x2 x5 a2 d) 6 a b) c) n6 Ϭ n5 6. Suppose you want to evaluate an algebraic expression for particular values of the variables.53 0. A 3.7 m.5 0. Why might it be helpful to simplify the expression first? 2.5 Ϫ3 5.wncp10_4_6. a) (n2)3 c) (nϪ4)Ϫ3 b) (z 2)Ϫ3 d) (cϪ2)2 4. 425 ϭ ␲r 3 4 3(425) ϭ 3 ␲r 3 3 Divide each side by 4␲.6 cm] ( ) by raising each side to the one-third power.52 · 0. 1 1 1275 3 a b ϭ 1r 3 23 4␲ 1 1275 3 a b ϭr 4␲ r ϭ 4. Simplify. a) x 3 · x 4 c) bϪ3 · b 5 b) a2 · aϪ5 d) m2 · mϪ3 4. 1275 ϭ 4␲r 3 3 1275 4␲r ϭ 4␲ 4␲ 1275 ϭ r3 To solve for r. Simplify. When you simplify an expression.53 2 0. How do you know that the length of the radius is an irrational number? ␲ )) 4.

0273 11. Simplify. 3 a) ≥ a b 5 3 4 14. Simplify.5 1 3 3 1 2 Ϫ0.qxd 12/7/09 6:07 PM Page 242 7.6) c) (Ϫ0. Write a correct solution. b) (aϪ1bϪ2)(aϪ2bϪ3) a) (a3b2)(a2b3) c) aϪ4b 5 ab 3 aϪ7b 7 Ϫ5 d) q Ϫ9 10r a b 16. 0. Write as a single power.5 · 1. r 5 1 Ϫ Ϫ 4. sϪ1. n5)Ϫ6 (m 2 . A cone with equal height and radius has volume 1234 cm3.027 ϭ 10b a4 19.49 4 0. s 2 ϭr 1 3 Ϫ Ϫ 4. Evaluate each expression for a ϭ Ϫ2 and b ϭ 1. Simplify. Identify any errors in each solution for simplifying an expression. s2 . s 2 ϭr 5 1 1Ϫ ϪϪ 1 4. Identify the errors in each simplification. s 2 a Ϫ1 1b . Simplify. Explain how to use a measuring cylinder containing water to calculate the diameter of a marble that fits inside the cylinder. n30 ϭ (mn)30 4 12. What is the height of the cone to the nearest tenth of a centimetre? 13. (m Ϫ3. a 2 a) a b b n2 3 b) a b m 2b 2 d) a b 5c f) (n2m)3 h) (xyϪ1)3 c 2 Ϫ4 c) a 2b d e) (ab)2 g) (c 3d 2)Ϫ4 1a 2 b Ϫ12 Ϫ 2 1c Ϫ3d 2 Ϫ1 Ϫ 2 b) q 2 r cd 1aϪ3b 2 3 15.6) · ( 4 0. 1 1 3 4 3 4 b) a b · a b 4 4 5 3 1 Ϫ 4 Ϭx 1 b) 2 a 1 Ϫ3b r2 . r 4. Evaluate. s 2 ϭ 1 3 1 r 4 . s2 Ϫ1 ϭ r 1. Write the correct solution. State the exponent law you used. Which exponent laws did you use? 3 b) ≥ a b 5 ¥ 3 Ϫ3¥ Ϫ4 c) a b 5 3 Ϫ4 ¥ a) 3 Ϫ3¥ Ϫ4 d) aϪ b 5 ≥ ≥ 8. Explain your reasoning. n2)Ϫ4 a) ϭ (mϪ5 .49 1 Ϫ 3 5 3 h) 0. A sphere has volume 375 cubic feet. nϪ3)2 ϭ m30 .6 0. Explain your strategy.wncp10_4_6. b) aϪ4 · aϪ1 a) xϪ3 · x 4 c) b4 · bϪ3 · b 2 d) m8 · mϪ2 · mϪ6 Ϫ5 x s5 e) 2 f) Ϫ5 x s Ϫ8 b t Ϫ4 g) Ϫ3 h) Ϫ4 b t 10. 3 2 a) 1.6 1 2 f) 3 2 4 5 2 g) 3 3 Ϫ a b 8 3 aϪ b 8 0. b) (2aϪ2b 2)Ϫ2 a) (xϪ1yϪ2)Ϫ3 Ϫ4 3 c) (4m2n3)Ϫ3 d) a mϪ2 nϪ3b 2 242 Ϫ2 ϭ Ϫ5a 2 b) ± 1 ≤ b2 2 e) a) (x 2yϪ3)(x 2yϪ1) ϭ x 2 · x 2 · yϪ3 · yϪ1 ϭ x1 · y 3 ϭ xy 3 5 4 3 4 Ϫ3 d) a b · a b 5 5 ≤ 1 3 17. Simplify. What is the surface area of the sphere to the nearest square foot? Chapter 4: Roots and Powers 10a Ϫ4 b Ϫ1 18. 2 3 Ϫ 2 4 a) m 3 · m 3 b) x 3 c) B Ϫ9aϪ4b 4 d) 1 2 4 Ϫ64c 6 ± 1 Ϫ a9b 2 3a b 9.

a) Write. in metres. THE WORLD OF MATH Math Fact: Platonic Solids Platonic solids are the only regular polyhedra that can be placed in a sphere so that each vertex touches the surface of the sphere. If x ϭ aϪ2 and y ϭ a3. aϪ3b Ϫ4 c 5 Ϫ1 a) q 2 r . are commonly used outside of North America. Use examples to illustrate the types of expressions you can simplify.C. 3 c) x 2 is the result of raising a power with a rational exponent to a rational exponent. is 2nϪ1 4 2 . the width. It is placed inside a sphere so that all its vertices touch the surface of the sphere. determine the length of AD. In about 300 B. Write 3 different expressions for each result. The measures. AB AE Explain how to apply the exponent laws to simplify algebraic expressions. 3 and its length.E. write each expression in terms of a. i) A3 ii) A4 iii) A5 b) Suppose each piece of paper from part a is folded in half along a line perpendicular to its length. …. then simplify expressions to represent the dimensions of each piece of paper. Euclid used trigonometry. AC ϭ a b . Evaluate each measure to the nearest millimetre. in centimetres. Simplify. For any whole number n. q 4 Ϫ3r c ab b) (2a Ϫ1b 4cϪ3)Ϫ2 (4a 2bcϪ4)2 E D 2 22. then simplify expressions to represent the dimensions of each folded piece.wncp10_4_6. 24. A2. Show your work. c) Compare your results in parts a and b. AE ϭ a b 3 2 3 3 A C 21. What do you notice? b) x 2 is the quotient of two powers with rational exponents. of a piece of Ϫ An paper is 2 Ϫ 2nϩ1 4 23. Write. ISO paper sizes A0.qxd 12/7/09 8:59 PM Page 243 20. similar triangles. in metres. b a) ax 2y 3 1 2 Ϫ b) ax 4 Ϭ y 2b 2 3 Reflect 1 3 B 1 cm C Given that ᭝ABC is similar to ᭝AED and AC AD ϭ . A regular tetrahedron has edge length 1 cm. A1. Point D is the centre of the sphere. and the Pythagorean Theorem to show the ratio of the edge length of each Platonic solid to the diameter of the sphere: Tetrahedron 1 3 2 1: a b 2 Cube Octahedron 1 1 : 22 Icosahedron 1 1 2 1a 1 1 32 ϩ152b 1 : a 10 ϩ2( 5) 2b 2 2 1 1 1 : 32 Dodecahedron 1: 4. of 3 line segments are: 1 1 1 2 2 3 1 2 1 2 AB ϭ a b . 3 a) x 2 is the product of two powers with rational exponents.6 Applying the Exponent Laws 243 .

A personal financial planner uses math and technology to explore different ways for a person to invest her or his money. while the denominator indicates a root.qxd 12/7/09 6:13 PM Page 244 S T U DY G U I D E CONCEPT SUMMARY Big Ideas ■ Applying the Big Ideas Any number that can be written as the m fraction . it is rational. The ability to understand. it is irrational. n 0. where m and n are integers. This means that: ■ If a real number can be expressed as a terminating or repeating decimal. ■ We can use the exponent laws to simplify expressions that involve rational exponents. insurance. ■ The numerator of a rational exponent indicates a power. and evaluate algebraic formulas that involve rational exponents is an essential skill. investment firms. as well as private practice. ■ Exponents can be used to represent roots and reciprocals of rational numbers. n is rational. 244 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers . A negative exponent indicates a reciprocal. ■ The exponent laws can be extended to include powers with rational and variable bases. ■ How can you predict whether the value of a radical will be a rational number or an irrational number? ■ How were the exponent laws used to create definitions for negative exponents and rational exponents? ■ Reflect on the Chapter What does it mean to simplify an expression involving radicals or exponents? THE WORLD OF MATH Careers: Financial Planner The financial services industry offers many career opportunities – in banking. otherwise.wncp10_BM1. manipulate. and rational exponents.

3. 2. [4.5] Apply the exponent laws to simplify expressions.01. A similar procedure applies for cube roots and higher roots. Write the simplest expression using positive exponents. Take the square root of the perfect square factor. [4.2] To determine whether a number is rational or irrational. 4. Use mental math to evaluate the powers and/or simplify the roots. 0.4. quotients of powers. To simplify expressions involving powers: 1. 0. To simplify a square root: 1. write the number in decimal form. 2. Ϫ 5 7 Irrational numbers: Ί 3. . Non-repeating. or powers of powers. Rational numbers: ■ ■ Simplify radicals.qxd 12/7/09 6:13 PM Page 245 SKILLS SUMMARY Skill Description Example Classify numbers. 3 10 2. 4. [4. Write the radicand as a product of its greatest perfect square factor and another number.75. ␲ Ί 200 ϭ Ί 100 • 2 ϭ Ί 100 · Ί 2 ϭ 10Ί 2 Ί 200 ϭ 3 8 • 25 Ί 3 ϭ 3 8 · 3 25 Ί Ί ϭ 23 25 Ί Evaluate powers. Ϫ3.1. Rewrite a power with a negative exponent as a power with a positive exponent. 2. [4. 64 2 Ϫ 3 ϭ 1 2 643 1 ϭ 3 AΊ 64 B 2 1 ϭ 2 4 1 ϭ 16 x3y 6 Ϫ4 1xy 2)3 Ϫ4 a 5 b ϭa 5 b x y x y x 5 y1 4 ϭ a 3 6b xy ϭ (x 5 Ϫ 3y1 Ϫ 6)4 ϭ (x 2yϪ5)4 ϭ x 8yϪ20 x8 ϭ 20 y Study Guide 245 .3] Repeating and terminating decimals are rational. non-terminating decimals are irrational.6] To evaluate powers without using a calculator: 1. 3. Represent powers with fractional exponents as radicals. Remove brackets by applying the exponent laws for products of powers.wncp10_BM1.

4 10 Ί Ί Ί 3 246 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers Two sizes of cubes have volumes 32 cm3 and 11 cm3. a) 5 is a square root of the number.wncp10_BM1. Look at this calculator screen. 4 18. 3. The formula T ϭ 2␲ gives the time.8 T seconds. Ί 30. and vitamins. Tell whether each number is rational or irrational. How could you check your answer? a) Ί 150 Ί b) 3 135 c) Ί 112 d) 4 162 Ί 12. using examples. 4. Evaluate each radical.141592654 a) Is the number 3.141 592 654 rational or irrational? Explain. for one complete swing of a pendulum with length L metres. then order the numbers from least to greatest. Estimate the value of each radical to 1 decimal place. Explain. b) 6 is the cube root of the number. Identify the number in each case.3 i) ␲ 7. What strategies can you use? a) Ί 11 Ί b) 3 Ϫ12 Ί c) 4 15 4. Write each mixed radical as an entire radical. a) Ϫ2 d) Ί 32 g) 0 b) 17 e) 0. ␲ 3. 6. Why do you not need a calculator? 3 a) Ί 1000 b) Ί 0. Ί 30. repeat. Justify your answers. the meaning of the index of a radical. For 3 35.2 11.25 m long. What is the difference in the edge lengths of the cubes? How can you use radicals to find out? . b) Is the number ␲ rational or irrational? Explain your answer.qxd 12/7/09 6:13 PM Page 246 REVIEW 4.1 1. Ί 5. Write each radical in simplest form. a) 6Ί 5 b) 3Ί 14 3 c) 4 Ί 3 d) 2 4 2 Ί 13.3 4. or neither? Support your answer with an explanation. Ί Ί L 10. minerals. c) 7 is a fourth root of the number. 9. Ί 20. 9. Place each number on a number line.81 4 81 Ί c) 6 64 d) 625 2.756 Ί h) 3 81 c) Ί 16 f) 12. 3 Ϫ30. 8. Alfalfa cubes are fed to horses to provide protein. What time does the pendulum take to complete one swing? Give the answer to the nearest second. Determine the approximate side length of a square with area 23 cm2. does its decimal form terminate. A clock pendulum is 0.

442 3 2 d) a 9 b 16 20. 2Ί 7.0325)Ϫ3 How much should Kyle invest today? 26. 4Ί 3.25% compounded annually: P ϭ 1000(1. Write the next 5 rows in the pattern. Describe the strategy you used. polonium-210 has a half-life of 20 weeks. when n is a natural number and a is a rational number. 81 ϭ 34 27 ϭ 33 9 ϭ 32 b) Extend the patterns in part a downward.5 c) 1. a sample of 100 g would decay to 50 g in 20 weeks. 22.52 20 . Express each radical as a power.0 cm? Give your answer to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. 53. Arrange these numbers in order from greatest to least. then write a correct solution. Evaluate each power without using a calculator. Review 247 . The half-life of an 1 isotope is the time for its mass to decay by . The height. Express each power as a radical. Kleiber’s law relates a mammal’s metabolic rate while resting. Describe your strategy. 2 3 Ί 5 . The percent. Show. 1 c) Explain how this pattern shows that aϪn ϭ n a when a is a non-zero rational number and n is a natural number.2 a) Ί 1. a) Identify the patterns in this list. 1 a) 160. 17. 24. 5Ί 2. A company designs a container with the shape of a triangular prism to hold 500 mL of juice. to its body mass. Arrange these numbers in order from greatest to least. M kilograms: 3 4 q ϭ 70M What is the approximate metabolic rate of each animal? a) a cow with mass 475 kg b) a mouse with mass 25 g 15. of polonium remaining after time t weeks is given by the formula P ϭ 100 10.4 1 n n 16. why a ϭ Ίa . 0. with examples.wncp10_BM1. 6Ί 2 4. 1 5 b) 1Ϫ502 3 a) 124 1 3 3 d) a b 8 18. Radioactive isotopes decay. A student simplified Ί 300 as shown: Ί 300 ϭ Ί 3 · Ί 100 ϭ Ί 3 · Ί 50 · Ί 50 ϭ Ί 3 · Ί 2 · Ί 25 · Ί 2 · Ί 25 ϭ 3 · 5 · Ί2 · 5 ϭ 75Ί 2 21. Kyle wants to have $1000 in 3 years.4 Ί b) 3 132 c) Q5 2. So. 54 . Evaluate each power without using a calculator. What percent of polonium remains after 30 weeks? t 23. 3Ί 6. 2 For example. without using a calculator. 3 5.5 4. q Calories per day. 3 4 Ϫ2 2 Ϫ3 b) a b c) a b a) 2Ϫ2 25 3 25.25 5 3 c) (Ϫ8) b) 1. He uses this formula to calculate how much he should invest today in a savings account that pays 3. The bases of the prism are equilateral triangles with side length s centimetres. of the prism is given by the formula: 1 Ϫ h ϭ 2000(3) 2sϪ2 What is the height of a container with base side length 8. QΊ 5R Ί 3 4 Identify the errors the student made. P.5 R 4 Ί d) a Ί 4 2 3 b 5 19. h centimetres.qxd 12/7/09 6:13 PM Page 247 14.

2 1 3 2 3 2 a) a b · a b 2 2 1 1 2 1 a) sϪ1t 3 (s 4t 3) ϭ sϪ1 · s 4 · t 3 · t 3 1 Ϫ3 ϭ sϪ4t 4c 3 Ϫ12cϪ1 b) q r ϭ 3 d0 d ϭ Ϫ12cϪ1 1 ϭ 12c . F hertz.164 1 0. A formula for calculating the frequency. When musicians play together. is called the golden ratio. was one of the Seven Wonders of the 1 ϩΊ 5 Ancient World. Show your work. Explain your reasoning. 2 Buildings and pictures with dimensions in this ratio are often considered visually pleasing and “natural. Identify any errors in each solution. Evaluate. The number 2 is often called “phi” after the first Greek letter in “Phidias.wncp10_BM1. Explain how to use exponents or radicals to estimate the radius of the sphere. high statue of the Greek god Zeus in the temple in Olympia. 3 4. Simplify.” 248 Chapter 4: Roots and Powers 4 3 3 d) 0.. What is the frequency of middle C? Give your answer to the nearest hertz.164 32. His 42-ft.E.qxd 12/7/09 10:24 PM Page 248 27. created in about 435 B. 2 r 3 sϪ1 Ϫ3 1 1Ϫ5. called the concert pitch. A sphere has volume 1100 cm3.C. 1 ϩΊ 5 : 1.5 2 Ϫ 31.5 2 3 1 12 6 c) ≥ a b 3¥ Ϫ 5 Ί F ϭ 440(12 2)n Middle C is 9 semitones below the concert pitch. 29.” The Greek sculptor Phidias used the golden ratio for the dimensions of his sculptures. Simplify. then write a correct solution. a) (a3b)(aϪ1b4) b) 1Ϫ5.6 28. of a note n semitones above the concert pitch is: 30. x2y Ϫ2 b) a b a) (3m4n)2 yϪ2 c) 116a 2b 6 2 Ϫ 1 2 c) a3 Ϫ3 ·a a5 d) a Ϫ2 Ϫ2b s r b) ax 2 yb a x 2yϪ2b d) 3 x 2y 1 x 2yϪ2 THE WORLD OF MATH Historical Moment: The Golden Ratio The ratio. they usually tune their instruments so that the note A above middle C has frequency 440 Hz.

␲ 3.3 2. The volume V cubic inches of each cube is given. a) Which is greater. B. C. Ί 0. Ϫ 121 D. Practice Test 249 . or D 1. Ί 50 Ί 3 64 C.3 V ‫ 46 ؍‬in. B.3 C. Write 442 as a radical in simplest form. Simplify each expression. D.099m to calculate the volume of water. d litres. V ‫ 612 ؍‬in. Scientists use the formula d ϭ 0. Calculate how much water a 550-kg moose should drink in one day. ) 1 pq 2 Ϫ2 Ϫ1 2 a) (p q 1 1 2 2 c 6d 5 Ϫ3 b) a 3 4b c d 9 10 8.812 a) b) (Ϫ4) 81 Ί Ϫ d) 16 1 2 1 5.09 B. V ‫ 57 ؍‬in.qxd 12/7/09 6:13 PM Page 249 PRACTICE TEST For questions 1 and 2. 7. A student simplified x Ϫ1y 3 as follows: xyϪ2 x Ϫ1y 3 ϭ xϪ1 ϩ 1 · y 3 Ϫ 2 xyϪ2 ϭ x 0y 1 ϭy Is the student correct? If not.3 V ‫ 521 ؍‬in. choose the correct answer: A. Ί 70 or 5Ί 3? Justify your answer. that a mammal with mass m kilograms should drink in 1 day. b) Sketch a number line to illustrate the numbers in part a. describe any errors and write a correct solution. 3 4 256 Ϫ2 c) 0. For which cube is the edge length an irrational number? A. Which number is rational? A. 4.wncp10_BM1. Evaluate without using a calculator. 6. Write your answers using positive exponents.

In 2004. you can use the patterns for squaring a binomial: 412 ϭ (40 ϩ 1)2 ϭ 402 ϩ 2(40)(1) ϩ 12 ϭ 1600 ϩ 80 ϩ 1 ϭ 1681 Adapt this method to determine 392 mentally. 352. there have been men and women so proficient in calculating mentally that they have been called “human calculators. Alexis Lemaire found the 13th root of a 100-digit number in less than 4 s. you have to recognize number patterns. and 552. he was able to find the 13th root of a 200-digit number in a little over 1 min. and understand number relationships. PART A: CALCULATING MENTALLY To calculate squares and square roots using mental math. 250 Algebra and Number Project . 452. Shakuntala Devi mentally multiplied the numbers 7 686 369 774 870 and 2 465 099 745 779 and gave the correct answer 18 947 668 177 995 426 462 773 730 in 28 s. In 2007.Project2. 252. ■ To square a 2-digit number. know some elementary algebra.” In 1980.qxd 12/7/09 6:37 PM Page 250 PROJECT ALGEBRA AND NUMBER H u m a n Ramp It Up! s Calculator T hroughout history. ■ Use a calculator to evaluate 152. What patterns do you notice? How can you use the patterns to determine the square of a number that ends in 5? Use the patterns to evaluate 752 and 1052.

Heron. particularly square roots and cube roots. You may need to research to find the explanation.Project2. The Bakhshali manuscript was found in Pakistan in 1881. or models such as algebra tiles to support your explanation. diagrams. Why must Ί 4489 end in 3 or 7? What is Ί 4489 ? How can the units digit of the radicand help you identify whether the radicand could be a perfect square. 251 . These might include formulas developed by Newton. and if it is. Explain why 60 Ͻ Ί 4489 Ͻ 70. and Bakhshali. Try to explain why the method works. ■ Use an Internet search or examine older math textbooks to identify some methods or formulas that have been used to calculate or estimate roots. EXTENSION Because most people do not have extraordinary mental calculation abilities. identify possible roots? PART B: INVESTIGATING MENTAL CALCULATION METHODS Invent your own methods or research to find mental math methods that can be used to: ■ Square different types of 2-digit numbers. PROJECT PRESENTATION Your completed project can be presented in a written or oral format but should include: ■ An explanation of your methods with examples ■ An explanation of why the method works. It is believed to be a 7th century copy of a manuscript written in the 5th century or earlier. relatively complex written methods were invented to calculate or estimate roots. use algebra. ■ Provide a brief written report with an example of how to use one of these methods.qxd ■ 12/7/09 6:37 PM Page 251 You can use your understanding of number relationships to determine the square roots of 4-digit numbers such as Ί 4489 mentally. number patterns. ■ Calculate the square root of 4-digit square numbers such as 2601.

29° 1 4 in. 7. a) Determine the perimeter of ᭝ABC to the nearest tenth of an inch. 8. b) List the first ten perfect cubes. a) List the first ten perfect squares. Find an integer to replace ٗ so that each trinomial can be factored. long when the angle between the sun’s rays and the ground is 32°.Math10_CumReview 1-4. 10 C b) Determine the area of ᭝ABC to the nearest square inch. Factor each polynomial. a) n2 ϩ 9n Ϫ 22 b) 60 Ϫ 19m ϩ m2 c) 6r 2 ϩ 23r ϩ 20 d) 10n2 ϩ n Ϫ 2 . A tree casts a shadow that is 15 yd. 117 b) 84. Expand and simplify. A right cone has a slant height of 12 in. Determine the volume of the cone to the nearest cubic inch. a) Calculate the diameter of the sphere to the nearest tenth of a centimetre. The surface area of a sphere is 86 cm2. 132. 252 Chapters 1–4 10. A cube has volume 50 653 cubic inches. 150 d) 42. a) (d ϩ 5)(d Ϫ 3) b) (5 Ϫ s)(9 Ϫ s) c) (Ϫ7 ϩ 4g)(7 ϩ 4g) d) (3k Ϫ 7)(2k ϩ 9) 13. b) b2 Ϫ 5b ϩ ٗ a) x 2 ϩ ٗx ϩ 14 2 d) a2 ϩ 4a ϩ ٗ c) y ϩ ٗy Ϫ 18 A B 9. A right rectangular pyramid has base dimensions of 6 m by 4 m and a height of 9 m. b) What is the radius of the sphere to the nearest inch? 2 4. In this trapezoid. a) 45. What is its surface area? 3. Sketch a rectangle diagram to illustrate each product. 90. a) 15a2 Ϫ 27a b) 4p ϩ 12p3 Ϫ 6p2 c) Ϫ8d4 Ϫ 14d d) 21w Ϫ 28 ϩ 14w 2 e) 18x 4y 2 Ϫ 4x 3y 3 ϩ 10x 2y 4 f) 33n 4p 3 ϩ 11n 2p 2 Ϫ 121np 4 11. c) Which of the perfect cubes in part b are also perfect squares? 14. 140. Determine the surface area of the pyramid to the nearest square metre. W 23 cm 16 cm X 6 cm Z Y 6. determine the measure of ЄW to the nearest tenth of a degree. Determine the greatest common factor and least common multiple of each set of numbers. Check by expanding. and a base diameter of 9 in. 154 c) 63. What is the height of the tree to the nearest foot? 5. 330 2. Which trinomials can be represented as a rectangle of algebra tiles? What does that tell you about the trinomials? a) t 2 ϩ 8t ϩ 7 b) c 2 ϩ 16c ϩ 4 c) 3s 2 ϩ 4s ϩ 6 d) 2m2 ϩ 11m ϩ 15 12. Factor.qxd 12/7/09 6:18 PM Page 32 CUMULATIVE REVIEW Chapters 1–4 1 3 1.

6 h) (Ϫ0. How much money should the investor invest today? 25.362 9 0.92 Ί Ί 4 7 3 b 4 5 iii) Ί (Ϫ4. The interest rate for a savings account is 2.5 2 0. that she should invest today is given by the formula P ϭ 30 000(1.7% compounded annually.064) 3 2 3 49 Ϫ2 i) a b 121 24. Suppose an investor wants to have $30 000 in 7 years.362 b) 0. Expand and simplify.75 Ϫ e) 16 c) (Ϫ0. Factor. a) Write each power as a radical. Expand and simplify. 4 150 . Evaluate Ϫ 2 1.5 a) a b a b 5 5 c) 1 5 0.qxd 12/7/09 6:18 PM Page 33 15. a) (2x Ϫ 3)(x 2 ϩ 3x Ϫ 5) b) (a ϩ 2b)(2a Ϫ 5b Ϫ 6) c) (4 ϩ t ϩ 3s)(3 Ϫ t) d) (n2 ϩ 2n Ϫ 1)(2n2 Ϫ n Ϫ 4) 17.25 2 3 5 Ϫ 3 0.6 iii) a b 4 b) Write each radical as a power. 3 Ϫ90 . 3 Ί90 . Substitute a number for the variable to check each product. a) (2c Ϫ 5)(c ϩ 6) ϩ (c ϩ 6)(3c Ϫ 2) b) (2t Ϫ 5)2 Ϫ (2t ϩ 5)(3t Ϫ 1) c) (3w ϩ 4)(2w ϩ 7) Ϫ (5w ϩ 3)(2w Ϫ 6) d) (6d ϩ 3)(2d Ϫ 3) Ϫ (3d Ϫ 4)2 18. Ί 30. a) Write each entire radical as a mixed radical.25 2 7 d) 2 1 3 1 3 Ϫ Ϫ a b a b 8 8 5 1 3 1 Ϫ a b aϪ b 8 8 26. a) 3c 2 Ϫ 24c Ϫ 60 b) Ϫ5h2 Ϫ 20h ϩ 105 c) 24c 2 Ϫ 87c Ϫ 36 d) 100 Ϫ 155a ϩ 60a2 e) 4t 2 Ϫ 48t ϩ 144 f) 64 ϩ 8w Ϫ 2w 2 g) 108r 2 Ϫ 147s 2 h) Ϫ70x 2 ϩ 22xy ϩ 12y 2 16. 4 250 Ί Ί Ί 21. Verify by multiplying the factors. a) 25n2 ϩ 40n ϩ 16 b) 24v 2 ϩ 14vw Ϫ 3w 2 c) 81c 2 Ϫ 169d 2 d) 9a2 Ϫ 30ab ϩ 25b2 4 19. 3 a) 81 4 Ϫ2 d) a b 9 g) 243 5 36 2 b) a b 49 0. Ί Ί i) 5Ί 3 ii) 2 3 5 iii) 11 4 2 3 5 iv) 3Ί 7 v) 9 Ί4 vi) 2 Ί 3 22. a) (aϪ2b Ϫ1)Ϫ3 a3b Ϫ c) 5ab 2xϪ4yϪ3 Ϫ4 b 4x 2yϪ5 1 Ϫ15a 2b Ϫ b) a 3 2 d) ± 6 xz Ϫ 1 3 8 Ϫ125yϪ9z 3 Cumulative Review Ϫ ≤ 1 3 253 . Locate each number on a number line. Ί Ί i) Ί 96 ii) 3 108 iii) 4 144 3 4 iv) Ί 425 v) Ί 648 vi) Ί352 b) Write each mixed radical as a entire radical.5) 3 3 1. The money.027) 3 3 3 4 25 Ϫ2 f) a b 64 Ϫ 0. Evaluate each power without using a calculator. P dollars.027)Ϫ7. Revise your estimate until its cube is within two decimal places of 40. 20. 3 2 i) 50 4 ii) (Ϫ2.Math10_CumReview 1-4.36 2 21 3 0. Simplify.8)6 23. Then order the numbers from least to greatest. Factor. ii) a i) 3 8. Use the two consecutive perfect cubes closest Ί to 40 to estimate a value for 3 40 .

NEW VOCABULARY relation arrow diagram function domain range function notation rate of change linear function vertical intercept horizontal intercept . ■ A linear function has a constant rate of change and its graph is a non-vertical straight line.wncp10_5_1 .qxd 12/7/09 5 3:36 PM Page 254 Relations and Functions BUILDING ON ■ writing equations to represent patterns in tables ■ graphing and analyzing linear relations BIG IDEAS ■ A relation associates the elements of one set with the elements of another set. ■ A function is a special type of relation for which each element of the first set is associated with a unique element of the second set.

Here. the longest day of the year. the sun never sets. .wncp10_5_1 . north of the Arctic Circle.qxd 12/7/09 3:36 PM Page 255 P A U L AT U U Q (place of coal) is in the Northwest Territories. on June 21st.

1 3:37 PM Page 256 Representing Relations LESSON FOCUS Represent relations in different ways.wncp10_5_1 . Make Connections This family tree shows relations within a family. Legend Simon Direct descendant MarieAnne Marriage Female Male Elisabeth Joseph Étienne Angélique How is Joseph related to Simon? How are Angélique and François related? How does the family tree show these relations? 256 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions MarieMadeleine Louis François .qxd 12/7/09 5.

Pair a letter with a word to show the association “is a letter of the word. S E T A R B.wncp10_5_1 . A set is a collection of distinct objects. An element of a set is one object in the set. 5} The order of the elements in the set does not matter. ■ A letter can only be used once in each word. One way to write a set is to list its elements inside braces. ■ Plurals cannot be used. 3. Suppose you reverse the order of the items in the pairs. Use the letters in the square and the words you wrote. Use the letters in the square below to write as many words as you can with 3 or more letters. A relation associates the elements of one set with the elements of another set.1 Representing Relations 257 . For example. ■ Each word must contain the letter in the centre square. Use the same association.qxd 12/7/09 3:37 PM Page 257 Construct Understanding TRY THIS A.” Write as many pairs as you can. 2. we can write the set of natural numbers from 1 to 5 as: {1. 5. C. 4. Does the association make sense? Explain.

the columns in the table. (cherry. and the ovals in the arrow diagram is important. blue). red). Each arrow associates an element of the first set with an element of the second set. green). a relation has direction from one set to the other set. this set of ordered pairs is a relation: {(apple.” That is. 258 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . element of second set So.” but it makes no sense to say.qxd 12/7/09 3:37 PM Page 258 Consider the set of fruits and the set of colours. It makes sense to say. For example: An apple may have the colour element of first set What other relations could you create using the same association between fruits and colours? association red. red). ■ an arrow diagram The two ovals represent the sets. “an apple may have the colour red. “red may have the colour apple. may have the colour apple blue blueberry green cherry huckleberry red The order of the words in the ordered pairs. We can associate fruits with their colours. (apple. (blueberry. blue)} Here are some other ways to represent this relation: ■ a table Fruit Colour apple red apple green blueberry blue cherry red huckleberry blue The heading of each column describes each set. (huckleberry.wncp10_5_1 .

Nunavut a) Describe this relation in words. Consider the relation represented by this table. Insecta eagle SOLUTION Class Mammalia a) Describe this relation in words. The territories are the second elements in the ordered pairs. Yukon). For example. Hay River is located in the NWT. (whale. b) i) {(ant. Aves). (eagle. Mammalia)}] ii) The communities are written in the first set of the arrow diagram.qxd 12/7/09 3:37 PM Example 1 Page 259 Representing a Relation Given as a Table Northern communities can be associated with the territories they are in. Animals can be associated with the classes they are in. Nunavut). (Whitehorse. (Nanisivik. is located in Hay River Nunavut Iqaluit Nanisivik Old Crow NWT Whitehorse Yellowknife Why is the direction of the arrows in the arrow diagram important? Yukon How are the representations the same? When the elements of one or both sets in a relation are numbers. Reptilia). The ordered pairs are: {(Hay River. (Old Crow. (Yellowknife. NWT). CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING NWT Animal ant Aves snake Reptilia turtle Reptilia whale a) The relation shows the association “is located in” from a set of northern communities to a set of territories.wncp10_5_1 . (turtle. Community Territory Hay River NWT Iqaluit Nanisivik Nunavut b) Represent this relation: i) as a set of ordered pairs ii) as an arrow diagram Old Crow Yukon Whitehorse Yukon Yellowknife 1.1 Representing Relations 259 . (Iqaluit. The territories are written in the second set. the relation can be represented as a bar graph. b) i) The communities are the first elements in the ordered pairs. Yukon). Reptilia). Nunavut). Insecta). each territory is written only once. NWT)} b) Represent this relation: i) as a set of ordered pairs ii) as an arrow diagram [Answers: a) The relation shows the association “belongs to the class” between a set of animals and a set of classes. (snake. 5.

write the breeds of dogs in the first set and the mean heights in centimetres in the second set.75 Lillooet has a mean height (cm) of Horseshoe Bay 2.5 Pemberton 20 0. lo 80 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Lil Mean Heights of Different Breeds of Dogs ah Different breeds of dogs can be associated with their mean heights. in hours.5 . Average Time (h) Afghan hound Chihuahua Corgi Golden retriever German shepherd Malamute 260 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions 30 60 65 75 4.3:37 PM Page 260 Representing a Relation Given as a Bar Graph 5 3 2 a) The association is: “has a mean height of ” er stl t ish m hi W ua Sq Ba sh rto 0 n 1 oe In the table.qxd Afghan hound 75 Chihuahua 20 Represent the relation: Corgi 30 a) as a table Golden retriever 60 German shepherd 60 Malamute 65 Ho Pe Mean Height (cm) rse Breed of Dog Town b) as an arrow diagram Answer: a) Town b) In the arrow diagram.5 Whistler 2. that it takes to drive to Vancouver. Consider the relation represented by this graph. Consider the relation represented by this graph. be SOLUTION 4 Time (h) Breed of dog oe Co rgi etr Ge iev rm er an sh ep he rd Ma lam ut e lde Average Travel Time to Vancouver Go Af gh an ho b) as an arrow diagram nr un d 0 ua 20 a) as a table m 40 y 60 2.75 Squamish 1. Represent the relation: ihu Example 2 Ch 12/7/09 Mean height (cm) wncp10_5_1 . Different towns in British Columbia can be associated with the average time. write the breeds of dogs in the first column and the mean heights in centimetres in the second column.

a) Describe the relation in words. Vernon B. 11) and (language.wncp10_5_1 .. In the diagram below: Western Canadian cities Both sets in a relation can be the same. b) (mathematics. Example 3 Identifying a Relation from a Diagram In this diagram: Western Canadian cities is within 1-h driving distance of CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. English words has this number of letters Natural numbers SOLUTION a) The relation shows the association “is within 1-h driving distance” from a set of cities in Western Canada to a set of cities in Western Canada. b) List 2 ordered pairs that belong to the relation. Why is the order of the elements in an ordered pair important? Give an example.) Discuss the Ideas [Sample Answers: a) The relation shows the association “has this number of letters” from a set of English words to a set of natural numbers.C. b) List 2 ordered pairs that belong to the relation. b) Two ordered pairs that belong to the relation are: (Innisfail AB. What are the advantages and disadvantages of the different ways you can represent a relation? 2.qxd 12/7/09 3:37 PM Page 261 Sometimes a relation contains so many ordered pairs that it is impossible to list all of them or to represent them in a table. 5. a) Describe the relation in words.1 Representing Relations 261 . (Kelowna B.C. 8)] 1. Olds AB).

a) Describe the relation represented by this bar graph.00 Sport Equipment a) Describe the relation in words.25 Simone Hébert Allard photography loonie 1. Typical Masses of Species of Salmon Sockeye 4 Pink Species 6 Re d Ye llo w n ee Or Gr 0 an ge 2 Bl ue Number of letters Number of Letters in a Word Word Represent the relation: a) as a table b) as an arrow diagram 262 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions Coho Chum Chinook 0 2 4 6 8 10 Mass (kg) 12 14 b) Represent the relation as a set of ordered pairs. Consider the relation represented by this graph. Artist Medium Gaëtanne Sylvester sculpture Hubert Théroux painting Coin penny 0.qxd 12/7/09 3:37 PM Page 262 Exercises A B 3. c) Represent the relation in a different way. ii) Represent the relation: as a set of ordered pairs ■ as an arrow diagram ■ a) 5. This table shows some of Manitoba’s francophone artists and the medium they use. b) Represent this relation: i) as a set of ordered pairs ii) as an arrow diagram badminton shuttlecock badminton racquet hockey puck hockey stick tennis ball tennis racquet soccer ball 4. .wncp10_5_1 .10 Nathalie Dupont photography quarter 0.00 toonie b) Value ($) 2.01 Huguette Gauthier stained glass nickel 0. For each table below: i) Describe the relation in words.05 James Culleton painting dime 0. Burning Sunset Detail by James Culleton 6.

wncp10_5_1 . 5. Show two different ways to represent your relation. 10. For example. Hayley Wickenheiser (1978) For each association below. Roberto Luongo (1979). 13.1 Representing Relations 263 . Jonathan Cheechoo (1980). French translates to words 11. a) Use the association “is older than” to write a relation. The association “is the sister of ” is shown in the diagram. a) What does this arrow diagram represent? is the number of letters in 3 Zamboni 4 zany zebra 5 Zen 6 zeppelin 7 zero 8 zombie b) Represent this relation in two different ways. c) Create an arrow diagram for words beginning with the letter X. The association “is the parent of ” is shown in the diagram. then describe the relation in words. In this relation: a) How many females are shown? b) How many males are shown? Justify your answers. For a word game.qxd 12/7/09 3:37 PM Page 263 7. Each dot represents a person and each arrow maps a sister to a sibling. Here are some Canadian hockey players and the year they were born. ii) The difference between the numbers is a prime number. b) List two ordered pairs that belong to the relation. C 12. Choose five people in your class. as shown. Jordin Tootoo (1983). then represent the relation in two different ways. a) Use each association below to create a relation as a set of ordered pairs. a) was born in b) is the birth year of Reflect In this relation: a) How many children are shown? b) How many parents are shown? c) How many grandparents are shown? Justify your answers. 8. Represent the relation using a set of ordered pairs. b) Create your own association for these five people. b) In part a. a) List the set of ordered pairs of the form: (digit. English words 9. Each dot represents a person and each arrow maps a parent to her or his child. Create a relation that you can describe in words. In the diagram below: a) Describe the relation in words. Two dice are rolled and the numbers that show are recorded. Represent this relation in different ways. 14. number of segments lit up) b) Represent this relation in two different ways. does the order of the numbers in each ordered pair matter? Explain. i) The sum of the numbers is even. use these data to represent a relation in different ways. A digital clock displays digits from 0 to 9 by lighting up different segments in two squares. words that begin with the letter Z can be difficult to find. the digit 2 needs 5 segments to light up. Jennifer Botterill (1979).

5 1.6 38 Work in a group of 3.5 12 Emily 1.qxd 12/7/09 5.0 0.7 65 Helen 1. Use the picture above. 264 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions Sara 1.8 40 Gina 1.2 3:39 PM Page 264 Properties of Functions LESSON FOCUS Develop the concept of a function.6 67 .5 0 Height (m) Age (years) David 1.wncp10_5_2.5 10 Jack 1.0 1. +3 ×2 Input Output Make Connections What is the rule for the Input/Output machine above? Which numbers would complete this table for the machine? Input Output 1 5 2 7 9 4 13 Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT 2.

2). 2. 5. unicycle). motorcycle. (bicycle. bicycle). that is. that is. tricycle. (motorcycle. 1).qxd 12/7/09 3:39 PM Page 265 Each of you chooses one of the relations below. A function is a special type of relation where each element in the domain is associated with exactly one element in the range. This diagram represents a function because each element in the first set associates with exactly one element in the second set. (4. 2. 3. The domain is the set of first elements: {1. bicycle. 4} When we list the elements of the range. How are they alike? How are they different? The set of first elements of a relation is called the domain. (2. ■ name related to age ■ name related to height ■ height related to name Represent the relation you chose. is the number of wheels on a 1 2 bicycle car motorcycle 3 4 This relation associates a vehicle with the number of wheels it has. (2. This relation associates a number with a vehicle with that number of wheels. we do not repeat an element that occurs more than once. (tricycle. car)} {(unicycle. The domain is the set of first elements: {unicycle. bicycle.wncp10_5_2. motorcycle). {(1. The set of related second elements of a relation is called the range. (3. motorcycle. 3). there are two arrows from 2 in the first set.2 Properties of Functions 265 . there is only one arrow from each element in the first set. (car. 4)} The set of ordered pairs above does not represent a function because two ordered pairs have the same first element. has this number of wheels bicycle car 1 2 motorcycle tricycle tricycle unicycle unicycle 3 4 This diagram does not represent a function because there is one element in the first set that associates with two elements in the second set. car} The range is the set of associated second elements: {1. 2). Compare the relations. car} The set of ordered pairs above represents a function because the ordered pairs have different first elements. 4} The range is the set of associated second elements: {unicycle. tricycle. 3. Here are some different ways to relate vehicles and the number of wheels each has. tricycle).

(regular hexagon. (6. 1. The domain is the set of the first elements of the ordered pairs: {right triangle. 4). 266 28 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions If (a. rectangle. 4). For each relation below: ■ Determine whether the relation is a function. 4} b) Check to see if any element in the first set associates with more than one element in the second set. So. range: {28. acute triangle. 30 March April [Answers: a) no b) yes. square. b) and (a. 31}] What other strategies could you use to determine whether each relation is a function? is the square of 1 –3 –2 4 9 –1 1 2 This relation is not a function because each of the numbers 1 and 4 in the first set associates with more than one number in the second set. (square. a) A relation that associates given shapes with the number of right angles in the shape: {(right triangle. 0)} Each ordered pair has a different first element. 2). 2). Justify your answer. (8. (acute triangle. 0). 1).wncp10_5_2. so for every first element there is exactly one second element. ■ Identify the domain and range of each relation that is a function. February. 30. the relation is a function. c) are ordered pairs in a function. (6. (square. March. 3)} b) has this number of days 2 January SOLUTION February a) Check to see if any ordered pairs have the same first element: {(right triangle. 0)} is the square of b) –3 1 –2 4 –1 1 9 1. a) A relation that associates a number with a prime factor of the number: {(4. (9. what can you say about b and c? 31 . (regular hexagon. 0). 4). ■ Identify the domain and range of each relation that is a function. 2). 4). (rectangle. April}. (acute triangle. 3). 1). regular hexagon} The range is the set of second elements of the ordered pairs: {0. (rectangle. Justify the answer. domain: {January.qxd 12/7/09 9:25 PM Example 1 Page 266 Identifying Functions For each relation below: CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING ■ Determine whether the relation is a function.

(Solution continues.50 5. 3. we say that h is the independent variable. for different numbers of tickets.wncp10_5_2. C dollars. h.00 7. 2. P dollars. P. often depends on the number of hours worked. Justify the choices.62 5 8. C ($) 6. 8.25 7.75. P ($) 1 12 2 24 3 36 4 48 5 independent variable 60 domain The values of the independent variable are listed in the first column of a table of values. Example 2 dependent variable range A table of values usually represents a sample of the ordered pairs in a relation. c) Write the domain and range. m grams. h. Hours Worked.35 1 2 3 4 1. Since the number of hours worked.2 Properties of Functions 267 . 5.75 a) Why is this relation also a function? a) Why is this relation also a function? b) Identify the independent variable and the dependent variable.75 3. we say P is the dependent variable.50. 5.…}. n. {1. The values of the dependent variable are listed in the second column of a table of values. b) Identify the independent variable and the dependent variable.08 5 6 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. a person’s gross pay. C c) {1. So.) [Answers: b) n.75. These elements belong to the range.qxd 12/7/09 3:39 PM Page 267 In the workplace. of different numbers of identical marbles. Describing Functions The table shows the masses. The table shows the costs of student bus tickets. n Cost. c) Write the domain and range. m (g) 1 1. n.00. 4.54 3 3.27 2 2. 3. does not depend on the gross pay. Number of Marbles.…}] 5. n Mass of Marbles. Justify your choices. Number of Tickets. These elements belong to the domain. h Gross Pay.25. 7.81 4 5.

the value of 3 quarters is $0. The domain is: {1.75 So.…}.62.25q We say: “V of q is equal to 0. Machine A calculates the value of the quarters.” This notation shows that V is the dependent variable and that V depends on q. Consider two machines that both accept quarters. the mass of the marbles. n. 2. b) From an understanding of the situation. the product of each natural number and 1. 2.08. 6. 5.54. 3.25q The equation V ϭ 0. the relation is a function. Machine B weighs the quarters. m.wncp10_5_2.81.25q.…}. 3. 6. V. So. The input can be any number in the domain. the input is the independent variable and the output is the dependent variable. So. m is the dependent variable and n is the independent variable. and the output depends on the input number.75. So.qxd 12/7/09 3:39 PM Page 268 SOLUTION a) For each number in the first column. Each machine performs a different operation. 268 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions .25q describes this function. V(3) ϭ 0.27. there is only one number in the second column. Since V is a function of q.25(3) V(3) ϭ 0. we can write this equation using function notation: V(q) ϭ 0.25 Output V(q) Function V When the input is q quarters. 4. that is. the output or value. all natural numbers The second column of the table is representative of the range.27 We can think of a function as an input/output machine. The range is: {1. 5. V(3) represents the value of the function when q ϭ 3. depends on the number of marbles. 7. in dollars is: 0. c) The first column of the table is representative of the domain.35. ■ Machine A Input q × 0. that is. so the machines represent two different functions.

08d ϩ 50 represents the volume. for a feast following an Arctic sports competition.4q This notation shows that M is the dependent variable and that M depends on q. where n is the number of people attending. we use x as the independent variable and y as the dependent variable. Conversely. we write y ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 5. we may write d(t) ϭ 4t ϩ 5.qxd ■ 12/7/09 3:39 PM Page 269 Machine B Input q × 4. we may write an equation in function notation as an equation in two variables. to name a function. C dollars. for the equation g (x) ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 5. the output or mass.4q The equation M ϭ 4.4 g. For example.wncp10_5_2. When we write an equation that is not related to a context. Any function that can be written as an equation in two variables can be written in function notation. (Question continues.) 5. Then an equation in two variables such as y ϭ 3x Ϫ 2 may be written as f (x) ϭ 3x – 2. And. Since M is a function of q. M. we can write this equation using function notation: M(q) ϭ 4. b) Determine the value of V(600). V litres. The equation C ϭ 25n ϩ 1000 represents the cost. a) Describe the function. of gas remaining in a vehicle’s tank after travelling d kilometres. a) Describe the function. Example 3 Using Function Notation to Determine Values The equation V ϭ Ϫ0. When the input is q quarters. We can use any other letter. Write the equation in function notation. For example. for the equation C(n) ϭ 300 ϩ 25n. Write the equation in function notation. The gas tank is not refilled until it is empty.4q describes this function. to write the equation d ϭ 4t ϩ 5 in function notation. such as g or h or k.) CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. in grams is: 4. t represents an element of the domain and d(t) represents an element of the range.2 Properties of Functions 269 . What does this number represent? (Solution continues.4 Output M(q) Function M The mass of 1 quarter is 4. What does this number represent? c) Determine the value of d when V(d) ϭ 26. we write C ϭ 300 ϩ 25n.

wncp10_5_2.08(600) ϩ 50 V(600) ϭ Ϫ48 ϩ 50 V(600) ϭ 2 V(600) is the value of V when d ϭ 600. use: Substitute: d ϭ 600 V(d) ϭ Ϫ0. How can you tell whether a set of ordered pairs represents a function? 2. 26 L of gas remains in the vehicle’s tank. that is. [Answers: a) C(n) ϭ 25n ϩ 1000 b) $3500 c) 160] c) To determine the value of d when V(d) ϭ 26. use: Substitute: V(d) ϭ 26 V(d) ϭ Ϫ0.qxd 12/7/09 3:39 PM Page 270 b) Determine the value of C(100). In function notation: V(d) ϭ Ϫ0. What does this number represent? SOLUTION a) The volume of gas remaining in a vehicle’s tank is a function of the distance travelled.08. This means that when the car has travelled 600 km.08d d ϭ 300 V(300) ϭ 26 means that when d ϭ 300. What does this number represent? b) To determine V(600). Discuss the Ideas What values of d do not make sense as possible domain values? 1. Which arrow diagrams represent functions? a) 1 doubled is 4 2 4 2 3 6 3 4 8 5 10 squared is c) 2 4 –2 3 9 –3 270 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . 26 ϭ Ϫ0.08d ϩ 50 c) Determine the value of n when C(n) ϭ 5000. the volume of gas remaining in the vehicle’s tank is 2 L. how can you determine the domain and range of the function? 3. When a function is completely represented using a set of ordered pairs or a table of values.08d ϩ 50 Solve for d. after the car has travelled 300 km. Why are some relations not functions? Why are all functions also relations? Exercises is greater than b) A 0 4. –24 ϭ Ϫ0.08d ϩ 50 Divide each side by Ϫ0.08d ϩ 50 V(600) ϭ Ϫ0. V ϭ 26.

6). square). ii) Identify the independent variable and the dependent variable. (6. (1. Justify your answers. (2. Justify your choices. rhombus). 1). a) Number of Cans of Cost. 3). n ($) 1 2.1 Ϫ0. –1)} c) {(2. Use two columns in this table to represent a relation.qxd 12/7/09 3:39 PM Page 271 5. (8. (3. a) {(1. trapezoid). a) C ϭ 20n ϩ 8 b) P ϭ n Ϫ 3 c) t ϭ 5d d) y ϭ Ϫx Altitude. iii) Write the domain and range. pentagon). (4. parallelogram). 9). 3).00 610 15. (2. 7)} 9. right triangle). c) Identify the domain and range of each relation in parts a and b. Which sets of ordered pairs represent functions? Identify the domain and range of each set of ordered pairs. A (m) Ϫ4. (3. 0). (–1. hexagon)} a) Does the set of ordered pairs represent a function? Explain. This set of ordered pairs associates a number with a polygon that has that number of sides: {(3. 5). (5. 1). Write in function notation. 6). (3. rectangle). (4. (0.00 5 10. T (°C) 3050 6.39 4 8. 27). 4). a) {(1. (3. (4. (0. 1). (3. For each table of values below: i) Explain why the relation is a function. 2). 64)} b) {(3.39 6 12. (4. Justify your answer. (6. 2). 5). Use the association “has this number of sides. (4. 11. The Rassemblement jeunesse francophone in Alberta brings together French language high school students from all over the province for a day of activities. 3). (0. (3. C Juice Purchased. (4. 0). 9)} d) {(0. (4. b) Name two relations that are not functions.” Would the new relation be a function? Explain. (3.39 2 4. Write as an equation in two variables. ■ Identify the domain and range of each relation. Name From Age Gender Marie Edmonton 13 F Gabriel Falher 16 M Élise Bonnyville 14 F Christophe Calgary 13 M Jean Edmonton 15 M Mélanie Edmonton 15 F Nicole Red Deer 17 F Marc Légal 13 M 5. 7). (3.8 3660 7. For each relation below: ■ Determine whether the relation is a function.8 10. a) d(t) ϭ 3t Ϫ 5 b) f (x) ϭ Ϫ6x ϩ 4 c) C(n) ϭ 5n d) P(n) ϭ 2n Ϫ 7 Temperature. b) Suppose the elements in the ordered pairs were reversed. 3)} b) B 8. (1.1 1830 7. (0. 3). a) Name two relations that are functions. 8).0 1220 11. (4. equilateral triangle).1 2440 3.00 3 6. (2. 12)} b) {(1. scalene triangle). isosceles triangle).2 Properties of Functions 271 .wncp10_5_2.

iii) Cookies are baked at 180°C or 356°F. What does each number represent? i) f (15) ii) m(20) b) Determine each value of l. b) All relations are functions. ii) Pure water boils at 100°C or 212°F. a) Write the function as an equation in 2 variables. Which statement is true? Give an example to justify your choice.54i converts a measurement of i inches to a measurement of C centimetres. each letter is worth a certain number of points. to C degrees Celsius. f degrees Fahrenheit. l centimetres.2) 15. .754l ϩ 71. 13. a) Determine: i) C(50) ii) C(Ϫ13) b) Determine each value of f when: i) C(f ) ϭ 20 ii) C(f ) ϭ Ϫ35 c) Write an equation in function notation to relate the temperatures in each fact.475 For a male: m(l) ϭ 2. 17. A car is travelling toward Meadow Lake Park. determine n when: i) f (n) ϭ 11 ii) f (n) ϭ Ϫ6 b) For the function g(x) ϭ Ϫ5x ϩ 1. b) Determine the value of C(12). D kilometres. i) Pure water freezes at 0°C or 32°F.wncp10_5_2.894l ϩ 70. For the function f (x) ϭ Ϫ5x ϩ 11. a) For the function f (n) ϭ 2n Ϫ 7. b) How far away from Meadow Lake Park was the car at the start of its journey? How do you know? 18. determine: a) f (1) b) f (Ϫ3) c) f (0) d) f (1.qxd 12/7/09 3:39 PM Page 272 12. How close was your answer to your actual height? 5 19. determine x when: i) g(x) ϭ 41 ii) g(x) ϭ Ϫ16 16. b) Which table in part a represents a function? Justify your choice. The function C(f ) ϭ (f Ϫ 32) converts a 9 temperature. The equation D ϭ Ϫ80t ϩ 300 represents the distance. Anthropologists who study human remains have developed equations for estimating the height of a person from a measure of her or his bones. but not all functions are relations. The height in centimetres is a function of the length. to Meadow Lake after t hours of driving. Here are some letters and their points. 14. Use an equation to estimate your height. but not all relations are functions. of the humerus (the upper arm bone). a) Describe the function.641 a) Determine each value. What does this number represent? 272 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions For a female: f (l) ϭ 2. The function C(i) ϭ 2. What does each number represent? i) f (l) ϭ 142 ii) m(l) ϭ 194 c) Measure the length of your humerus. Write this equation in function notation. In a crossword game. a) Create two different tables to represent relations that associate these letters and their points. What does this number represent? c) Determine the value of i when C(i) ϭ 100. Saskatchewan. a) All functions are relations.

in units. What are the domain and range of the function? Describe how you can determine if a relation is a function. Forensic anthropologists work in crime labs. and age at death.wncp10_5_2.224 For a male: h ϭ 3. where h is the height of the person in centimetres and r is the length of the radius in centimetres. To convert a temperature in degrees Celsius to degrees Fahrenheit. humerus ulna radius Specimens must be cleaned. and catalogued. law enforcement agencies. and may give expert testimony in court. Here are some typical equations used to estimate the height of a person from the length of her or his radius. then a person’s height can be approximated. are s. Measurements of the skull and teeth can help to estimate the age of a person. The lengths of the sides of a triangle. and t. They collect data on bones and teeth to identify the sex. 21. mass.925.271r ϩ 89. multiply the Celsius 9 temperature by then add 32. For a female: h ϭ 3. radius.qxd 12/7/09 3:39 PM Page 273 C 20. A rectangle with length l centimetres and width w centimetres has a perimeter of 12 cm. accurately measured. s ϩ 5. Use these 5 instructions to write an equation in function notation for this conversion. both as individuals and as societies. What are the domain and range of the function? 23. or at archaeological sites. Reflect 22. 5. The area of a rectangle with length l centimetres and width w centimetres is 9 cm2. Its perimeter is 16 units. museums. race. THE WORLD OF MATH Careers: Forensic Anthropologist Forensic anthropologists study human remains to understand more about how people develop. Use function notation to express t as a function of s. They may identify bones and bone fragments that have been in storage for many years. Express the perimeter of the rectangle as a function of its length.2 Properties of Functions 273 . Use function notation to express the length of the rectangle as a function of its width.343r ϩ 81. or ulna is known. height. When the length of the humerus. Use an example to illustrate each strategy you might use.

6).qxd 12/7/09 7:56 PM Page 274 CHECKPOINT 1 Concept Development Connections Here is a Frayer model for a function. a table. square pyramid). 5). These are the values of the dependent variable. Faces 4 In Lesson 5. triangular pyramid). – You related the elements of the domain to the independent variable and the elements of the range to the dependent variable. The range is the set of second elements – You described a relation in words and represented it using: a set of ordered pairs. Essential Characteristics A function is a relation where In Lesson 5. 4). (1. and algebraically using function notation. pyramid 5 square pyramid 6 cube 6 {(0. (2. rectangular prism)} is the number of faces on a 4 5 6 274 – You identified a function by checking to see whether its ordered pairs had different first elements. 2 6 3 7 (6. These are the associated with exactly one values of the independent variable. Example Non-examples Number of y 0 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 Object triangular – You described functions in words. 1 5 (5. (6. an arrow diagram. Function x ■ Chapter 5: Relations and Functions cube rectangular prism square pyramid triangular pyramid . ■ Definition The domain is the set of first elements each element in the first set is in the ordered pairs.2 – You listed the elements of the domain and of the range.1 in the ordered pairs. (3.wncp10_5_2. cube). and a bar graph. element in the second set. 7)} rectangular prism plus 4 equals 0 4 {(4.

qxd 12/7/09 7:56 PM Page 275 Assess Your Understanding 5. 5. (skin. ii) Create a function. below the surface: T(d) ϭ 10d ϩ 20 a) Identify the dependent and independent variables. b) Write this function as an equation in two variables. The temperature. Describe what this number represents. (bark. carving)} Number 2 3 2 4 3 is usually coloured grass sea sky snow d) 1 2 c) Number of Factors 1 b) blue green white For the numbers 1 to 4. of Earth’s interior is a function of the distance. a) Which relations in question 1 are functions? Justify your answers. Copy and complete this table for different representations of relations. 3. T degrees Celsius. c) Determine the value of T(5). b) Represent each relation in part a in different ways. i) Create a relation that is not a function.wncp10_5_2.1 1. basket). (stone. the first number in an ordered pair is greater than the second number. Description in Words a) Set of Ordered Pairs Arrow Diagram Table or Graph {(skin. kayak). d kilometres. (stone. b) State the domain and range of each function.2 2. a) Think about two sets of numbers and an association. Checkpoint 1 275 . Describe what this number represents. inukshuk). drum). 4. d) Determine the value of d when T(d) ϭ 50.

This graph shows the depth of a scuba diver as a function of time. Make Connections In math. A Scuba Diver’s Dive 20 Depth (m) 16 12 8 4 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 Time (min) How many minutes did the dive last? At what times did the diver stop her descent? What was the greatest depth the diver reached? For how many minutes was the diver at that depth? 276 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions .3 4:02 PM Page 276 Interpreting and Sketching Graphs LESSON FOCUS Describe a possible situation for a given graph and sketch a possible graph for a given situation.qxd 12/7/09 5. a graph provides much information.wncp10_5_3.

How are the graphs the same? How are they different? The properties of a graph can provide information about a given situation. Sketch a graph to represent this situation: You put the plug in the bath and turn on the taps.3 Interpreting and Sketching Graphs 277 . Depth of water (cm) Depth of Water in a Bathtub 32 C 24 16 B E 8 A D 12 16 Time (min) F 8 G 0 4 20 24 A. What does each segment of the graph represent? Compare your description with that of your partner.qxd 12/7/09 4:02 PM Page 277 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. You turn off the taps and pull out the plug to let out some water. This graph shows the depth of water in a bathtub as a function of time.wncp10_5_3. You leave the bathroom and return to discover that the bath has overflowed. You put the plug back in. C. B. Are both your stories the same? Should they be? Explain. Compare your graph with that of your partner. 12 Steep increase Distance (m) 10 Scale for dependent variable Steep decrease No change 8 Moderate increase 6 Steep decrease 4 Moderate decrease 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Time (min) Scale for independent variable 5. You will need grid paper.

100 cm d) D and E. c) Bags D and E have the same mass because the points that represent them lie on the same vertical line and it passes through 1800 on the Mass axis.00.qxd G 150 100 BC E D F 50 A 0 4 8 12 16 20 Age (years) a) Which person is the oldest? What is her or his age? b) Which person is the youngest? What is her or his age? c) Which two people have the same height? What is this height? d) Which two people have the same age? What is this age? e) Which of person B or C is taller for her or his age? [Answers: a) G. 10 years e) B] Does this graph represent a function? Explain. It costs $7. The cost is $4.00. Explain the answer to each question below. b) Bag B has the least mass because it is represented by the point on the graph farthest to the left and the horizontal axis represents mass. 200 Height (cm) wncp10_5_3. d) Bags A and E cost the same because the points that represent them lie on the same horizontal line and it passes through 4 on the Cost axis. Why do you think bag D is more expensive than bag E? 278 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . newborn c) B and C. The mass appears to be 500 g. Each point on this graph represents a person. b) Which bag has the least mass? What is this mass? c) Which bags have the same mass? What is this mass? Costs and Masses of Various Bags of Popcorn C 6 Cost ($) a) Which bag is the most expensive? What does it cost? CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING d) Which bags cost the same? What is this cost? 0 Ages and Heights of People D 4 2 1. e) Bag D has the better value for money because it has a greater mass than bag C and costs less than bag C. 18 years b) A.2/19/10 10:32 AM Example 1 Page 278 Interpreting a Graph Each point on this graph represents a bag of popping corn. A E B 400 800 1200 1600 2000 Mass (g) e) Which of bags C or D has the better value for money? SOLUTION a) Bag C is most expensive because it is represented by the highest point on the graph and the vertical axis represents cost. Explain your answer to each question below. The mass is 1800 g.

so as time increases. the distance increases. the car stops for 1 h: the car takes approximately 45 min to travel 50 km toward Athabasca. so as time increases. In the first hour. the car has travelled 130 km so it has reached Winkler.12/7/09 4:02 PM Page 279 The graph shows how the volume of water in a watering can changes over time. Segment BC is horizontal. to travel 130 km. which is the volume at point A. SOLUTION Segment OA Graph Journey The graph goes up to the right. The car travels approximately 65 km toward Winkler. the distance stays the same. the distance stays the same. Segment CD goes down to the right. a distance of approximately 140 km.0 A 0. so as time increases. so as time increases.5 0 20 40 60 80 Time (s) D 100 Describing a Possible Situation for a Graph Example 2 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Day Trip from Winnipeg to Winkler. Volume of Water in a Watering Can 2. The graph goes down to the The car returns to right. 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 O C A D The distance between Winnipeg and Winkler is 130 km.0 Volume (L) wncp10_5_3. AB The graph is horizontal. The starting volume is 1 L. so the volume is decreasing from 70 s to 90 s.5 1. At C. the car stops for approximately 45 min. What are the dependent and the independent variables? 5. so as time increases. The car stops for approximately 15 min. so the volume is constant from 30 s to 70 s. the distance from Winnipeg increases. the car takes 1 h to travel approximately 90 km to Athabasca] What was the total driving time? Explain. the volume is 0 L after 90 s. Manitoba 2.3 Interpreting and Sketching Graphs 279 . At point D. the car leaves Winnipeg and travels approximately 65 km toward Winkler. This graph represents a day trip from Athabasca to Kikino in Alberta.qxd B C 1. E 1 2 3 4 Time (h) 5 6 Day Trip from Athabasca to Kikino Distance (km) Distance (km) Describe the journey for each segment of the graph. CD The graph is horizontal. Segment AB goes up to the right. B Describe the journey for each segment of the graph. Winnipeg and takes 2 h the distance decreases. DE A 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 O B C D E 1 2 3 4 Time (h) 5 6 [Answer: The car takes 2 h to travel 140 km to Kikino. so the volume of water is increasing from 0 s to 30 s. where it stops for 2 h. BC The graph goes up to the right.

Label each section of your graph. BC 2 Samuel’s speed increases from 0 to 20 km/h. She ran at approximately 8 m/s for 12 s. AB 4 Journey OA 6 O F E 10 B A 280 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions Why does the graph not end at point E? . Label each section of the graph. and his speed decreased to approximately 5 km/h for 10 min as he cycled up the hill. 12 8 C 4 O D 20 30 40 Time (min) 50 Segment Samuel slows down to 0 km/h. so his speed decreases and the segment goes down to the right. Samuel arrived at the bottom of a hill. At the beginning of a race. Alicia took 2 s to reach a speed of 8 m/s. and explain what it represents. CD 60 4 Samuel cycles at approximately 20 km/h for 30 min. Sketch a graph of speed as a function of time. so the segment is horizontal. His speed does not change. so the segment is horizontal. then he cycled for 30 min at approximately 20 km/h. so the segment goes up to the right. so the segment is horizontal. The horizontal axis represents time in minutes. His speed does not change. and explain what it represents. He accelerated until he reached a speed of 20 km/h. The vertical axis represents speed in kilometres per hour. EF Samuel remains stopped at 0 km/h for 10 min. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. DE 8 12 Time (s) Samuel’s speed decreases to 5 km/h. C 16 Samuel cycles uphill at approximately 5 km/h for 10 min. so the segment goes down to the right. Sketch a graph of speed as a function of time. then slowed down to a stop in 2 s.wncp10_5_3.qxd 12/7/09 4:02 PM Example 3 Page 280 Sketching a Graph for a Given Situation Samuel went on a bicycle ride. SOLUTION Samuel’s Bicycle Ride Answer: 24 20 A Alicia’s Race B 8 16 Speed (m/s) Speed (km/h) Draw and label axes on a grid. He stopped at the top of the hill for 10 min.

Height of the Tide in a Harbour Time (s) Time (s) Graph C Graph D Time (s) Time (s) 6. to 06:00 12:00 18:00 Time (24-h clock) 24:00 C 2.qxd 12/7/09 4:02 PM Page 281 Discuss the Ideas 1. Explain the answer to each question below. Gill’s Run 8 Distance from home (km) Height (m) 10 6 4 2 0 00:00 Graph B Graph A Height (m) 2 F Height (m) E G Height (m) 3 Height (m) Height (m) 4 a) What is the greatest height? At what times does it occur? b) What is the least height? At what times does it occur? c) How high is the tide at 04:00? d) When is the tide 4 m high? 1. This graph shows her distance from home during one of her runs. Describe Gill’s run for each segment of the graph. She does this until the flag has been raised. what does each segment represent? ■ a horizontal line segment ■ a segment that goes up to the right ■ a segment that goes down to the right Exercises A 3. H A 200 400 600 800 Mass (kg) a) Which bear has the greatest mass? What is this mass? b) Which bear is the shortest? What is its height? c) Which two bears have the same mass? What is this mass? d) Which two bears have the same height? What is this height? B 4. Each point on the graph represents a polar bear.0 A B D 10 feet 20 30 Time (min) 5. what does each segment represent? ■ a horizontal line segment ■ a segment that goes up to the right ■ a segment that goes down to the right 2. Explain the answer to each question below.3 Interpreting and Sketching Graphs 281 . Heights and Masses of 8 Polar Bears C D 1 0 B 5. Gill runs for exercise.wncp10_5_3.0 O a) 2 mi. Which graph best represents the height of the flag? Give reasons for your choice. then moves both hands up the rope and pulls again. For a graph of distance as a function of time. This graph shows the height of the tide in a harbour as a function of time in one day. For a graph of speed as a function of time. Sepideh pulls the rope steadily with both hands for a short time. To raise a flag.

A Person’s Drive to Work Car’s speed (km/h) O 30 80 60 40 20 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Distance from home (km) 8 12. Explain what each section of the graph represents.M.M.. On a typical day: ■ No cartons are sold between 7 A.. or from 5 P. a) Describe what is happening for each line segment in this graph.M. onward.M. the students are in class. and from 1 P. At 7 A. 10. b) The helicopter with more seats has the lower maximum speed. Label each section of the graph and explain what it represents.wncp10_5_3. e) The helicopter with fewer seats is newer.M. The oven is then turned off and returns to room temperature after 15 min. 9.M. to 10 A. 282 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . ■ The machine is filled at 11 A.M. a) The older helicopter is cheaper to operate. and 8 A. A tray of cookies is placed in the oven to bake for 10 min. c) The helicopter with the lower maximum speed is cheaper to operate. This graph shows her depth below sea level as a function of time on one of her dives.M.M. An oven is turned on at a room temperature of 20°C and it takes 10 min to reach a temperature of 190°C. Sketch a graph of the number of cartons in the vending machine as a function of time.M.M. 10:15 A. Katanya went scuba diving in Egypt. Volume of Gas in a Snowmobile Depth (m) 30 C 20 Volume of gas (L) Depth of Katanya’s Scuba Dive D B A 10 E 4 8 12 16 20 Time (min) 24 28 8. Sketch a graph of temperature as a function of time. ■ The machine has a capacity of 100 cartons. 11. A school vending machine sells cartons of milk and juice. ■ From 8 A. to noon. 400 A B 200 0 10 20 Age (years) Graph of Maximum Speed against Number of Seats Maximum speed (km/h) Cost to operate ($/h) Graph of Cost against Age 200 C G A E 20 B 10 D F 0 2 4 6 8 10 Time from start of journey (h) b) How much gas was in the tank at the start of the journey? Was the tank full at this time? Explain. Write all that you know about the dive from the graph. Point A and Point B represent the same helicopters in each of these graphs. Write all that you know about a person’s drive to work from this graph. d) The helicopter with the greater maximum speed is older. it is three-quarters full. and at 4 P. A B 100 0 2 4 Number of seats Which statements are true? Justify your answers. to 3 P..qxd 12/7/09 7:58 PM Page 282 7.

After 3 min his mom enters the room to ask him a question. Graph A Graph B a) b) Time Time 15.3 Interpreting and Sketching Graphs 283 . what features of the graph do you have to use in your description and how do you use them? Include a sketch of a graph in your explanation.qxd 12/7/09 4:02 PM Page 283 13. Label the axes. 5. C “Jonah is watching television. 17. choose a dependent variable and an independent variable. Each graph shows a quantity as a function of time. After a further 3 min. Chad goes bungee jumping. i) the distance above the ground as a function of time ii) the speed as a function of time b) Explain the similarities and differences between the two graphs. Justify the shape of each graph. The diagrams below show cross-sections of swimming pools that will be filled with water at the same constant rate. a) Fill Here b) Fill Here Time When you describe a possible situation for a given graph. For each graph. Write and justify a possible situation that it represents. Sketch two graphs on the same grid to represent the depth of water in each pool as a function of time. then turns the volume back up. Choose a dependent variable for each graph. The two graphs below have the same shape.” Describe any errors in the student’s graph. He turns the volume down a bit. and suggest a possible situation that it represents. a commercial comes on so Jonah presses the mute button. Copy each graph and include numbers and units on both axes. Copy the graph and include numbers on the axes. Jonah’s dad turns on the dishwasher so Jonah gradually turns up the volume. a) 60 40 20 0 2 4 6 8 Time (min) b) 10 Speed Distance 14. Describe the significance of any key points or changes in the graph. a) Sketch each graph of his jump. answers his mom.wncp10_5_3. and suggest a possible situation that it represents. but different vertical axes. Volume of a Television Volume scale 80 16. Two minutes later. A student drew a graph to represent this situation. a) b) Time Reflect c) 18.

wncp10_5_4.qxd 12/7/09 3:52 PM Page 284 MATH LAB 5. then $60 a day for each additional day. the cost is $65 per day for the first three days. Make Connections To rent a car for less than one week from Ace Car Rentals. Number of Days Total Cost Car Is Rented ($) 1 65 2 130 3 195 4 255 5 315 6 375 Why are the points on the graph not joined? Is this relation a function? How can you tell? What is the domain? What is the range? 284 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions .4 Graphing Data LESSON FOCUS Graph data and investigate the domain and range when the data represent a function.

wncp10_5_4. sketch the graph. list the set of ordered pairs. If your answer is yes. If you used a computer. ■ Is the length of the rope a function of the number of knots? Explain. Tie a knot in the rope. C. What is the domain? What is the range? ■ Would it make sense to extend the graph to the right? To the left? If your answer is yes.4 Math Lab: Graphing Data 285 . how far could you extend it? What is the new domain? What is the new range? If your answer is no. Number of Knots Length of Rope (cm) B. ■ ■ ■ Measure the length of the rope without any knots. Would the length of the rope after each number of knots be the same as that which you first recorded? Why or why not? 5. Measure the length of the rope with the knot. Try to tie the knots so they are all the same size and tightness. Repeat the measurements for up to 5 knots. a graphing calculator. the length of the rope is related to the number of knots tied. You will investigate the relation between the number of knots and the length of rope. You will need: ■ a length of rope ■ a metre stick ■ grid paper. A. what restrictions are there on the domain and range? Suppose you used another piece of rope with the same length. Record the number of knots and the length of the rope in a table.qxd 12/7/09 3:52 PM Page 285 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. or a computer with graphing software When you tie knots in a rope. print the graph. ■ ■ ■ How did you determine on which axis to plot each variable? How did you choose the scale for each axis so the data fit on the axes? Did you join the points? Justify your answer. If you used a graphing calculator. Graph the data.

Temperature. a) At a constant pressure. How can you tell from each graph that the relation is a function? a) b) Altitude. ii) Does the graph represent a function? Explain. Air Temperature Speed of Sound (°C) (m/s) Age (years) Dose of Vitamin C Tablet (mg) 0 331 3 15 5 334 6 25 10 337 9 45 15 340 12 45 20 343 15 65 18 65 21 75 2. question 9. Would the graph represent a function? Justify your answer. then graphed the data.8 . For each table of values below: i) Graph the data. Graph the data in these tables of values from Lesson 5.1 5 10. Suppose you combined your data with those of 4 pairs of classmates.39 3050 Ϫ0.qxd 2/19/10 3:26 PM Page 286 D. does the graph represent a function? Justify your answer. the speed b) The recommended daily of sound in air is related to the air dose of vitamin C is related temperature.39 12. I When you graph all the data. Decide whether to join the points.00 1220 11. to a female’s age in years.00 3660 Ϫ4. I Suppose you calculated the mean rope length for each number of knots.0 4.wncp10_5_4.8 6 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions 610 2 286 2. C A (m) T (°C) Purchased. Will you join the points? Justify your answer. Assess Your Understanding 1.00 2440 3. n ($) 1 15.1 4 8.2.39 1830 7. Number of Cans of Juice Cost.1 3 6.

The great horned owl is Alberta’s provincial bird.wncp10_5_5.qxd 12/7/09 5. Joe collected data on the numbers of different species of birds he heard or saw in a 1-h period every 2 h for 24 h.5 3:55 PM Page 287 Graphs of Relations and Functions LESSON FOCUS Determine the properties of the graphs of relations and functions. Alice collected data on the temperature in the area at the end of each 1-h period. Make Connections In an environmental study in Northern Alberta.5 Graphs of Relations and Functions 287 . They plotted their data: Does each graph represent a relation? A function? How can you tell? Which of these graphs should have the data points connected? Explain. 5.

The range is the set of even whole numbers. A. The domain is the set of whole numbers. ■ Five cubic centimetres of loose sugar also has a mass of 4 g. How are your graphs alike? How are they different? C.qxd 12/7/09 3:55 PM Page 288 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. Graph the mass of sugar as a function of the number of sugar cubes from 0 to 5 sugar cubes. Each of you chooses one of these tasks: ■ A sugar cube has a volume of 5 cm3 and a mass of 4 g. You will need grid paper. Work together: ■ Identify the dependent variable and independent variable for each function. We can represent the function that associates every whole number with its double in several ways. How did you decide on which axis to graph each variable? ■ How did you decide whether to connect the points? ■ Are there any restrictions on the domain and range? Explain. Share your results. Using a table of values: Whole Number. x Double the Number. 288 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . y 0 0 1 2 2 4 3 6 4 8 The table continues for all whole numbers. Graph the mass of sugar as a function of the volume of sugar from 0 to 25 cm3 of loose sugar. B.wncp10_5_5.

for the graph above. If one edge of the ruler always intersects the graph at no more than one point. the points on the graph are not connected. A relation that is not a function has two or more ordered pairs with the same first coordinate. So. any vertical line drawn will always pass through no more than one point. 5. then slide the ruler across the graph. for the graph above. when the ordered pairs of the function are plotted on a grid.qxd 12/7/09 3:55 PM Page 289 Using a graph: y How would the graph change if both x and y were real numbers? 8 6 y = 2x 4 How can you tell the domain and range from the graph? 2 x 0 2 4 We know the relation y ϭ 2x is a function because each value of x associates with exactly one value of y. The domain of a function is the set of values of the independent variable. a vertical line can be drawn to pass through more than one point. the graph represents a function. when the ordered pairs of the relation are plotted on a grid. So.5 Graphs of Relations and Functions 289 .wncp10_5_5. 4 y y 2 4 –2 2 –2 0 0 x 2 x 2 4 Vertical Line Test for a Function A graph represents a function when no two points on the graph lie on the same vertical line. and each ordered pair has a different first element. the range is the y-values. When the domain is restricted to a set of discrete values. The range of a function is the set of values of the dependent variable. Place a ruler vertically on a graph. 6 A function has ordered pairs with different first coordinates. the domain is the x-values.

Any vertical line drawn on the graph passes through 0 points or 1 point.qxd 12/7/09 3:55 PM Example 1 Page 290 Identifying whether a Graph Represents a Function Which of these graphs represents a function? Justify the answer. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) 1. World Population 180 160 140 6 7 8 9 Shoe size 6 4 a) Outside Temperature over a 24-h Period 2 0 Temperature (°C) Height (cm) 200 120 0 b) World population (billions) Height against Shoe Size 1950 1970 1990 2010 Year 10 SOLUTION b) 20 10 Height (cm) 60 40 20 200 0 180 160 140 120 0 80 Mass (kg) Height against Shoe Size 18:00 06:00 Time (24-h clock) Masses of Students against Height Use the vertical line test for each graph.wncp10_5_5. World population (billions) World Population 290 6 How does the vertical line test relate to the definition of a function? 4 2 0 1950 1970 1990 2010 Year Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . Which of these graphs represents a function? Justify your answer. 0 160 170 180 190 Height (cm) [Answers: a) function b) not a function] 6 7 8 9 Shoe size 10 b) This graph does represent a function. a) This graph does not represent a function because two points lie on the same vertical line.

x Յ 3. The domain is the set of all real numbers less than or equal to 3.qxd 12/7/09 3:55 PM Page 291 Determining the Domain and Range of the Graph of a Function Example 2 Determine the domain and range of the graph of each function. The domain is the set of x-values of the function.” (Solution continues.wncp10_5_5. y = g(x) y 1 0 The domain is the set of x-values of the function. y Յ 2 b) Ϫ3 Յ x Յ 5. x 2 We say: “x is greater than or equal to Ϫ2 and less than or equal to 2. so the graph continues to the left.5 Graphs of Relations and Functions 291 . that is. that is. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) 2. 8 6 b) y y = g(x) y 1 y = f(x) –2 0 x 2 4 a) 2 –2 0 y 4 2 y = f(x) x 2 –4 –2 0 x 2 4 –2 –4 SOLUTION a) The dot at the right end of the graph indicates that the graph stops at that point. –2 Visualize the shadow of the graph on the x-axis. including these numbers. The range is the set of all real numbers greater than or equal to Ϫ1. b) The dot at each end of the graph indicates that the graph stops at that point. 3 Յ y Յ 7] y 6 4 y = f(x) 2 –2 x 0 2 4 When data are not discrete. Determine the domain and range of the graph of each function. that is. The domain is the set of real numbers between Ϫ2 and 2. Visualize the shadow of the graph on the x-axis. y ՆϪ1. we use inequality symbols to indicate the domain and range. 8 b) 8 6 y 2 4 y = f(x) 2 x 0 8 y = g(x) 4 6 –2 y 2 4 –2 0 x 2 4 [Answers: a) x Յ 5. There is no dot at the left end of the graph. Ϫ2 Յ x Յ 2. The range is the set of y-values of the function. Visualize the shadow of the graph on the y-axis.) 5.

as a function of time. 3. We may plot a point at n ϭ 9. This graph shows the approximate height of the tide. b) Why are the points on the graph connected? Explain. h metres.5] . 12:00.qxd 1. c) Determine the domain and range of the graph. 11:00. 0 –2 Example 3 x 2 Determining the Domain and Range of the Graph of a Situation Number of Fishing Boats Anchored in an Inlet This graph shows the number of fishing boats. 10:00.8 0. 28 c) Determine the domain and range of the graph. 0. 20 16 Height of Tide at Port Clements. 15:00. anchored in an inlet in the Queen Charlotte Islands as a function of time. Justify the choices. at Port Clements. 2009. n 24 Number of boats a) Identify the dependent variable and the independent variable. Haida Gwaii on June 17. {09:00. 10. 11. 16:00} The range is the set of the numbers of boats. 2009 12 h 8 4 0 t 09:00 13:00 Time 17:00 SOLUTION a) The number of fishing boats is a function of time. including these numbers. 14:00. t c) 09:00 Յ t Յ 16:00. Visualize the shadow of the graph on the y-axis. that is. 1 0 Յ y Յ 2. {6. t. between 10:00 and 11:00. The range is the set of real numbers between y = g(x) y 0 and 2.4 0 t 09:00 13:00 Time a) Identify the dependent variable and the independent variable.2 0. This means that most values between the points are not valid. depends on the time of day. the number of boats decreases from 10 to 8.9 Յ h Յ 1. for example. t. n. but no other point is valid between 10 and 8 because we cannot have a fractional number of boats. 8. the dependent variable is n and the independent variable is t. b) Why are the points on the graph not connected? Explain. June 17.12/7/09 3:55 PM Page 292 The range is the set of y-values of the function. 25} 292 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Chapter 5: Relations and Functions Height of tide (m) wncp10_5_5. Since the number of boats. if we know a corresponding time. 13:00. c) The domain is the set of times. n. that is. [Answers: a) h. 15. b) The points on the graph are not connected because the number of boats is restricted to a whole number. that is. Justify your choices.6 1.

then a horizontal line to the y-axis. b) To determine the value of x when f (x) ϭ 4: 16 Since y ϭ f (x). The line appears to intersect the y-axis at 13. y CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4.qxd 12/7/09 3:55 PM Example 4 Page 293 Determining Domain Values and Range Values from the Graph of a Function Here is a graph of the function f (x) ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 7. Discuss the Ideas 1. 12 Draw a horizontal line to the graph. The range value is a value of f (x).wncp10_5_5. –8 y a) Determine the range value when the domain value is 3. x ϭ 1 y –2 0 1 2 x 4 When the range value is 4. What can you tell about the domain and range of a function from its graph? 3. 13 f(x) = –3x + 7 4 x 0 –2 0 g(x) = 4x – 3 x 4 2 –4 The domain value is a value of x. 8 f(x) = –3x + 7 4 The line intersects the x-axis at 1. f (Ϫ2) ϭ 13 When the domain value is Ϫ2. So. the domain value is 1. [Answers: a) 9 b) Ϫ1] So. the range value is 13. when f (x) ϭ 4.5 Graphs of Relations and Functions 293 . f(x) = –3x + 7 12 4 –2 8 x 0 2 4 4 SOLUTION –2 16 12 Begin at x ϭ Ϫ2 on the x-axis. How do you decide whether to connect the points you plot for a graph? 2. 8 Draw a vertical line to the graph. 12 8 b) Determine the domain value when the range value is 4. Here is a graph of the function g(x) ϭ 4x Ϫ 3. begin at y ϭ 4 on the y-axis. a) To determine the value of f (x) when x ϭ Ϫ2: y 2 4 b) Determine the domain value when the range value is Ϫ7. then a vertical line to the x-axis. 16 a) Determine the range value when the domain value is Ϫ2. How can you identify whether a graph represents a function? 5.

range: 1 Յ y Յ 2 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions –4 x –2 y y = g(x) x 0 –2 2 2 2 –4 y 4 2 2 c) 2 2 0 4 6 4 2 4 2 4 4 2 x 0 –2 2 y 0 c) x 4 7.wncp10_5_5. range: 2 Յ y Յ 4 domain: 1 Յ x Յ 3. Which of these graphs represents a function? Justify your answer.qxd 12/7/09 3:55 PM Page 294 Exercises A B 4. range: 1 Յ y Յ 4 domain: x Ն 0. 8. Write the domain and range for each graph. 2 y y –2 –2 a) 4 2 e) 4 6. List the domain and the range of the graph of each function. range: y ϭ 2 domain: 1 Յ x Յ 4. a) 6 y b) x 2 4 y = f(x) 0 –2 –2 0 –4 x 2 4 domain: 1 Յ x Յ 3. 2 d) 0 2 x 2 –2 4 5. a) b) 4 y 2 –4 x 4 2 –4 x 0 –2 –4 2 –2 x 0 –2 b) y y=1 x 2 y 2 –2 0 x=1 x 2 b) y x 0 2 4 4 d) y –2 i) ii) iii) iv) 294 x 2 4 0 x 0 2 9. Which of these graphs represents a function? Justify your answer. How can you tell that each graph in question 4 represents a function? a) x y 0 –2 4 2 y c) y 0 2 2 1 –4 b) 0 –2 4 –4 3 y 2 –2 c) 4 2 0 –2 a) y 4 y d) 4 x 2 2 4 y = h(x) –2 0 y y = j(x) x 2 4 . Determine the domain and range of the graph of each function. Match the graph of each function to its domain and range listed below.

a) What do the data in each graph represent? Graph A i) Distance from school (km) Distance of School Bus from School d Skid Distance of a Car 160 d 120 80 40 s 40 80 120 Speed (km/h) 0 a) Why are the points on the graph connected? b) Estimate the domain and range of the graph. d) The cube root of a real number is a function of the number. b) The altitude of a plane is a function of the time it is in the air. 12 8 4 0 t 8:00 8:30 9:00 Time (h) Graph B Number of Students on a School Bus Number of students ii) 16 12. 5. they can estimate the speed the car was travelling by measuring the skid distance. 11. t. a) The cost of a custom-made T-shirt is a function of the number of letters on the T-shirt. Are there any restrictions on the domain and range? Explain. Skid distance (m) 12/7/09 32 n 13. For which graphs should the student connect the points? Justify your answers. n. Suppose a student drew a graph of each function described below. c) The mass of a baby is a function of her age. Are there any restrictions on the domain and range? Explain. c) Why are the points connected on one graph but not on the other? n Number of cars wncp10_5_5. This graph shows the number of cars.5 Graphs of Relations and Functions 295 . in the school parking lot as a function of time. 24 16 Number of Cars in the School Parking Lot 8 0 t 8:00 8:30 9:00 Time (h) b) Identify the independent and dependent variables.qxd 60 40 20 0 t 16:00 08:00 Time a) Identify the independent and dependent variables. Justify your choices.3:56 PM Page 295 10. When police officers investigate a car crash. b) Why are the points on the graph not connected? c) Estimate the domain and range of the graph.

c ($) 0 24 Area Covered. d) Write the domain and range of the functions in parts b and c.qxd 12/7/09 3:56 PM Page 296 14. a) domain: Ϫ2 Յ x Յ 3. One litre of latex paint covers approximately 8. This is a graph of the function g (x) ϭ Ϫx ϩ 3. correct them. 19.0 240 15. If they are not.5 180 24. Draw a graph of a function on a grid. Volume of Paint. the sun is above the horizon every 60 days from January 1st. –4 a) Determine the range value when the domain value is 0. a) Identify the independent variable and the dependent variable.5 m2 and costs $12.7 120 f(x) = 2x – 1 2 0 60 y 4 h 0 16. then explain your corrections to your classmate. 17.wncp10_5_5. This is a graph of the function f (x) ϭ 2x Ϫ 1. range: Ϫ1 Յ y Յ 1 . Write the domain and range of the function. <se_c05_l05_p03: photo of somebody painting> 296 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions a) Determine the range value when the domain value is Ϫ2. range: 1 Յ y Յ 5 b) domain: x Ն 1. Day 6 18.4 360 –2 0 x 0 2 4 6 9. Sketch a graph of a function that has each domain and range. and check that the domain and range of your classmate’s graph are correct. b) Determine the domain value when the range value is 0. h. b) Determine the domain value when the range value is 5. Paulatuuq is north of the Arctic Circle.9 300 7. 6 4 y g(x) = –x + 3 2 x –2 0 2 4 –2 15. p (L) 0 Cost. Did you connect the points? Why or why not? c) Use the table of values and the graph to explain why this relation is a function. The table shows the number of hours. a) Copy and complete this table. 18. b) Graph the data in the table. Justify your choices. which is day 0. A (m2) 0 17 2 4 6 8 b) Graph the area covered as a function of the volume of paint. c) Graph the area covered as a function of the cost. Exchange graphs with a classmate.

98 Greater than 50 g and up to 100 g 1.qxd 40 T 38 36 0 t 6 8 10 12 14 Time (h) 16 18 84 Should the points have been connected? Give reasons for your answer. A hospital patient has his temperature taken every hour. then each day the payment is doubled. the total money received is a function of the number of days.12/7/09 3:56 PM Page 297 20. Patient’s Temperature against Time Temperature (˚C) wncp10_5_5. Payment Scheme 2: A person receives $10 each day. b) Write the domain and range of this function. 5. b) Write the domain and range of this function. How do you determine the domain and range of a function from its graph? Include examples in your explanation. a) Graph planetary year as a function of distance from the sun. so any graph with time as its independent variable should have its points connected. One planetary year is the time it takes for a planet to travel once around the sun. c) Which payment scheme would you choose if you were receiving the money for 30 days? Explain. b) Graph the data. Reflect 23. Did you connect the points? Explain.54 Greater than 30 g and up to 50 g 0. Is this statement true? A measure of time can be any real number. Generalize and explain rules for determining whether a graph represents a function.75 a) Graph the cost of sending a letter as a function of its mass. Since the planets take different times to travel around the sun. one year on each planet is different. Other distances in the solar system are compared to the distance from Earth to the sun. For both payments. 24. Mass of Letter Cost ($) Up to 30 g 0. Explain your answer with examples. Did you connect the points? Explain.18 Greater than 100 g and up to 200 g 1.5 Graphs of Relations and Functions 297 . C 21.96 Greater than 200 g and up to 500 g 2. a) Make a table of values for each payment scheme. Payment scheme 1: A person receives 1¢ on day 1. This table shows the costs to send letters within Canada in 2009. The distance from Earth to the sun is 1 astronomical unit. Earth Jupiter Saturn Uranus Distance from Sun (astronomical units) 1 5 10 19 Planetary Year (Earth years) 1 12 29 22.

5 – You used the vertical line test on graphs to identify functions.4 – You generated data for a relation. – You connected points on a graph if all real-number values of the variables were permitted. ■ Dependent variable labels the vertical axis Use the vertical line test Identify the domain and range Use projections (shadows) onto each axis Chapter 5: Relations and Functions In Lesson 5. Can you extend the domain and range? – You identified the independent and dependent variables of a function.wncp10_5_5. then graphed and analyzed the data. Where does the graph start and end? Does the graph increase.3 ■ In Lesson 5. or stay constant? Graphs of relations and functions Use grid paper What do the key points represent? In Lesson 5. – You graphed tables of values for functions and identified their domains and ranges. Are the points joined? Is the graph a function? From a situation – You applied what you know about functions to interpret graphs that represent different situations.qxd 12/7/09 8:01 PM Page 298 CHECKPOINT 2 Concept Development Connections How are the axes labelled? How are the key points plotted? Where does the graph start and end? ■ What do the axes represent? Draw a graph for a given situation Use technology Interpret a given graph Identify the independent and dependent variables From a graph Independent variable labels the horizontal axis 298 – You applied what you know about functions to sketch graphs that represent different situations. decrease. .

state the restrictions. 5. with different masses were graphed. up to the age of 18. 14 45 14 50 c) What are the domain and range of these data? 15 56 15 64 17 65 18 90 d) Suppose data for more people. If your answer is no. then describe a situation the graph could represent. Write the domain and range of each graph. explain why no restrictions exist.4 2. Age (years) Mass (kg) b) Should you join the points? Explain your reasoning. y a) b) 4 y c) 8 4 4 2 2 0 x x 2 –2 0 y 2 4 –2 0 x 2 –4 –8 Checkpoint 2 299 . a) Use technology or grid paper to graph these data for people up to the age of 18.wncp10_5_5. Copy the graph below. Justify your description. 5.qxd 12/7/09 8:01 PM Page 299 Assess Your Understanding 5. Choose labels for each axis.5 3. Would there be any restrictions on the domain and range? If your answer is yes.3 1. Which graphs represent functions? Justify your answer.

50 3 14.25 12. How are the patterns in the table shown in the graph? How can you tell from the table that the graph represents a linear relation? 300 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . Make Connections The table of values and graph show the cost of a pizza with up to 5 extra toppings.00 5 15.qxd 12/7/09 5.00 15.75 10.00 1 12.wncp10_5_6.75 14.6 3:59 PM Page 300 Properties of Linear Relations LESSON FOCUS Identify and represent linear relations in different ways.00 4 15.00 Cost ($) 16.00 2 13.00 13.00 11.00 0 1 2 3 4 5 Number of extra toppings What patterns do you see in the table? Write a rule for the pattern that relates the cost of a pizza to the number of its toppings. Cost of a Pizza Number of Extra Toppings Cost ($) 0 12.

5.qxd 12/7/09 3:59 PM Page 301 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. Does each graph represent a linear relation? How do you know? The cost for a car rental is $60. plus $20 for every 100 km driven. A. Copy and complete each table of values for the 6 rectangles.6 Properties of Linear Relations 301 . Draw the next two rectangles in the pattern. This pattern continues. You will need 1-cm grid paper. We can identify that this is a linear relation in different ways. ■ a table of values Independent variable ϩ100 ϩ100 ϩ100 ϩ100 Distance (km) Cost ($) Dependent variable 0 60 100 80 200 100 300 120 ϩ20 400 140 ϩ20 ϩ20 ϩ20 For a linear relation. Which table of values represents a linear relation? How can you tell? C. Width of Rectangle (cm) Area (cm2) 1 2 Width of Rectangle (cm) Perimeter (cm) 1 2 B. Graph the data in each table of values. The independent variable is the distance driven and the dependent variable is the cost. Use this pattern of rectangles. a constant change in the independent variable results in a constant change in the dependent variable.wncp10_5_6.

The rate of change is constant for a linear relation.qxd 12/7/09 3:59 PM Page 302 ■ Why is it important that the ordered pairs are listed so their first elements are in numerical order? a set of ordered pairs ϩ100 ϩ100 ϩ100 ϩ100 {(0.20/km The rate of change is $0. 60). that is.wncp10_5_6. Dependent variable 120 100 20 80 Change in dependent variable Change in independent variable 40 0 100 200 300 400 500 Distance (km) Independent variable We can use each representation above to calculate the rate of change. (200. (300. The rate of change can be expressed as a fraction: change in dependent variable $20 ϭ change in independent variable 100 km ϭ $0. (100. An equation for this linear function is: C ϭ 0. the rental cost increases by 20¢. for each additional 1 km driven. 120). Let the cost be C dollars and the distance driven be d kilometres. 80). We can determine the rate of change from the equation that represents the linear function. (400.20/km. 100).20d ϩ 60 initial amount independent variable rate of change dependent variable 302 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . 140)} ϩ20 ■ ϩ20 ϩ20 ϩ20 a graph Car Rental Cost Cost ($) 160 The graph of a linear relation is a straight line.

Which table of values represents a linear relation? Justify your answer. n. the table of values represents a linear relation. calculate the change in each variable.qxd 12/7/09 3:59 PM Example 1 Page 303 Determining whether a Table of Values Represents a Linear Relation Which table of values represents a linear relation? Justify the answer.6 Properties of Linear Relations 303 . A dollars 5Ϫ0ϭ5 41 41 Ϫ 32 ϭ 9 10 10 Ϫ 5 ϭ 5 50 50 Ϫ 41 ϭ 9 15 15 Ϫ 10 ϭ 5 59 59 Ϫ 50 ϭ 9 A T 20 20 Ϫ 15 ϭ 5 68 68 Ϫ 59 ϭ 9 60 3 120 6 180 9 240 12 300 15 5 Since the changes in both variables are constant. So. a) C Change in C 0 F Change in F 32 t n b) The relation between the amount of goods and services tax charged. 5. C. b) I Change in I 0 P Change in P 0 5 5Ϫ0ϭ5 75 75 Ϫ 0 ϭ 75 10 10 Ϫ 5 ϭ 5 300 300 Ϫ 75 ϭ 225 15 15 Ϫ 10 ϭ 5 675 675 Ϫ 300 ϭ 375 20 20 Ϫ 15 ϭ 5 1200 1200 Ϫ 675 ϭ 525 [Answers: a) not linear b) linear] What other strategies could you use to check whether each table of values represents a linear relation? The changes in I are constant. T dollars. C F I 0 32 0 0 5 41 5 75 10 50 10 300 0 1 15 59 15 675 20 2 20 68 20 1200 40 4 60 8 80 16 100 32 SOLUTION The terms in the first column are in numerical order. and time. F electrical circuit P CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1.wncp10_5_6. So. in an in degrees Fahrenheit. a) The relation between b) The relation between temperature in degrees the current. but the changes in P are not constant. P watts. a) The relation between the number of bacteria in a culture. and temperature power. and Celsius. t minutes. the table of values does not represent a linear relation. I amps. and the amount of the purchase.

that is. then graph the relation. so their equations represent linear relations.wncp10_5_6. i) y ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 25 ii) y ϭ 2x2 ϩ 5 iii) y ϭ 5 2. so its equation does not represent a linear relation. y ϭ x ϩ 25. y ϭ 5. y ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 25. 304 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . and x ϭ 1. The graph in part ii is not a straight line.qxd 2/19/10 10:44 AM Page 304 When an equation is written using the variables x and y. x represents the independent variable and y represents the dependent variable. i) x ϭ Ϫ2 ii) y ϭ x ϩ 25 iii) y ϭ 25 iv) y ϭ x2 ϩ 25 iv) x ϭ 1 b) Which equations in part a represent linear relations? How do you know? b) Which equations in part a represent linear relations? How do you know? SOLUTION a) Create a table of values. i) y ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 25 x y Ϫ2 31 Ϫ1 28 y 30 0 25 1 Ϫ2 13 Ϫ1 7 x 0 2 y = –3x + 25 iii) y ϭ 5 y 0 5 1 20 10 x 0 –2 2 7 2 19 x y y 10 22 2 x 20 –2 [Answers: b) x ϭ Ϫ2. and iv are straight lines. Determining whether an Equation Represents a Linear Relation Example 2 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) Graph each equation. y ϭ 25] ii) y ϭ 2x2 ϩ 5 13 y = 2x 2 + 5 iv) x ϭ 1 6 0 5 4 1 5 5 0 x x 4 2 Ϫ1 0 1 2 y 1 y=5 2 2 y 0 –2 1 y 1 x=1 x 2 b) The graphs in parts i. a) Graph each equation. iii.

6 Properties of Linear Relations 305 . Which relation is linear? Justify your answer. a) Every year. multiply each value by 0. [Answers: a) linear b) not linear] Time (years) Value ($) ϩ1 ϩ1 ϩ1 0 24 000 1 20 400 2 17 340 3 14 739 Ϫ3600 Ϫ3060 Ϫ2601 There is a constant change of 1 in the 1st column. the cost increases by $50 per hour. an electrician charges a $75 flat rate. b) The area of a square is related to the side length of the square. then check to see if the relation is linear.wncp10_5_6. So. The distance travelled is related to time. The value is related to time. the value decreases by 15%. The total cost for service is related to time. b) For a service call. the relation is not linear. Every year. plus $50 for each hour he works. the value of the car decreases by 15%. The value of the car is: 100% Ϫ 15% ϭ 85% of its previous value So. 3. b) After the first hour. 5.85. Time (h) ϩ1 ϩ1 ϩ1 ϩ1 Cost ($) 0 75 1 125 2 175 3 225 ϩ50 4 275 ϩ50 ϩ50 ϩ50 What equation could you write for the linear relation in part b? There is a constant change of 1 in the 1st column and a constant change of 50 in the 2nd column. but the differences in the 2nd column are not constant. a) A dogsled moves at an average speed of 10 km/h along a frozen river. so the relation is linear. SOLUTION Create a table of values.qxd 12/7/09 4:00 PM Page 305 Identifying a Linear Relation Example 3 Which relation is linear? Justify the answer. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) A new car is purchased for $24 000.

t. The dependent variable is the volume. Calculate the change in each variable from one point to the other. b) Determine the rate of change of each relation. 1200 Change in volume: 4000 L Ϫ 3000 L ϭ 1000 L Graph A Filling a Water Tank Volume (L) b) Choose two points on the line. V. 306 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions V 800 400 0 t 40 80 120 Time (min) a) Identify the dependent and independent variables. Graph B represents the hot tub being emptied at a constant rate. b) Determine the rate of change of each relation. Saskatchewan. t b) 20 L/min Graph B a) V. Graph B represents the tank being emptied at a constant rate.qxd 12/7/09 4:00 PM Page 306 Determining the Rate of Change of a Linear Relation from Its Graph Example 4 A water tank on a farm near Swift Current. t b) Ϫ40 L/min] . t 40 80 120 Time (min) 0 Graph B Emptying a Hot Tub For Graph A 1600 a) The independent variable is the time. Graph A represents the hot tub being filled at a constant rate. 50 L of water are added to the tank. then describe what it represents. holds 6000 L. Every minute. A hot tub contains 1600 L of water. Graph A represents the tank being filled at a constant rate. V 6000 Volume (L) Volume (L) 6000 4000 2000 0 Graph B Emptying a Water Tank V 4.wncp10_5_6. then describe what it represents. 6000 4000 2000 Change in time: 80 min Ϫ 60 min ϭ 20 min Rate of change: Volume (L) SOLUTION 0 V Volume increases by 1000 L Time increases by 20 min t 40 80 120 Time (min) 1000 L ϭ 50 L/min 20 min The rate of change is positive so the volume is increasing with time. Graph A Filling a Hot Tub 4000 2000 t 40 80 120 Time (min) 1600 t 40 80 120 Time (min) 0 Volume (L) Graph A Filling a Water Tank CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING V 1200 800 400 a) Identify the independent and dependent variables. [Answers: Graph A a) V.

6 Properties of Linear Relations 307 . How can you tell from each format whether a relation is linear? ■ a description in words ■ a set of ordered pairs ■ a table of values ■ an equation ■ a graph 2.wncp10_5_6. V. Discuss the Ideas 1. 100 L of water are removed from the tank. The dependent variable is the volume. Calculate the change in each variable from one point to the other. Every minute.qxd 12/7/09 4:00 PM Page 307 For Graph B a) The independent variable is the time. t. b) Choose two points on the line. Volume (L) Graph B Emptying a Water Tank 6000 V 4000 Volume decreases by 2000 L 2000 0 Time increases by 20 min t 40 80 Time (min) Change in volume: 2000 L Ϫ 4000 L ϭ Ϫ2000 L Change in time: 40 min Ϫ 20 min ϭ 20 min Rate of change: Ϫ2000 L ϭ Ϫ100 L/min 20 min The rate of change is negative so the volume is decreasing with time. What is “rate of change”? How can you use each format in question 1 to determine the rate of change of a linear relation? 5.

a) Create a table of values when necessary. 1). 11). (9. 1). (0. (1. 6.qxd 12/7/09 4:00 PM Page 308 Exercises A B 3. a metres. (7.5 1 1 0 0 9 3 s (km/h) d (m) 4. s kilometres per hour.wncp10_5_6. 9). (4. 11 200 6 10 800 8 10 400 . when the brakes are first applied. 3). t minutes. (5. (2. a) The distance required for a car to come to a complete stop after its brakes are applied is the braking distance. iii) If the relation is linear. i) y ϭ 2x ϩ 8 ii) y ϭ 0. then graph each relation. a) {(3.5x ϩ 12 iv) y ϭ 2x iii) y ϭ x2 ϩ 8 v) x ϭ 7 vi) x ϩ y ϭ 6 b) Which equations in part a represent linear relations? How do you know? a) b) Time (min) Distance (m) Time (s) Speed (m/s) 0 10 0 10 2 50 1 20 4 90 2 40 6 130 3 80 c) d) Speed (m/s) Time (s) Distance (m) Speed (m/s) 15 7. ii) Use the table of values to determine whether the relation is linear. Which graphs represent linear relations? How do you know? a) 7. (2. is related to the speed of the car. Ϫ3). For each relation below: i) Identify the dependent and independent variables. Which sets of ordered pairs represent linear relations? Explain your answers. The braking distance. 7). 5)} b) {(Ϫ2. is related to the time. determine its rate of change. y = k(x) 2 0 2 4 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions 4 a (m) 12 000 11 600 4 y t (min) 2 4 x x 308 35 0 y 0 27 y = g(x) 0 –4 –2 c) 20 70 y b) 13 60 5.5 4 2 10 5 16 4 5 2. (2. 3). Ϫ7)} c) {(1. 1). 3)} 50 y 2 –2 y = f(x) 0 4 x 2 80 d) 4 4 2 y = h(x) 2 x b) The altitude of a plane. d metres. Which tables of values represent linear relations? Explain your answers. that has elapsed since it started its descent.

2034.5). d metres. (8. Determine the rate of change. What does it represent? 13. The set of ordered pairs below describes the rotation. she drives on a toll highway. 2988. and the second coordinate is the approximate angle of rotation in degrees. to rent a hall for a banquet is given by the equation C ϭ 550 ϩ 15n. An equation for the height of the flare. (4. (12. Sophie and 4 of her friends plan a trip to the Edmonton Chante for one night.40 1. then describe what it represents. (6.5)} For the next 21 s.6 Properties of Linear Relations 309 . This graph represents Jerome’s long distance phone call to his pen pal in Nunavut. Kashala takes a cross-country trip from her home in Lethbridge through the United States.20 Cost ($) 12/7/09 C 2. (27. The first coordinate is the time in hours. A safety flare is shot upward from the top of a cliff 200 m above sea level. above sea level t seconds after the flare is fired. She is charged a constant amount at each toll booth and she starts with US$10 in change. is related to the height of the balloon.80 t 0 10 20 30 Time (min) a) Identify the dependent and independent variables. 2352.80 7. C dollars. 90). Kashala’s Drive on the Toll Highway C 9. Describe two strategies you could use to determine if this relation is linear. The total cost is related to the number of people. For the first 12 s. plus $10 for each additional person in the room. 12. (24. b) Determine the rate of change. h (m) d (km) 5 8 10 11 30 20 50 25 100 36 a) Graph these data. The cost.4:00 PM Page 309 8.5)} Determine whether either set of ordered pairs represents a linear relation.40 0 n 1 2 3 4 Number of toll booths 5. 2670. h metres. b) State the rate of change. This graph represents the cost of Kashala’s drive on the toll highway. Earth rotates through approximately 360° every 24 h.20 7.40 9. The hotel room is $95 for the first 2 people. 3526).9t 2 ϩ 153. (12.80 Change remaining (US$) wncp10_5_6. Describe two strategies you could use to determine whether this relation is linear. 3147. her height above the ground is described by this set of ordered pairs: {(15. d kilometres. 3353. (21. b) Is the relation linear? What strategy did you use? 9. then describe what it represents.00 8.60 0. (18. In Illinois. A skydiver jumps from an altitude of 3600 m. a chart shows how the distance to the horizon. The Cost of Jerome’s Phone Call 3.5). Explain.5). (33. 15. Is the relation linear? How do you know? 11. 360)} 10.60 8. 270). {(0. 180).2t ϩ 200.qxd 9. In a hot-air balloon. her height in metres above the ground is described by this set of ordered pairs: {(0. 3600). 0). a) Explain why the equation represents a linear relation. Jerome is charged a constant rate. 14.5). where n represents the number of people attending the banquet. is given by the equation d ϭ Ϫ4.

22. Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . b) An equation of the form Ax ϩ By ϭ C for non-zero constants. iii) A taxi service charges a $5 flat fee plus $2 for each kilometre travelled. Match each description of a linear relation with its equation and set of ordered pairs below. i) A hang glider starts her descent at an altitude of 2000 m. 4500)} 17. 17). a) Perimeter. Explain how you know. of a cube with edge length s: A ϭ 6s2 c) Volume. always represents a linear function. What does it represent? 20. 11)} Set B: {(1. (10. iv) The cost to print each yearbook is $5. (400. List three different strategies you can use to tell whether a relation is linear. and C. of a sphere with radius r : 4 V ϭ ␲r3 3 d) Circumference. Is the relation between the time it will take to harvest the patch and the number of pickers needed linear? Justify your answer. always represents a linear relation. c) An equation of the form y ϭ Cx2 for a non-zero constant C. Which statements are true? Use examples to justify your answers. a) Which situations represent linear relations? Explain how you know. a) A relation described by exactly two ordered pairs is always linear. state the rate of change. A.3 km/s. ii) A population of bacteria triples every hour for 4 h. of an equilateral triangle with side length s: P ϭ 3s Reflect 310 b) Surface area.06x Equation 3: y ϭ 20x Set A: {(100. Equation 1: y ϭ 500 ϩ 40x Equation 2: y ϭ 35 Ϫ 0. of a circle with radius r: A ϭ ␲r2 19. 300)} Set C: {(0. There is a start up fee of $500 to set up the printing press. Explain your choices. (40. then dividing by 3. A berry patch is to be harvested. (300.wncp10_5_6. A. identify: ■ the dependent and independent variables ■ the rate of change and explain what it represents C 18. b) The cost of a banquet is related to a flat fee plus an amount for each person who attends. c) The volume of gas in a car’s gas tank is related to the distance driven since the time when the tank was filled. Is this relation between distance and time linear? Justify your answer. This works because sound travels at approximately 0. Include an example with each strategy. e) A linear relation is always a linear function. b) For the linear relation.qxd 12/7/09 4:00 PM Page 310 16. You can estimate the distance in kilometres between you and a distant storm by measuring the time in seconds between seeing a lightning flash and hearing the thunder. (200. b) For each linear relation in part a. A. (80. Here are two equations that can be used to model the value. 2100). 23). Identify the measurement formulas that represent linear relations. of a circle with diameter d: C ϭ ␲d e) Area. always represents a linear function.2n) a) Which equation represents a linear relation? Justify your answer. B. 21. C. 100). She descends at a constant speed to an altitude of 1500 m in 10 min. 3700). V dollars. V. a) The amount a person earns is related to her hourly wage. v) An investment increases in value by 12% each year. (100. 500). 29). (15. d) An equation of the form x ϭ C for a constant C. P. (5. of a $24 000 truck as it depreciates over n years: V ϭ 24 000 Ϫ 2000n and V ϭ 24 000(0. 20). 200).

domain.7 4:04 PM Page 311 Interpreting Graphs of Linear Functions LESSON FOCUS Use intercepts.wncp10_5_7.7 Interpreting Graphs of Linear Functions 311 .qxd 12/7/09 5. Make Connections Float planes fly into remote lakes in Canada’s Northern wilderness areas for ecotourism. Height of a Float Plane Height (m) 1000 h 800 600 h = f(t) 400 200 0 t 1 2 3 4 5 6 Time (min) 7 8 9 10 Where does the graph intersect the vertical axis? What does this point represent? Where does the graph intersect the horizontal axis? What does this point represent? What is the rate of change for this graph? What does it represent? 5. rate of change. This graph shows the height of a float plane above a lake as the plane descends to land. and range to describe the graph of a linear function.

Copy and complete the table to show the distance from Irving cabin at different times on the tour.qxd 12/7/09 8:06 PM Page 312 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work in a group. What does it represent? ■ What are the domain and range for each graph? Any graph of a line that is not vertical represents a function. 312 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . C. Team 1 Time (h) Distance from Irving Cabin (km) 0 100 1 Team 2 Time (h) Distance from Irving Cabin (km) 0 0 1 B. Dogsled tours are run between Armstrong cabin and Irving cabin. Dogsled team 2 travels at an average speed of 25 km/h and starts its tour at Irving cabin. What do these points represent? ■ Determine the rate of change for each graph. Dogsled team 1 travels at an average speed of 20 km/h and starts its tour at Armstrong cabin.wncp10_5_7. Draw a graph to show the distance from Irving cabin as a function of time. The cabins are 100 km apart. A. We call these functions linear functions. ■ How are the graphs the same? How are they different? ■ Identify where each graph intersects the vertical and horizontal axes. Share your results with the other pair of students. One pair of students chooses team 1 and the other pair chooses team 2. You will need grid paper.

0). This point of intersection represents the initial temperature. The horizontal intercept is 4. The horizontal intercept is 5.25°C/h The rate of change is positive because the temperature is increasing over time. The vertical intercept is –5. The point where the graph intersects the vertical axis has coordinates (0. when the temperature is 0°C. Temperature (°C) Temperature in Location B 20 T T = g(t) 10 0 –10 10 h – 5 h = 5 h t 2 4 6 8 Time (h) 10 12 –10°C – 0°C = –10°C The point where the graph intersects the horizontal axis has coordinates (5. 0). –5°C. –5).wncp10_5_7. t hours.qxd 12/7/09 8:06 PM Page 313 Each graph below shows the temperature. 10). This point of intersection represents the time. after 4 h. 10°C. The domain is: 0 Յ t Յ 12 The range is: –5 Յ T Յ 10 change in T 5°C The rate of change is: ϭ change in t 4h ϭ 1. The point where the graph intersects the vertical axis has coordinates (0. Temperature (°C) Temperature in Location A 20 T 10°C – 5°C = 5°C T = f(t) 10 t 0 2 4 –10 6 8 Time (h) 10 12 12 h – 8 h = 4 h The point where the graph intersects the horizontal axis has coordinates (4.7 Interpreting Graphs of Linear Functions 313 . when the temperature is 0°C. The vertical intercept is 10. as a function of time. The domain is: 0 Յ t Յ 10 The range is: –10 Յ T Յ 10 The rate of change is: change in T Ϫ10°C ϭ 5h change in t ϭ Ϫ2°C/h The rate of change is negative because the temperature is decreasing over time. for two locations. This point of intersection represents the time. after 5 h. This point of intersection represents the initial temperature. 5. T degrees Celsius.

This graph shows how the height of a burning candle changes with time. that is. the distance the scooter can travel on a full tank of gas: 200 km b) The domain is the set of possible values of the distance travelled: 0 Յ d Յ 200 The range is the set of possible values of the volume of fuel: 0ՅVՅ8 314 1. Volume of Gas in a Scooter V Height of a Burning Candle 8 6 V = f(d) 4 2 0 100 200 Distance (km) d 300 a) Write the coordinates of the points where the graph intersects the axes. Describe what the points of intersection represent. b) What are the domain and range of this function? [Answers: a) (0. Height (cm) Volume (L) 10 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Chapter 5: Relations and Functions h 8 h = f(t) 4 0 t 10 20 30 40 Time (min) 50 a) Write the coordinates of the points where the graph intersects the axes. 0).qxd 12/7/09 4:04 PM Example 1 Page 314 Determining Intercepts. 10). 8). 45 b) domain: 0 Յ t Յ 45. Describe what the points of intersection represent. b) What are the domain and range of this function? SOLUTION a) On the vertical axis. This point of intersection is the distance travelled until the volume of gas is 0 L. Domain. What is the fuel consumption in litres per 100 km? . Determine the vertical and horizontal intercepts. This point of intersection represents the volume of gas in the tank when the distance travelled is 0 km. The vertical intercept is 8. the capacity of the gas tank: 8 L On the horizontal axis. 10. range: 0 Յ h Յ 10] Are there any restrictions on the domain and range? Explain. that is. the point of intersection has coordinates (0. 0). The horizontal intercept is 200.wncp10_5_7. Determine the vertical and horizontal intercepts. (45. the point of intersection has coordinates (200. and Range of the Graph of a Linear Function This graph shows the fuel consumption of a scooter with a full tank of gas at the beginning of a journey.

7). then draw a line through them. 2 2 and (1. that is. To determine the x-intercept.7 Interpreting Graphs of Linear Functions 315 . To determine the y-intercept. 0b . a . evaluate f (0). f (x) ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 7 Since the function is linear. its graph is a straight line. y f(x) = x – 3 2 0 –2 The y-coordinate of the point where a graph intersects the y-axis is called the y-intercept. f (1) ϭ Ϫ2(1) ϩ 7 6 f (1) ϭ 5 4 7 f(x) = –2x + 7 Plot the points (0. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING SOLUTION 2. determine the value of x when f (x) ϭ 0. x 2 4 6 f(x) = 0.qxd 12/7/09 4:04 PM Page 315 We can use the intercepts to graph a linear function written in function notation. or x-intercept f(0). y When x ϭ 1. f (0) ϭ Ϫ2(0) ϩ 7 0 ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 7 f (0) ϭ 7 Ϫ7 ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 7 Ϫ 7 Ϫ7 ϭ Ϫ2x Ϫ7 xϭ Ϫ2 7 xϭ 2 Determine the coordinates of a third point on the graph. Sketch a graph of the linear function f (x) ϭ 4x Ϫ 3. When f (x) ϭ 0. or the vertical intercept. 4 The x-coordinate of the point where a graph intersects the x-axis is called the x-intercept.wncp10_5_7. or y-intercept Example 2 Sketching a Graph of a Linear Function in Function Notation Sketch a graph of the linear function f (x) ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 7. Determine the y-intercept: Determine the x-intercept: When x ϭ 0. or the horizontal intercept. 0 x 2 4 Answer: y 2 –2 0 –2 x 2 4 f(x) = 4x – 3 What other strategy could you use to graph the function? Which strategy would be more efficient? 6 5. evaluate f (x) when x ϭ 0. 5).

2 – 4 = –2 t 8 12 Time 30 d 200 d = k(t) 100 0 Ϫ2 1 ϭϪ 4 2 So. 12 8 d d = k(t) 3.12/7/09 4:04 PM Page 316 Matching a Graph to a Given Rate of Change and Vertical Intercept Example 3 b) d 8 d = f(t) 4 t 0 4 8 Time 12 Distance a) Distance 1 Which graph has a rate of change of and a vertical intercept 2 of 6? Justify the answer. 20 Time t 10 20 Time 30 The rate of change is: b) The graph of d ϭ k(t) has a vertical intercept of 6. this is the correct graph. Distance 12 d d = k(t) 10 – 8 = 2 8 4 8–4=4 t 0 4 8 12 Time 2 1 ϭ 4 2 So. it is not the correct graph. a) 4 0 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING t 4 8 Time 300 Distance wncp10_5_7. The rate of change is: 316 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions [Answer: the graph in part a] .qxd 12 d 200 100 d = f(t) t 0 SOLUTION 10 b) d d = f(t) 8 – 4 = 4 8 4 0 4 300 Distance Distance a) The graph of d ϭ f (t) has a vertical intercept of 6. Which graph has a rate of change of Ϫ5 and a vertical intercept of 100? Justify your answer.

What is the maximum number of books that can be printed? C t 2 4 6 Time (h) The electrician charges $190 to complete a job. From 4200 on the C-axis. 2000 What are the domain and range of this function? 1000 0 n 50 100 150 200 Number of yearbooks From the graph. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4.7 Interpreting Graphs of Linear Functions 317 .) 5. For how many hours did she work? 1 [Answer: 3 h] 4 SOLUTIONS Method 1 To estimate the number of yearbooks that can be printed for $4200. Why are the points on this graph not joined? Cost of Publishing a Yearbook C Cost ($) 4000 3000 Use a straightedge to help. This graph shows the total cost for a house call by an electrician for up to 6 h work. draw a horizontal line to the graph. about 180 yearbooks can be printed. (Solution continues. Cost of Publishing a Yearbook C Cost of an Electrician’s House Call 3000 360 2000 Cost ($) Cost ($) 4000 1000 n 0 50 100 150 200 Number of yearbooks 240 120 0 The budget for publishing costs is $4200. use the graph.wncp10_5_7. then a vertical line to the n-axis.qxd 12/7/09 4:04 PM Example 4 Page 317 Solving a Problem Involving a Linear Function This graph shows the cost of publishing a school yearbook for Collège Louis-Riel in Winnipeg.

which is 500. the cost increases by $1000.qxd 12/7/09 4:04 PM Page 318 Method 2 The set-up cost is the cost when the number of books printed is 0. use the equation: Substitute: C ϭ 4200 C ϭ 20n ϩ 500 Solve for n. Cost of Publishing a Yearbook C Cost ($) 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 $2500 – $1500 = $1000 100 books – 50 books = 50 books n 50 100 150 200 Number of yearbooks The graph shows that for every 50 books printed.wncp10_5_7. Determine the change in each variable. 318 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions What is an advantage of using each method? . 4200 ϭ 20n ϩ 500 4200 Ϫ 500 ϭ 20n ϩ 500 Ϫ 500 3700 ϭ 20n 3700 20n ϭ 20 20 185 ϭ n The maximum number of yearbooks that can be printed is 185. The set-up cost is $500. An equation that represents this situation is: C ϭ 20n ϩ 500 To determine the maximum number of yearbooks that can be printed. $1000 The rate of change is: ϭ $20/book 50 books The increase in cost for each additional book published is $20. This is the vertical intercept of the graph. The increase in cost for each additional book printed is the rate of change of the function.

1200 63 54 45 36 27 18 9 0 A A = f(V) V 2 4 6 Volume (L) a) What is the rate of change? What does it represent? b) What area is covered by 6 L of paint? c) What volume of paint would cover 45 m2? 5. A feet. that paint covers as a function of its volume. Area covered (m2) Distance (km) A = f(t) 400 40 0 b) A 800 0 Altitude (ft. iii) Determine the domain and range. Write the coordinates of the points where the graph intersects the axes. of a small plane as a function of time. t hours. What information do the vertical and horizontal intercepts provide about a linear function? Use an example to explain. This graph shows the area. Each graph shows the altitude. For each graph: i) Determine the vertical intercept. How can you tell from a graph whether a linear function has a positive or negative rate of change? 3.) A 120 b) d d = f(t) 80 1200 t 4 8 Time (min) A A = g(t) 800 400 0 t 120 1 2 3 Time (h) 4 6 Time (min) 8 6. Sketch a graph of each linear function. ii) Determine the rate of change.) a) Distance (km) 4. iii) Determine the domain and range. Each graph below shows distance. d kilometres. as a function of time.7 Interpreting Graphs of Linear Functions 319 . 2. When a situation can be described by a linear function. t minutes. V litres.wncp10_5_7. a) f (x) ϭ 4x ϩ 3 b) g(x) ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 5 c) h(x) ϭ 9x Ϫ 2 d) k(x) ϭ Ϫ5x Ϫ 2 d = g(t) 80 40 t 0 t 2 B d 1 2 3 Time (h) 4 5. For each graph: i) Determine the vertical and horizontal intercepts. 7.qxd 12/7/09 4:04 PM Page 319 Discuss the Ideas 1. A square metres. Write the coordinates of the point where the graph intersects the axis. ii) Determine the rate of change. why doesn’t it matter which pair of points you choose to determine the rate of change? Exercises a) Altitude (ft.

Write the coordinates of the point where the graph intersects the axes. This graph shows the cost for a cab at Eagle Taxi Cabs. The graphs below show the temperature. is located in the flood plain of the Red River. 16 12 C = f(d) 8 4 0 2 4 6 8 Distance (km) d 10 a) Determine the rate of change. The cost.qxd 4 6 8 Time (h) 10 a) Determine the vertical and horizontal intercepts. Manitoba. C –20 Cost ($) 9. What does it represent? b) What is the cost when the distance is 7 km? c) What is the distance when the cost is $9. is a function of the distance travelled. Describe what the point represents. a) Which graph has a rate of change of 5°C/h and a vertical intercept of Ϫ10°C? b) Which graph has a rate of change of Ϫ10°C/h and a vertical intercept of 20°C? iii) 20 Temperature (°C) C 600 400 200 t 0 2 T = f(t) t 0 12 4 8 Time (h) –10 T T = g(t) 10 t 0 4 8 12 Time (h) –10 20 800 T 10 20 Cost of Running a Backhoe Cost of labour ($) wncp10_5_7. T degrees Celsius. backhoes were used to build dikes around houses and farms in the town. d) What is the cost to run the backhoe for 7 h? e) For how many hours is the backhoe run when the cost is $360? T 10 T = h(t) 0 t 2 4 6 Time (h) –10 –20 iv) Temperature (°C) 20 T 10 0 –10 T = k(t) t 4 8 12 Time (h) 10. at different locations. C dollars. What does it represent? c) Write the domain and range. This graph shows the labour costs for running a backhoe.50? 320 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions . as a function of time. b) Determine the rate of change. Adolphe.12/7/09 4:05 PM Page 320 ii) Temperature (°C) i) Temperature (°C) 8. d kilometres. t hours. St. To help prevent flooding.

100 Volume (m3) wncp10_5_7.qxd V 80 V = f(t) 60 40 20 t 0 10 20 30 40 Time (min) 50 Graph B 12. The capacity of each of 2 fuel storage tanks is 100 m3. as a function of time. and both cars are driven on city roads until their tanks are nearly empty. This graph shows the distance to the finish line. t hours.12/7/09 4:05 PM Page 321 11. Graph A represents the volume of fuel in one tank as a function of time as the tank is filled. Graph B represents the volume of fuel in another tank as a function of time as the tank is emptied. Manitoba. V 80 60 40 Graph A 20 d 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Distance (km) Use the graphs to explain why the Smart car is more economical to drive than the SUV. d kilometres.7 Interpreting Graphs of Linear Functions 321 . A Smart car and an SUV have full fuel tanks. for one dogsled in a race near Churchill. Volume of fuel in tank (L) Fuel Consumption of a Smart Car 40 V 30 20 10 d 100 200 300 400 500 600 Distance (km) 0 Fuel Consumption of an SUV Volume of fuel in tank (L) a) What was the length of time it took the dogsled to finish the race? b) What was the average speed of the dogsled? c) How long was the race in kilometres? d) What time did it take for the dogsled to 2 complete of the race? 3 13. about how much fuel would be in a tank that was being filled from empty? 5. Distance to finish (km) Dogsled Race 60 d 20 t 1 2 Time (h) V 80 60 V = g(t) 40 20 0 40 0 Volume (m3) 100 t 10 20 30 40 Time (min) 50 a) Does it take longer to fill the empty tank or empty the full tank? How do you know? b) In the time it takes for one tank to be half empty. The graphs show the fuel consumption for each vehicle.

The club had 300 power bars to sell.08d 180 y x –2 0 –2 y = g(x) –4 –6 . This graph shows the cost of the sweatshirts. C dollars. For each graph: i) State the x. ii) Use the intercepts to describe how x and y are related. a years.12/7/09 4:05 PM Page 322 14. Northlands School Outdoor Club had a fundraiser to help purchase snowshoes. Why would you not want to list all the values in the range? a 100 C P n 100 200 300 –80 Number of bars sold 40 60 80 Age (years) a) Why are there no intercepts on this graph? b) What is the rate of change? What does it represent? c) At what age is the recommended maximum heart rate 120 beats/min? d) What is the approximate recommended maximum heart rate for a person aged 70? a) The number of sweatshirts cannot be a fraction or decimal. as a function of the number ordered. R beats per minute. Ballenas School places an order for school sweatshirts with its logo of a killer whale on the back. What does each represent? c) Describe the domain and range for the function. Why do you think the points on the graph are joined? b) i) About how many sweatshirts can be bought for $700? ii) Suppose one more sweatshirt was ordered. This graph shows the recommended maximum heart rate of a person. Heart rate (beats/min) wncp10_5_7. n. a) f (x) ϭ 5 Ϫ 2. Cost ($) 800 17. a) 6 80 –2 0 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions y = f(x) 2 P = f(n) x 0 2 4 6 2 4 6 –2 b) 2 322 y 4 a) What is the profit on each bar sold? How do you know? b) Determine the intercepts.qxd C C = f(n) 600 400 200 n 0 20 40 60 Number of sweatshirts 16. What would be the increase in cost? 15.and y-intercepts. Two graphs that relate two real numbers x and y in different ways are shown below. Profit ($) 240 160 R 160 R = f(a) 140 120 100 0 20 18. This graph shows the profit made from selling power bars. as a function of her or his age. Sketch a graph of each linear function for positive values of the independent variable.5x b) g(t) ϭ 85t c) h(n) ϭ 750 ϩ 55n d) V(d) ϭ 55 Ϫ 0. for a stress test.

5) ϭ 127. The distance between Parksville and the Duke Point Ferry Terminal on Vancouver Island is 50 km. 20.qxd 12/7/09 4:05 PM Page 323 19.5. a) Sketch a graph of the linear function d ϭ f (t) that satisfies these conditions: f (1. domain and range. and child psychology. perhaps the most famous mathematician of all time. State the intercepts.wncp10_5_7. Her most famous work was on the development of the golden ratio and the golden rectangle.5) ϭ 297. She wrote many articles on mathematics. Include examples in your explanation. “Distance to A as a function of distance from B”. Theano lived in the 6th century B.5 b) Determine f (5).E. medicine. Her husband was Pythagoras. and the rate of change. Distance to Duke Point (km) Distance from Parksville and to Duke Point 50 d 40 30 20 10 p 0 10 20 30 40 50 Distance from Parksville (km) Reflect Explain why knowing the intercepts and the rate of change of the graph of a linear function may be helpful when you solve problems. 5. Describe the graph of the function. c) Determine t when f (t) = 212.5 and f (3.C. a) What do the intercepts represent? Why are they equal? b) What is the rate of change? Why does it not have units? What does it indicate? c) How would interchanging the dependent and independent variables change the graph? d) Suppose the distance between two towns A and B is k kilometres. THE WORLD OF MATH Historical Moment: Theano Theano was one of the first known woman mathematicians. astronomy. d) Suggest a context for this linear function. A person drives from Parksville to the ferry terminal.7 Interpreting Graphs of Linear Functions 323 . as well as on physics. in what is now southern Italy.

■ 324 ■ What is a relation? What is a function? Create a graphic organizer to show their common characteristics. Chapter 5: Relations and Functions .qxd 12/7/09 4:07 PM Page 324 S T U DY G U I D E CONCEPT SUMMARY Big Ideas Applying the Big Ideas A relation associates the elements of one set with the elements of another set. ■ A function is a special type of relation for which each element of the first set is associated with a unique element of the second set. and any vertical line drawn through the graph intersects the graph at no more than one point. ■ Reflect on the Chapter How can the properties of linear functions be used to solve real-world problems? Include examples with your explanation. and a graph. a table.wncp10_BM. a constant change in the independent variable results in a constant change in the dependent variable. ■ For a function. This means that: ■ A relation may be represented as: a rule. The set of first elements is the domain and the set of related second elements is the range. ■ For a linear function. a set of ordered pairs. an arrow diagram. ■ A linear function has a constant rate of change and its graph is a non-vertical straight line. each element of the domain is associated with exactly one element of the range. and those that are unique.

2. (2. 3). Study Guide 325 .wncp10_BM. The range is the set of second elements. The rate of change is negative when the graph goes down to the right. 7. 11)} [5. 5. {(Ϫ1. 2. the range is: {3. (0. [5. When f (x) ϭ 0: 0 ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 5 2x ϭ 5 x ϭ 2.5 The x-intercept is 2. 11} For the graph below: The domain is all possible times in one day. the domain is: {Ϫ1.4. For this set of ordered pairs. 9). The range is: –4 Յ T Յ 10 Temperature (°C) 12 T T = f(h) 8 4 h 0 06:00 –4 [5. 5.6. 7).5. When x ϭ 0: f (0) ϭ Ϫ2(0) ϩ 5 f (0) ϭ 5 The y-intercept is 5. 5. the domain is the set of values of the independent variable.7] For a graph. 3}.qxd 12/7/09 4:07 PM Page 325 SKILLS SUMMARY Skill Description Example Determine the domain and range of a function. 9. 0. 18:00 Time d 200 100 0 150 km t 2h 2 3 Time (h) The rate of change is: 150 km ϭ 75 km/h 2h Determine the intercepts of the graph of a linear function. The domain is the set of first elements of the ordered pairs.5.7] The x-intercept is the value of x when y or f (x) is 0. 5. For the linear function f (x) ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 5. (1.7] The rate of change is: change in dependent variable change in independent variable The rate of change is positive when the graph goes up to the right. The range is the set of values of the dependent variable. 1. 5. Distance against Time Distance (km) Determine the rate of change of the graph of a linear function. (3. 5). The y-intercept is the value of y when x is 0.

(4. oxygen (8). a) y ϭ Ϫ4x ϩ 9 b) C ϭ 12n ϩ 75 c) D ϭ Ϫ20t ϩ 150 d) P ϭ 4s 5. a) Laura cycles home from school. Bill Reid Haida Susan Point Salish 3. (4. (5. Artist Heritage Bob Dempsey Tlingit Dorothy Grant Haida 5. This graph shows the volume of water in Liam’s flask as he hikes the Trans Canada trail.1 1. 20)} d) {(5. chlorine (17). Morgan Gitxsan 6.qxd 12/7/09 4:07 PM Page 326 REVIEW a) Write the function as an equation in 2 variables. 4). (3. (5. 7. c) Determine the value of P(150). a) has an atomic number of b) is the atomic number of Graph B Graph A 1. The function P(n) ϭ 5n Ϫ 300 describes the profit. Write in function notation. What does this number represent? 5. silver (47) For each association below. 9). carbon (6). 9)} c) {(2. 12). 8). 0)} b) {(2.3 Bill Helin Tsimshian John Joseph Squamish Judith P. 5). Ϫ5)} 4. for a school dance when n students attend. 2). Here is a list of some chemical elements and their atomic numbers: hydrogen (1). What does this number represent? d) Determine the value of n when P(n) ϭ 700. Justify your choices. Which sets of ordered pairs represent functions? What strategies did you use to find out? a) {(4. (Ϫ5. then walks back to school. Which graph best matches this situation? Explain your choice. use these data to represent a relation in different ways. 4). This table shows some Northwest Coast artists and their cultural heritage. (Ϫ3. b) Represent this relation: i) as a set of ordered pairs ii) as an arrow diagram 2. 16). Water in Liam’s Flask 2.5 0 4 8 12 16 Distance (km) 20 a) Describe what is happening for each line segment of the graph. iron (26). 1). 3). (Ϫ2. Describe a possible situation for the graph. b) How many times did Liam fill his flask? . P dollars. (Ϫ5. 5).wncp10_BM. (4. b) Identify the independent variable and the dependent variable. Ϫ5). 326 Chapter 5: Relations and Functions Time Time Graph D Distance to Laura’s house Distance to Laura’s house Graph C Time b) Choose one of the graphs in part a that did not describe Laura’s journey. (3.2 Time Distance to Laura’s house Distance to Laura’s house a) Describe the relation in words.0 0. (4.5 1.0 Volume (L) 5.

170 Number of Bicycles at School Number of bicycles –2 180 13 15 17 Age (years) y 4 f(x) = –3x + 1 9. The data below show how the temperature of boiling water as it cools is related to time.5 b) 300 60 53 30 700 57 25 1100 62 20 V 69 15 1500 Number of marbles 12/7/09 Volume of jar (cm3) wncp10_BM. –2). range: 0 Յ y Յ 3 b) domain: x Յ 1. (5. 5). (9. (13.6 20 10 0 08:00 16:00 Time 13. Did you join the points? Why or why not? b) Does the graph represent a function? How can you tell? Time (min) 10. 1).4 8. 6). Estimate when necessary. (2. 8 Height (cm) 30 0 x 2 –4 a) Determine the range value when the domain value is 1. Which sets of ordered pairs represent linear relations? Explain your answers. (1. (4. 5). 8)} c) {(–2. Write the domain and range for each graph. a) Graph the data.qxd 12. range: Ϫ2 Յ y Յ 2 5. This is a graph of the function f (x) ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 1. Are there any restrictions on the domain and range? Explain. (1. 5. 5)} b) {(1. (1. Which of these graphs represents a function? Justify your answer. a) {(1. a) Heights and Ages of 8 Students 160 0 20 10 5. 4). Sketch a graph of a function that has each domain and range. a) domain: Ϫ1 Յ x Յ 5.4:07 PM Page 327 c) How much water was in Liam’s flask at the start of his hike? d) Identify the dependent and independent variables. –3)} Review 327 . d) Why are the points joined on one graph but not on the other? Graph B Graph A i) ii) Temperature (°C) 0 89 5 78 10 50 h 0 10 20 Height of jar (cm) n 50 40 30 h 10 20 Height of jar (cm) 0 11. c) Write the domain and range for each graph. 2). –3). (–1. 5). b) Determine the domain value when the range value is 4. For the graphs below: a) What does each graph represent? b) Identify the independent and dependent variables.

328 Temperature (°C) 10:46 AM Temperature (°C) 2/19/10 Temperature (°C) wncp10_BM. What does it represent? d) Use your answer to part c to determine the diameter of a bicycle wheel. t hours.qxd Chapter 5: Relations and Functions P 1600 800 0 –800 P = f(n) n 200 400 600 Number sold a) How many baseball caps have to be sold before the company begins to make a profit? b) What is the profit on the sale of each baseball cap? c) How many caps have to be sold to make each profit? i) $600 ii) $1200 d) In part c. travelled by Jadan on her bicycle as a function of the number of wheel revolutions. 3°C/h 18. when the profit doubles why does the number of baseballs caps sold not double? . create a table of values when necessary. as a function of time. d metres. P dollars. a) Explain why the equation represents a linear relation. The number of units of insulin taken. This graph shows the distance. i) x ϭ 3 ii) y ϭ 2x2 ϩ 3 iii) y ϭ 2x ϩ 3 iv) y ϭ 3 v) y ϭ 3x vi) x ϩ y ϭ 3 b) Which equations in part a represent linear relations? How do you know? 15. where g represents the 15 number of grams of carbohydrates consumed. on a company’s sale of n baseball caps. then graph the relation. T a) b) 4 T 4 T = f(t) 2 t 2 Time (h) 0 –2 T = k(t) 2 0 –2 t 2 4 Time (h) –4 c) 4 T 2 t 0 2 –2 8 T = g(t) Time (h) 4 6 1 i) Ϫ3°C. 2400 d 4000 2000 0 ii) 3°C. These graphs show the temperature. 6000 iii) Ϫ3°C.7 16. n. as she rode from Whitehorse to the Grey Mountain Road lookout in the Yukon. What does it represent? 17. b) State the rate of change. Isabelle manages her diabetes by taking insulin to control her blood sugar. Ϫ3°C/h Profit ($) Distance (m) Jadan’s Bicycle Trip n 800 1600 2400 3200 Number of revolutions a) How far was Jadan from the lookout when she started her bicycle trip? b) Write the domain and range. a) For each equation. T degrees Celsius. Match each graph with its vertical intercept and rate of change. °C/h 3 5. is given by the 1 equation N ϭ g. c) Determine the rate of change. N. This graph shows the profit.Page 328 14.

or D 1. Could you extend the graph? Identify and explain any restrictions on the domain and range. (–3. Explain. 5). (–1. B.5 10 4. Did you connect the points? Explain. 6). 21 C. 4). 5). f (x) ϭ 5 B. Describe a possible situation for this graph. Justify your description. what is the value of f (Ϫ3)? A. What does it represent? f) For how long should you cook a turkey with mass 7 kg? Mass (kg) Time (h) 4 2.0 Practice Test 329 . 2)} b) n s 2 1 1 y y = f(x) 2 1 Ϫ3 4 4 Ϫ1 c) 9 –2 0 x 2 4 6 8 –2 4. f (x) ϭ 5x C. 0 2. For each relation represented below: i) State whether it is a function and how you know.0 8 3. Ϫ15 D. Label the axes and give the graph a title. d) Determine the domain and range of the graph. Justify your choice.wncp10_BM. 1 B. 5.qxd 12/7/09 4:07 PM Page 329 PRACTICE TEST For questions 1 and 2. C. State whether it is a linear function and how you know. Represent the function in a different way. f (x) ϭ Ϫ5 3. This table of values shows how the time to cook a turkey is related to its mass. (1. c) Graph the data. choose the correct answer: A. a) {(2. e) Determine the rate of change for this function. Which equation does not represent a linear function? A. ii) If the relation is a function: State its domain and range. a) Why is this relation a function? b) Identify the dependent and the independent variables. (0. iii) If the relation is a linear function: Identify the dependent and independent variables. Determine the rate of change. For the function f (x) ϭ 3 Ϫ 6x.5 6 3. f (x) ϭ 5x2 D.

NEW VOCABULARY slope rise run negative reciprocals slope-intercept form slope-point form general form .wncp10_6_1.qxd 12/7/09 4:09 PM 6 Page 330 Linear Functions BUILDING ON ■ graphing linear relations ■ recognizing the properties of linear relations ■ solving linear equations BIG IDEAS ■ The graph of a linear function is a non-vertical straight line with a constant slope. ■ Certain forms of the equation of a linear function identify the slope and y-intercept of the graph or the slope and the coordinates of a point on the graph.

qxd 12/7/09 4:09 PM Page 331 P O T A S H M I N I N G Saskatchewan 1 currently provides almost of the 4 world’s potash. . which is an ingredient of fertilizer. Sales data are used to predict the future needs for potash.wncp10_6_1.

Make Connections The town of Falher in Alberta is known as la capitale du miel du Canada.qxd 12/7/09 6. It has the 3-story slide in the photo above.1 4:10 PM Page 332 Slope of a Line LESSON FOCUS Determine the slope of a line segment and a line.wncp10_6_1. This diagram shows different line segments on a square grid. Think of a strategy to calculate a number to represent the steepness of each line segment. How could you describe the steepness of the slide? Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. B. the Honey Capital of Canada. Which segment is the least steep? How does its number compare with the other numbers? 332 Chapter 6: Linear Functions . Which is the steepest line segment? How does your number show that? D C B A C. F E A.

For Roof A rise Slope ϭ run 13 Slope ϭ 13 Slope ϭ 1 For Roof B rise Slope ϭ run 7 Slope ϭ 12 Slope ϭ 0.583 For Roof C rise Slope ϭ run 14 Slope ϭ 8 Slope ϭ 1.75 Roof C is the steepest because its slope is the greatest. we count units to determine the rise and the run. The run is the corresponding horizontal distance. E. Steeper roofs are more expensive to shingle. What number would you use to describe the steepness of a horizontal line? Some roofs are steeper than others. 6.qxd 12/7/09 4:10 PM Page 333 D. For each roof above.wncp10_6_1.1 Slope of a Line 333 . Roof A Roof B Roof C rise rise rise run run run The steepness of a roof is measured by calculating its slope. but not as steep as segment BC. On a grid. Roof B is the least steep because its slope is the least. draw a line segment that is steeper than segment CD. rise Slope ϭ run The rise is the vertical distance from the bottom of the edge of the roof to the top. How are line segments CD and EF alike and different? How do the numbers for their steepnesses compare? F. Use your strategy to calculate a number to represent its steepness.

From Chapter 5.wncp10_6_1. 3 Line segment AB has slope . The change in x is the run. 2 x 0 –4 4 0 x a) 4 2 2 –2 –4 –6 y F x 0 –4 2 –2 D –4 E SOLUTION b) Count units to determine the rise and run. slope ϭ run Determining the Slope of a Line Segment Example 1 Determine the slope of each line segment. y run is 10 rise is 6 B 2 x 0 –4 2 4 –2 A Slope ϭ rise run 6 10 3 Slope ϭ 5 Slope ϭ Write the fraction in simplest form. so the rise is 6 and the run is 10. 5 334 Chapter 6: Linear Functions G –4 2 –2 [Answers: a) 0 y x 2 1 3 b) Ϫ ] 2 3 H . Determine the slope of each line segment. a) From A to B. y a) B b) CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING C 2 –6 2 4 –2 –2 A y 1. rise So.qxd 12/7/09 4:10 PM Page 334 The slope of a line segment on a coordinate grid is the measure of its rate of change. recall that: Rate of change ϭ change in dependent variable change in independent variable Rate of change ϭ change in y change in x y run change in x rise change in y x 0 The change in y is the rise. both x and y are increasing.

y could decrease and the rise would be negative. both y and x increase.wncp10_6_1. y is decreasing. so the slope of the segment is negative. How do you identify the rise and the run? When a line segment goes down to the right.1 Slope of a Line 335 . the change in y is 0 and x increases. So. The rise is 0 and the run is positive. The rise is positive and the run is 0. C Why does calculating the slope of the line segment joining D to C produce the same result as calculating the slope of the segment from C to D? y 4 2 x –4 0 –2 2 –2 rise is –10 –4 D run is 5 rise Slope ϭ run Ϫ10 Write the fraction in simplest form. so the slope of the segment is positive. the rise is negative and the run is positive. x rise Slope ϭ run rise 0 A fraction with denominator 0 is not defined. so the run is 5. any horizontal line segment has slope 0.qxd 12/7/09 4:10 PM Page 335 b) From C to D. y rise is negative negative slope 0 positive slope x 0 run is positive For a horizontal line segment. For a vertical line segment. y run is positive rise is positive x Suppose the slope is an integer. any vertical line segment has a slope that is undefined. y increases and the change in x is 0. 5 Slope ϭ Ϫ2 Line segment CD has slope Ϫ2. For a vertical line segment. x is increasing. Slope ϭ When a line segment goes up to the right. y decreases and x increases. so the rise is Ϫ10. Slope ϭ 6. y y x 0 undefined slope 0 0 slope rise Slope ϭ run 0 Slope ϭ run Slope ϭ 0 So. both the rise and run are positive.

7 Line segment RS has slope . the triangles are similar.wncp10_6_1. 8 y S 2 2 rise is 7 –2 x 0 2 R 4 rise is –3 4 2 6 slope 8 is – 3 y 2 –2 x 0 –2 slope 4 is 9 –4 –2 T –4 Sample Answers: y run is 5 Why can we choose any point on the grid as one endpoint of the line segment? U run is 8 0 2 x 4 Suppose the slope was 3 written as . From R. vertical and horizontal segments are drawn for the rise and run. Join RS. On line MT. Label the point U. N TU 12 ϭ UM 18 TU 2 ϭ UM 3 SV 8 ϭ VN 12 SV 2 ϭ VN 3 RW 4 ϭ WP 6 RW 2 ϭ WP 3 The lengths of the legs have the same ratio. Join TU. 4 8 a) b) Ϫ 9 3 SOLUTION 7 has a rise 5 of 7 and a run of 5. 5 a) A line segment with slope Ϫ3 3 b) The slope Ϫ can be written as . move 3 units down and 8 units right. move 7 units up and 5 units right. How would you Ϫ8 draw the line segment? We can show that the slopes of all segments of a line are equal. 8 8 Ϫ3 A line segment with slope has 8 a rise of Ϫ3 and a run of 8. From T. Choose any point T on a grid. y These segments form right triangles. 7 3 a) b) Ϫ 5 8 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. 3 Line segment TU has slope Ϫ . Label the point S.qxd 12/7/09 4:10 PM Example 2 Page 336 Drawing a Line Segment with a Given Slope Draw a line segment with each given slope. Choose any point R on a grid. So. U 18 Consider the lengths of the legs 6 12 V of these right triangles. 336 Chapter 6: Linear Functions 6 W 12 8 –8 –6 S T 4 P 2 4 R –2 M Q 0 –2 –4 x 2 4 6 8 . Draw a line segment with each slope.

the slope of line MT is .wncp10_6_1. y2) (y2 – y1) A(x1. 1). –5) and F(8. –3) and D(2. y1) 0 x 6. the slope of 3 the line is the slope of any segment of the line. y Ϫ y1 Slope of line AB ϭ 2 x2 Ϫ x1 (x2 – x1) B(x2. SOLUTION CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. 2 2 6 Slope of segment PQ ϭ Slope of segment NR ϭ .qxd 12/8/09 5:05 PM Page 337 Any right triangle drawn with its hypotenuse on line MT will have legs in the 2 ratio . or 3 9 3 2 So. y Slope of a Line A line passes through A(x1. –3) From C to D: The rise is the change in y-coordinates. Rise ϭ 1 Ϫ (Ϫ3) The run is the change in x-coordinates. Run ϭ 2 Ϫ (Ϫ5) 1 Ϫ (Ϫ3) Slope of CD ϭ 2 Ϫ (Ϫ5) 4 Slope of CD ϭ 7 How could you use slope to verify that three points lie on the same line? Example 3 leads to a formula we can use to determine the slope of any line. y1) and B(x2. 3 Determining Slope Given Two Points on a Line Example 3 Determine the slope of the line that passes through C(–5. 6). 1) 2 x 4 –2 C(–5. run –6 –4 rise 2 –2 11 ] 4 y D(2. y2). [Answer: Sketch the line. Subtract corresponding coordinates to determine the change in x and in y. So it does not matter which points we choose on the line. For example. Determine the slope of the line that passes through E(4.1 Slope of a Line 337 .

y1 ϭ 24. He recorded the hours he worked and his pay for 3 different days. Slope of PQ ϭ x2 Ϫ x1 2 1 x ϭ 3. Yvonne travelled at an average speed of 24 km/h. The values of x are time in hours. from North Winnipeg to Grand Beach. such as P(1. Chapter 6: Linear Functions c) How can the answer to part b be used to determine: [Answers: a) 12 b) Tom’s hourly rate 1 of pay: $12/h c) i) $42 ii) 2 hours] 2 36 24 b) What does the slope represent? i) how much Tom earned 1 in 3 hours? 2 ii) the time it took Tom to earn $30? Graph of a Bicycle Ride Slope of PQ ϭ 338 48 0 SOLUTION Slope of PQ ϭ CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Pay ($) wncp10_6_1. 72) Distance (km) 60 48 P(1. She plotted these data on a grid. Use this formula: y Ϫy Substitute: y2 ϭ 72. 72). the slope of the line is measured in kilometres per hour. this is Yvonne’s average speed for her trip. Tom has a part-time job. So.12/8/09 5:05 PM Example 4 Page 338 Interpreting the Slope of a Line Yvonne recorded the distances she had travelled at certain times since she began her cycling trip along the Trans Canada Trail in Manitoba. Graph of a Bicycle Ride 72 4. Label the axes x and y. Tom plotted these data on a grid. and x ϭ 1 2 72 Ϫ 24 3Ϫ 1 48 2 Slope of PQ ϭ 24 The slope of the line is 24. 24) and Q(3. 1 72 y Q(3. 24) 12 0 x 1 2 3 Time (h) b) The values of y are distances in kilometres. Distance (km) 60 a) What is the slope of the line through these points? 48 36 Graph of Tom’s Pay 24 72 12 b) What does the slope represent? 0 c) How can the answer to part b be used to determine: 1 2 3 Time (h) 3 i) how far Yvonne travelled in 1 hours? 4 ii) the time it took Yvonne to travel 55 km? 24 2 4 6 Time (h) a) What is the slope of the line through these points? a) Choose two points on the line.qxd 4 .

Yvonne travelled: a1 b (24 km) ϭ 42 km 4 4 3 In 1 hours. For each line segment.wncp10_6_1. or 60 min. 4 ii) Yvonne travelled approximately 24 km in 1 h.5 min. or not defined? y y a) b) a) x 0 x 0 y c) 0 y d) x x 0 b) 6. and use the formula to determine the slope of EF. Exercises A 4. 2. Yvonne took: ϭ 2.5 min Yvonne took approximately 2 h 20 min to travel 55 km. Yvonne travelled approximately 42 km.5 min) ϭ 137. When you look at a line on a grid. When you know the coordinates of two points E and F. negative. 3 3 So. y1)? Explain.1 Slope of a Line 339 . zero.qxd 12/7/09 4:10 PM Page 339 c) i) In 1 h. in 1 hours. Why can you choose any 2 points on a line to determine its slope? 3.5 min 24 So. 60 min To travel 1 km. 5. is its slope positive. to travel 55 km. Discuss the Ideas 1. how can you tell whether its slope is positive. or 2 h 17. negative. does it matter which point has the coordinates (x1. Yvonne travelled approximately 24 km. or not defined? Give examples. 0. Determine the slope of the road in each photo. Yvonne took: 55(2.

a) As x increases by 1. c) As x decreases by 4. b) Determine the slope of each segment. D. a) On a grid. Label the points C. draw a line that passes through 3 points. a) How would determining the slopes of lines in the picture help a person to copy the picture? b) Copy the picture above. y decreases by 2. y increases by 3. run. 4) and R(3. using the strategy you described in part a. b) As x increases by 2. 6) ii) S(0. 14. 1) x 2 d) R(–3. Determine the slope of each line described below. 3) 3 B y F(4.15. 4) 4 y x 0 7. Draw a line segment that has one endpoint at the origin and whose slope is: 2 2 4 a) b) Ϫ c) 4 d) Ϫ 3 5 3 10. Ϫ7) and W(Ϫ6. a) Draw 2 different line segments with slope . 4) E(–4. y increases by 1. y decreases by 7. Explain the results. The artist then copies the image on a different grid. and slope.wncp10_6_1. The run is 90 in. c) Compare the slopes you calculated in parts a and b. Sketch a line whose slope is: a) positive b) zero c) negative d) not defined 9. i) P(1. an artist places a square grid over the picture. making sure corresponding grid squares match. 0. –2) 340 2 x 0 –3 x 11. and a run of 90 in. What is the slope of the treadmill? b) The treadmill is set at its maximum slope. d) As x decreases by 2. To copy a picture by hand. a) Choose two points on line segment DE. 2) and Q(3.qxd 12/7/09 4:11 PM Page 340 6. –4 b) Choose two different points on segment DE and calculate its slope. Ϫ5) b) Explain what each slope tells you about the line. a) Determine the slope of the line that passes through each pair of points. 8. Chapter 6: Linear Functions E –4 –2 0 x 2 4 6 –2 D 2 –2 y 3 S(–1. For each line segment. i) CD ii) DE iii) CE What do you notice? 15. and E. –2) 0 –6 y K(3. 1) A(–3. Ϫ8) iv) U(Ϫ12. 7 12. a) A treadmill is set with a rise of 6 in. 1) –2 0 c) 2 2 –4 –2 M(–1. a) b) 4 y B(3. Use these two points to determine the slope of the line segment. 5 b) How are the line segments in part a the same? How are they different? 13. determine its rise. 5) iii) V(Ϫ1. 1) and T(8. What is the rise? .

By how much does it drop over that distance? 20. and Ϫ 3 3 a) Which number is correct for the slope of line BC? Give reasons for your choice. Four students determined the slope of the line through B(6. How long is the trench measured horizontally? c) Suppose the trench is 18 ft. 21. –3) and E(–5. b) For each incorrect answer. a) Draw the line through each pair of points. Ϫ2) and C(Ϫ3. y a) slope: –2 4 Line i 1 b) slope: 2 2 1 c) slope: Ϫ 2 d) slope: 2 Line ii –2 x 2 Line iii Line iv 18. How did you determine these points? a) 4 1 3 c) Ϫ b) Ϫ1 7 d) 4 6.1 Slope of a Line 341 . 23. the trench must be dug so that it drops 1 in. 17. Their 1 1 answers were: 3.wncp10_6_1. Draw the line through G(Ϫ5. A trench is to be dug to lay a drainage pipe. –3) and C(5. . 3) and E(–5. Ϫ3. explain what the student might have done wrong to get that answer. a) On a grid. 1 Its slope must be less than . 0) ii) D(0. from 2 beginning to end. 0) iv) B(0. for every 4 ft. measured horizontally. long measured horizontally. What is the minimum horizontal distance needed for the ramp? Justify your answer. 0) iii) D(0. 3) and C(5. Match each line below with a slope. Write the coordinates of 3 other points on the line. Ϫ5). To ensure that the water in the pipe flows away. i) B(0. The entrance 12 to the hospital is 70 cm above the ground. Explain your choices.qxd 12/7/09 4:12 PM Page 341 16. b) Explain why the slope of a vertical line is undefined. a) Explain why the slope of a horizontal line is zero. 0) b) How are the slopes of the lines in part a related? 19. sketch each line: i) a line that has only one intercept ii) a line that has two intercepts iii) a line that has more intercepts than you can count b) How many lines could you draw in each of part a? What is the slope of each line? 22. A hospital plans to build a wheelchair ramp. Determine the slope of the line. 1) with each given slope. a) What is the slope of the trench? 1 b) Suppose the trench drops 6 in.

the height is onethird the span.2 27.00 1. the height and span are equal. zero. c) What does the slope represent? d) How could you use the slope to determine the mass of each volume of aluminum? Explain your strategy. i) The line has a positive x-intercept and a negative y-intercept. iv) The line has an x-intercept but does not have a y-intercept. a) For each line described below. or undefined? Justify your answer.8 125 337.20? e) What assumptions did you make when you completed parts c and d? 25. b) Calculate the slope of the line through the points. Explain your strategy. b) Sketch each line in part a. What is the slope of this roof? . ii) The line has a negative x-intercept and a positive y-intercept.5 216 583. A one-third pitch roof has a span of 36 ft.00 2. is its slope positive. Here are her data: Volume of Aluminum (cm3) Mass of Aluminum (g) 64 172. A full pitch roof has a span of 36 ft. c) Determine how much money Charin had in his account when he started saving money each month. 26. iii) Both intercepts are positive. This table shows how his savings account balance is changing. d) What assumptions did you make when you answered parts a to c? 28.wncp10_6_1. c) Determine the cost to send 33 text messages. ii) 275 cm3 i) 50 cm3 e) What is the approximate volume of each mass of aluminum? i) 100 g ii) 450 g Months Saved 280 a) How much money does Charin save each month? How could you use the concept of slope to determine this? b) Determine how much money Charin will have saved after 10 months.qxd 12/7/09 4:12 PM Page 342 24. What is the slope of this roof? b) For a one-third pitch roof. d) How many messages can be sent for $7. This graph shows the cost for text messages as a function of the number of text messages.00 0 span 5 10 15 20 Number of messages a) Why is a line not drawn through the points on the graph? b) What is the cost for one text message? How do you know? 342 Chapter 6: Linear Functions a) For a full pitch roof. negative. Account Balance ($) 2 145 5 a) Graph these data on a grid. Charin saves the same amount of money each month. Cost for Text Messages height Cost ($) 3. Pitch is often used to measure the steepness of a roof. Tess conducted an experiment where she determined the masses of different volumes of aluminum cubes.

2). and the pilot had to glide to make an emergency landing in Gimli. Describe the types of slope a line may have. THE WORLD OF MATH Profile: The Slope of a Road The slope of a road is called the grade of the road. b) Determine the slope of segment OB and tan ЄAOB. On July 23.wncp10_6_1. and any point A on the positive x-axis. a) Construct an angle of 30° at the origin. 1983. When a grade run is greater than 6%. The altitude of the plane decreased from 7000 m to 5500 m in a horizontal distance of 18 km. which rise is the fraction expressed as a percent. 4). when the angle doubles does the slope of the other arm double? Justify your answer. Manitoba. d) How is the slope of a line segment related to the tangent of the angle formed by the segment and the positive x-axis? 31. b) Repeat part a for an angle of 60°. The plane was at an altitude of 2600 m when it was 63 km away from Winnipeg. Trucks may have to gear down to travel safely. When the plane had been fuelled. c) For an angle with one arm horizontal. How is the slope of a line related to rate of change? Include examples in your explanation. c) Repeat parts a and b for B(5.1 Slope of a Line 343 . imperial units instead of metric units were used for the calculations of the volume of fuel needed. Use grid paper. Reflect 30. a sign is erected by the side of the road to warn traffic travelling downhill.qxd 12/7/09 4:12 PM Page 343 C 29. Determine the slope of the other arm of the angle. Could this plane reach Winnipeg? Explain. with one arm along the positive x-axis. Ontario. a) Plot point O at the origin. point B(2. a Boeing 767 travelling from Montreal to Edmonton ran out of fuel over Red Lake. Suppose the plane glided to the ground at a constant speed. What are the rise and the run of a road with slope 6%? 6.

Compare your results with those of 3 classmates. determine the slope of each side.wncp10_6_2. Make Connections Look at the map above.qxd 12/7/09 6. B. ■ What do you notice about the slopes of parallel line segments? ■ What do you notice about the slopes of perpendicular line segments? C. For each square. 344 Chapter 6: Linear Functions . A. You will need grid paper and a ruler. Do the relationships you discovered in Step B seem to be true in general? Justify your answer. draw 2 squares with different orientations. On a coordinate grid. This map of Calgary shows the area close to the Saddledome. Which streets are parallel to 11th Avenue? Which streets are perpendicular to 11th Avenue? How could you verify this? Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work on your own.2 4:27 PM Page 344 Slopes of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines LESSON FOCUS Use slope to determine whether two lines are parallel or perpendicular.

y2): y Ϫ y1 Slope ϭ 2 x2 Ϫ x1 y J6 M Ϫ1 Ϫ 2 2 Ϫ (Ϫ4) Ϫ3 1 Slope of GH ϭ . line AB is parallel to line CD.] 1 Ϫ4 . Sketch the lines. Ϫ1). 7) and K(7. Line CD passes through C(Ϫ1. 5) and N(5. SOLUTION Use the formula for the slope of a line through points with coordinates (x1.wncp10_6_2.qxd 3/9/10 10:47 AM Page 345 When two lines have the same slope. MN is not parallel to those lines. Line JK passes through J(Ϫ1. congruent triangles can be drawn to show the rise and the run. Ϫ2). or Ϫ 8 2 1Ϫ5 5 Ϫ (Ϫ4) Slope of MN ϭ K 2 G –4 Slope of GH ϭ 4 Ϫ4 4 . 7). Ϫ3) and D(1. Line AB passes through A(Ϫ3. 1). Are they parallel? Justify your answer. Sketch the lines. so the lines are not parallel. y1) and (x2. Line MN passes through M(Ϫ4. 6. 6). Are they parallel? Justify the answer. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1. Since the slope of MN is different from the slopes of GH and JK. 7) and B(Ϫ5. 2) and H(2. Lines that have the some slope are parallel. or Ϫ 6 2 Slope of MN ϭ –2 0 N 2 H Slope of JK ϭ x 6 3Ϫ7 7 Ϫ (Ϫ1) Slope of JK ϭ 4 [Answer: The slopes of the lines are not equal. Example 1 Identifying Parallel Lines Line GH passes through G(Ϫ4. 7 y Slope of AB ϭ 5 5 B 5 10 7 Slope of CD ϭ 5 D 8 6 7 7 4 2 A C x 0 2 6 4 8 10 Since the slope of AB is equal to the slope of CD. or Ϫ 9 9 Since the slopes of GH and JK are equal.2 Slopes of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines 345 . Ϫ2) and F(Ϫ1. 3). the two lines are parallel. Line EF passes through E(Ϫ3.

are negative reciprocals if ab ϭ Ϫ1. Ϫ5). y C 8 6 Lines AB and CD are drawn perpendicular. a Example 2 Examining Slopes to Compare Lines Line PQ passes through P(Ϫ7. 2) and Q(Ϫ2. 3) and V(7.qxd 12/7/09 4:27 PM Page 346 Non-parallel lines in the same plane have different slopes. 1). which is not 0 defined. 3 4 Ϫ is the negative reciprocal of . The slope of a vertical line is . the slopes of horizontal and vertical lines are not negative reciprocals. a line with slope a. [Answer: a) The two lines are perpendicular. Horizontal and vertical lines are an exception. a) Are these two lines parallel. perpendicular. or neither? Justify your answer. 4 3 3 4 And. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. A 4 6 B D The rise of AB is the opposite of the run of CD. perpendicular. Ϫ4) and S(5.wncp10_6_2. a ϶ 0. 7) and T(2. a b a b ϭ Ϫ1 Ϫ 4 3 The relationship between the slopes of AB and CD is true for any two oblique perpendicular lines. a and b. b) Sketch the lines to verify your answer to part a. 10). or neither? Justify the answer. 1 that is. 1 The slope of a horizontal line is 0. 6). a) Are these two lines parallel. Perpendicular lines are not parallel. rise rise Slope of AB ϭ run Slope of CD ϭ run Slope of AB ϭ 4 3 Slope of CD ϭ 3 Ϫ4 4 3 2 –4 –2 –4 3 x 0 4 –2 3 Slope of CD ϭ Ϫ 4 Two real numbers. b) Sketch the lines to verify the answer to part a. Slopes of Perpendicular Lines The slopes of two oblique perpendicular lines are negative reciprocals. Line UV passes through U(Ϫ2.] 346 Chapter 6: Linear Functions . so they have different slopes. Line RS passes through R(Ϫ3. Line ST passes through S(Ϫ2. The run of AB is equal to the rise of CD. is perpendicular to a line with slope Ϫ . So.

2 (Solution continues. The two slopes are reciprocals.qxd 12/7/09 4:27 PM Page 347 SOLUTION a) Slope of PQ ϭ Slope of PQ ϭ 10 Ϫ 2 Ϫ2 Ϫ (Ϫ7) Slope of RS ϭ 1 Ϫ (Ϫ4) 5 Ϫ (Ϫ3) 8 5 Slope of RS ϭ 5 8 The two slopes are not equal. 3) and H(1.wncp10_6_2. Ϫ2). SOLUTION 3. 6)] Ϫ4 Ϫ6 2 3 The slope of a line perpendicular to EF is the negative reciprocal 2 3 of . which is Ϫ . a) Determine the slope of a line that is perpendicular to the line through G(Ϫ2. So. b) y Q 10 8 6 4 2 P S x –8 –6 –4 0 –2 4 –2 R –4 Identifying a Line Perpendicular to a Given Line Example 3 a) Determine the slope of a line that is perpendicular to the line through E(2. Ϫ1 Ϫ 3 Slope of EF ϭ Ϫ4 Ϫ 2 Slope of EF ϭ CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING [Answers: a) 3 b) sample answer: 5 J(3.) 6. Ϫ1). b) Determine the coordinates of G so that line EG is perpendicular to line EF. b) Determine the coordinates of J so that line GJ is perpendicular to line GH. the two lines are neither parallel nor perpendicular. a) Determine the slope of EF. but not negative reciprocals. so the lines are not parallel. so the lines are not perpendicular. 3 2 Slope of EF ϭ 3 The slope of a line perpendicular to EF is Ϫ . 3) and F(Ϫ4.2 Slopes of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines 347 .

the rise from B to C is 2 and the run is 8. To check whether ABCD is a rectangle. Example 4 Why do the slopes of oblique perpendicular lines have opposite signs? 6 4 E 2 F 0 –2 G x 4 2 –2 What are some other possible coordinates for G? Using Slope to Identify a Polygon ABCD is a parallelogram. 4 C H 2 x SOLUTION 0 A parallelogram has opposite sides equal. Draw a line through EG. move 3 units down and 2 units right. It is a rectangle if its angles are right angles. 2 1 Slope of BC ϭ . From point E.wncp10_6_2. EFGH is a parallelogram. EFGH is not a rectangle. This means that ЄABC is a right angle and that ABCD is a rectangle. How do you determine whether two lines are parallel? 2. there is a run of 2 units. 3 The slope of line EG is Ϫ . Mark point G. Is it a rectangle? Justify the answer. 0). AB and BC are perpendicular. determine whether two intersecting sides are perpendicular. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING y 4 A D 2 x –4 –2 B 0 4. Line EG is perpendicular to line EF. 2 so for each rise of Ϫ3 units.qxd 12/7/09 4:27 PM Page 348 y b) Draw line EF. Is it a rectangle? Justify your answer. or 8 4 Since the slopes of AB and BC are negative reciprocals. Discuss the Ideas y E –2 F 2 –2 G [Answer: No.] Why didn’t we need to check that all the angles of parallelogram ABCD were right angles? Why didn’t we write the slope of AB as Ϫ4? 1. Determine whether AB is perpendicular to BC. From the diagram. How do you determine whether two lines are perpendicular? 348 Chapter 6: Linear Functions . the rise from A to B is Ϫ4 and the run is 1. Its coordinates are G(4. Ϫ4 Slope of AB ϭ 1 From the diagram.

Ϫ10 10 6. The coordinates of the endpoints of segments are given below. or neither? 1 a) 4. what is the slope of a parallel line? 4 4 a) b) Ϫ 3 5 c) 3 d) 0 8. The slopes of lines are given below. Ϫ3). 6 6 y 6 K d) 6 y P 4 Q 2 x R –2 0 2 4 6 –2 S Is this golfer set up correctly? How did you find out? 9. This golfer is checking his set-up position by holding his club to his chest and looking to see whether it is parallel to an imaginary line through the tips of his shoes. Ϫ2). 5). 1). 2). Ϫ1). The slopes of lines are given below. K(7. Ϫ4). Are the two lines parallel. 5) c) N(Ϫ6. 5) and U(1. For each grid below: i) Write the coordinates of the 2 labelled points on each line. The slopes of lines are given below. For each line. a) 7 7 c) . what is the slope of a perpendicular line? 5 7 a) b) Ϫ 6 8 c) 9 d) Ϫ5 5. E(5. Ϫ1) b) B(Ϫ6.qxd 12/7/09 4:27 PM Page 349 Exercises A 3. T(Ϫ1. 0 –2 1 . Ϫ4) and Q(1. P(Ϫ3. The slopes of two lines are given. or neither? Justify your answer. R(3. 0).wncp10_6_2. 3) and D(2. 4) d) G(Ϫ2. Are the two line segments parallel. or neither? Justify your answer. ii) Are the two lines parallel. H(4. V(5. perpendicular. 4 b) . 0) 6. What is the slope of a line that is: i) parallel to each given line? ii) perpendicular to each given line? 7 4 a) Ϫ b) 5 c) d) Ϫ4 3 9 B 4 4.2 Slopes of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines 349 . Ϫ 8 8 d) 2 D x 4 –2 A C b) 6 E y G 4 F 2 x 0 –2 c) J 2 H 4 y 2 M x –4 B –2 2 4 –2 N 7. perpendicular. For each line. 1) and J(1. a) S(Ϫ4. C(Ϫ3. perpendicular.

KM has an x-intercept of Ϫ9 and a y-intercept of 6. Ϫ2) and B(3. a) DE has an x-intercept of 4 and a y-intercept of Ϫ6. b) HJ has an x-intercept of Ϫ2 and a y-intercept of 3. y D4 2 G –2 F 0 E2 x –4 15. and C(3. HJKM is a quadrilateral. The coordinates of the vertices of ᭝ABC are A(Ϫ3. d) Line EF is perpendicular to AB. draw line EF. 2). Ϫ2) and B(1. 1). 4). Ϫ1). Ϫ2). 16. A line passes through A(Ϫ3. b) Is HJKM a rectangle? Justify your answer. 12.qxd 12/7/09 4:27 PM Page 350 10. Determine the slope of each new line segment formed. 18. 14. c) What relationship do you notice between the slopes in parts a and b? . a) On a grid. draw line CD. b) Join the midpoints of the sides.wncp10_6_2. What is the slope of EF? e) Given that R(Ϫ4. Which type of quadrilateral is DEFG? Justify your answer. 350 Chapter 6: Linear Functions 13. 4). A line passes through A(5. 2). 4). Ϫ4) lies on CD. and F(4. 1). 11. What is the slope of CD? c) Point C has coordinates (Ϫ1. b) Line CD is parallel to AB. a) Draw line AB on a grid and determine its slope. Determine the coordinates of its x. Is ᭝DEF a right triangle? Justify your answer. What is the slope of AE? e) Determine two sets of possible coordinates for E. b) Line CD is parallel to AB. draw line AB and determine its slope.and y-intercepts. Determine two sets of possible coordinates for D. How can you tell that ᭝ABC is a right triangle? 17. E(1. FG has an x-intercept of Ϫ6 and a y-intercept of 4. 4) and R(1. B(6.and y-intercepts. The coordinates of the vertices of ᭝DEF are D(Ϫ3. QRST is a rectangle with Q(Ϫ2. How are the lines in each pair related? Justify your answer. What is the slope of CD? c) Given that Q(1. a) Determine the slope of each side of the triangle. y J 4 H 2 x 0 –4 2 4 –2 K M a) Is HJKM a parallelogram? Justify your answer. Ϫ2). Ϫ4) lies on EF. Determine the coordinates of its x. Draw a triangle on a grid. Do you have enough information to determine the coordinates of S and T? Explain. Why might your answers be different from those of a classmate? d) Line AE is perpendicular to AB.

2 Slopes of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines 351 . and C(4. 4) and S(0. 4). 24. Ϫ2). and a ruler to draw the line. a) On grid paper. Explain your strategy. Before Agnes began a painting. ABCD is a parallelogram. 20. and D(1. C 21. c) What other strategy could you use to determine the coordinates of D? Explain. 5). Reflect 22. Determine the value of c so that the line segment with endpoints B(2. 10). She then drew each line by hand. The coordinates of two of the vertices of ᭝RST are R(Ϫ3. THE WORLD OF MATH Historical Moment: Agnes Martin Agnes Martin was born in Macklin. 2) and C(9. draw several different rhombuses.qxd 12/7/09 4:27 PM Page 351 19. she calculated the distances between pairs of parallel lines or bands. 0). b) Repeat part a for a square with side length a units. Verify that the diagonals of this square are perpendicular. Given A(3. Ϫ7) and E(5. She was an artist who used parallel lines and grids in her artwork. 3). Three vertices have coordinates A(Ϫ4. using a string stretched tightly across the surface to guide her. determine the value of a for which: a) Line AB is parallel to line CD. B(7. and lived from 1912 to 2004.wncp10_6_2. b) Determine the coordinates of D. What have you learned about perpendicular lines and parallel lines? Include examples in your answer. Saskatchewan. B(2. Ϫ3). b) Line AB is perpendicular to line CD. a) Is ABCD a rectangle? Justify your answer. C(0. 6. On a grid. construct a square with side length 4 units and one vertex at the origin. Explain your answer. Determine possible coordinates for T so that ᭝RST is a right triangle. a). Use slopes to determine the relationship between the diagonals. 6) is parallel to the line segment with endpoints D(c. 2). 23.

2 – You generalized and applied rules for determining whether two lines are parallel or perpendicular. reciprocals. given its slope and a point on the line. – You drew lines that were parallel or perpendicular to a given line. x 0 y x 0 0 0 slope x – You showed that the slope of a line is equal to the slope of any segment of the line. y2) x 0 – You drew a line. P(x1. r i se ru n positive slope run y x – You determined the slope of a line segment and the slope of a line from measurements of the rise and run. and the slope of a line given the coordinates of two points on the line. y1) and Q(x2.wncp10_6_2. undefined slope – You determined the slope of a line segment given the coordinates of the endpoints of the segment. 3 –2 Chapter 6: Linear Functions y J –1 –2 352 – You solved contextual problems involving slope. y2) is: y 2 – y1 Slope = x2 – x1 y (y2 – y1) (x2 – x1) – You explained the meaning of the slope of a horizontal line and a vertical line. y1) Two lines are parallel when they have equal slopes. The slope of a line through P(x1.1 K . 1 Slope of EF = – 2 – You determined the coordinates of a point on a line. F 2 In Lesson 6. negative slope y rise – You defined the slope of a line segment and the slope of a line as rate of change. Two lines are perpendicular when their slopes are negative Slope of GH = – E –1 4 G –1 2 0 Slope of MN = 3 1 Slope of JK = – 3 1 (3) – = –1 3 1 2 y ■ ( ) 4 x 2 H 1 M 3 0 x 2 N In Lesson 6.qxd 12/8/09 5:07 PM Page 352 CHECKPOINT 1 Concept Development Connections ■ y Definition y The slope of a line is the Slope = x 0 measure of its rate of change. Q(x2. given its slope and another point on the line.

2 2 4 6 Time (h) 8 5. Determine two possible sets of coordinates for N. Ϫ10) b) an x-intercept of 3 and a y-intercept of Ϫ5 3. A line passes through D(Ϫ6. Determine the slope of the line that passes through each pair of points. 5 2 7 14 4 6. Ϫ1) and E(2.wncp10_6_2. Explain your strategy. perpendicular. and C(3.qxd 12/7/09 8:09 PM Page 353 Assess Your Understanding 6. Describe the strategies you used to determine the coordinates. Draw lines with the given slopes. Is ᭝ABC a right triangle? Justify your answer. 2 5 9 18 1 b) Ϫ . The vertices of a triangle have coordinates A(Ϫ1. a) Determine the coordinates of two points on a line that is parallel to DE. 5). Checkpoint 1 353 . He plotted these data on a grid.1 1. 5) and R(2. Two vertices of right ᭝MNP have coordinates M(Ϫ3. Point N lies on an axis. 6) and P(3. Ϫ6). Determine the slopes of line segments AB and CD. a) . a) What is the slope of the line through these points? What does it represent? 1 b) How far did Jordan travel in 1 hours? 4 c) How long did it take Jordan to travel 65 km? 100 0 6. a) Q(Ϫ2. Jordan recorded the distances he had travelled at certain times since he began his snowmobile trip along the Overland Trail from Whitehorse to Dawson in the Yukon. 7. Why can the slope of a line be determined by using any two points on the line? Jordan’s Snowmobile Journey 200 Distance (km) 4. b) Determine the coordinates of two points on a line that is perpendicular to DE. B(Ϫ5. Are the lines parallel. y A 4 2 D x –6 C –2 0 B 2. 5). or neither? Justify your answers. 8. 4 c) . 1). Ϫ3).

qxd 12/7/09 4:29 PM Page 354 MATH LAB 6. Make Connections Alimina purchased an mp3 player and downloaded 3 songs. Graph C Songs Downloaded to an mp3 Player 8 6 4 2 0 354 Chapter 6: Linear Functions 1 3 2 Time (days) 4 Number of songs Graph B Songs Downloaded to an mp3 Player Number of songs Number of songs Graph A Songs Downloaded to an mp3 Player 8 6 4 2 0 8 6 4 2 0 1 2 3 Time (days) 4 1 2 3 Time (days) 4 . Which graph represents this situation? Explain your choice.wncp10_6_3.3 Investigating Graphs of Linear Functions LESSON FOCUS Investigate the relationship between the graph and the equation of a linear function. Each subsequent day. she downloads 2 songs.

How does changing the value of m change the appearance of the graph? What does m represent? C. How does changing the value of b change the appearance of the graph? What does b represent? E. Use a table to record your results. Include values of b that are negative and 0. Use a graphing calculator or a computer with graphing software.wncp10_6_3. Include values of m that are negative and 0. Use a table to record your results. Equation y ϭ 2x ϩ 6 Value of b Sketch of the Graph Slope of the Graph x-intercept y-intercept 6 D. A. Graph y ϭ mx ϩ 6 for different values of m.3 Math Lab: Investigating Graphs of Linear Functions 355 . Equation Value of m yϭxϩ6 1 Sketch of the Graph Slope of the Graph x-intercept y-intercept B.qxd 12/7/09 4:29 PM Page 355 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. Graph y ϭ 2x ϩ b for different values of b. Predict the appearance of the graph of y ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 4. Verify your prediction by graphing. How could you use what you learned in this lesson to determine an equation for that function? 6. Suppose you are given the graph of a linear function.

each mark on the x-axis and y-axis represents 1 unit. a) y ϭ 3x ϩ 5 b) y ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 5 c) y ϭ 3x Ϫ 5 d) y ϭ Ϫ3x Ϫ 5 7. Draw this graph without using technology. 4. Describe the graph of the linear function whose equation is y ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 6. a) Predict what will be common about the graphs of these equations. A linear function is written in the form y ϭ mx ϩ b. question 12. b) The slope of each line is Ϫ . What do m and b represent in this context? 356 Chapter 6: Linear Functions . a) Predict what will be common about the graphs of these equations. i) y ϭ x Ϫ 1 ii) y ϭ 2x Ϫ 1 iii) y ϭ Ϫ3x Ϫ 1 iv) y ϭ Ϫ2x Ϫ 1 b) Graph the equations to check your prediction. Describe your strategy. b) Compare the equation above with the equation y ϭ mx ϩ b. to rent a hall for a banquet is given by the equation C ϭ 550 ϩ 15n. 6. 3. 5. i) y ϭ x Ϫ 3 ii) y ϭ x Ϫ 2 iii) y ϭ x iv) y ϭ x ϩ 3 b) Graph the equations to check your prediction. Use your results from Try This to suggest what the numbers m and b represent. where n represents the number of people attending the banquet. the cost. In the screens below. 2 3 2.6. a) Graph this equation on grid paper. Graph each equation on grid paper without using a table of values. In Lesson 5. C dollars.wncp10_6_3. What is the equation of each line? 1 1 a) The slope of each line is . page 309.qxd 12/7/09 4:29 PM Page 356 Assess Your Understanding 1. Explain how you could use this information to graph the function.

Distance from home (km) Graph of a Bicycle Journey 60 40 20 0 3 1 2 Time (h) What does the vertical intercept represent? What does the slope of the line represent? 6.wncp10_6_4.4 4:32 PM Page 357 Slope-Intercept Form of the Equation for a Linear Function LESSON FOCUS Relate the graph of a linear function to its equation in slope-intercept form.4 Slope-Intercept Form of the Equation for a Linear Function 357 . Make Connections This graph shows a cyclist’s journey where the distance is measured from her home.qxd 12/7/09 6.

b) y = mx + b x 0 358 Chapter 6: Linear Functions . This is the cost in dollars for each additional 1 km driven. is the rate of change. 30 20 10 How do you know this is the graph of a linear function? 0 What does the slope of the graph represent? Write an equation to describe this function. Lesson 5. y slope is m (0. Cost of Cell Phone Plan 50 C 40 Cost ($) A cell phone plan charges a monthly fee that covers the costs of the first 300 min of phone use. 0.6. Car Rental Costs Cost ($) 160 C The number.20d ϩ 60 d 100 200 300 400 500 Distance (km) The number. any linear function can be described in slope-intercept form.20. is the vertical intercept of the graph.wncp10_6_4. In general. 120 80 40 0 An equation of the function is: C ϭ 0. n 20 40 60 80 100 120 Time used beyond 300 min In Chapter 5. 60. Verify that your equation is correct. or the slope of the graph. This is the cost in dollars that is independent of the distance driven – the initial cost for renting the car.qxd 12/7/09 4:32 PM Page 358 Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work with a partner. where m is the slope of the line and b is its y-intercept. The linear function below represents the cost of a car rental. This graph represents the cost of the plan based on the time beyond 300 min. we described a linear function in different ways. Slope-Intercept Form of the Equation of a Linear Function The equation of a linear function can be written in the form y ϭ mx ϩ b.

6 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2 y = –3 x + 2 4 x –4 –2 0 2 4 What other strategy could you use to graph this linear function? y 2 1 2 y= 1 x 2 +3 x 0 2 4 6 6. from (0. 3). SOLUTION Use: 3 Substitute: m ϭ and b ϭ Ϫ4 y ϭ mx ϩ b 5 3 yϭ xϪ4 5 3 An equation for this function is: y ϭ x Ϫ 4 5 1. 5 Write an equation for this function.wncp10_6_4.4 Slope-Intercept Form of the Equation for a Linear Function 359 . 3). move 1 unit up and 2 units right. plot a point at (0. The graph of a linear function 7 has slope Ϫ and y-intercept 5. 3). Graph the linear function with 3 equation: y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 2 4 Answer: 1 Compare: y ϭ x ϩ 3 2 with: y ϭ mx ϩ b y 4 1 The slope of the graph is . Draw a line through the points. with coordinates (0. 7 [Answer: y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 5] 3 Can you write an equation for a linear function when you know its slope and x-intercept? How would you do it? Graphing a Linear Function Given Its Equation in Slope-Intercept Form Example 2 1 Graph the linear function with equation: y ϭ x ϩ 3 2 SOLUTION CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. 3 Write an equation for this function. 2 The y-intercept is 3. On a grid.qxd 12/7/09 4:32 PM Page 359 Writing an Equation of a Linear Function Given Its Slope and y-Intercept Example 1 The graph of a linear function has slope 3 and y-intercept Ϫ4. then mark a point. The slope of the line is: rise 1 run ϭ 2 So.

and its 0 –4 y-intercept. substitute the coordinates of a point on the line into the equation. 3 yϭϪ xϪ4 2 3 An equation for the function is: y ϭ Ϫ x Ϫ 4 2 To verify the equation. so. m ϭ . or Ϫ 2 2 Substitute for m and b in y ϭ mx ϩ b. 360 y . Ϫ1). However. ϭ Ϫ x Ϫ 4 2 ϭ Ϫ1 3 ϭ Ϫ (Ϫ2) Ϫ 4 2 ϭ3Ϫ4 ϭ Ϫ1 0 y –2 y = g(x) Can the graph of a linear function be described by more than one equation of the form y ϭ mx ϩ b? Explain. it remains a mystery. THE WORLD OF MATH Historical Moment: Why Is m Used to Represent Slope? Some historians have researched the works of great mathematicians from many different countries over the past few hundred years to try to answer this question. 3 Substitute x ϭ Ϫ2 and y ϭ Ϫ1 into the equation: y ϭ Ϫ x Ϫ 4 2 3 L. Verify the equation. b. which means to climb. At this time. the French mathematician René Descartes did not use m to represent slope. x determine the slope of the line. Verify the equation. –2 –3 The line intersects the y-axis at Ϫ4. S. 2 3 Ϫ3 So. b ϭ Ϫ4. the equation is correct.wncp10_6_4. ϭ y R. 4 –4 2 SOLUTION x Use the equation: y ϭ mx ϩ b 2 To write the equation of a linear function. Write an equation to describe this function. From the graph. m. Others have attempted to identify words that could be used to refer to the slope of a line. Choose the point (Ϫ2. The choice of the letter m may come from the French word monter. 2 y CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING x 0 –4 y = f(x) –2 3. historians cannot answer this question.qxd 12/7/09 4:32 PM Example 3 Page 360 Writing the Equation of a Linear Function Given Its Graph Write an equation to describe this function. S. Chapter 6: Linear Functions 2 [Answer: y ϭ 2x Ϫ 3] Since the left side is equal to the right side. the rise is Ϫ3 when the run is 2.

So. What would the slope and vertical intercept be? d) Use the equation: Substitute: P ϭ 146 P ϭ 5t Ϫ 300 Simplify. the profit cannot be exactly $146. b) Suppose 123 people bought tickets. What was the total cost? c) Suppose the total cost was $505.wncp10_6_4.2 ϭ t Since the number of tickets sold is not a whole number. A ticket cost $5 and the cost for the DJ was $300. b) Suppose Karim went to the gym for 23 months.4 Slope-Intercept Form of the Equation for a Linear Function 361 . 446 ϭ 5t 446 5t ϭ 5 5 89. a) Write an equation for the total cost. on the sale of t tickets. Suppose you graphed the linear relation. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4. 650 ϭ 5t 650 5t ϭ 5 5 130 ϭ t One hundred thirty people bought tickets. the income is: 5t dollars The expenses are $300. [Answers: a) C ϭ 29n ϩ 99 b) $766 c) 14 months d) no] c) Use the equation: Substitute: P ϭ 350 P ϭ 5t Ϫ 300 Collect like terms. P dollars.qxd 12/7/09 4:32 PM Example 4 Page 361 Using an Equation of a Linear Function to Solve a Problem The student council sponsored a dance. 350 ϭ 5t Ϫ 300 350 ϩ 300 ϭ 5t Ϫ 300 ϩ 300 Solve for t. C dollars. How many people bought tickets? d) Could the profit be exactly $146? Justify the answer. a) Write an equation for the profit. for n months at the gym. an equation is: P ϭ 5t Ϫ 300 b) Use the equation: P ϭ 5t Ϫ 300 P ϭ 5(123) Ϫ 300 P ϭ 615 Ϫ 300 P ϭ 315 The profit was $315. 6. 146 ϭ 5t Ϫ 300 146 ϩ 300 ϭ 5t Ϫ 300 ϩ 300 Solve for t. plus a monthly fee of $29. Substitute: t ϭ 123 Simplify. SOLUTION a) The profit is: income Ϫ expenses When t tickets are sold. Karim pays a start-up fee of $99. For how many months did Karim use the gym? d) Could the total cost be exactly $600? Justify your answer. What was the profit? c) Suppose the profit was $350. To join the local gym.

50 d) F(c) ϭ c ϩ 32 5 y 11. slope is 2 b) y-intercept is Ϫ5. 1 a) y-intercept is 1. 2 a) What mistakes did the student x make? 0 2 b) What is the equation of the –2 graph? y = f(x) 12. a) y ϭ 4x Ϫ 7 b) y ϭ x ϩ 12 3 4 c) y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 7 d) y ϭ 11x Ϫ 9 8 1 e) y ϭ x f) y ϭ 3 5 5. ii) Write an equation to describe the graph. Explain the strategy you used. Write an equation for the graph of a linear function that: a) has slope 7 and y-intercept 16 3 b) has slope Ϫ and y-intercept 5 8 7 c) passes through H(0. plus $50 for each hour she works. When you are given the graph of a linear function. slope is 3 B 7. Graph each equation on grid paper. A student said that the equation 4 of this graph is y ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 4. . slope is Ϫ 3 4 d) y-intercept is 0. When a real-world situation can be modelled by a linear function. what do the slope and vertical intercept usually represent? 2. Ϫ3) and has slope 16 6 d) has y-intercept Ϫ8 and slope Ϫ 5 5 e) passes through the origin and has slope Ϫ 12 6. how can you quickly sketch the graph? Exercises A 4. plus a 2% currency conversion fee.75x Ϫ 2. Sketch or print the graph. For each equation.95 13 11 9 c) C(n) ϭ 0. for withdrawing d dollars. Write an equation to represent the total fee.wncp10_6_4. then verify the equation. slope is 2 2 c) y-intercept is 4.qxd 12/7/09 4:32 PM Page 362 Discuss the Ideas 1. Graph each equation. When you are given an equation of a linear function in slope-intercept form. C dollars. a) Write an equation to represent the total cost. Graph the line with each y-intercept and slope. b) How would the equation change if the electrician charges $100 initial fee plus $40 for each hour she works? 9. Use a graphing calculator or a computer with graphing software. how can you determine an equation that represents that function? 3. 10. Explain the strategy you used. identify the slope and y-intercept of its graph. F dollars. an electrician charges an $80 initial fee.50 foreign cash withdrawal fee. The total fee for withdrawing money at an ATM in a foreign country is a $3. For each graph that follows: i) Determine its slope and y-intercept. For a service call.45n ϩ 25. for t hours of work. iii) Use the equation to calculate the value of y when x ϭ 10. a) y ϭ 2x Ϫ 7 1 c) y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 5 4 e) V ϭ Ϫ100t ϩ 6000 362 b) y ϭ Ϫx ϩ 3 5 d) y ϭ x Ϫ 4 2 f) C ϭ 10n ϩ 95 Chapter 6: Linear Functions 8. 4 3 a) f(x) ϭ Ϫ x ϩ b) g(x) ϭ 3.

c) What were the nightly tips when Alun earned $64? Explain your strategy. y ϭ mx ϩ b.qxd 12/7/09 4:32 PM Page 363 a) b) y = f(x) 2 x 0 x 0 –2 15. when the tips are t dollars. What do they represent? b) Write an equation to describe the graph. What was the total cost? c) Michelle paid a total cost of $120. a) How can you use the slope-intercept form of an equation. Alun has a part-time job working as a bus boy at a local restaurant. An online music site charges a one-time membership fee of $20. y a) y ϭ x ϩ 4 y ϭ 4x ϩ 1 4 yϭxϪ4 2 y = f(x) y ϭ Ϫ4x ϩ 1 x 400 2 200 t 0 2 4 6 8 Time (min) 10 a) Determine the slope and the h-intercept.wncp10_6_4. i) How would the graph change? ii) How would the equation change? 14. This graph represents the height of a float plane above a lake as the plane descends to land.4 Slope-Intercept Form of the Equation for a Linear Function 363 . E dollars. c) Use the equation to calculate the value of h when t ϭ 5. C dollars. h Height (m) 800 600 h = f(t) 16. Which equation matches each given graph? Justify your choice.80 for every song that is downloaded. to graph the horizontal line y ϭ 2? b) How can you graph the vertical line x ϭ 2? Explain your answers. then verify the equation. b) What will Alun earn when the tips are $400? Explain your strategy. a) Write an equation for the total cost. for downloading n songs.5 min. b) Jacques downloaded 109 songs. plus $0. y y 2 2 –2 4 y = g(x) –4 –6 c) 4 2 y y d) x 0 –2 y = h(x) 2 4 y = k(x) x 0 –4 2 4 –4 –2 13. 17. How many songs did she download? 3 b) y ϭ x Ϫ 1 2 2 yϭϪ xϩ1 3 2 yϭ xϪ1 3 2 y ϭ Ϫx ϩ 3 5 c) y ϭ x ϩ 7 3 3 yϭϪ xϪ7 5 5 y ϭ Ϫ7x Ϫ 3 5 yϭϪ xϪ7 3 2 y x –2 0 –2 2 4 y = g(x) 2 y x –2 0 –2 y = h(x) –4 –8 6. He earns $34 a night plus 5% of the tips. a) Write an equation for Alun’s total earnings. d) Suppose the plane began its descent at 700 m and it landed after 8 min.

Determine 3 the value of c when the line passes through the point F(4. How do the values of m and b in the linear equation y ϭ mx ϩ b relate to the graph of the corresponding linear function? Include an example. Describe the steps you used to determine the equation. What do you notice? a) f(x) ϭ Ϫx Ϫ 4 b) f(x) ϭ Ϫx ϩ 1 –2 y x 2 x 0 Graph D y x 2 2 2 Graph D Graph C 4 0 –2 x 22. 5).qxd 12/7/09 4:32 PM Page 364 20. 1 1 y ϭ x ϩ 9. y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 15. y-intercept Ϫ2 3 c) slope Ϫ3. An equation of a line is y ϭ mx Ϫ . 7 24. Chapter 6: Linear Functions . Compare the graphs. Write an equation of a linear function that has y-intercept 4 and x-intercept 3. y-intercept 2 3 18. a) slope 3. Consider these equations: d) f(x) ϭ x Ϫ 1 Graph A 2 0 –3 c) f(x) ϭ x ϩ 3 0 –2 –2 2 19. An equation of a line is y ϭ x ϩ c. Identify the graph below that corresponds to each given slope and y-intercept. Describe your strategy.wncp10_6_4. y ϭ Ϫ x 5 Which equations represent parallel lines? Perpendicular lines? How do you know? Graph B f(x) x 2 21. y-intercept Ϫ2 1 d) slope Ϫ . Match each equation with its graph. y ϭ 5x ϩ 15. 5 23. y-intercept 2 1 b) slope . y ϭ Ϫ5x ϩ 13. 5 5 1 y ϭ x ϩ 21. How did you decide on the equation for each graph? a) y ϭ 2x Ϫ 1 b) y ϭ 3x Ϫ 1 1 c) y ϭ Ϫx Ϫ 1 d) y ϭ x Ϫ 1 3 Graph B Graph A y 4 2 y x 2 –4 0 –2 x 0 3 –2 2 Graph B Graph A 4 2 y y 4 –2 x –4 y 2 –2 Graph C y –2 x 0 –4 f(x) 4 2 x 2 4 Graph C –4 –2 0 4 x C f(x) 2 –2 0 –2 –4 –2 Reflect 364 2 Graph D f(x) –2 x 0 –2 –3 1 y ϭ Ϫ5x Ϫ 7. Ϫ6). 5 1 y ϭ 5x ϩ 24. Determine 8 the value of m when the line passes through the point E(Ϫ3. Match each equation with its graph.

How many different ways can you do this? Compare your equations and strategies.wncp10_6_5. How would you write an equation to describe this line? Suppose you could not identify the h-intercept.5 4:36 PM Page 365 Slope-Point Form of the Equation for a Linear Function LESSON FOCUS Relate the graph of a linear function to its equation in slope-point form. Which strategy is more efficient? x –4 –2 0 –2 4 y = f(x) –4 6. Determine an equation for this line.qxd 12/7/09 6.5 Slope-Point Form of the Equation for a Linear Function 365 . How could you write an equation for the line? 30 h h = f(t) 20 10 t 0 20 40 60 80 Time (min) Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT y Work with a partner. Make Connections Height (cm) This graph shows the height of a candle as it burns.

. y1). y). of the line is: rise m ϭ run mϭ y Ϫ y1 x Ϫ x1 m(x Ϫ x1) ϭ (x Ϫ x1)a Multiply each side by (x Ϫ x1). Ϫ3(x ϩ 2) ϭ y Ϫ 5 y Ϫ 5 ϭ Ϫ3(x ϩ 2) This equation is called the slope-point form. Another point on the line is Q(x. y1) Q(x. y) on the line to write an equation for the slope. 5). m.wncp10_6_5. This line has slope m and passes through the point P(x1. We can use this strategy to develop a formula for the slope-point form for the equation of a line. This line has slope Ϫ3 and passes through P(Ϫ2.qxd 12/8/09 4:29 PM Page 366 When we know the slope of a line and the coordinates of a point on the line. 5) 4 2 x –4 –2 0 –2 mϭ y Ϫ5 x Ϫ (Ϫ2) mϭ y Ϫ5 x ϩ2 y Ϫ5 x ϩ2 Q(x. y P(x1. y) Substitute: m ϭ Ϫ3 Ϫ3 ϭ 2 Multiply each side by (x ϩ 2). both the slope and the coordinates of a point on the line can be identified from the equation. y) x 0 pe slo m is The slope. we use the property that the slope of a line is constant to determine an equation for the line. y Ϫ y1 b x Ϫ x1 m(x Ϫ x1) ϭ y Ϫ y1 y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x Ϫ x1) 366 Chapter 6: Linear Functions Simplify. m: rise Slope ϭ run y P(–2. We use any other point Q(x. Ϫ3(x ϩ 2) ϭ (x ϩ 2)a y Ϫ5 b xϩ2 –4 Simplify.

passes 2 through (2. Draw a line through the points. y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x – x1) 1 y Ϫ 2 ϭ (x ϩ 4) 3 To match the slope-point form. y y – 2 = 1 (x + 4) 3 4 3 1 2 P x –6 –4 –2 0 2 6.5 Slope-Point Form of the Equation for a Linear Function 367 . y1) and has slope m is: y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x Ϫ x1) Graphing a Linear Function Given Its Equation in Slope-Point Form Example 1 a) Describe the graph of the linear function with this equation: 1 y Ϫ 2 ϭ (x ϩ 4) 3 b) Graph the equation. SOLUTION a) Compare the given equation with the equation in slope-point form. 1 [Answer: a) slope Ϫ . a) Describe the graph of the linear function with this equation: 1 y ϩ 1 ϭ Ϫ (x Ϫ 2) 2 b) Graph the equation.qxd 12/7/09 4:37 PM Page 367 Slope-Point Form of the Equation of a Linear Function The equation of a line that passes through P(x1. y1 ϭ 2 1 mϭ 3 x1 ϭ Ϫ4 1 The graph passes through (Ϫ4. 2) and has slope . 3 b) Plot the point P(Ϫ4. 1 y Ϫ 2 ϭ [x Ϫ (Ϫ4)] 3 y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x – x1) CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1. 2) on a grid and use the slope of 1 to plot 3 another point.wncp10_6_5. Ϫ1)] So. rewrite the given equation so the operations are subtraction.

. the equation of the line is: y ϭ x Ϫ 4 4 5 From the equation. the equation of the line is: 3 y ϩ 2 ϭ (x ϩ 1) 4 3 b) y ϩ 2 ϭ (x ϩ 1) Remove brackets. y To calculate the slope. Show that these coordinates produce the same equation in slope-intercept form. What is the y-intercept of this line? x 3 mϭ 4 0 [Answers: a) sample answer: 1 y Ϫ 1 ϭ Ϫ (x Ϫ 1) 3 1 4 4 b) y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ . What is the y-intercept of this line? y CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2 x –4 –2 0 2 4 6 y = f(x) 2. ] 3 3 3 The coordinates of another point on the line are (3. a) Write an equation in slope-point form for this line. – 2). Substitute: y1 ϭ Ϫ2.qxd 12/8/09 4:29 PM Example 2 Page 368 Writing an Equation Using a Point on the Line and Its Slope a) Write an equation in slope-point form for this line. 4 4 3 3 yϭ xϩ Ϫ2 Simplify. use: 2 rise m ϭ run 3 0 (–1. m. 1). Explain how the general expression for the slope of a line can help you remember the equation y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x Ϫ x1). 4 4 3 5 yϭ xϪ 4 4 3 5 In slope-intercept form. 4 368 Chapter 6: Linear Functions 2 4 b) Write the equation in part a in slope-intercept form. y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x Ϫ x1) 3 and m ϭ 4 3 y Ϫ (Ϫ2) ϭ [x Ϫ (Ϫ1)] 4 3 y ϩ 2 ϭ (x ϩ 1) 4 In slope-point form. x1 ϭ Ϫ1.wncp10_6_5. y –4 2 y = g(x) x –2 SOLUTION a) Identify the coordinates of one point on the line and calculate the slope. b) Write the equation in part a in slope-intercept form. –2) –4 4 2 4 6 –4 Use the slope-point form of the equation. The coordinates of one point are (–1. 4 3 3 yϩ2ϭ xϩ Solve for y. the y-intercept is Ϫ .

a) Write a linear equation to represent this function. (Solution continues. to write an equation for the function. A temperature in degrees Celsius. Q 360 5 [Answers: a) c Ϫ 100 ϭ (f Ϫ 212). 2795°F. in a polygon is a linear function of the number of sides. so two points on the graph have coordinates T(3. s2 ϭ 360. b) Use the equation to determine the sum of the angles in a dodecagon. We write the slope of the graph of the function in two ways: y Ϫ y1 x Ϫ x1 Q(x2.qxd 12/8/09 4:29 PM Page 369 We can use the coordinates of two points that satisfy a linear function.) 6. of the polygon. This is the slope-point form of the equation. Why is it possible for equations of a linear function to look different but still represent the same function? This is the slope-intercept form of the equation. Simplify. an equation is: ϭ 2 x Ϫ x1 x2 Ϫ x1 mϭ and Example 3 y mϭ P(x1. The sum of the angles in a triangle is 180°. y1) x 0 Writing an Equation of a Linear Function Given Two Points The sum of the angles. s degrees. 180) and Q(4. is a linear function of the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit. f. The boiling point of water is 100°C and 212°F. P(x1. y2) y2 Ϫ y1 x2 Ϫ x1 y Ϫ y1 y Ϫ y1 So. 360) s = f(n) 540 n=3 s = 180 n=4 s = 360 a) Write a linear equation to represent this function.5 Slope-Point Form of the Equation for a Linear Function 369 . SOLUTION a) s ϭ f(n). s Ϫ 180 ϭ 180 nϪ3 s Ϫ 180 (n Ϫ 3)a b ϭ 180(n Ϫ 3) nϪ3 s Ϫ 180 ϭ 180(n Ϫ 3) s Ϫ 180 ϭ 180n Ϫ 540 s ϭ 180n Ϫ 360 Multiply each side by (n Ϫ 3). and n2 ϭ 4 360 Ϫ 180 s Ϫ 180 ϭ 4Ϫ3 nϪ3 Simplify. c. b) Use the equation to determine the temperature in degrees Celsius at which iron melts. or 9 T 180 0 3. s 720 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING n 2 4 6 8 cϭ 5 160 fϪ b) 1535°C] 9 9 Use this form for the equation of a linear function: s Ϫ s1 s Ϫ s1 ϭ 2 n Ϫ n1 n2 Ϫ n1 Substitute: s1 ϭ 180. y2). n. The freezing point of water is 0°C and 32°F. The sum of the angles in a quadrilateral is 360°.wncp10_6_5. n1 ϭ 3. y1) and Q(x2.

Ϫ1). Use: y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x Ϫ x1) 2 y Ϫ (Ϫ1) ϭ (x Ϫ 1) 3 2 y ϩ 1 ϭ (x Ϫ 1) 3 Substitute: y1 ϭ Ϫ1. Use: Substitute: n ϭ 12 s ϭ 180n Ϫ 360 s ϭ 180(12) Ϫ 360 s ϭ 1800 The sum of the angles in a dodecagon is 1800°. Ϫ1) has equation: y ϩ 1 ϭ (x Ϫ 1) 3 370 Chapter 6: Linear Functions 2 3 . Compare the equation: 2 y ϭ x Ϫ 5 with the equation: 3 y ϭ mx ϩ b 2 The slope of the line is . why does it make sense to use the slope-intercept form instead of the slope-point form? Writing an Equation of a Line That Is Parallel or Perpendicular to a Given Line Write an equation for the line that passes through R(1. Example 4 In part b. and mark a point at 3 R(1. 3 b) perpendicular to the line y ϭ 3x ϩ 5 y x –2 0 –2 –4 R(1. x1 ϭ 1. Write an equation for the line that passes through S(2. Ϫ1). –1) y= 2 x 3 4 [Answers: a) y ϩ 3 ϭ 3(x Ϫ 2) 1 b) y ϩ 3 ϭ Ϫ (x Ϫ 2)] 3 6 –5 –6 What other strategies could you use to write an equation for each line? 2 2 a) Any line parallel to y ϭ x Ϫ 5 has slope . Ϫ3) and is: 2 b) perpendicular to the line y ϭ x Ϫ 5 3 a) parallel to the line y ϭ 3x ϩ 5 SOLUTION Sketch the line with equation: 2 y ϭ x Ϫ 5. Ϫ1) and is: CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2 a) parallel to the line y ϭ x Ϫ 5 3 4. Write each equation in slope-intercept form.wncp10_6_5.qxd 12/8/09 4:29 PM Page 370 b) A dodecagon has 12 sides. and m ϭ Simplify. 3 3 The required line passes through R(1. 2 The line that is parallel to the line y ϭ x – 5 and passes 3 2 through R(1.

Discuss the Ideas 1. if an equation is given in slope-point form. Ϫ1). on a graphing calculator and on a computer with graphing software. it must be rearranged before graphing.wncp10_6_5. x1 ϭ 1. How can you use the slope-point form of the equation of a line to sketch a graph of the line? 3. that is. Use: 3 y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x Ϫ x1) Substitute: y1 ϭ Ϫ1. 2 3 y ϩ 1 ϭ Ϫ (x Ϫ 1) 2 2 The line that is perpendicular to the line y ϭ x Ϫ 5 and passes 3 3 through the point R(1. How does the fact that the slope of a line is constant lead to the slope-point form of the equation of a line? 2.qxd 12/8/09 4:29 PM Page 371 2 b) Any line perpendicular to y ϭ x Ϫ 5 has a slope that is the 3 2 negative reciprocal of . part a. it must be in the form y ϭ f(x). its slope is Ϫ3. that is.5 Slope-Point Form of the Equation for a Linear Function 371 . Here is the graph from Example 4. 3 2 The required line passes through R(1. the equation needs to be rearranged to isolate y on the left side of the equation. So. How can you determine the slope-point form of the equation of a line given a graph of the line? 6. Ϫ1) has equation: y ϩ 1 ϭ Ϫ (x Ϫ 1) 2 To graph the equation of a linear function using technology. and m ϭϪ 2 3 y Ϫ (Ϫ1) ϭ Ϫ (x Ϫ 1) Simplify.

Ϫ4) and has slope Ϫ2. Ϫ5) 4 . 5) and has slope Ϫ4. a) Write a linear equation to represent this function. Ϫ8) 3 c) has slope Ϫ and passes through R(7. For each equation. a) Why is y Ϫ 5 ϭ Ϫ4(x ϩ 3) an equation of this line? b) Why is y ϭ Ϫ4x Ϫ 7 an equation of this line? 372 Chapter 6: Linear Functions i) P(–2. Write an equation for the graph of a linear function that: a) has slope Ϫ5 and passes through P(Ϫ4. then determine the x. Ϫ1) and J(Ϫ5. 4 B 7. write an equation in slope-point form. A 4. a) y Ϫ 5 ϭ –4(x Ϫ 1) b) y ϩ 7 ϭ 3(x Ϫ 8) c) y ϩ 11 ϭ (x ϩ 15) d) y ϭ 5(x Ϫ 2) 4 e) y ϩ 6 ϭ (x ϩ 3) 7 8 f) y Ϫ 21 ϭ Ϫ (x ϩ 16) 5 5. 4) ii) 4 y y y = g(x) y = f(x) P(3. –2) 0 2 6 4 4 –2 –2 0 –2 y = k(x) x 2 P(1. a) y ϩ 2 ϭ Ϫ3(x Ϫ 4) b) y ϩ 4 ϭ 2(x ϩ 3) c) y Ϫ 3 ϭ (x ϩ 5) d) y ϭ Ϫ(x Ϫ 2) 8. a) For each line. Ϫ2) c) U(Ϫ3. Write an equation for the line that passes through each pair of points. Describe the graph of the linear function with each equation. b) Use the equation to determine the speed of sound when the air temperature is 0°C. Ϫ5) and C(1.qxd 12/7/09 4:38 PM Page 372 Exercises 9. the speed of sound is 337 m/s. 11. Write each equation in slope-point form and in slope-intercept form. 3) and has 1 slope Ϫ . a) The line passes through T(Ϫ4. Ϫ5) 4 d) has slope 0 and passes through S(3. then graph the equation. 3) 2 x –4 x –4 0 –2 2 4 –2 0 2 –2 –4 iii) iv) y y y = h(x) x –4 –2 P(–4. identify the slope of the line it represents and the coordinates of a point on the line. Ϫ8) 6. 1) b) Q(Ϫ4. 1) and has slope 3. c) The line passes through V(2. 10.wncp10_6_5.and y-intercepts of each graph. –2) b) Write each equation in part a in slope-intercept form. 8) d) H(Ϫ7. 2) b) has slope 7 and passes through Q(6. 2 3 d) The line has x-intercept Ϫ5 and slope . The speed of sound in air is a linear function of the air temperature. a) B(Ϫ2. When the air temperature is 10°C. A line passes through D(Ϫ3. Graph each line. When the air temperature is 30°C. the speed of sound is 349 m/s. b) The line passes through U(3. 7) and R(5. Ϫ7) and V(2.

Justify your choice. what is the slope of the line and what does it represent? b) Choose variables to represent the volume of the liquid. 1 y Ϫ 1 ϭ (x Ϫ 2) 3 1 y ϩ 2 ϭ (x ϩ 1) 3 y Ϫ 1 ϭ 3(x Ϫ 2) 1 y Ϫ 2 ϭ (x Ϫ 1) 3 Volume of Liquid (mL) Mass of Cylinder and Liquid (g) 38.9 20 x b) 4 10 14. Chloé conducted a science experiment where she poured liquid into a graduated cylinder. and the mass of the cylinder and liquid. Which equation matches each graph? Describe each graph in terms of its slope and y-intercept.4 ϭ 0. Explain your strategy. then measured the mass of the cylinder and liquid.wncp10_6_5.375(x ϩ 4) d) y Ϫ 2. 2 3 a) y ϩ ϭ (x Ϫ 5) 7 8 2 10 b) y Ϫ ϭ Ϫ (x ϩ 11) 3 9 c) y ϩ 1. 6. Use a graphing calculator or a computer with graphing software. Determine this mass.3) c) 51. How does the graph of y ϩ y1 ϭ m(x ϩ x1) compare with the graph of y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x Ϫ x1)? Include examples in your explanation.35 ϭ Ϫ0. c) Use your equation to determine the mass of the cylinder and liquid when the volume of liquid is 30 mL. Sketch or print the graph. d) Chloé forgot to record the mass of the empty graduated cylinder. Write an equation that relates these variables. 2 –2 y y = g(x) 2 x –2 0 2 4 y 16. Write instructions that another student could follow to get the same display.qxd 12/7/09 4:38 PM Page 373 12. Graph each equation. y a) y ϩ 1 ϭ 2(x Ϫ 2) y ϩ 2 ϭ 2(x Ϫ 1) 4 y = f(x) y Ϫ 2 ϭ 2(x ϩ 1) 2 y ϩ 1 ϭ Ϫ2(x Ϫ 2) 0 2 y Ϫ 1 ϭ (x Ϫ 2) 3 y = h(x) 3 2 y Ϫ 1 ϭ (x Ϫ 2) 2 x 2 –2 0 2 y Ϫ 1 ϭ Ϫ (x Ϫ 2) 3 2 y Ϫ 2 ϭ Ϫ (x Ϫ 1) 3 15. Here are Chloé’s data. Match each graph with its equation. a) y ϩ 3 ϭ 2(x Ϫ 1) b) y Ϫ 3 ϭ (x Ϫ 2) c) y Ϫ 3 ϭ 2(x ϩ 1) d) y ϩ 3 ϭ Ϫ(x ϩ 2) Graph B Graph A y 4 6 y 2 x 0 –2 –4 2 2 x –2 –2 0 –2 Graph D Graph C 2 y y x 0 0 –2 x 3 –2 –2 –4 –6 13.5(x Ϫ 6.5 a) When these data are graphed.5 Slope-Point Form of the Equation for a Linear Function 373 .

a) Write an equation for the line that passes through D(Ϫ5. b) Predict the sales of potash in 2010 and 2015. Ϫ5). Use the slope-point form to show that a line with slope m and intersecting the y-axis at b has equation y ϭ mx ϩ b.4 million tonnes. Explain your strategy. In 2007. Assume the mass of potash sold is a linear function of time. What might their equations be? How many possible pairs of equations are there? 27. How are they alike? How are they different? Reflect 374 Chapter 6: Linear Functions How is the slope-point form of the equation of a line different from the slope-intercept form? How would you use each form to graph a linear function? Include examples in your explanation. c) Write an equation for line GH using point H and the slope. In Alberta. where the point is at the y-intercept.qxd 12/7/09 4:38 PM Page 374 17. 5 b) The line passes through F(4. 5 25 One line has equation y ϭ Ϫ x Ϫ . 6) and is: 5 a) parallel to the line y Ϫ 3 ϭ Ϫ (x ϩ 2) 2 5 b) perpendicular to the line y Ϫ 3 ϭ Ϫ (x ϩ 2) 2 How do you know your equations are correct? 23. the student population in francophone schools from January 2001 to January 2006 increased by approximately 198 students per year. 9 What is the equation of the other line? 25. Use a different strategy to check your answer. 5). Ϫ3). 3 3 What is the equation of the other line? C 26. A line passes through G(Ϫ3. a) The line has x-intercept 4 and is parallel to 3 the line with equation y ϭ x Ϫ 7. there were approximately 3470 students enrolled in francophone schools. The slope-intercept form of the equation of a line is a special case of the slope-point form of the equation. Ϫ1) and is perpendicular to the line that has x-intercept Ϫ3 and y-intercept 6. b) Compare the equations in part a. the Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan sold 8.2 million tonnes of potash. Write an equation for each line. 2 One line has equation y Ϫ 3 ϭ (x ϩ 5). Ϫ2) and is: a) parallel to the line y ϭ 2x ϩ 3 b) perpendicular to the line y ϭ 2x ϩ 3 22.wncp10_6_5. Write an equation for the line that passes through C(1. a) Write an equation that describes the relation between the mass of potash and the time in years since 2005. 19. In 2005. Write an equation for the line that passes through E(2. What assumptions did you make? 18. Two perpendicular lines intersect on the y-axis. d) Verify that the two equations are equivalent. What strategy did you use? What different strategy could you have used to verify that the equations are equivalent? 20. a) Write an equation in slope-point form to represent the number of students enrolled in francophone schools as a function of the number of years after 2001. In January 2003. the corporation sold 9. Two perpendicular lines intersect at K(Ϫ2. b) Use the equation in part a to estimate the number of students in francophone schools in January 2005. Ϫ3) and is: 4 i) parallel to the line y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 1 3 4 ii) perpendicular to the line y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 1 3 21. . a) Determine the slope of line GH. 24. 11) and H(4. due to increased demand. Two perpendicular lines intersect at M(3. b) Write an equation for line GH using point G and the slope.

– You rewrote the equation of a linear function from slope-point form to slope-intercept form. I know two points on the graph. The situation involves a constant rate of change and a given data point. Checkpoint 2 375 .3 In Lesson 6. – You wrote the equation of a linear function after determining the slope of its graph and the coordinates of a point on its graph. – You wrote the equation of a linear function given the coordinates of two points on its graph. I know the slope and one point on the graph.qxd 12/7/09 8:11 PM Page 375 CHECKPOINT 2 Concept Development Connections I know the slope and the y-intercept. The situation involves a constant rate of change and an initial value. Slope–Point Form y – y 1 = m(x – x1) ■ In Lesson 6.wncp10_6_5.5 – You developed the slope-point form of the equation of a linear function. ■ – You used technology to explore how changes in the constants m and b in the equation y ϭ mx ϩ b affect the graph of the function. Linear Relations – You used the graph of a linear function to write an equation for the function in slope-intercept form. – You graphed a linear function given its equation in slope-point form.4 – You used the slope and y-intercept of the graph of a linear function to write the equation of the function in slope-intercept form. – You graphed a linear function given its equation in slope-intercept form. ■ Slope–Intercept Form y = mx + b In Lesson 6.

then a lesser slope. a) Write an equation for this line using the slope-intercept form. b) Write an equation for the line using the slope-point form. Ϫ2) and is parallel to the line that has x-intercept 5 and y-intercept 3. b) Explain how to change the equation so the line will have a greater slope.5 3. A line has slope 2 and y-intercept 3. a) Determine the slope and d-intercept. d) The line passes through F(4. Ϫ3) and is perpendicular to the line with equation y ϩ 4 ϭ 2(x ϩ 2). then verify the equation. 7) and E(6.4 d 80 60 d = f(t) 40 20 t 0 1 2 3 Time (h) 4 6. a) y ϩ 2 ϭ 3(x Ϫ 4) 1 b) y Ϫ 2 ϭ Ϫ (x Ϫ 6) 2 c) The line passes through D(Ϫ4. For the equation y ϭ x Ϫ 4: 2 a) Use a graphing calculator or a computer with graphing software to graph it. Ϫ1). Sketch or print each graph. Explain your strategy. c) Compare the two equations. This graph represents Eric’s snowmobile ride. What does each represent? b) Write an equation to represent the graph. then a lesser y-intercept. Graph each line. Make the change. Label each line with its equation.qxd 12/7/09 8:11 PM Page 376 Assess Your Understanding 6. 4.3 3 1. 2.wncp10_6_5. c) Explain how to change the equation so the line will have a greater y-intercept. i) How far was Eric from home after 1 he had travelled 2 hours? 4 ii) How long did it take Eric to travel 45 km from home? Distance from home (km) 6. How are they alike? How are they different? 376 Chapter 6: Linear Functions . e) The line passes through G(Ϫ7. c) Use the equation to answer each question below. Make the change.

6 4:41 PM Page 377 General Form of the Equation for a Linear Relation LESSON FOCUS Relate the graph of a linear function to its equation in general form.6 General Form of the Equation for a Linear Relation 377 .qxd 12/7/09 6. not including meals and breaks. There must be at least one female and one male on the field at any time. Make Connections A softball team may field any combination of 9 female and male players. Make a table of values for the possible numbers of tables and chairs that Holly could assemble in one day. Holly works in a furniture plant. Holly works 8 h a day.wncp10_6_6. She takes 30 min to assemble a table and 15 min to assemble a chair. A. Number of Tables Number of Chairs 6. What are the possible combinations for female and male players on the field? Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner.

Consider what happens to the general form of the equation in each of the following cases: ■ 378 Chapter 6: Linear Functions y When A ϭ 0: Ax ϩ By ϩ C ϭ 0 becomes By ϩ C ϭ 0 Solve for y. What type of relation have you graphed? How do you know? C.qxd 12/7/09 4:41 PM Page 378 B. Suppose you interchanged the columns in the table. would produce a vertical line? A horizontal line? Ax ϩ By ϩ C ϭ 0 is the general form of the equation of a line. General Form of the Equation of a Linear Relation What values of A. What do the intercepts represent? D. Describe the graph. The x.and y-terms are on the left side of the equation. Use graphing technology if it is available. Write an equation for your graph. B B y = –C B x . ϪC yϭ B ϪC ϪC is a constant. The coefficients and constant terms are integers. then graphed the data. How would the graph change? How would the equation change? This graph is described by the equation 2x Ϫ 3y ϭ 12. where A is a whole number. Choose variables to represent the number of tables and number of chairs. and B and C are integers. Graph the data.wncp10_6_6. We may move the constant term to the left side of the equation: 2x Ϫ 3y ϭ 12 2x Ϫ 3y Ϫ 12 ϭ 12 Ϫ 12 2x Ϫ 3y Ϫ 12 ϭ 0 The equation is now in general form. 0 By ϭ ϪC Divide each side by B. and the constant term is on the right side. C. and the graph of y ϭ is a horizontal line. E. B. y –2 0 –2 –4 x 2 4 6 8 2x – 3y = 12 The equation 2x Ϫ 3y ϭ 12 is written in standard form.

Collect all the terms on the right side of the equation.wncp10_6_6.qxd ■ 12/7/09 4:41 PM Page 379 When B ϭ 0: Ax ϩ By ϩ C ϭ 0 becomes 0 Solve for x. 2x ϩ 3y Ϫ 12 ϭ 0 b) 3 y Ϫ 1 ϭ (x ϩ 2) 5 3 5(y Ϫ 1) ϭ 5 a b (x ϩ 2) 5 5y Ϫ 5 ϭ 3(x ϩ 2) 5y Ϫ 5 ϭ 3x ϩ 6 5y ϭ 3x ϩ 11 0 ϭ 3x Ϫ 5y ϩ 11 This is the general form of the equation. can all the terms be positive? Can all the terms be negative? Explain. Ax ϭ ϪC ϪC xϭ A ϪC ϪC is a constant. 1 a) y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 3 4 3 b) y ϩ 2 ϭ (x Ϫ 4) 2 [Answers: a) x ϩ 4y Ϫ 12 ϭ 0 b) 3x Ϫ 2y Ϫ 16 ϭ 0] 2 3y ϭ 3 aϪ xb ϩ 3(4) 3 Collect all the terms on the left 3y ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 12 side of the equation. Ax ϩ C ϭ 0 Divide each side by A. Collect like terms.6 General Form of the Equation for a Linear Relation 379 . For the two equations. why were the terms collected on different sides of the equation? When an equation of a line is written in general form. and the graph of x ϭ is a vertical line. 3 2 a) y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 4 b) y Ϫ1 ϭ (x ϩ 2) 3 5 SOLUTION a) x = –C A 2 yϭϪ xϩ4 3 2 3y ϭ 3 aϪ x ϩ 4b 3 Multiply each side by 3. Remove the brackets. A A Example 1 y x Rewriting an Equation in General Form Write each equation in general form. Remove the brackets. Write each equation in general form. Multiply each side by 5. The general form of the equation is: 3x Ϫ 5y ϩ 11 ϭ 0 6. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1.

CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. SOLUTION a) To determine the x-intercept: Substitute: y ϭ 0 3x ϩ 2y Ϫ 18 ϭ 0 Solve for x. 3(0) ϩ 2y Ϫ 18 ϭ 0 2y ϭ 18 2y 18 ϭ 2 2 yϭ9 The y-intercept is 9 and is described by the point (0. Draw a line through the points. a) Determine the x. Ϫ3] Why is it a good idea to check that the graph is correct when you use the intercepts to draw the graph? . 9). plot the points that represent the intercepts. [Answer: a) Ϫ9. b) On a grid.qxd 12/7/09 4:41 PM Page 380 Graphing a Line in General Form Example 2 a) Determine the x. To determine the y-intercept: Substitute: x ϭ 0 3x ϩ 2y Ϫ 18 ϭ 0 Solve for y.wncp10_6_6. y 3x + 2y – 18 = 0 8 6 4 2 0 380 x 2 4 6 Chapter 6: Linear Functions c) Verify that the graph is correct. c) Verify that the graph is correct. 3x ϩ 2(0) Ϫ 18 ϭ 0 3x ϭ 18 3x 18 ϭ 3 3 xϭ6 The x-intercept is 6 and is described by the point (6. 0).and y-intercepts of the line whose equation is: x ϩ 3y ϩ 9 ϭ 0 b) Graph the line.and y-intercepts of the line whose equation is: 3x ϩ 2y Ϫ 18 ϭ 0 b) Graph the line.

ϭ 3x ϩ 2y Ϫ 18 R. 3x Ϫ 2y Ϫ 16 ϭ 0 Ϫ2y Ϫ 16 ϭ Ϫ3x Ϫ2y ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 16 Ϫ3x 16 yϭ ϩ Ϫ2 Ϫ2 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Solve for y. 2 If an equation is given in general form. ϭ 0 ϭ 3(2) ϩ 2(6) Ϫ 18 ϭ 6 ϩ 12 Ϫ 18 ϭ0 Since the left side is equal to the right side. 3 yϭ xϪ8 2 3 From the equation. L.6 General Form of the Equation for a Linear Relation 381 . Here is the graph from Example 3 on a graphing calculator and on a computer with graphing software. Example 3 Determining the Slope of a Line Given Its Equation in General Form Determine the slope of the line with this equation: 3x Ϫ 2y Ϫ 16 ϭ 0 SOLUTION 3. Add 16 to each side. 6) satisfies the equation. the point satisfies the equation and the graph is probably correct.wncp10_6_6.S.S. the slope of the line is .qxd 12/7/09 4:41 PM Page 381 c) The point T(2. 6. Substitute x ϭ 2 and y ϭ 6 in the equation 3x ϩ 2y Ϫ 18 ϭ 0. Verify that T(2. Subtract 3x from each side. Determine the slope of the line with this equation: 5x Ϫ 2y ϩ 12 ϭ 0 5 [Answer: ] 2 Rewrite the equation in slope-intercept form. 6) appears to be on the graph. it must be rearranged to the form y ϭ f(x) before graphing using technology. Divide each side by Ϫ2.

c) Write an equation for the relation in general form. [Sample Answers: a) (2. 27). Mass of Peanuts. She has 60 cm of ribbon that she will cut into 5 pieces with 2 different lengths: 2 pieces have the same length and the remaining 3 pieces also have equal lengths. How would the graph change? How would the equation change? . 0) and (0. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4. ii) Will Devon spend exactly $10 if she buys 400 g of peanuts and 300 g of raisins? Use the graph and the equation to justify the answers. a) Generate some data for this relation. b) Graph the data. b) Graph the data. so she can buy 600 g of raisins for $6. Akeego is making a ribbon shirt. SOLUTION a) If Devon buys only peanuts at $2 for 100 g. c) Write an equation for the relation in general form. 21) c) 3x ϩ 2y Ϫ 60 ϭ 0 d) i) no ii) yes] What other strategies could you use to determine the equation of the line? Suppose you interchanged the coordinates and graphed p ϭ f(r). r (g) d) i) Can each of 2 pieces be 18 cm long and each of 3 pieces be 3 cm long? r ii) Can each of 2 pieces be 3 cm long and each of 3 pieces be 18 cm long? 800 600 500 0 400 0 1000 200 200 600 r = f(p) p 0 200 400 b) Join the points because Devon can buy any mass of items she likes. they cost $4.wncp10_6_6. Use the graph and the equation to justify your answers. Devon has $10 to purchase both these items. If Devon buys 200 g of peanuts. c) Use the coordinates of two points on the line: (500. 24). she can buy 1000 g. (6. p (g) 1000 Mass of Raisins. ϭ 2 p Ϫ p1 p2 Ϫ p1 r2 ϭ 1000. d) i) Will Devon spend exactly $10 if she buys 300 g of peanuts and 400 g of raisins? a) Generate some data for this relation showing the possible lengths of the pieces. and p2 ϭ 0 r Ϫ0 1000 Ϫ 0 ϭ p Ϫ 500 0 Ϫ 500 r Multiply each side by (p Ϫ 500). ϭ Ϫ2 p Ϫ 500 r ϭ Ϫ2(p Ϫ 500) r ϭ Ϫ2p ϩ 1000 Collect all the terms on the left side of 2p ϩ r Ϫ 1000 ϭ 0 382 Chapter 6: Linear Functions the equation.qxd 12/8/09 4:30 PM Page 382 Determining an Equation from a Graph of Generated Data Example 4 Peanuts cost $2 per 100 g and raisins cost $1 per 100 g. (4. p1 ϭ 500. If Devon buys only raisins at $1 for 100 g. 1000) Use the slope-point form with these coordinates: r Ϫ r1 r Ϫ r1 Substitute: r1 ϭ 0. she can buy 500 g.

Discuss the Ideas 1.6 General Form of the Equation for a Linear Relation 383 .S. 600 400 g of peanuts and 300 g of 400 (400. 300) does not satisfy the equation. 300) raisins are represented by the point (400. 400) 200 p 0 200 400 Check whether the point (300. How is this process like solving a linear equation? 6. ϭ 2p ϩ r Ϫ 1000 R.wncp10_6_6. 200 Since this point does not lie on the line. the point (300. 300 g of peanuts and 400 g of raisins are represented by the point (300. Is it easier to graph a linear relation with its equation in general form or slope-intercept form? Use examples to support your opinion. Since this point lies on the line.S. Plot this point on the grid. Devon can buy these masses of peanuts and raisins. An equation in general form may be rewritten in slope-intercept form. the point (400. 400) satisfies the equation: 2p ϩ r Ϫ 1000 ϭ 0 Substitute: p ϭ 300 and r ϭ 400 L. p 0 Devon cannot buy these masses of 200 400 peanuts and raisins. r ii) Use the graph to determine whether 1000 2p + r – 1000 = 0 Devon will spend exactly $10 if she 800 buys 400 g of peanuts and 300 g of raisins. ϭ 0 ϭ 2(300) ϩ 400 Ϫ 1000 ϭ0 Since the left side is equal to the right side. ϭ 2p ϩ r Ϫ 1000 R. Check whether the point (400.S. Plot this point on the grid. ϭ 0 ϭ 2(400) ϩ 300 Ϫ 1000 ϭ 100 Since the left side is not equal to the right side. 300). 1000 r 2p + r – 1000 = 0 800 600 400 (300.qxd 12/7/09 4:41 PM Page 383 d) i) Use the graph to determine whether Devon will spend exactly $10 if she buys 300 g of peanuts and 400 g of raisins. 3. What steps would you use to sketch the graph of a linear relation in general form? 2.S. 300) satisfies the equation: 2p ϩ r Ϫ 1000 ϭ 0 Substitute: p ϭ 400 and r ϭ 300 L. 400) does satisfy the equation. 400).

Determine the slope of the line with each equation. Write each equation in slope-intercept form. 12.wncp10_6_6. pipe are used. a) 4x ϩ 3y Ϫ 24 ϭ 0 b) 3x Ϫ 8y ϩ 12 ϭ 0 c) 2x Ϫ 5y Ϫ 15 ϭ 0 d) 7x ϩ 3y ϩ 10 ϭ 0 13. a) Generate some data for this relation. a) Generate some data for this relation. 384 Chapter 6: Linear Functions 11. In which form is each equation written? a) 8x Ϫ 3y ϭ 52 b) 9x ϩ 4y ϩ 21 ϭ 0 c) y ϭ 4x ϩ 7 d) y Ϫ3 ϭ 5(x ϩ 7) 5. pipe are needed? b) Suppose 3 pieces of 8-ft. Two numbers. i) Ϫ2x ϩ 3y ϩ 42 ϭ 0 ii) 4y Ϫ 5x ϭ 100 1 1 iii) x Ϫ y ϩ 1 ϭ 0 2 2 iv) 5y ϩ 9x Ϫ 20 ϭ 0 b) Write each equation in part a in general form. Graph each line. B 8. pipe be used? Justify your answer. 9. a) 8x Ϫ 3y ϭ 24 b) 7x ϩ 8y ϭ 56 c) 4x Ϫ 11y ϭ 88 d) 2x Ϫ 9y ϭ 27 6. a) 4x ϩ 3y ϭ 36 b) 2x Ϫ y ϭ 7 c) y ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 6 d) y ϭ 5x Ϫ 1 7.qxd 12/7/09 4:41 PM Page 384 Exercises A 4. pipe are used. Rebecca uses these pans to fill an order for 504 Nanaimo bars. then graph the data. Which strategy did you use each time? a) x Ϫ 2y ϩ 10 ϭ 0 b) 2x ϩ 3y Ϫ 15 ϭ 0 c) 7x ϩ 4y ϩ 4 ϭ 0 d) 6x Ϫ 10y ϩ 15 ϭ 0 15. a) Explain how you can tell that each equation is not written in general form. ii) Graph the equation. Which strategy did you use each time? a) 4x ϩ y Ϫ 10 ϭ 0 b) 3x Ϫ y ϩ 33 ϭ 0 c) 5x Ϫ y ϩ 45 ϭ 0 d) 10x ϩ 2y Ϫ 16 ϭ 0 14. Should you join the points? Explain. c) Write an equation in general form to relate f and s. a) 3x Ϫ 4y ϭ 24 b) 6x Ϫ 5y ϭ Ϫ60 c) 3x Ϫ 2y ϭ 24 d) 5x Ϫ y ϭ 10 10. It will have s pipes each 6 ft. long and e pipes each 8 ft. Should you join the points? Explain. Pascal saves loonies and toonies. long. Determine the x-intercept and the y-intercept for the graph of each equation. have a sum of 12. d) Could 4 pieces of 8-ft. Rebecca makes and sells Nanaimo bars. For each equation below: i) Determine the x. d) i) Could Pascal have 6 toonies and 8 loonies? ii) Could Pascal have 6 loonies and 8 toonies? Use the graph and the equation to justify your answers. then write an equation for the relation. b) Choose letters to represent the variables. Write each equation in general form. a) The x-intercept is 2 and the y-intercept is Ϫ3. a) Generate some data for this relation.and y-intercepts of the graph of the equation. . A pipe for a central vacuum is to be 96 ft. b) Graph the data. f and s. The value of his coins is $24. This equation describes the relation: 6s ϩ 8e ϭ 96 a) Suppose 4 pieces of 6-ft. How many pieces of 6-ft. Justify your choice for the form of the equation. pipe are needed? c) Could 3 pieces of 6-ft. b) Graph the data. She uses pans that hold 12 bars or 36 bars. Graph each equation on grid paper. How many pieces of 8-ft. iii) Verify that the graph is correct. b) The x-intercept is Ϫ6 and the y-intercept is 2. 16. c) Write an equation to relate the variables. pipe be used? Justify your answer. long. d) Use the graph to list 6 pairs of integers that have a sum of 12.

if possible. Why is it difficult? b) Use a different strategy to graph your equation. the equation does not represent a linear function. Suppose you know the x. when C ϭ 0. Write each equation in general form. How can you write an equation to describe the line without determining the slope of the line? Use the line with x-intercept 5 and y-intercept Ϫ3 to describe your strategy. a) Why can’t you use intercepts to graph the equation 4x Ϫ y ϭ 0? b) Use a different strategy to graph the equation. B. and C. Which equations below are equivalent? How did you find out? a) y ϭ 3x ϩ 6 b) 2x Ϫ 3y Ϫ 3 ϭ 0 2 c) y Ϫ 2 ϭ (x Ϫ 2) d) 3x Ϫ y Ϫ 6 ϭ 0 3 2 e) y ϭ x Ϫ 1 f) y Ϫ 3 ϭ 3(x Ϫ 3) 3 2 g) y Ϫ 1 ϭ (x Ϫ 3) h) y ϩ 3 ϭ 3(x Ϫ 1) 3 25. a) x Ϫ 22y Ϫ 15 ϭ 0 b) 15x ϩ 13y Ϫ 29 ϭ 0 c) 33x ϩ 2y ϩ 18 ϭ 0 d) 34x Ϫ y ϩ 40 ϭ 0 18. Indicate whether each equation represents a linear function. b) Write an expression for the y-intercept in terms of A.6 General Form of the Equation for a Linear Relation 385 .qxd 12/7/09 4:41 PM Page 385 17. y G y = f(x) 4 2 x 0 H 2 b) Is the relationship in part a true for all lines? Explain how you know. and C. Write it in 2 different forms. The general form for the equation of a line is: Ax ϩ By ϩ C ϭ 0 a) Write an expression for the slope of the line in terms of A. Choose one equation from question 18. a) Write the equation of a linear function in general form that would be difficult to graph by determining its intercepts. How did your strategy help you graph the equation? C 26. a) 2x ϩ 3y Ϫ 6 ϭ 0 b) 2x Ϫ 3y ϩ 6 ϭ 0 Graph B Graph A y y 2 2 –2 0 x 2 –2 0 x 2 23. Justify your answer. If an equation of a line cannot be written in general form. d) y ϭ 28. Show that different forms of this equation represent the same graph. 22. Explain your steps. Graph each equation. Graph the equation in each of its 3 forms. Write each equation in general form. a) How are the x. x y a) ϩ ϭ 1 4 3 10 b) y ϭ x c) y ϭ 2x(x ϩ 4) x ϩy ϩ2 4 27. Compare the graphs. Describe a situation that can be most appropriately modelled with the equation of a linear relation in general form. Include a sketch in your answer. Match each equation with its graph. 20. Describe the graph of Ax ϩ By ϩ C ϭ 0. Reflect 24. Sketch or print the graph. 21.wncp10_6_6.and y-intercepts of this line related to the slope of the line? Justify your answer.and y-intercepts of a line. B. 1 1 a) y ϭ x Ϫ 4 b) y Ϫ 2 ϭ (x ϩ 5) 3 3 1 3 4 c) y ϩ 3 ϭ Ϫ (x Ϫ 1) d) y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 2 3 4 19. Use a graphing calculator or a computer with graphing software. 6.

we also know the slope of a parallel line and a perpendicular line. ■ When the equation is written in the form y ϭ mx ϩ b. the slope of the line is m and the coordinates of a point on the line are (x1. This means that: When we know the slope of a line. or the slope and the coordinates of a point on the graph. research is conducted. ■ When the equation is written in the form y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x Ϫ x1). To understand the market. Often. ■ Certain forms of the equation of a linear function identify the slope and y-intercept of the graph. 386 Chapter 6: Linear Functions . ■ ■ ■ Any equation can be written in the general form Ax ϩ By ϩ C ϭ 0. and B and C are integers. these data will be used to produce linear models to solve problems. y1). describe how you would graph the function. The slope of a line is equal to the slope of any segment of the line. For a company to be successful.wncp10_BM. ■ Reflect on the Chapter For each form of the equation of a linear function. ■ What information do you need to know about a linear function to be able to write an equation to describe it? Include examples in your explanation. it must ensure that its product meets consumers’ needs and can be produced and sold at prices that ensure the company makes a profit. THE WORLD OF MATH Careers: Marketing Marketing involves understanding consumers’ needs and buying habits. where A is a whole number. then data are analyzed and used to make predictions.qxd 12/7/09 4:44 PM Page 386 S T U DY G U I D E CONCEPT SUMMARY Big Ideas ■ Applying the Big Ideas The graph of a linear function is a non-vertical straight line with a constant slope. the slope of the line is m and its y-intercept is b.

2] Write the equation of a line in slope-intercept form. 6. m. has equation: y ϭ mx ϩ b mϭ Ϫ1 Ϫ 4 5 . y1) and Q(x2. an equation is: 5 yϭϪ xϩ3 4 [6. Ϫ1): mϭ y2 Ϫ y 1 x2 Ϫ x1 [6. y2) has slope.qxd 12/7/09 8:13 PM Page 387 SKILLS SUMMARY Skill Description Example Determine the slope of a line and identify parallel lines and perpendicular lines.5] Graph a linear relation in general form. Plot points at the intercepts.1. then y ϭ 0. y1). and y-intercept. 5 5 For a line with slope Ϫ and 4 y-intercept 3. A line with slope. A line with slope.wncp10_BM. The slope of a line 4 4 perpendicular to PQ is . then draw a line through the points.4] Write the equation of a line in slope-point form.6] 4 and passing 5 through P(Ϫ2. and solving for y. has equation: y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x Ϫ x1) [6. [6. m. A line has equation: 3x ϩ 4y ϩ 12 ϭ 0 For the y-intercept: 3(0) ϩ 4y ϩ 12 ϭ 0 4y ϭ Ϫ12 y ϭ Ϫ3 For the x-intercept: 3x ϩ 4(0) ϩ 12 ϭ 0 3x ϭ Ϫ12 x ϭ Ϫ4 2 y x –6 –4 –2 0 2 –2 3x + 4y + 12 = 0 –4 Study Guide 387 . or 5 A line with slope 4 y Ϫ 4 ϭ (x ϩ 2) 5 The general form of the equation is: Ax ϩ By ϩ C ϭ 0 Determine intercepts by substituting: x ϭ 0. b. m. 4) and Q(2. 4) has equation: 4 y Ϫ 4 ϭ (x Ϫ (Ϫ2)). A line that passes through P(x1. where: For P(Ϫ2. and passing through P(x1. and solving for x. or Ϫ 2 Ϫ (Ϫ2) 4 The slope of a line parallel to PQ 5 is Ϫ .

7) and E(5. or neither? Justify your choice. 2). 8) and C(Ϫ1. negative. For each line described below. c) The line has a y-intercept but does not have an x-intercept. a) As x increases by 3.2 6. 3). a) b) 4 y y 4 y = f(x) y = g(x) x 0 –2 2 x 2 –4 –2 0 2 2. R(4. and C(6. is its slope positive. B(2. 1). perpendicular. a) H(Ϫ3. Ϫ1) 8. 800) 600 2 4 6 Time (min) Chapter 6: Linear Functions 6. 3 1 a) Ϫ1 b) c) Ϫ 2 4 4. Graph of Gabrielle’s Run Distance (m) 800 400 (2. P(Ϫ1. The slope of line FG is given. Is quadrilateral STUV a parallelogram? Justify your answer. 320) 200 0 388 (5. 5).1 1. Sketch graphs to help explain what happens to the graph of y ϭ 3x ϩ 4 when: a) the coefficient of x increases by 1 each time until the coefficient is 6 b) the constant term decreases by 1 each time until it is Ϫ4 . Are the two lines parallel. M(5. 6. The coordinates of two points on two lines are given. or undefined? Justify your answer.qxd 12/7/09 4:44 PM Page 388 REVIEW a) What is the slope of the line and what does it represent? b) How is slope related to rate of change? c) Assume Gabrielle continues to run at the same rate. Ϫ2) b) D(Ϫ3. Determine the slope of a line that passes through each pair of points. b) The line has a negative x-intercept and a negative y-intercept. ii) Write the coordinates of three other points on the line. A line passes through A(Ϫ3. 5). Ϫ1) b) N(Ϫ4. Gabrielle likes to jog and has a pedometer to measure how far she runs. i) How far did Gabrielle jog in 4 min? ii) How long will it take Gabrielle to jog 1000 m? 6.wncp10_BM. S 6 y 4 V –4 T 2 x –2 2 –2 4 6 U 9. Is ᭝ABC a right triangle? Justify your answer. y decreases by 2. 7) and K(Ϫ1. Triangle ABC has vertices A(Ϫ1. Ϫ5) 5.3 10. For each slope given below: i) Sketch the line through A with that slope. What is the slope of a line that is: i) parallel to FG? ii) perpendicular to FG? 6 11 a) 3 b) Ϫ c) d) 1 5 8 7. Determine the slope of each line. What strategy did you use? a) B(Ϫ6. 7) and Q(2. 3. Ϫ1). 3). zero. Ϫ2). Gabrielle plotted these data on a grid. She checks her pedometer periodically and records its readings. J(Ϫ1.

Write an equation for each graph. a) b) y 4 x –2 0 –3 2 4 2 y y = g(x) y = f(x) x –4 –2 0 2 –2 Review 389 . a) Write an equation to represent the total amount.5 16. Consider the graph of y ϭ x Ϫ 5. Verify that the equation is correct. 7 a) Write 2 equations that describe 2 different lines that are parallel to this line. he had in his account after w weeks. Write an equation for line DE. A dollars. Line DE passes through F(Ϫ2. Explain your strategy. b) After how many weeks did Mason have $355 in his account? c) Suppose you graphed the equation you wrote in part a. then write its equation in a different way. iii) Verify your equation. then draw the graph. Describe your strategy. For each graph below: i) Determine its slope and y-intercept. ii) Graph the equation. a) y ϩ 4 ϭ 2(x ϩ 3) 1 b) y Ϫ 1ϭ Ϫ (x Ϫ 4) 3 18. Match each equation with its graph. How do you know that the 2 new lines are perpendicular to the original line? 6. 3 a) y ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 4 b) y ϭ x Ϫ 2 4 12. 1 a) y ϭ x Ϫ 3 b) y ϭ Ϫ3x Ϫ 2 2 c) y ϭ 2x ϩ 3 d) y ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 3 Graph A 4 Graph B y y 2 x 0 –3 x 0 –2 –2 Graph D Graph C y y x –2 0 2 2 x –2 –4 –2 14. identify the slope and y-intercept of its graph. Mason had $40 in his bank account when he started to save $15 each week. For each equation. ii) Write an equation that describes the graph. iii) Choose a different point on the graph.wncp10_BM. How do you know all 3 lines are parallel? b) Write 2 equations that describe 2 different lines that are perpendicular to this line. a) 6 y y b) 2 4 y = f(x) 2 x –2 0 2 –2 x –2 y = g(x) 2 –4 –2 –4 13. What would the slope and the vertical intercept of the graph represent? 4 15.qxd 12/7/09 4:44 PM Page 389 6.4 11. 3) and is perpendicular to the line described by the equation y ϭ 2x ϩ 1. 17. For each equation below: i) Identify the slope of its graph and the coordinates of a point on the graph.

Explain your strategy. Describe your strategy. 28. Max earned $60. 3) and K(5. a) Why is each equation not in general form? 1 i) 4y Ϫ 5x Ϫ 40 ϭ 0 ii) x ϩ y ϭ 4 3 1 1 iii) y Ϫ 2 ϭ (x ϩ 4) iv) y ϭ x ϩ 3 3 5 b) Write each equation in part a in general form. B. 5) ii) J(Ϫ3. then graph the data. then write an equation for the cost as a function of the number of people. b) i) Could Kylie have rented 5 new releases and 6 old movies? ii) Could Kylie have rented 6 new releases and 5 old movies? Justify your answers. 24. Justify each choice. Ϫ7) and H(1. Explain what each variable represents. A video store charges $5 to rent a new release and $3 to rent an older movie. i) 3x Ϫ 4y Ϫ 24 ϭ 0 ii) x Ϫ 3y ϩ 12 ϭ 0 b) What is the slope of each line in part a? How did you determine the slopes? 23. Max babysits for 2 families. c) Use the graph to list 5 pairs of numbers that have a difference of 6. the other family pays $4 an hour. Chapter 6: Linear Functions y 2 0 x 6. Two families went on a traditional nuuchahnulth dugout canoe tour in Tofino harbour. a) Generate some data for this relation. b) What is the cost per person? How can you determine this from the equation? c) A third family paid $264. Describe the strategies you used. then write an equation. g and l. is 6.wncp10_BM. 20. b) Write an equation in general form to relate g and l. graph the data. b) Write an equation for the relation. a) Generate some data for this relation. The difference between two numbers. a) Graph each equation. How many people went on the tour? 25. Last week. and explain why you used that strategy. a) Choose variables. One family pays him $5 an hour. Which equations are equivalent? How did you determine your answers? 2 2 a) y ϭ x ϩ 1 b) y Ϫ 3 ϭ (x Ϫ 4) 5 5 2 c) y Ϫ 1 ϭ (x Ϫ 1) 5 2 d) y Ϫ 3 ϭ (x Ϫ 5) 5 e) 2x Ϫ 5y ϩ 7 ϭ 0 f) 2x Ϫ 5y Ϫ 5 ϭ 0 26.qxd 12/7/09 4:44 PM Page 390 19. a) Generate some data for this relation. then graph the data. Match each equation with its graph below. Kylie spent $45 renting movies last month. a) Write an equation for the line that passes through each pair of points. The other family paid $132 for 3 people. One family paid $220 for 5 people. i) G(Ϫ3.6 390 Graph B Graph A 2 4 x 2 4 6 –2 Graph C y 2 –2 0 x 27. 22. Ϫ1) b) Use each equation you wrote in part a to determine the coordinates of another point on each line. .C. Choose another strategy to graph the equation. Write the equation of a line in general form that you could not easily graph by using intercepts. 4 4 a) y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 3 b) y Ϫ 3 ϭ Ϫ (x ϩ 3) 5 5 c) 5x ϩ 4y Ϫ 15 ϭ 0 y 4 4 2 0 21.

CD C. choose the correct answer: A. a) Suppose 340 people attend the banquet. Write the equation of each line in the form that you think best describes the line. AB B. CD C. The caterer charges a fixed amount plus an additional charge for each person who attends. What will the total cost be? b) The total cost was $9810. Write the new equation in slope-intercept form. Which line at the right has equation 2x Ϫ 3y ϩ 2 ϭ 0? A. GH –6 0 –4 C H 2 –2 F –4 B G iii) 3x Ϫ 4y Ϫ 12 ϭ 0 b) Determine an equation of the line that is parallel to the line with equation 3 y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 5. 2). Do not use an intercept. C.wncp10_BM. 3 1 i) y ϭ Ϫ x ϩ 5 ii) y Ϫ 3 ϭ (x ϩ 2) 2 3 D E D. EF 3. 4. 2). GH A 2. EF 2 D. y y y a) b) c) 2 –2 x 2 –2 y = f(x) 0 2 2 –2 x 2 –2 y = g(x) 0 x –2 0 2 y = h(x) –3 5. Write the new 3 equation in general form. Explain your strategies. Which line at the right has slope Ϫ ? 2 A. 5). Explain how you know your 2 equation is correct. Write an equation of the line that passes through P and Q(1. Sophia is planning the graduation banquet.qxd 12/7/09 4:44 PM Page 391 PRACTICE TEST y For questions 1 and 2. Justify your choice. c) Determine an equation of the line that is perpendicular to the line with 1 equation y Ϫ 3 ϭ (x ϩ 2). or D 3 1. AB B. a) Graph each line. and passes through B(Ϫ1. and passes through A(6. d) Determine the coordinates of a point P on the line with equation 3x Ϫ 4y Ϫ 12 ϭ 0. The banquet will cost $11 250 if 600 people attend and $7650 if 400 people attend. B. How many people attended the banquet? c) What strategies did you use to answer parts a and b? Practice Test 391 x .

wncp10_7_1.qxd 12/7/09 4:47 PM 7 Page 392 Systems of Linear Equations BUILDING ON ■ modelling problems using linear relations ■ graphing linear functions ■ solving linear equations BIG IDEAS ■ A system of two linear equations is solved when the set of ordered pairs that satisfies both equations is determined. infinite solutions. or adding or subtracting the equations. ■ A system of two linear equations may have one solution. or no solution. ■ Multiplying or dividing the equations in a linear system by a non-zero number. NEW VOCABULARY system of linear equations. produces an equivalent system. linear system solving by substitution equivalent systems solving by elimination infinite coincident lines .

then solve. scientists collected data on the numbers of polar bears they encountered. we can write. When we know some of these data.qxd 12/7/09 4:47 PM Page 393 P O L A R B E A R S In Nunavut. related problems using linear systems.wncp10_7_1. . and the bears’ reactions.

1 4:47 PM Page 394 Developing Systems of Linear Equations LESSON FOCUS Model a situation using a system of linear equations.wncp10_7_1.qxd 12/7/09 7. Make Connections Which linear equation relates the masses on these balance scales? x 2 kg x 2 kg 12 kg Which linear equation relates the masses on these balance scales? x x y y 2 kg 2 kg 12 kg How are the two equations the same? How are they different? What do you know about the number of solutions for each equation? 394 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations .

wncp10_7_1. 1 2 2 1 1 2 Each player spins the pointer 10 times and records each number. There are 20 more small buses than large buses. The total passenger capacity is 780. How many times did the pointer land on 1 and land on 2? Write two equations that model this situation. A game uses a spinner with the number 1 or 2 written on each sector. The sum of the 10 numbers is the player’s score. 7. One player had a score of 17. A school district has buses that carry 12 passengers and buses that carry 24 passengers.1 Developing Systems of Linear Equations 395 . Why do you need two equations to model this situation? Is a solution of one equation also a solution of the other equation? Explain.qxd 12/7/09 4:47 PM Page 395 Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work with a partner.

S. The total passenger capacity is 780. A system of linear equations is often referred to as a linear system. There are some large buses but we don’t know how many. For each equation. substitute: s ϭ 35 and l ϭ 15 12s ϩ 24l ϭ 780 L. we can write two equations to model the situation. Let l represent the number of large buses. the left side is equal to the right side. We first identify the unknown quantities. So. Since s ϭ 35 and l ϭ 15 satisfy each equation. s and l.S.S. s ϭ l ϩ 20 L. Suppose you are told that there are 35 small buses and 15 large buses. We can also verify the solution by substituting the known values of s and l into the equations. There are some small buses but we don’t know how many. A solution of a linear system is a pair of values of s and l that satisfy both equations. 396 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . This agrees with the given data. In each equation. To verify that this is the solution. this equation relates the numbers of buses: s ϭ l ϩ 20 Why can we also write the first equation as: s ϩ 2l ϭ 65? Why might it be better to write this equation as: 12s ϩ 24l ϭ 780? These two linear equations model the situation: 12s ϩ 24l ϭ 780 s ϭ l ϩ 20 These two equations form a system of linear equations in two variables.S. So. Let s represent the number of small buses. ϭ s ϭ 35 R. we compare these data with the given situation.S.wncp10_7_1. Total capacity ϭ 35(12) ϩ 15(24) ϭ 420 ϩ 360 ϭ 780 The difference in the numbers of small and large buses is 20 and the total passenger capacity is 780. The difference in the numbers of small and large buses is: 35 Ϫ 15 ϭ 20 Calculate the total capacity of 35 small buses and 15 large buses. ϭ l ϩ 20 ϭ 15 ϩ 20 ϭ 35 ϭ L. Each small bus carries 12 people and each large bus carries 24 people. these numbers are the solution of the linear system. ϭ 12s ϩ 24l ϭ 12(35) ϩ 24(15) ϭ 420 ϩ 360 ϭ 780 ϭ R. this equation represents the total capacity: 12s ϩ 24l ϭ 780 There are 20 more small buses than large buses.qxd 2/26/10 10:30 AM Page 396 To determine how many of each type of bus there are. so the solution is correct.

So. To verify this solution: The measurements above confirm that the length is 2 ft.) ϭ 10 ft. So. The width of the stage is 31 ft. wide. Its perimeter is 158 ft. Use the linear system from part a to verify that Denise is correct. [Answer: a) 2l ϩ 2w ϭ 158.wncp10_7_1.) ϩ 2(3 ft. less than the length. the solution is correct. long and 3 ft. Alberta. This confirms that the perimeter is 16 ft. Perimeter ϭ twice the length plus twice the width ϭ 2(5 ft. ϩ 6 ft. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1. wide. longer than its width. The perimeter is: l ϩ l ϩ w ϩ w ϭ 2l ϩ 2w So. wide. How could you use guess and test to solve the problem? 7. b) Denise has determined that the Nunavut flag is 5 ft.1 Developing Systems of Linear Equations 397 .qxd 12/7/09 4:47 PM Example 1 Page 397 Using a Diagram to Model a Situation a) Create a linear system to model this situation: The perimeter of a Nunavut flag is 16 ft. Use the linear system from part a to verify that Sebi is correct. a) Create a linear system to model this situation: The stage at the Lyle Victor Albert Centre in Bonnyville. SOLUTION a) Draw a rectangle to represent the flag. is rectangular. Its length is 2 ft. longer than the width. long and 3 ft. Use the variables l and w to represent the dimensions of the flag in feet. Calculate the perimeter. this equation represents the perimeter: 2l ϩ 2w ϭ 16 The length of the flag is 2 ft. more than the width. long and 24 ft. w ϭ l Ϫ 31] ᐉ w w ᐉ The perimeter of the flag is 16 ft. b) Sebi has determined that the stage is 55 ft. ϭ 16 ft. this equation relates the dimensions: l ϭ w ϩ 2 A linear system that models the situation is: 2l ϩ 2w ϭ 16 lϭwϩ2 b) The flag is 5 ft.

Use this information to create a table.qxd 12/7/09 4:47 PM Page 398 Using a Table to Create a Linear System to Model a Situation Example 2 a) Create a linear system to model this situation: In Calgary.S. Refund per Number of Item ($) Items Money Raised ($) Can 0. Since c ϭ 2700 and b ϭ 300 satisfy each equation. Use the linear system to verify these numbers. a school raised $195 by collecting 3000 items for recycling.05c ϩ 0. b) The school collected 2700 pop cans and 300 plastic bottles. Use the linear system to verify these numbers.05c Bottle CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations What other linear system could model this situation? Would the solution be different? Explain.10b ϭ 140. ϭ c ϩ b ϭ 2700 ϩ 300 ϭ 3000 ϭ R.S.05c ϩ 0.20 b [Answer: a) 0. .05(2700) ϩ 0. For each equation. a linear system that models the situation is: c ϩ b ϭ 3000 0. 0. substitute: c ϭ 2700 and b ϭ 300 c ϩ b ϭ 3000 L.20b ϭ 195 b) To verify the solution: In each equation. The school received 5¢ for a can and 10¢ for a bottle.05 c 0.wncp10_7_1. The school received 5¢ for each pop can and 20¢ for each large plastic bottle.05c ϩ 0. and let b represent the number of bottles.20(300) ϭ 135 ϩ 60 ϭ 195 ϭ R. Let c represent the number of cans. c ϩ b ϭ 2000] 195 Total The third column in the table shows that the total number of items collected can be represented by this equation: c ϩ b ϭ 3000 The fourth column in the table shows that the money raised can be represented by this equation: 0.20b ϭ 0. ϭ 0. 0.20b 3000 2. the left side is equal to the right side.05c ϩ 0.20b ϭ 195 So. 398 b) The school collected 1200 cans and 800 bottles. SOLUTION a) Choose a variable to represent each unknown number.S. a) Create a linear system to model this situation: A school raised $140 by collecting 2000 cans and glass bottles for recycling.05c ϩ 0. 0.20b ϭ 195 L.S. these numbers are the solution of the linear system.

5f ϭ e where e represents the number of packages of 8 batteries and f represents the number of packages of 4 batteries. Cary wrote this linear system: 8e ϩ 4f ϭ 320 1.5 times as many packages of 4 batteries as packages of 8 batteries. To verify the solution. so the solution was wrong. said that the solution of the linear system was: There are 30 packages of 8 batteries and 20 packages of 4 batteries. There were 1. Cary said that since the left side is equal to the right side for each equation. ϭ 8e ϩ 4f ϭ 8(30) ϩ 4(20) ϭ 240 ϩ 80 ϭ 320 ϭ R. the solution is correct. But when Devon used the problem to verify the solution.5f ϭ 1. There could be an error in the equations that were written to represent the situation. 1.wncp10_7_1. Cary’s classmate. This illustrates that it is better to consider the given data to verify a solution rather than substitute in the equations. in each equation Cary substituted: e ϭ 30 and f ϭ 20 8e ϩ 4f ϭ 320 L.qxd 12/7/09 4:48 PM Page 399 For this situation: A store display had packages of 8 batteries and packages of 4 batteries. What are the correct equations for this situation? 7.1 Developing Systems of Linear Equations 399 . she realized that there should be more packages of 4 batteries than packages of 8 batteries.S.S.5f ϭ e L. Devon.S.5(20) ϭ 30 R. ϭ 1.S.S. The total number of batteries was 320. ϭ e ϭ 30 ϭ L.

Roller skate wheels come in packages of 4. Create a situation about wheels that can be modelled by the linear system below. A bicycle has 2 wheels and a tricycle has 3 wheels. The total number of these wheels in all packages is 440. r represents the number of packages of roller skate wheels in the store. A possible problem is: A store has 80 packages of wheels for inline skates and roller skates. how do you decide which parts of the situation can be represented by variables? 2. So. equation 2 could represent the total number of packages of inline skate and roller skate wheels in the store. Write a related problem. which is the number of roller skate wheels in a package. equation 1 could represent the total number of wheels in all these packages in the store. The variable r is multiplied by 4.wncp10_7_1. When you write a linear system to model a situation. How many packages of inline skate wheels and how many packages of roller skate wheels are in the store? Discuss the Ideas 1. The total number of wheels on all bicycles and tricycles in the store is 100. Inline skate wheels come in packages of 8. Create a situation about wheels that can be modelled by the linear system below. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. And. which is the number of inline skate wheels in a package. 8i ϩ 4r ϭ 440 i ϩ r ϭ 80 SOLUTION 8i ϩ 4r ϭ 440 i ϩ r ϭ 80 1 2 We number the equations in a linear system to be able to refer to them easily. How can you verify the solution of a linear system? 400 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . Write a related problem. How many bicycles and how many tricycles are in the store?] Then. What does the solution of a linear system mean? 3. Explain the meaning of each variable. 2b ϩ 3t ϭ 100 b ϩ t ϭ 40 [Sample Answer: A possible problem is: There are 40 bicycles and tricycles in a department store. Explain the meaning of each variable. i represents the number of packages of inline skate wheels in the store. So.qxd 12/7/09 4:48 PM Example 3 Page 400 Relating a Linear System to a Problem A store sells wheels for roller skates in packages of 4 and wheels for inline skates in packages of 8. In equation 1: The variable i is multiplied by 8.

a) During a clothing sale. a) Create a linear system to model this situation: The perimeter of an isosceles triangle is 24 cm. as shown in the diagrams. a) Create a linear system to model this situation: Two different lengths of pipe are joined. Which linear systems have the solution x ϭ Ϫ1 and y ϭ 2? a) 3x ϩ 2y ϭ Ϫ1 b) 3x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ1 2x Ϫ y ϭ 1 Ϫx Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ1 c) Ϫ3x ϩ 5y ϭ 13 4x Ϫ 3y ϭ Ϫ10 8.wncp10_7_1. 7. Write a linear system to model the two balance scales. A 4. long and the longer pipe is 6 ft. Each equal side is 6 cm longer than the shorter side. c) Use the linear system to verify the masses of the bags in part b. Explain what each variable represents. the Indian booth sold chapatti and naan breads for $2 each. B 6. Match each situation to a linear system below. 22 ft. 2 jackets and 2 sweaters cost $228. and 4 cm 9. less than the length. 10 cm. long. A jacket costs $44 more than a sweater.qxd 12/7/09 4:48 PM Page 401 Exercises b) Verify that the shorter pipe is 4 ft. A total of $228 was raised. a) These balance scales illustrate the two different sizes of bags of rice: x represents the mass of a large bag and y represents the mass of a small bag. Which system of equations is not a linear system? a) 2x ϩ y ϭ 11 b) 2x ϭ 11 Ϫ y x ϭ 13 ϩ y 4x Ϫ y ϭ 13 3 1 c) Ϫ x Ϫ y ϭ d) Ϫx2 ϩ y ϭ 10 2 4 xϩyϭ5 3 7 xϩ2ϭϪ 2 8 5. b) The perimeter of a standard tennis court for doubles is 228 ft. Justify your choice. c) At a cultural fair. i) 2x ϩ 2y ϭ 228 ii) 2x ϩ 2y ϭ 228 x Ϫ y ϭ 42 x Ϫ y ϭ 40 iii) 2x ϩ 2y ϭ 228 x Ϫ y ϭ 44 7. b) Verify that the side lengths of the triangle are: 10 cm. Teri works in a co-op that sells small and large bags of wild rice harvested in Saskatchewan. The width is 42 ft.1 Developing Systems of Linear Equations 401 . x x x y 10 kg 5 kg 2 kg y x 1 kg 1 kg 1 kg b) Use the diagrams of the balance scales to verify that a small bag of rice has a mass of 2 kg and a large bag has a mass of 5 kg. Forty more chapatti breads than naan breads were sold. 20 ft.

a) Write a linear system that has the solution x ϭ 1 and y ϭ 1. What do you need to consider when you write a linear system to model a situation? Use one of the exercises to explain. Show how this system can be written as a linear system. 5a ϩ 2c ϭ 38 aϪcϭ2 Reflect 402 a) What problem might Jacqui have written? Justify your answer. then write a related problem. She modelled the situation with this linear system. b) What does each variable represent? 14. b) Why is there more than one linear system with the same solution? 18. Explain what you did. A dogsled team travelled a total distance of 25 km from home to three cabins and then back home. Explain what each variable means. Ϫ3x ϩ 24 ϭ Ϫ6 xϩy x y Ϫ Ϫ ϭxϩy 5 3 17. 10. Any linear system in two variables can be expressed as: Ax ϩ By ϭ C Dx ϩ Ey ϭ F a) What do you know about the coefficients B. and F when the solution is the ordered pair (x. Jacqui wrote a problem about the costs of tickets for a group of adults and children going to a local fair. E. C. All distances are measured along the trail.qxd 12/7/09 4:48 PM Page 402 For questions 10 and 11. Solution B: The distance from home to cabin 1 is 6 km. Write a situation that can be modelled by this linear system. how do you know that y ϭ 2 is part of the solution of this linear system? x ϩ 2y ϭ 7 x ϩ 3y ϭ 9 b) Solve the system for x. D. x ϩ y ϭ 100 x Ϫ y ϭ 10 C 15. The distance from cabin 1 to cabin 2 is 6 km. a) Without solving this system. The distance from home to cabin 2 is 13 km. write a linear system to model each situation.wncp10_7_1. Then verify which of the given solutions of the related problem is correct. Shen used this linear system to represent a situation involving a collection of $2 and $1 coins. y)? b) What do you know about the coefficients A. and F when the solution is the ordered pair (0. Padma walked and jogged for 1 h on a treadmill. She walked 10 min more than she jogged. 2t ϩ l ϭ 160 t ϩ l ϭ 110 a) What problem might Shen have solved? b) What does each variable represent? 13. For how long did Padma walk? For how long did she jog? (Solution A: Padma walked for 35 min and jogged for 25 min. What is the distance from home to cabin 1? What is the distance from cabin 1 to cabin 2? (Solution A: The distance from home to cabin 1 is 7 km. 0)? 16. The distance from cabin 1 to cabin 2 is 7 km.) Cabin 3 5 km Home y Cabin 2 x y Cabin 1 11. Solution B: Padma jogged for 35 min and walked for 25 min. Explain what you did. C. Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations .) 12.

Saskatchewan. What are the coordinates of the point of intersection of the two lines? Explain why these coordinates are the solution of the linear system. 6 y 4 2 –4 –2 0 x 2 What are the equations of the graphs? Explain your reasoning. One player is Wendel Clark.wncp10_7_2.2 Solving a System of Linear Equations Graphically 403 . 7.2 Page 403 Solving a System of Linear Equations Graphically LESSON FOCUS Use the graphs of the equations of a linear system to estimate its solution. Make Connections Two equations in a linear system are graphed on the same grid. erected 6 large hockey cards by a highway to celebrate the town’s famous hockey players.qxd 12/7/09 4:51 PM 7. The town of Kelvington.

Graph the equations on the same grid. Each equation of this linear system is graphed on a grid. You will need grid paper and a ruler. the coordinates (x.wncp10_7_2. 3x ϩ 2y ϭ Ϫ12 1 Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 1 2 3x + 2y = –12 How could you verify that the graphs represent the equations in the linear system? –4 –2 2 0 y x –2 –2x + y = 1 –4 –6 We can use the graphs to estimate the solution of the linear system. we check that the coordinates (Ϫ2.qxd 12/7/09 4:51 PM Page 404 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. y) of the point of intersection are the solution of the linear system. The set of points that satisfy equation 2 lie on its graph. 404 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . What are the coordinates of the point of intersection. Create a linear system to model this situation. Here is a problem about the hockey cards in Kelvington. To verify the solution. P. The difference between the height and width is 4 ft. the point of intersection appears to be (Ϫ2. The set of points that satisfy equation 1 lie on its graph. If the two lines intersect. The set of points that satisfy both equations lie where the two graphs intersect. How did you decide on which axis each variable should be graphed? C. From the graphs. of the two lines? D. Why must the coordinates of P be a solution of each equation in the linear system? E. What are the side lengths of each large hockey card in Kelvington? The solution of a linear system can be estimated by graphing both equations on the same grid. Ϫ3). The perimeter of each large hockey card is 24 ft. Ϫ3) satisfy both equations. B. What are the dimensions of each card? A.

3x Ϫ 2y ϭ 14 –4 3x – 2y = 14 L.qxd 12/7/09 4:51 PM Page 405 In each equation. 2). 3x Ϫ 2y ϭ 14 Divide by Ϫ2 to solve for y. Both the x.S.S. For each equation. In each equation. the left side is equal to the right side. Write equation 2 in slope-intercept form. x ϭ 6 and y ϭ 2 is the solution of the linear system. these numbers are the solution of the linear system. ϭ 3x Ϫ 2y –6 ϭ 3(6) Ϫ 2(2) ϭ 18 Ϫ 4 ϭ 14 ϭ R. the left side is equal to the right side. Since x ϭ Ϫ2 and y ϭ Ϫ3 satisfy each equation. –1)] 1 2 Determine the x-intercept and y-intercept of the graph of equation 1.S. 2) x 2 6 8 –2 xϩyϭ8 L. S. Ϫ2y ϭ Ϫ3x ϩ 14 3 yϭ xϪ7 2 y The slope of the graph of equation 2 8 x+y=8 3 is .and y-intercepts are 8.S. substitute: x ϭ 6 and y ϭ 2 0 What other strategy could you use to graph the equations? (6. Verify the solution.wncp10_7_2. ϭ x ϩ y ϭ6ϩ2 ϭ8 ϭ R. we substitute: x ϭϪ2 and y ϭϪ3: 3x ϩ 2y ϭ Ϫ12 Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 1 L. xϩyϭ8 3x Ϫ 2y ϭ 14 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1.2 Solving a System of Linear Equations Graphically 405 . 7.S. ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 3(Ϫ2) ϩ 2(Ϫ3) ϭ Ϫ2(Ϫ2) Ϫ 3 ϭ Ϫ6 Ϫ 6 ϭ4Ϫ3 ϭ Ϫ12 ϭ1 ϭ R. Solve this linear system. 6 2 Graph each line. ϭ R. and its y-intercept is Ϫ7. So. 4 The point of intersection appears 2 to be (6.S.S. 2x ϩ 3y ϭ 3 xϪyϭ4 SOLUTION xϩyϭ8 3x Ϫ 2y ϭ 14 [Answer: (3. Why must the solution satisfy both equations? For each equation. Example 1 Solving a Linear System by Graphing Solve this linear system. ϭ 3x ϩ 2y L.

4t where d is the distance in kilometres from Tyrell’s cabin and t is the time in hours since both people began their journey d 1200 0 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING t 1 4 2 3 Time (h) 5 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . 1400 Distance (miles) a) Graph the linear system above. Graph the equations. For the graph of equation 2. a) Solve the linear system to determine values of d and t that satisfy both equations. The cabins are 6 km apart. A linear system that models this situation is: d ϭ 6 Ϫ 4t d ϭ 2.4 km/h toward Jaden’s cabin. to Ottawa at an average speed of 400 mph. A linear system that models this situation is: d ϭ 1400 Ϫ 400t d ϭ 350t where d is the distance in miles from Ottawa and t is the time in hours since the planes took off a) Graph the linear system above. b) Use the graph to solve this problem: When do Jaden and Tyrell meet and how far are they from Tyrell’s cabin? [Answer: b) after travelling for approximately 54 min and at approximately 2. d ϭ 1400 Ϫ 400t 1 d ϭ 350t 2 Each equation is in slope-intercept form. Tyrell started at his cabin at the same time and paddled at an average speed of 2.wncp10_7_2. Another plane left Ottawa at the same time to travel to Regina at an average speed of 350 mph.3 km from Tyrell’s cabin] How would the equations in the linear system change if you wanted to determine when the planes meet and how far they are from Regina? Explain.qxd 12/7/09 4:51 PM Example 2 Page 406 Solving a Problem by Graphing a Linear System One plane left Regina at noon to travel 1400 mi. and paddled her kayak toward her friend Tyrell’s cabin at an average speed of 4 km/h. in Saskatchewan. For the graph of equation 1. d = 350t 1000 800 600 d = 1400 – 400t 400 200 406 2. the slope is 350 and the vertical intercept is 0. Jaden left her cabin on Waskesiu Lake. the slope is Ϫ400 and the vertical intercept is 1400. b) Use the graph to solve this problem: When do the planes pass each other and how far are they from Ottawa? SOLUTION The planes pass each other when they have been travelling for the same time and they are the same distance from Ottawa.

(Solution continues. Cost for all the people Another equation is: 5s ϩ 9a ϭ 180 is $180. [Answers: a) s ϩ r ϭ 60. from Ottawa. Let s represent the number of students. 0. So.9 h and at a distance of 650 mi.9) mi.9 h. in 1.9 h. 32 people entered the centre and a total of $180 in admission fees was collected. the admission fee is $5 for a student and $9 for an adult.2 Solving a System of Linear Equations Graphically 407 .9. The plane travelling from Ottawa to Regina travels at 350 mph. that is. In one hour.wncp10_7_2. One equation is: s ϩ a ϭ 32 SOLUTION a) Use a table to help develop the equations. Let a represent the number of adults. To verify the solution. its distance from Ottawa will be: 350(1.. it will travel: 400(1. ϭ 760 mi.qxd 12/7/09 4:51 PM Page 407 b) The graphs appear to intersect at (1. Alberta.9 h is 60(0. in 1.) 7.9) mi. 650). from Ottawa. the planes appear to pass each other after travelling for 1. from Ottawa. 5s dollars represents the total cost for the students. Example 3 How could you solve the problem without using a linear system? Solving a Problem by Writing then Graphing a Linear System a) Write a linear system to model this situation: To visit the Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump interpretive centre near Fort Macleod. use the given information. a) Write a linear system to model this situation: Wayne received and sent 60 text messages on his cell phone in one weekend. The time and distance are approximate because these measures cannot be read accurately from the graph. So. 9a dollars represents the total cost for the adults. it will be: (1400 Ϫ 760) mi. The plane travelling from Regina to Ottawa travels at 400 mph. Cost per student is $5. b) Graph the linear system then solve this problem: How many students and how many adults visited the centre during this time? CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. or 640 mi. So. Cost per adult is $9. Given: Creating a Linear System b) Graph the linear system then solve this problem: How many text messages did Wayne send and how many did he receive? There are students and adults. He sent 10 more messages than he received. s Ϫ r ϭ 10 b) 35 sent and 25 received] There are 32 people. ϭ 665 mi.9) min ϭ 54 min The planes pass each other after travelling for approximately 1 h 54 min and when they are approximately 650 mi.

Determine the cost for 27 students at $5 each and 5 adults at $9 each: 27 students at $5 each ϭ $135 ϩ 5 adults at $9 each ϭ $45 32 people for $180 The total number of people is 32 and the total cost is $180. Discuss the Ideas 1. Suppose the equations had been graphed with s on the vertical axis and a on the horizontal axis. What are some limitations to solving a linear system by graphing? 408 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . 32 a 28 24 s + a = 32 20 16 12 5s + 9a = 180 8 (27. 5) 4 0 s 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 The point of intersection appears to be (27. so the solution is correct. Twenty-seven students and 5 adults visited the centre. Would the graphs have been different? Would the solution have been different? Explain. Verify this solution. place a straightedge through the intercepts of each line and plot more points on each line. 5).qxd 12/7/09 8:15 PM Page 408 The linear system is: s ϩ a ϭ 32 1 5s ϩ 9a ϭ 180 2 b) Use intercepts to graph each line. What steps do you follow to solve a system of linear equations by graphing? 2. Equation a-intercept s-intercept s ϩ a ϭ 32 32 32 5s ϩ 9a ϭ 180 20 36 Since the data are discrete.wncp10_7_2.

7. and $0. a) 2x ϩ 4y ϭ Ϫ1 b) 5x ϩ 5y ϭ 17 3x Ϫ y ϭ 9 x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ1 23 c) x ϩ y ϭ d) 3x ϩ y ϭ 6 4 3 4 xϪyϭ xϩyϭϪ 4 3 8.qxd 12/8/09 4:32 PM Page 409 Exercises A 3. Is his solution exact or approximate? Explain.07 per brochure. Solve each linear system.wncp10_7_2. 6. 300). Part-time sales clerks at a computer store are offered two methods of payment: Plan A: $700 a month plus 3% commission on total sales Plan B: $1000 a month plus 2% commission on total sales. Determine the solution of each linear system. b) Use the graph to solve these problems: i) How many brochures must be printed for the cost to be the same at both companies? ii) When is it cheaper to use Company A to print brochures? Explain. Two companies charge these rates for printing a brochure: Company A charges $175 for set-up.02s where P is the clerk’s monthly salary in dollars and s is the clerk’s monthly sales in dollars a) Graph the linear system above. Explain how you know whether the solution is exact or approximate. A linear system that models this situation is: C ϭ 175 ϩ 0. and $0. a) y –2x + y = 10 y b) 4 4 2 2 x + 4y = 4 –6 x+y=5 x 0 –2 –4 x – y = –1 0 c) 2 x 4 d) y 2 y –3x + y = 5 2 5x + y = 2 x 0 –2 0 4 2 –2 –x + y = –4 x 2 4 x + 3y = –5 –4 B 4.03s P ϭ 1000 ϩ 0. 9.10n C ϭ 250 ϩ 0.10 per brochure. Explain the meaning of the point of intersection of the graphs of a system of linear equations. b) Use the graph to solve these problems: i) What must the monthly sales be for a clerk to receive the same salary with both plans? ii) When would it be better for a clerk to choose Plan B? Explain. a) Solve each linear system. Emil’s solution to this linear system was (500. For each linear system. 3x Ϫ y ϭ 1149 Ϫx ϩ 2y ϭ 142 7. A linear system that models this situation is: P ϭ 700 ϩ 0. y a) 2x + 3y = 12 2 0 x 2 4 6 8 –2 x – y = 11 –4 b) y 31 –3x + y = 4 4 3x – 4y = –16 2 –4 –2 0 x 2 4 5.07n where C is the total cost in dollars and n is the number of brochures printed a) Graph the linear system above. i) x ϩ y ϭ 7 ii) x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ1 3x ϩ 4y ϭ 24 3x ϩ 2y ϭ 12 iii) 5x ϩ 4y ϭ 10 iv) x ϩ 2y ϭ Ϫ1 5x ϩ 6y ϭ 0 2x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ5 b) Choose one linear system from part a. use the graphs to determine the solution.2 Solving a System of Linear Equations Graphically 409 . Company B charges $250 for set-up.

Indicate whether your solution is exact or approximate. x x y y 16. The class sold a total of 115 gift cards. The solution of the linear system is in the third quadrant. 2x ϩ 7y ϭ 3 4x ϩ 3y ϭ 7 b) Why is the solution approximate? C 17. Solve the related problem. 14. a) Write a linear system to model this situation: A box of 36 golf balls has a mass of 1806 g. a team gets 2 points for a win and 1 point for an overtime loss. Each shorter 1 side. Emma solved a linear system by graphing. How many wins and how many overtime losses did the team have? 12. What might the second equation be? Explain how you determined the equation. a) Solve this linear system by graphing. b) Use a graph to solve this problem: What is the mass of the box and the mass of one golf ball? c) Why was it difficult to determine a solution? Reflect 410 19. When 12 balls are removed. b) Draw the graphs to determine the solution. The area of Stanley Park in Vancouver is 391 hectares. A group of adults and students went on a field trip to the Royal Tyrell Museum. is 3 in. 15. She first determined the intercepts of each line. When you solve a linear system graphically. The forested area is 141 hectares more than the rest of the park. how can you determine whether the solution is approximate or exact? Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . Explain what you did. What is the area of each part of the park? 11. x. In the American Hockey League. near Drumheller. a) Suppose you want to solve this linear system by graphing. the mass is 1254 g. 18. One equation of a linear system is y ϭ 2x ϩ 1. How many of each type of card did the class sell? 13. They had 43 more wins than overtime losses. y.qxd 12/7/09 4:51 PM Page 410 For questions 10 to 13. Equation x-intercept y-intercept 1 5 5 2 4 6 a) Write a linear system that Emma could have solved. Explain your work. Annika’s class raised $800 by selling $5 and $10 movie gift cards. In the 2008–2009 regular season. less than each longer side. 2 What are the values of x and y? 10. How do you know that the lines are perpendicular? 2x ϩ 3y ϭ Ϫ5 x y Ϫ ϭ2 2 3 b) Create another linear system where the lines are perpendicular. The total admission fee was $152.wncp10_7_2. the Manitoba Moose had 107 points. write a linear system to model each situation. Alberta. There were 13 more students than adults. How many adults and how many students went on the field trip? 17 in. The home plate in a baseball diamond is a pentagon with perimeter 58 in.

qxd 12/7/09 9:13 PM Page 411 MATH LAB 7.wncp10_7_3. the population of Canada was 31 612 897.3 Math Lab: Using Graphing Technology to Solve a System of Linear Equations 411 .3 Using Graphing Technology to Solve a System of Linear Equations Arctic Ocean LESSON FOCUS Determine and verify the solution of a linear system using graphing technology. The population of the eastern provinces was 12 369 487 more than the population of the territories and western provinces. You will need: ■ a graphing calculator or computer with graphing software Léa’s school had a carnival to celebrate Festival du Voyageur. The total attendance was 520.75 by charging an adult $3.75 and a student $2. Territories Yukon Northwest Territories Pacific Ocean Nunavut Western Provinces British Columbia Alberta Manitoba Labrador Atlantic Ocean Québec Saskatchewan Newfoundland Ontario Eastern Provinces N W 0 500 1000 km E S Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia New Brunswick Make Connections In 2006.50. How many adults and how many students attended? 7. The school raised $1518. What linear system models this situation? How could you determine the population of the territories and western provinces? How could you determine the population of the eastern provinces? Why can’t you determine an exact solution by graphing on grid paper? Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner.

Before you graph.5 2. To solve this linear system: x ϩ 2y ϭ 8 3x ϩ 4y ϭ 20 Gerard entered each equation into his graphing calculator in this form: Plot1 Plot2 Plot3 \Y1 = -X/2+4 \Y2 = -3X/4+5 \Y3 \Y4 = \Y5 = \Y6 = \Y7 = Gerard created a table of values for these equations. Verify your solution by using the data in the given problem. How could you verify the solution in Step C by using tables of values? E.5 2 1. Graph each line. 412 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . Determine the coordinates of the point of intersection of the lines.5 X=0 a) How could Gerard use the table to determine the solution of the linear system? b) Describe a different strategy Gerard could use to solve this linear system. Are these coordinates exact or approximate? Explain. X 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Y1 4 3. Express each equation in slope-intercept form.qxd 12/7/09 4:53 PM Page 412 A.25 3.5 1 Y2 5 4. D. How can you use your results to determine the number of adults and the number of students who attended the carnival? Assess Your Understanding 1. C. Write a linear system to model this situation. how can you tell in which quadrant the point of intersection lies? What table settings would you use? Why did you choose these? B.5 3 2.wncp10_7_3.25 . F.75 2 1.

a) Explain how you would use graphing technology to determine the solution of this linear system.wncp10_7_3. 3x Ϫ 6y ϭ 14 7 xϩyϭ 6 b) What is the solution? 3.qxd 12/7/09 4:53 PM Page 413 2. A community group purchased 72 cedar tree and spruce tree seedlings to plant for an Earth Day project.3 Math Lab: Using Graphing Technology to Solve a System of Linear Equations 413 . How many of each type of tree seedling did the group purchase? 4. Explain your prediction. The number of cedar trees was twice the number of spruce trees. will you always get an approximate solution? Use the linear systems below to explain. When you graph to solve a linear system that contains fractional coefficients. System A System B 1 xϩyϭ3 2 2x ϩ y ϭ 1 xϩ yϭ3 2 x y 55 ϩ ϭ 3 2 36 23 6 7. 5. a) Each linear system below contains the equation x ϩ 2y ϭ 3. c) Solve the linear system to check your prediction. Solve each system by graphing. i) x ϩ 2y ϭ 3 ii) x ϩ 2y ϭ 3 iii) x ϩ 2y ϭ 3 iv) x ϩ 2y ϭ 3 2x Ϫ y ϭ 1 2x Ϫ y ϭ 6 2x Ϫ y ϭ 11 2x Ϫ y ϭ 16 b) What patterns are there in the linear systems and their solutions? Use the patterns to predict another linear system that would extend the pattern.

wncp10_7_3. and related linear systems to problems. – You verified the solution of a linear system by examining tables of values. ■ Graph to Locate the Point of Intersection Identify the Solution y 60 x = 45 12x + 24y = 1500 y = 40 50 40 (45.2 – You solved a linear system by graphing the linear equations on grid paper and determining the coordinates of their point of intersection. How many of each size of box does the store have? ■ Identify the Variables a Linear System boxes with 12 balls. Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations .qxd 12/7/09 4:53 PM Page 414 CHECKPOINT 1 Concept Development Connections ■ Given this Situation and Related Problem – You defined a linear system. boxes with 24 balls. x–y=5 20 In Lesson 7. 12x + 24y = 1500 Let y represent the number of x-y=5 – You identified whether a solution to a linear system was exact or approximate. – You used technology to determine whether the solution of a linear system was exact or approximate. 414 In Lesson 7. There are 5 more boxes containing 12 balls than boxes containing 24 balls. Model the Situation with Let x represent the number of In Lesson 7. A store has boxes containing 1500 golf balls.1 solution. 40) 30 10 0 x 10 20 30 40 50 60 Use the equations to verify Use the problem to verify the the solution. wrote linear systems to model problems.3 – You solved linear systems using graphing technology by first expressing each equation in the form y ϭ f (x).

then write a related problem. 2x ϩ y ϭ 1 x ϩ 2y ϭ Ϫ1 4. 2.2 3. Together. A small tree removes 0. a) Create a linear system to model this situation: The Commonwealth stadium in Edmonton. The total cost for 18 people was $396. Alberta. An urban forest has 15 000 large and small trees. Its width is 16 ft. a) Write a linear system to model this situation: A group of students and adults went to the Vancouver Aquarium in B. 10x ϩ 5y ϭ 850 x Ϫ y ϭ 10 7.02 kg each year.4 kg of pollution from the air each year.C. ii) Use the problem to verify these dimensions. has the largest video screen JumboTron in the world. Create a situation that can be modelled by this linear system. these trees remove 7200 kg of pollution each year. i) Use the equations to verify these dimensions. b) Under what conditions is Plan A cheaper? Justify your answer.1 1. b) Use graphing technology to solve this problem: How many of each size of tree are in the forest? Checkpoint 1 415 . less than its length. Describe your strategy. b) The length of the screen is 40 ft. and its width is 24 ft.wncp10_7_3. Solve this linear system by graphing on grid paper.qxd 12/7/09 4:53 PM Page 415 Assess Your Understanding 7. a) Write a linear system to model this situation: A large tree removes 1. 5. Its perimeter is 128 ft.3 6. A fitness club offers two payment plans: Plan A: an initiation fee of $75 plus a user fee of $5 per visit Plan B: a user fee of $10 per visit A linear system that models this situation is: F ϭ 75 ϩ 5v F ϭ 10v where F is the total fee in dollars and v is the number of visits a) Graph this linear system. The admission fee was $21 for a student and $27 for an adult. b) Use a graph to solve this problem: How many students and how many adults went to the aquarium? 7.

x x y y 10 kg y 10 kg 2 kg Make Connections Look at the picture above. Is there enough information to determine the masses of the container labelled x and the container labelled y? Explain.4 4:55 PM Page 416 Using a Substitution Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations LESSON FOCUS Use the substitution of one variable to solve a linear system. ■ ■ 3x ϩ 5y ϭ 6 x ϭ Ϫ4 2x ϩ y ϭ 5 y ϭ Ϫx ϩ 3 What strategies did you use? How can you check that each solution is correct? 416 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work with a partner.qxd 12/7/09 7. How would your answer change if you knew that each container labelled x had a mass of 5 kg? Explain. Solve each linear system without graphing.wncp10_7_4.

3.S.4 Using a Substitution Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 417 .S. Consider this linear system. the left side is equal to the right side.S. 3x ϩ 4y ϭ Ϫ4 1 x ϩ 2y ϭ 2 2 In equation 2. x ϩ 10 ϭ 2 x ϭ Ϫ8 Would we get the same solution if we solved equation 2 for y instead of for x? Explain. x ϩ 2y ϭ 2 2 L. Substitute x ϭ Ϫ2y ϩ 2 in equation 1. you solved linear systems by graphing. To verify the solution is correct. Solve for y. solve equation 2 for x. By using substitution. For each equation. we substitute for both variables in the original equations. Substitute y ϭ 5 in equation 2.2 and 7. Collect like terms. One algebraic strategy is called solving by substitution. the variable x has coefficient 1.S.wncp10_7_4. we substitute for that variable in one of the original equations then solve that equation for the other variable. We substitute the expression for x in the other equation. When we know the value of one variable. ϭ 3x ϩ 4y ϭ 3(Ϫ8) ϩ 4(5) ϭ Ϫ24 ϩ 20 ϭ Ϫ4 ϭ R. 3x ϩ 4y ϭ Ϫ4 1 3(Ϫ2y ϩ 2) ϩ 4y ϭ Ϫ4 Ϫ6y ϩ 6 ϩ 4y ϭ Ϫ4 Ϫ2y ϭ Ϫ10 yϭ5 Use the distributive property to simplify. x ϩ 2y ϭ 2 2 x ϩ 2(5) ϭ 2 Solve for x. x ϩ 2y ϭ 2 2 x ϭ Ϫ2y ϩ 2 Why did we solve for x instead of for y? Since the solution of the linear system is the point of intersection of the graphs of the two lines. substitute: x ϭ Ϫ8 and y ϭ 5 3x ϩ 4y ϭ Ϫ4 1 L. then we use what we know about solving linear equations to determine the value of that variable. the x-coordinate must satisfy both equations. In each equation. So.qxd 12/7/09 4:55 PM Page 417 In Lessons 7. This strategy is time-consuming even when you use graphing technology. Would we get the same solution if we substituted y ϭ 5 in equation 1 instead of equation 2? Explain. and you can only approximate the solution. we transform a system of two linear equations into a single equation in one variable. so the solution is: x ϭ Ϫ8 and y ϭ 5 7. ϭ x ϩ 2y ϭ Ϫ8 ϩ 2(5) ϭ Ϫ8 ϩ 10 ϭ2 ϭ R. We use algebra to determine an exact solution.

5x Ϫ 3y ϭ 18 4x Ϫ 6y ϭ 18 SOLUTIONS [Answer: x ϭ 3 and y ϭ Ϫ1] Method 1 2x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7 4x ϩ y ϭ 5 1 2 Solve equation 2 for y. 4x ϩ y ϭ 5 4(1. 4x ϩ y ϭ 5 y ϭ 5 Ϫ 4x 2 Substitute y ϭ 5 Ϫ 4x in equation 1.5 in equation 2. Solve this linear system.wncp10_7_4.5) ϩ y ϭ 5 6ϩyϭ5 y ϭ Ϫ1 418 Intersection X=-8 Y=5 2 2 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . 2x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7 4x ϩ y ϭ 5 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1. then solve for x. Substitute x ϭ 1.5 1 Simplify.qxd 3/10/10 12:13 PM Page 418 Here is the graphical solution for the linear system on page 417: Plot1 Plot2 Plot3 \Y1 = (-3/4)X-1 \Y2 = (-1/2)X+1 \Y3 = \Y4 = \Y5 = \Y6 = \Y7 = Solving a Linear System by Substitution Example 1 Solve this linear system. 2x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7 2x Ϫ 4(5 Ϫ 4x) ϭ 7 2x Ϫ 20 ϩ 16x ϭ 7 18x ϭ 27 x ϭ 1.

Solve equation 1 for 2x. then solve for y.4 Using a Substitution Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 419 . it is helpful if there are two like terms where one term is a multiple of the other term. Verify the solution. 2(2x) ϩ y ϭ 5 2(7 ϩ 4y) ϩ y ϭ 5 14 ϩ 8y ϩ y ϭ 5 9y ϭ Ϫ9 y ϭ Ϫ1 3 Simplify.5 Verify that we get the same solution when we substitute y ϭ Ϫ1 into equation 2.5) Ϫ 4(Ϫ1) ϭ3ϩ4 ϭ7 ϭ R. ϭ 2x Ϫ 4y ϭ 2(1. Substitute y ϭ Ϫ1 into equation 1. we label it with a different number. 2x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7 2x Ϫ 4(Ϫ1) ϭ 7 2x ϩ 4 ϭ 7 2x ϭ 3 x ϭ 1.5 and y ϭ Ϫ1 7.wncp10_7_4.5 and y ϭ Ϫ1 2x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7 1 L. the left side is equal to the right side. 2x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7 1 2x ϭ 7 ϩ 4y Why did we write 4x ϭ 2(2x) and not 4y ϭ 2(2y)? Substitute 2x ϭ 7 ϩ 4y in equation 3.5) Ϫ 1 ϭ6Ϫ1 ϭ5 ϭ R. the term 4x can be written as 2(2x): 2(2x) ϩ y ϭ 5 3 When we change the form of an equation.S. Solve for x. 2x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7 1 4x ϩ y ϭ 5 2 In equation 2.S.S.qxd 12/7/09 4:55 PM Page 419 Method 2 When no equation in a linear system has a variable with coefficient 1. 4x ϩ y ϭ 5 2 L. In each equation. substitute: x ϭ 1. ϭ 4x ϩ y ϭ 4(1. so the solution is: x ϭ 1.S. For each equation.

5% and $1000 at 4.] The interest is 10% of y dollars: 0.10x ϩ 200 ϭ 190 Ϫ0. 0. the total interest was $73. Let x dollars represent the amount invested at 8%.wncp10_7_4. Let y dollars represent the amount invested at 10%. 500 ϩ y ϭ 2000 y ϭ 1500 Nuri invested $500 at 8% and $1500 at 10%. The interest is 8% of x dollars: 0. After one year. x ϭ 500 Substitute x ϭ 500 in equation 1.10(Ϫx ϩ 2000) ϭ 190 Collect like terms.08x ϩ 0.02x ϩ 200 ϭ 190 Divide each side by Ϫ0. 0.5%. 0.5% and the rest at an annual interest rate of 4. the total interest was $190. a) Create a linear system to model this situation: Alexia invested $1800.10y The total interest is $190. part at an annual interest rate of 3. One equation is: x ϩ y ϭ 2000 x dollars at 8% b) Solve this problem: How much money did Alexia invest at each rate? [Answers: a) x + y ϭ 1800.5%. b) Solve this problem: How much money did Nuri invest at each rate? SOLUTIONS a) Use a table to help develop the equations. part at an annual interest rate of 8% and the rest at an annual interest rate of 10%. use substitution to solve the linear system.02 Ϫ0. Solve for y in equation 1.08x ϩ 0. x ϩ y ϭ 2000 Solve for y. x ϩ y ϭ 2000 1 y ϭ Ϫx ϩ 2000 Substitute y ϭ Ϫx ϩ 2000 in equation 2.08x Ϫ 0.08x ϩ 0.10y ϭ 190 1 2 b) Method 1 Because the coefficients of x and y in equation 1 are 1.035x ϩ 0. Given: Creating a Linear System There are two investments.qxd 12/7/09 4:55 PM Example 2 Page 420 Using a Linear System to Solve a Problem a) Create a linear system to model this situation: Nuri invested $2000.10y ϭ 190 2 Use the distributive property. After one year.045y ϭ 73 b) Alexia invested $800 at 3.08x y dollars at 10% CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING Another equation is: 0. 2.08x ϩ 0.02x ϭ Ϫ10 to solve for x. 420 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations Why might you want to multiply equation 2 by 100? . The total investment was $2000. 0.10y ϭ 190 The linear system is: x ϩ y ϭ 2000 0.

we can multiply the first equation by 2.08x ϩ 0. Add the amounts: $500 ϩ $1500 ϭ $2000. Express each equation in slope-intercept form. x ϩ 2y ϭ 5 3 1 1 1 x – yϭϪ 2 3 3 3 Multiply each term by 3. The result is the equations in System B.4 Using a Substitution Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 421 . To verify the solution. x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ1 4 7. 2) 0 2 x + 2y = 5 x 4 In System A.08x ϩ 190 y ϭ Ϫ0. System B System A 4 y 2 –3 0 1 1 1 x – 3y = – 3 3 (1. Intersection X=500 Y=1500 The lines intersect at: (500. Nuri invested $500 at 8% and $1500 at 10%. x ϩ y ϭ 2000 0. System A 5 x ϩyϭ 2 2 System B 1 Multiply each term by 2.qxd 12/8/09 4:34 PM Page 421 Method 2 Use graphing technology to solve the system and the problem. Add the interest. use the data in the given problem.10y ϭ 190 y ϭ Ϫx ϩ 2000 0. These two linear systems have the same graphs and the same solution x ϭ 1 and y ϭ 2. 1500) The solution is: x ϭ 500 and y ϭ 1500 So. 2) x 5 +y=2 2 x 2 4 4 y x – y = –1 2 –3 (1. The total interest is: $40 ϩ $150 ϭ $190 These numbers match those given in the problem. and the second equation by 3 to write equivalent equations with integer coefficients.wncp10_7_4.10y ϭ Ϫ0. so the solution is correct.8x ϩ 1900 Graph each equation. which is the total amount invested 8% of 500 is $40 and 10% of $1500 is $150.

Simplify. Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations Why did we multiply equation 1 by 6 and equation 2 by 12? . the solution of the linear system is unchanged. equation 1 is equivalent to equation 3. 1 2 x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 2 3 5 1 yϭ xϪ 4 3 SOLUTIONS CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. When an equation in a linear system has coefficients or a constant term that are fractions. A system of equivalent equations is called an equivalent linear system and has the same solution as the original system. their point of intersection. 4 1 x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ2 2 5 1 3 yϭ xϪ 4 8 23 55 [Answer: x ϭ Ϫ and y ϭ Ϫ ] 3 24 Method 1 2 1 x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 1 2 3 5 1 yϭ xϪ 2 4 3 Write an equivalent system with integer coefficients. For equation 1: 1 2 x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 2 3 1 2 6 a xb ϩ 6 a yb ϭ 6(Ϫ1) 2 3 3x ϩ 4y ϭ Ϫ6 Multiply each term by 6. we can multiply by a common denominator to write an equivalent equation with integer coefficients. and equation 2 is equivalent to equation 4.wncp10_7_4. 3 For equation 2: 1 5 yϭ xϪ 4 3 1 5 12(y) ϭ 12 a xb Ϫ 12 a b 4 3 12y ϭ 3x Ϫ 20 4 422 Multiply each term by 12. Example 3 Solving a Linear System with Fractional Coefficients Solve this linear system by substitution. Solve this linear system by substitution. Multiplying or dividing the equations in a linear system by a non-zero number does not change the graphs. that is. and hence.qxd 12/7/09 4:55 PM Page 422 The two linear systems have the same solution x ϭ 1 and y ϭ 2 because the corresponding equations are equivalent. Simplify. So.

qxd 12/7/09 4:55 PM Page 423 Solve equation 3 for 3x. 3 9 3 1 3 xϭ a b 9 2 1 xϭ 6 (Solution continues. 8 12y ϭ 3x Ϫ 20 4 13 Ϫ Solve for x. 12 a b ϭ 3x Ϫ 20 8 39 Ϫ ϭ 3x Ϫ 20 2 39 20 Ϫ ϭ 3x 2 40 39 – ϭ 3x 2 2 1 3x 2ϭ 1 xϭ 6 Divide by 3. 2 6 9 10 2 x Ϫ ϭ Ϫ1 Solve for x.4 Using a Substitution Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 423 . 2 3 4 3 10 1 1 x ϩ x Ϫ ϭ Ϫ1 Collect like terms. 12y ϭ 3x Ϫ 20 4 12y ϭ (Ϫ4y Ϫ 6) Ϫ 20 Solve for y. 3 9 10 2 x ϭ Ϫ1 ϩ 3 9 2 1 2 xϭ Divide by . substitute for y in equation 1. Substitute for 3x in equation 4. 3x ϩ 4y ϭ Ϫ6 3 3x ϭ Ϫ4y Ϫ 6 Equations 3 and 4 form a linear system that is equivalent to the linear system formed by equations 1 and 2. or Ϫ 16 8 13 Substitute y ϭ Ϫ into equation 4. Method 2 2 1 x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 2 3 5 1 yϭ xϪ 4 3 1 2 Since equation 2 is solved for y. 12y ϭ Ϫ4y Ϫ 26 16y ϭ Ϫ26 13 26 y ϭ Ϫ .wncp10_7_4. 2 1 x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 1 2 3 1 5 2 1 x ϩ a x Ϫ b ϭ Ϫ1 Use the distributive property.) 7.

or Ϫ 24 8 Verify the solution. When you want to write an equivalent equation with integer coefficients. substitute: x ϭ 1 2 x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 2 3 L. For each equation. yϭ 13 1 and y ϭ Ϫ 6 8 5 1 yϭ xϪ 2 4 3 In each equation.qxd 12/7/09 4:55 PM Page 424 1 Substitute x ϭ in equation 2. or Ϫ 24 8 ϭ L. the left side is equal to the right side. ϭ Ϫ 13 8 1 13 Ϫ 12 12 ϭ Ϫ1 ϭ R. ϭ 1 1 1 2 13 a b ϩ aϪ b 2 6 3 8 L. how do you decide which number to multiply by? Use an example to explain. R.S.S.S. how can you form an equivalent linear system? 2. 6 5 1 yϭ xϪ 2 4 3 5 1 1 a bϪ 4 6 3 5 1 yϭ Ϫ 24 3 40 1 yϭ Ϫ 24 24 39 13 y ϭ Ϫ .S.S. ϭ 1 1 5 a bϪ 4 6 3 ϭ 1 5 Ϫ 24 3 ϭ ϭ 1 40 Ϫ 24 24 13 39 ϭ Ϫ . What are some advantages of solving a linear system using the substitution strategy rather than graphing? 424 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . When you have a system of linear equations.wncp10_7_4. 3. so the solution is: 1 13 x ϭ and y ϭ Ϫ 6 8 Discuss the Ideas 1.

wncp10_7_4. Thirtyone people reported a heavy use of the internet. How many bears responded and how many bears did not respond? 11. 9. 2x ϩ 2y ϭ Ϫ4 Ϫ12x ϩ 4y ϭ Ϫ24 b) Show that both linear systems in part a have the same solution. a) y ϭ 9 Ϫ x b) x ϭ y Ϫ 1 2x ϩ 3y ϭ 11 3x Ϫ y ϭ 11 c) x ϭ 7 ϩ y d) 3x ϩ y ϭ 7 2x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ10 yϭxϩ3 5. while others responded by sitting. There were 94 more bears that did not respond than did respond. walking away. identify a number you could multiply each term by to ensure that the equation has only integer coefficients and constants. 7.4 Using a Substitution Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 425 . choose a divisor. This was 80% of the high school students and 60% of the adults. x y Ϫ ϭ2 3 2 5x 3y ϩ ϭ1 6 4 b) Verify that both linear systems in part a have the same solution. a) 2x ϩ 3y ϭ 11 b) 4x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ5 4x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ13 2x ϩ 3y ϭ 5 c) x ϩ 2y ϭ 13 d) 3x ϩ y ϭ 7 2x Ϫ 3y ϭ Ϫ9 5x ϩ 2y ϭ 13 B 6. The perimeter of the flag was 540 cm. Explain why you chose that number.qxd 12/7/09 4:55 PM Page 425 Exercises A 4. Explain what you did. Which of these systems would you choose? Why? i) x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ5 ii) x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ5 x ϭ Ϫ1 Ϫx Ϫ y ϭ 3 iii) 2x Ϫ 3y ϭ 7 x Ϫ 2y ϭ 3 b) Solve each linear system in part a. i) 2x Ϫ 3y ϭ 2 ii) 40x ϩ 10y ϭ 10 4x Ϫ 4y ϭ 2 3x ϩ 5y ϭ 5 iii) Ϫ3x ϩ 6y ϭ 9 iv) Ϫ3x ϩ 4y ϭ 6 5x Ϫ 2y ϭ Ϫ7 9x ϩ 3y ϭ 27 b) Solve each linear system in part a. Some bears did not appear to respond. How many students and how many adults were in the study? 7. a) For each equation. Use substitution to solve each linear system. a) In each linear system. Forty-five high school students and adults were surveyed about their use of the internet. Louise purchased a Métis flag whose length was 90 cm longer than its width. A study recorded the reactions of 186 polar bears as they were approached by a tundra buggy. For questions 10 to 18. write a linear system to model each situation. standing. Solve the linear system to solve the related problem. a) For each equation. Create an equivalent linear system. Solve each linear system. identify two like terms and say how they are related. a) Suppose you wanted to solve a linear system in the fewest steps. or running away. 8. What are the dimensions of the flag? 12. Create an equivalent linear system by dividing each term in the equation by that divisor. 10.

C. His total mark for the test was 63. she sold 76 single-scoop cones and 49 double-scoop cones for a total revenue of $474. One weekend. This linear system was used to solve a problem about the cost of buying reams of printer paper and ink cartridges for a school computer lab: 7. then $30 per weekend. Forty-seven students are searching for fossils in 11 groups of 4 or 5. How many groups of 4 and how many groups of 5 are searching? 19. One bond earned interest at an annual rate of 2. 1 2 3 1 7 a) x ϩ y ϭ 1 b) x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ 2 3 4 2 12 1 1 5 xϪ yϭ 4 3 2 4 xϪyϭϪ 3 1 3 c) x Ϫ y ϭ 1 3 8 7 4 d) x ϩ y ϭ 3 4 3 1 1 3 Ϫ xϪ yϭ 4 8 2 14. 2x ϩ 4y ϭ 98 x ϩ y ϭ 27 22.25. Joel has a part-time job that pays him $40 per weekend. What is the cost of each cone? 18. Tess has a part-time job at an ice-cream store. Manitoba. On Saturday.50r ϩ 45c ϭ 375 r Ϫ c ϭ 15 a) Create a situation that can be modelled using the linear system. The total mark possible for the test was 75. Write a related problem. Solve the system and the problem. The total number of yellow cedar masks is 38. For how many weekends would Joel have to work before he earns the same amount as Sue? Justify your answer. b) Solve the system and the problem. 426 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations 5 1 xϪ yϭ2 2 6 20. a) What is the usual average speed? b) What is the distance from Penticton to Chute Lake? . members of a cycling club rode on the KVR trail (Kettle Valley Railway) uphill from Penticton in Okanagan. Many researchers. How many marks is each part worth? 16. involve students to help unearth fossil remains of 80 million-year-old reptiles. Explain what you did. such as those at the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre at Morden. the downhill ride increased the cyclists’ usual average speed by 4 km/h.5%. The return trip took 2 h. How do your solutions show that the systems are equivalent? C 23. How much money was invested in each bond? 17.50. 21. Sam scored 80% on part A of a math test and 92% on part B of the math test. The uphill climb reduced the cyclists’ usual average speed by 6 km/h and they took 4 h to get to Chute Lake. Write a related problem. On Sunday. Create a situation that can be modelled by this linear system. a) Write a linear system that is equivalent to this system.75% per year. 2x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ4 3x ϩ 2y ϭ 1 b) Solve each linear system. Five thousand dollars was invested in two savings bonds for one year. Sue has a part-time job that paid a starting bonus of $150. Sixty percent of the people masks and 40% of the animal masks are made of yellow cedar. Tess sold 54 singlescoop cones and 37 double-scoop cones for a total revenue of $346.25. An art gallery has a collection of 85 Northwest Coast masks of people and animals. B. The total interest earned was $162. The other bond earned 3. Solve each linear system.qxd 2/19/10 10:51 AM Page 426 13. On the return trip. How many people masks and how many animal masks are there? 15.wncp10_7_4.

it climbed for 10 min. Then it descended for 15 min. The difference between the rate of climb and the rate of descent was 400 m/min. The solution of this linear system is (–2. Researchers at the Nk’Mip Desert and Heritage Centre in Osoyoos. which do you choose first: the equation you start with or the variable you solve for? Use an example to justify your answer. 7. The mean mass of all the snakes was 194 g. and C.wncp10_7_4.7 g greater than the mean mass of the females. The mean mass of the males was 37. What were the rate of climb and the rate of descent? 26. What was the mean mass of the males and the mean mass of the females? Show your work. installs. 3). Explain why x will always equal y in the solution of this linear system for any non-zero values of A. THE WORLD OF MATH Careers: Electronics Technician An electronics technician assembles. A ϶ B.qxd 12/7/09 4:55 PM Page 427 24.. A technician can use a solution of a linear system to determine the current flowing through an electrical circuit and the voltage across the circuit. business. B. Ax ϩ By ϭ Ϫ17 Bx ϩ Ay ϭ 18 Reflect When you use the substitution strategy to solve a linear system. 25. B. troubleshoots. Ax ϩ By ϭ C Bx ϩ Ay ϭ C 27.C.4 Using a Substitution Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 427 . measured the masses of 45 female rattlesnakes and 100 male rattlesnakes as part of a study. What are the values of A and B? Show your work. Its current altitude was then 1000 m below its cruising altitude. After an airplane reached its cruising altitude. and industry. and repairs electronic equipment used by consumers.

w w ᐉ Perimeter: 32 ft. ᐉ ᐉ w Perimeter: 40 ft. w ᐉ ᐉ The carpenter placed the sheets side to side and measured their perimeter.5 4:59 PM Page 428 Using an Elimination Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations LESSON FOCUS Use the elimination of one variable to solve a linear system.wncp10_7_5. ᐉ w w Suppose you wanted to determine the dimensions of a piece of this plywood. Which linear system would model the situation? How would you solve the linear system? 428 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations .qxd 12/7/09 7. Make Connections A carpenter placed two identical plywood sheets end to end and measured their perimeter.

4. Create equation 3 by adding like terms in equation 1 and equation 2. What do you notice? B. Similarly.5 Using an Elimination Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 429 .qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Page 429 Construct Understanding TRY THIS Work with a partner. This is called solving by elimination. Create and solve your own linear system where each equation has the same y-coefficient. What do you notice? E. Use graphing technology if it is available. 7. What do you notice? Why does adding or subtracting the like terms in two linear equations always result in another linear equation? C. Graph all three equations on the same screen or grid. We use this property to solve a linear system by first eliminating one variable by adding or subtracting the two equations. Use this linear system: x ϩ 2y ϭ 10 1 xϩyϭ7 2 A. Graph all four equations on the same screen or grid. Add and subtract the equations to create two other linear equations. Graph all four equations. adding or subtracting the two equations in a linear system produces equivalent linear systems. Create equation 4 by subtracting equation 2 from equation 1. D. you learned that multiplying or dividing each equation in a linear system by a non-zero number does not change the solution because the linear systems that are formed are equivalent. How does adding or subtracting equations help you solve a linear system? In Lesson 7.wncp10_7_5. How would subtracting equation 2 from equation 1 help you solve the system? Would adding the two equations help you solve the system? Explain.

S. 2x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ7 1 Ϫ(x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ4) 2 Collect like terms. Example 1 Solving a Linear System by Subtracting to Eliminate a Variable Solve this linear system by elimination. 2x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ7 1 x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ4 2 Because the coefficients of y are equal. Subtract equation 2 from equation 1 to determine the value of x. In each equation.8 and y ϭ 3.S.S. we can eliminate y by subtracting the equations. the left side is equal to the right side. ϭ R. ϭ x ϩ y ϭ 2(Ϫ3) ϩ (Ϫ1) ϭ Ϫ3 ϩ (Ϫ1) ϭ Ϫ6 Ϫ 1 ϭ Ϫ4 ϭ Ϫ7 ϭ R.wncp10_7_5.S. 2(Ϫ3) ϩ y ϭ Ϫ7 Ϫ6 ϩ y ϭ Ϫ7 y ϭ Ϫ1 Verify the solution. Solve this linear system by elimination. 430 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 1. ϭ 2x ϩ y L. For each equation. 2x ϩ y Ϫ x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ7 Ϫ (Ϫ4) x ϭ Ϫ3 Substitute x ϭ Ϫ3 into equation 1 to determine the value of y. substitute: x ϭ Ϫ3 and y ϭ Ϫ1 2x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ7 1 x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ4 2 L. 2x ϩ 7y ϭ 24 3x Ϫ 2y ϭ Ϫ4 [Answer: x ϭ 0. 2x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ7 1 Solve for y.2] . 3x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7 5x Ϫ 6y ϭ 8 SOLUTION 3x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7 5x Ϫ 6y ϭ 8 1 2 No like terms have equal coefficients. so the solution is: x ϭ Ϫ3 and y ϭ Ϫ1 We may need to multiply one or both equations by constants before we can eliminate a variable by adding or subtracting.qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Why did we put brackets around equation 2 when we subtracted it? Page 430 Consider this linear system.

5 3x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7 1 5x Ϫ 6y ϭ 8 2 L.5 3 4 What number would you multiply each equation by to be able to eliminate y by subtracting? Substitute y ϭ Ϫ5. To solve this linear system. multiply equation 1 by 5 and multiply equation 2 by 3. For each equation.5 Using an Elimination Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 431 . 3x Ϫ 4(Ϫ5.5 in equation 1. ϭ 3x Ϫ 4y L.S.S. To make these terms equal. In each equation.wncp10_7_5.5) ϭ 5(Ϫ5) Ϫ 6(Ϫ5. Their least common multiple is 15. so the solution is: x ϭ Ϫ5 and y ϭ Ϫ5.5) ϭ 7 3x ϩ 22 ϭ 7 3x ϭ Ϫ15 x ϭ Ϫ5 Verify the solution. 5 × equation 1: 3 × equation 2: 5(3x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7) → 15x Ϫ 20y ϭ 35 3(5x Ϫ 6y ϭ 8) → 15x Ϫ 18y ϭ 24 3 4 These equations form an equivalent linear system. 15x Ϫ 20y ϭ 35 Ϫ(15x Ϫ 18y ϭ 24) Ϫ20y Ϫ (Ϫ18y) ϭ 35 Ϫ 24 Ϫ2y ϭ 11 y ϭ Ϫ5.S. 3x Ϫ 4y ϭ 7 1 Solve for x.S.5 7. ϭ R. the left side is equal to the right side. subtract equation 4 from equation 3 to eliminate x. ϭ 5x Ϫ 6y ϭ 3(Ϫ5) Ϫ 4(Ϫ5. substitute: x ϭ Ϫ5 and y ϭ Ϫ5.qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Page 431 Consider the x-terms.5) ϭ Ϫ15 ϩ 22 ϭ Ϫ25 ϩ 33 ϭ7 ϭ8 ϭ R.

Example 2 Solving a Linear System by Adding to Eliminate a Variable Use an elimination strategy to solve this linear system. we may have to write equivalent equations with integer coefficients before we apply the elimination strategy. 3. 3 xϪyϭ2 4 1 1 xϩ yϭ2 8 4 SOLUTION [Answer: x ϭ 8 and y ϭ 4] 1 2 xϪ yϭ4 1 3 2 1 1 5 xϩ yϭ 2 2 4 2 Multiply each equation by a common denominator. 3 × equation 4: 3(2x ϩ y ϭ 10) → An equivalent linear system is: 6x ϩ 3y ϭ 30 5 4x Ϫ 3y ϭ 24 3 432 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations 6x ϩ 3y ϭ 30 5 . How would that help 2 you eliminate one variable? 4 An equivalent linear system is: 4x Ϫ 3y ϭ 24 3 2x ϩ y ϭ 10 4 To eliminate y. 2 1 6 × equation 1: 6 a x Ϫ y ϭ 4b 3 2 2 1 6 a x b Ϫ 6 a yb ϭ 6(4) 3 2 4x Ϫ 3y ϭ 24 4 × equation 2: 3 1 1 5 4a x ϩ y ϭ b 2 4 2 1 1 5 4a x b ϩ 4a y b ϭ 4a b 2 4 2 2x ϩ y ϭ 10 Suppose you multiplied equation 1 1 by . multiply equation 4 by 3 so both y-terms have the numerical coefficient. 1 2 xϪ yϭ4 3 2 1 1 5 xϩ yϭ 2 4 2 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2.qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Page 432 In a linear system.wncp10_7_5. Use an elimination strategy to solve this linear system.

ϭ x Ϫ y L.8 7.5 ϭ R.2 ϭ4 ϭ 2. In each equation.4) y ϭ Ϫ0.8 2 1 1 1 5 xϪ yϭ4 1 xϩ yϭ 2 3 2 2 4 2 2 1 1 1 L.7 Ϫ 0.8) 3 2 2 4 ϭ 3.5 Using an Elimination Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 433 .4) ϩ (Ϫ0. ϭ x ϩ y 3 2 2 4 2 1 1 1 ϭ (5.S. the left side is equal to the right side. Substitute x ϭ 5. ϭ R.4 2 y ϭ Ϫ2(0.8) ϭ (5. What other strategy could you use to solve this linear system? For each equation.4 and y ϭ Ϫ0.S.4) Ϫ y ϭ 4 3 2 1 3.4 and y ϭ Ϫ0.S.4) Ϫ (Ϫ0.4 5 3 Solve for x. Multiply each side by Ϫ2 to solve for y.6 ϩ 0. 2 1 xϪ yϭ4 1 3 2 2 1 (5.8 Collect like terms.4 in equation 1.qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Page 433 Add: 6x ϩ 3y ϭ 30 ϩ (4x Ϫ 3y ϭ 24) 10x ϭ 54 x ϭ 5.4 ϭ 2.wncp10_7_5.6 2 1 Ϫ y ϭ 0.S. so the solution is: x ϭ 5. substitute: x ϭ 5.6 Ϫ y ϭ 4 2 1 Ϫ y ϭ 4 Ϫ 3. Verify the solution.

CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 3. b) Solve this problem: What is the mass of each alloy needed to produce the desired alloy? [Answers: a) f ϩ t ϭ 625.qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Page 434 Using a Linear System to Solve a Problem Example 3 a) Write a linear system to model this situation: An alloy is a mixture of metals. 250 g of the 25% alloy] b) Solve this problem: What is the mass of each alloy needed to produce the desired alloy? SOLUTION a) Let s grams represent the mass of 60% alloy and let t grams represent the mass of 35% alloy.50(100 g) ϭ 50 g This 50 g of silver is made up of 60% of s plus 35% of t. So.wncp10_7_5.50f ϩ 0. Sketch a diagram. So. He has a 60% silver alloy and a 35% silver alloy. the first equation is: s ϩ t ϭ 100 The mass of silver in the bracelet is 50% of 100 g: 0.35t ϭ 50 434 1 2 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . An artist was commissioned to make a 100-g bracelet with a 50% silver alloy.35t ϭ 50 The linear system is: s ϩ t ϭ 100 0. 60% + s grams = 35% 50% t grams 100 g From the diagram: The 100-g mass of the bracelet is the sum of mass s grams of 60% alloy and mass t grams of 35% alloy. a) Write a linear system to model this situation: An artist was commissioned to make a 625-g statue of a raven with a 40% silver alloy. the second equation is: 0.25t ϭ 250 b) 375 g of the 50% alloy.60s ϩ 0.60s ϩ 0. 0. She has a 50% silver alloy and a 25% silver alloy.

60. 0.25t ϭ Ϫ10 Divide each side by Ϫ0. Solve the linear system for y and z. So.60t ϭ 60) 3 Ϫ0. 60 g of 60% silver alloy and 40 g of 35% silver alloy are needed. Use the distributive 0. 60 g of 60% alloy was used in the bracelet. then subtract to eliminate s. To verify the solution. then subtract equation 3 from equation 2.25 to solve for t.60 × equation 1: 0. Verify your solution. Then solve for x.60(s ϩ t ϭ 100) 0. So. and 60 g ϩ 40 g ϭ 100 g. t ϭ 40 Substitute t ϭ 40 in equation 1. the mass of silver in the bracelet from this alloy is: 35% of 40 g ϭ 14 g The mass of silver in the bracelet is 36 g ϩ 14 g ϭ 50 g.60s ϩ 0.35t ϭ 50 2 Ϫ(0.qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Page 435 b) Multiply equation 1 by 0. which form a linear system in two variables. use the given data. The bracelet has a mass of 100 g. the mass of silver in the bracelet from this alloy is: 60% of 60 g ϭ 36 g 40 g of 35% alloy was used in the bracelet.60t ϭ 60 3 property.60s ϩ 0. s ϩ t ϭ 100 1 s ϩ 40 ϭ 100 s ϭ 60 Sixty grams of 60% silver alloy and 40 g of 35% silver alloy are needed. Why couldn’t you determine a solution if the bracelet was made with a 25% silver alloy? THE WORLD OF MATH Math Fact: A Linear System with Three Variables We can use both the substitution and elimination strategies to solve a linear system with three equations in three variables: x ϩ 4y ϩ 3z ϭ 5 x ϩ 3y ϩ 2z ϭ 4 x ϩ y Ϫ z ϭ Ϫ1 1 2 3 We can begin by eliminating the variable x.wncp10_7_5. Subtract equation 2 from equation 1.5 Using an Elimination Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 435 . Subtract equation 3 from equation 2. which is 50% of the mass of the 100-g bracelet. 7. So. x ϩ 4y ϩ 3z ϭ 5 Ϫ(x ϩ 3y ϩ 2z ϭ 4) yϩzϭ1 1 2 4 x ϩ 3y ϩ 2z ϭ 4 Ϫ(x ϩ y Ϫ z ϭ Ϫ1) 2y ϩ 3z ϭ 5 2 3 5 The result is equations 4 and 5.60s ϩ 0.

S. The least common multiple of the coefficients of y is 12. substitute: x ϭ and y ϭ 23 23 2x ϩ 3y ϭ 8 1 5x Ϫ 4y ϭ Ϫ6 2 14 52 14 52 L. the left side is equal to the right side.wncp10_7_5. 14 52 In each equation. The least common multiple of the coefficients of x is 10. ϭ 5 a b Ϫ 4 a b L. Solve this linear system. Multiply equation 1 by 5 and equation 2 by 2. ϭ 70 208 Ϫ 23 23 138 ϭϪ 23 ϭ Ϫ6 ϭ R. 3x ϩ 9y ϭ 5 9x Ϫ 6y ϭ Ϫ7 1 2 [Answer: x ϭ Ϫ and y ϭ ] 3 3 SOLUTION 2x ϩ 3y ϭ 8 5x Ϫ 4y ϭ Ϫ6 1 2 Eliminate x first. 4 × equation 1: 8x ϩ 12y ϭ 32 3 × equation 2: ϩ (15x Ϫ 12y ϭ Ϫ18) 23x ϭ 14 14 xϭ 23 Verify the solution. 5 × equation 1: 10x ϩ 15y ϭ 40 2 × equation 2: Ϫ (10x Ϫ 8y ϭ Ϫ12) 23y ϭ 52 52 yϭ 23 Eliminate y next. then add.S.S. 14 52 so the solution is: x ϭ and y ϭ 23 23 436 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations What is an advantage of not 52 substituting y ϭ into one of 23 the equations to determine x? . 2x ϩ 3y ϭ 8 5x Ϫ 4y ϭ Ϫ6 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 4.S. then subtract.qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Example 4 Page 436 Solving by Determining the Value of Each Variable Independently Solve this linear system. ϭ 2 a b ϩ 3 a b 23 23 23 23 28 156 ϩ 23 23 184 ϭ 23 ϭ8 ϭ R. Multiply equation 1 by 4 and equation 2 by 3. ϭ For each equation.

in beaver pelts. how do you know when you need to begin by multiplying? Exercises A 3. Years ago.wncp10_7_5. B. When you use the elimination strategy to solve a linear system. Use an elimination strategy to solve each linear system. Solve each linear system in question 4. Use an elimination strategy to solve each linear system.5 Using an Elimination Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 437 . Explain what you did for part d. When you use the elimination strategy to solve a linear system.5 min and at a fast tempo for 30 s. The items and the cost in beaver pelts for each fur trader are shown below: 10 knives ϩ 20 blankets ϭ 200 beaver pelts 15 knives ϩ 25 blankets ϭ 270 beaver pelts What is the cost. The mean attendance at the Winnipeg Folk Festival for 2006 and 2008 was 45 265. Two fur traders purchased some knives and blankets from the Hudson’s Bay Company store at Fort Langley. Bernard used an electronic metronome to help him keep time to a guitar piece he was learning to play. how can you tell whether you will add equations or subtract them? 2. He played at a moderate tempo for 4.qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Page 437 Discuss the Ideas 1. The rate for the moderate tempo was 40 beats/min less than the rate for the fast tempo. What is the rate in beats per minute for each tempo? For questions 8 to 11. Solve each linear system. of one knife and of one blanket? 11.C. B 6. Talise folded 545 metal lids to make cones for jingle dresses for herself and her younger sister. a) 8x Ϫ 3y ϭ 38 b) 2a Ϫ 5b ϭ 29 3x Ϫ 2y ϭ Ϫ1 7a Ϫ 3b ϭ 0 c) 18a Ϫ 15b ϭ 4 d) 6x Ϫ 2y ϭ 21 10a ϩ 3b ϭ 6 4x ϩ 3y ϭ 1 9. a) x Ϫ 4y ϭ 1 b) 3a ϩ b ϭ 5 x Ϫ 2y ϭ Ϫ1 9a Ϫ b ϭ 15 c) 3x Ϫ 4y ϭ 1 d) 3x Ϫ 4y ϭ 0 3x Ϫ 2y ϭ Ϫ1 5x Ϫ 4y ϭ 8 4. write an equivalent linear system where both equations have: i) the same x-coefficients ii) the same y-coefficients a) x Ϫ 2y ϭ Ϫ6 b) 15x Ϫ 2y ϭ 9 3x Ϫ y ϭ 2 5x ϩ 4y ϭ 17 c) 7x ϩ 3y ϭ 9 d) 14x ϩ 15y ϭ 16 5x ϩ 2y ϭ 7 21x ϩ 10y ϭ Ϫ1 5. How many cones are on each dress? 10. a) 2x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ5 b) 3m Ϫ 6n ϭ 0 3x ϩ 5y ϭ 3 9m ϩ 3n ϭ Ϫ7 c) 2s ϩ 3t ϭ 6 d) 3a ϩ 2b ϭ 5 5s ϩ 10t ϭ 20 2a ϩ 3b ϭ 0 7. For each linear system. people bought goods with beaver pelts instead of cash. What was the attendance in each year? 7. 8. Bernard played a total of 620 beats on the metronome. Her dress had 185 more cones than her sister’s dress. The attendance in 2008 was 120 more than the attendance in 2006. model each situation with a linear system then solve the problem.

tall. 3x ϩ y ϭ 17 xϩyϭ7 b) Solve the problem you created. One-quarter of the girls and of the 4 boys said they played online games with someone over the weekend.05 d) Ϫ1. How do you know that the scales will still be balanced? c) How does this process help you determine the value of x and the value of y? d) How is this process related to the elimination strategy for solving a linear system? 438 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations 17.50. tall.5y ϭ 0.5x Ϫ 0. Suppose you want to eliminate one variable in the linear system below by adding.5 2x ϩ y ϭ 1.15y ϭ 0. a) What are two different ways to eliminate a variable? 3x ϩ 4y ϭ 29 2x Ϫ 5y ϭ Ϫ19 b) Solve the system using the two ways you described in part a. How many players were Canadian and how many were foreign? 14.75. . Explain what you did for part a. Explain how you created the problem. a b x y a) ϩ ϭ 1 b) ϩ ϭ 7 2 3 2 2 3x ϩ 2y ϭ 48 a 2b Ϫ ϭ Ϫ1 4 3 c) 0.5y ϭ 0. 13. tall. Three-sevenths of the foreign players were over 6 ft. This linear system models a problem about a pentagon.wncp10_7_5. Seven-ninths of the Canadian players were over 6 ft. Melody surveyed the 76 grade 10 students in her school to find out who played games 3 online. Thirty-nine students played online games that weekend.027 Ϫ0. How many girls and how many boys did Melody survey? 15. 3x ϩ 2y ϭ 21 xϪyϭ2 What might the problem be? Solve the problem you suggest. A co-op that sells organic food made 25 kg of soup mix by combining green peas that cost $5/kg with red lentils that cost $6. 17 of whom were over 6 ft. Solve each linear system.50/kg. This mixture costs $140. a) Which linear system is modelled by these two balance scales? Balance scales 1 x x x y 1 kg 10 kg 5 kg 1 kg Balance scales 2 x y 5 kg 1 kg 1 kg b) From Balance scales 1.qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Page 438 12.5x ϩ 2. Which ticket is more expensive? Justify your answer. 19. a) Write a problem that can be modelled by this linear system. 20. What was the mass of peas and the mass of lentils in the mixture? 18. To visit the Manitoba Children’s Museum in Winnipeg: ■ One adult and 3 children pay $27.5 16.03x ϩ 0. suppose you remove mass x and mass y from the left side and 7 kg from the right side. ■ Two adults and 2 children pay $27. The 2008–09 Edmonton Oilers had 25 players.

b) Write. 22. c) Compare your solutions in parts a and b. a) Write another equation whose coefficients and constant differ by 3.4047 ha. The farmer received $363 008 for both crops. In the equation 2x ϩ 5y ϭ 8. Solve the linear system formed by these equations.5 Using an Elimination Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations 439 .wncp10_7_5. give an example of a linear system that you think would be best solved using that strategy. Justify your choices.70/bushel. The total yield of grain for both areas was 99 840 bushels. then the solution of the linear system will always be the same. 7. If Cam had invested the bond amount into the stock and the stock amount into the bond. b) Pose and solve a related problem. substitution.qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Page 439 21. This table shows the numbers of males and females in a study of colour blindness. For each strategy. and elimination to solve a linear system. Female Male Colour blind Total Total 12 14 98 88 186 100 Not colour blind 2 100 200 a) Use the data in the table to create a situation that can be modelled by a linear system. C 24. then solve two different systems of linear equations for which the coefficients and constant term in each equation differ by 3. One acre is 0. At the end of the year. The total loss for both investments was $84. the difference in consecutive coefficients and constant term is 3.35/bushel and the barley sold for $2. The wheat sold for $6. the stock had lost 10.5% and the bond had gained 3. he would have lost only $14. How much money did Cam invest in the stock and in the bond? 23. d) Use algebra to verify that when the coefficients and constant term in the linear equations differ by a constant in this way. A farmer in Saskatchewan harvested 1 section (which is 640 acres) of wheat and 2 sections of barley. Reflect You have used graphing. Would you have to write and solve a different linear system to determine the yield in bushels/hectare? Explain. Cam invested in a stock and a bond for one year. a) What was the yield of each section in bushels/acre? b) Some farmers use hectares instead of acres or sections to measure area.5%.

4 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations ■ In Lesson 7. 3x + y = 7 – You created equivalent equations by multiplying or dividing each term in an equation by a non-zero number. 2x – y = 3 Solve by graphing Solve by substitution Use graphing software. – You created an equivalent linear system by adding or subtracting the two equations in a linear system. = 3x + y 2x – y = 3 2 L. Substitute for x and y in each equation to check that the values satisfy the equations. Since the left side is equal to the right side for each equation. the solution is: x = 2 and y = 1 440 In Lesson 7. 3(2) + y = 7 x=2 3x + y = 7 6+y =7 y =1 Substitute for x in equation 1.S. = R.5 – You solved linear systems by using the elimination strategy.S. 1) 2 –2 4 x 5x = 10 6 Solve by elimination Substitute for x in equation 1. Add the equations to y = –3x + 7 eliminate y.qxd 12/7/09 4:59 PM Page 440 CHECKPOINT 2 Concept Development Connections ■ Linear System – You solved linear systems by using the substitution strategy. 3x + y = 7 1 3x + y = 7 1 a graphing calculator. Substitute for y 5x = 10 in equation 2. x=2 y 6 2x – y = 3 4 2x – (–3x + 7) = 3 2 0 5x – 7 = 3 (2.wncp10_7_5. or 2x – y = 3 2 2x – y = 3 2 grid paper. = 2x – y = 3(2) + 1 = 2(2) – 1 =7 =3 = R. Solve equation 1 for y. Solution: x = 2 and y = 1 3(2) + y = 7 6+y =7 y =1 Solution: x = 2 and y = 1 Verify the solution. .S. 3x + y = 7 1 L.S.

The larger volume contained 5. What was the volume of each solution? 7. The smaller volume contained 4. Solve each linear system by substitution.3x ϩ 0. One bond earned interest at an annual rate of 5.5y ϭ Ϫ0. a) Write a linear system to model this situation: A store sold Inukshuk replicas made with either 6 or 7 stones.75. During the school year.75 or a main course for $4.wncp10_7_5. b) Solve this problem: How many of each type of replicas were sold? 3. How can you check that your answers are correct? 95° y° 90° y° 60° x° 2x ° Checkpoint 2 441 . The total number of stones in all Inukshuit sold was 494. she bought either a bowl of soup for $1. The total interest earned was $50.5%.4 1.15 Ϫ0.5% acid. she spent $490 and bought 160 food items. Each time Trisha went to the school cafeteria.5 4. The other bond earned 4. Solve each linear system by elimination. The total volume of acid in both solutions was 100 mL. The volumes of two acid solutions differed by 1000 mL.qxd 12/7/09 5:00 PM Page 441 Assess Your Understanding 7.65 d) x ϩ 2y ϭ Ϫ2 Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 6 5. a) 5x ϩ y ϭ 4 xϩyϭ2 b) 3x Ϫ y ϭ 1 2x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 c) x y 9 ϩ ϭϪ 3 4 4 5x 3y 17 Ϫ ϭϪ 6 4 4 2.5x Ϫ 0.3y ϭ 0.5% per year. How much money was invested in each bond? 7. Determine the values of x and y in this diagram. 6. One thousand dollars was invested in two savings bonds for one year. 8 1 5 b) x ϩ y ϭ a) 3x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ11 3 6 3 Ϫx ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 1 3 17 xϪ yϭϪ 4 4 8 c) 0. How many times did Trisha buy soup? How many times did she buy a main course? Justify your answers.5% acid. The store sold 13 more Inukshuit made with 6 stones than those made with 7 stones.

What are our ages? Can Phil determine his grandparents’ ages given these clues? Why or why not? Construct Understanding THINK ABOUT IT Work in a group of 3. Add our two ages. Double this sum is 302. Each linear system below contains the equation: Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 2 Solve each linear system by graphing. Make Connections Phil was teased by his grandparents to determine their ages given these clues. The sum of our ages is 151. System 1 Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 2 2x ϩ y ϭ 2 System 2 Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 2 Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 4 System 3 Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 2 Ϫ4x ϩ 2y ϭ 4 Share your results with your group.6 5:03 PM Page 442 Properties of Systems of Linear Equations LESSON FOCUS Determine the numbers of solutions of different types of linear systems.wncp10_7_6.qxd 12/7/09 7. Use graphing technology if it is available. How many solutions does each linear system have? 442 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations .

7. the lines intersect at exactly one point. When lines coincide. there is only one solution: x ϭ Ϫ2 and y ϭ Ϫ1 Because the slopes of the lines are different. Ϫ1). Intersection X=-2 Y=-1 Here are the graphs of the linear system: Ϫ4x ϩ 2y ϭ 8 Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ2 How can you tell from the equations that the lines are parallel? The graphs do not intersect. Because the lines have equal slopes and the same y-intercept. So. So. they are coincident. Infinite means unlimited or without bound. We can graph a linear system to determine how many solutions it has. So. there is no solution. they are coincident lines. so all the points on the line are solutions. the lines are parallel. Because the slopes of the lines are equal.6 Properties of Systems of Linear Equations 443 .qxd 12/7/09 5:03 PM Page 443 All the linear systems you studied in earlier lessons have had exactly one solution.wncp10_7_6. every point on one line is also a point on the other line. ■ Here are the graphs of the linear system: 2x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 4x ϩ 2y ϭ Ϫ2 4 How can you tell from the equations that they represent the same line? y 2 –2 0 –2 –4 x 2 4 2x + y = –1 4x + 2y = –2 Since the graphs coincide. ■ ■ Here are the graphs of the linear system: x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ3 Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 3 The graphs intersect at (Ϫ2. there are infinite solutions.

so the lines are coincident and the linear system has infinite solutions. For equation 2: Ϫ2x Ϫ 2y ϭ 4 Add 2x to each side. [Answers: a) one solution b) infinite solutions c) no solution] a) x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ2 Ϫ2x Ϫ 2y ϭ 4 1 2 For equation 1: Subtract x from each side. 4 Ϫ2y 2x ϭ ϩ Ϫ2 Ϫ2 Ϫ2 y ϭ Ϫx Ϫ 2 4 Equation 4 is the same as equation 3. The slope-intercept forms of both equations are the same. CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING a) x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ2 Ϫ2x Ϫ 2y ϭ 4 1. 6y ϭ Ϫ4x Ϫ 10 Divide by 6 to solve for y. so the slope is Ϫ1 and the y-intercept is Ϫ2.wncp10_7_6. Ϫ2y ϭ 2x ϩ 4 Divide by Ϫ2 to solve for y. b) 4x ϩ 6y ϭ Ϫ10 Ϫ2x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ1 1 2 For equation 1: 4x ϩ 6y ϭ Ϫ10 Subtract 4x from each side. Determine the number of solutions of each linear system. b) 4x ϩ 6y ϭ Ϫ10 Ϫ2x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ1 a) x ϩ y ϭ 3 Ϫ2x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ2 c) 3x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 Ϫ6x Ϫ 2y ϭ 12 b) 4x ϩ 6y ϭ Ϫ10 Ϫ2x Ϫ 3y ϭ 5 SOLUTION c) 2x Ϫ 4y ϭ Ϫ1 3x Ϫ 6y ϭ 2 Write each equation in slope-intercept form to identify the slope and y-intercept of each line. 6y Ϫ4x 10 ϭ Ϫ 6 6 6 5 2 yϭϪ xϪ 3 3 3 2 5 The slope is Ϫ and the y-intercept is Ϫ .qxd 12/7/09 5:03 PM Example 1 Page 444 Determining the Number of Solutions of a Linear System Determine the number of solutions of each linear system. 3 3 444 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ2 y ϭ Ϫx Ϫ 2 3 The slope is Ϫ1 and the y-intercept is Ϫ2.

the lines intersect at exactly one point and the linear system has one solution. Multiply each side by Ϫ1 to solve for y. Because the slopes are different. Ϫ2y 6x 12 ϭ ϩ Ϫ2 Ϫ2 Ϫ2 y ϭ Ϫ3x Ϫ 6 4 The slope is Ϫ3 and the y-intercept is Ϫ6. Possible Solutions for a Linear System Intersecting Lines Parallel Lines Coincident Lines One solution No solution Infinite solutions y y 0 x 0 y x 0 x 7. Ϫy ϭ 2x Ϫ 1 y ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 1 4 The slope is Ϫ2 and the y-intercept is 1. there are only three possibilities. y ϭ Ϫ3x Ϫ 1 3 The slope is Ϫ3 and the y-intercept is Ϫ1. the lines are parallel and the linear system has no solution. For equation 2: Add 6x to each side. Ϫ6x Ϫ 2y ϭ 12 Ϫ2y ϭ 6x ϩ 12 Divide each side by Ϫ2 to solve for y.6 Properties of Systems of Linear Equations 445 . Why is it important to identify the y-intercepts when the equations in a linear system have the same slope? When you attempt to solve a linear system of two equations in two variables. Because the slopes are equal and the y-intercepts are different. c) 3x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 Ϫ6x Ϫ 2y ϭ 12 Why don’t you need to identify the y-intercepts to show there is only one solution? What is the solution? 1 2 For equation 1: 3x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ1 Subtract 3x from each side. You can determine the number of solutions using different methods.wncp10_7_6.qxd 12/7/09 5:03 PM Page 445 For equation 2: Ϫ2x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ1 Add 2x to each side.

The second line must also have slope 2. 1.wncp10_7_6. the lines must have different slopes so they can intersect. The lines must have equal slopes but different y-intercepts. write another linear equation that will form a linear system with: a) exactly one solution b) no solution SOLUTION a) For a linear system with one solution. Then its equation is: y ϭ 3x ϩ 2 A possible linear system with exactly one solution is: y ϭ 2x ϩ 4 y ϭ 3x ϩ 2 b) For a linear system with no solution. Write the given equation in slope-intercept form to identify its slope. or Infinite Solutions Given the equation Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 4. From part a. y ϭ 2x ϩ 4 The slope of the line is 2. the lines must be parallel but not coincident so there is no point of intersection.qxd 12/7/09 5:03 PM Example 2 Page 446 Creating a Linear System with 0. Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 4 Add 2x to each side. the given equation is equivalent to y ϭ 2x ϩ 4. Given the equation Ϫ6x ϩ y ϭ 3. write another linear equation that will form a linear system with: a) exactly one solution b) no solution c) infinite solutions CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING 2. Then its equation is: y ϭ 2x ϩ 5 A possible linear system with no solution is: y ϭ 2x ϩ 4 y ϭ 2x ϩ 5 446 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations c) infinite solutions [Sample Answers: a) y ϭ 2x ϩ 4 b) y ϭ 6x Ϫ 3 c) Ϫ12x ϩ 2y ϭ 6] . Let the second line have slope 3 and any y-intercept. with slope 2. such as 2. Let its y-intercept be 5.

The given equation is: Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 4 To determine an equivalent equation. 6x Ϫ 3y ϭ Ϫ12 A possible linear system with infinite solutions is: 6x Ϫ 3y ϭ Ϫ12 Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 4 Discuss the Ideas How is a linear system with infinite solutions like a linear system with no solution? How are the systems different? 1. (Ϫ3)(Ϫ2x) ϩ (Ϫ3)(y) ϭ (Ϫ3)(4) Simplify. the remains of which are in Iraq. One field produces 2 of a bushel per square unit while the other 3 1 field produces grain at the rate of of a bushel per square unit. multiply each term by a non-zero number. such as Ϫ3. The equations must be equivalent. Some of these problems are preserved on clay tablets.6 Properties of Systems of Linear Equations 447 .wncp10_7_6.qxd 12/7/09 5:03 PM Page 447 c) For a linear system with infinite solutions. a tablet dating from around 300 BCE contains a problem similar to this: Two fields have a total area of 1800 square units. How can you use the slopes of the lines in a linear system to determine the number of possible solutions? How can you use the intercepts? THE WORLD OF MATH Historical Moment: Linear Systems and the Babylonians Babylon was a city-state. The Babylonians had a superior knowledge of mathematics including the ability to solve problems that can be modelled by linear systems. Why do you get the equation of a coincident line when you multiply or divide each term of the equation of a linear function by a non-zero number? 3. What is the area of each field? How would you solve this problem? 7. the lines must be coincident so they intersect at every possible point. For example. 2. what strategies could you use to determine how many solutions it has? Use an example to explain. Without solving a linear system. 2 grain at the rate of The total yield is 1100 bushels.

5 2 C 0. Determine the number of solutions of each linear system.5 4 10. He noticed that the signs of the two slopes were different. For the linear system formed by each pair of equations. Use these 6 equations: 4x ϩ 2y ϭ 20 x Ϫ 3y ϭ 12 5x Ϫ 15y ϭ Ϫ60 2x ϩ y ϭ 10 6x ϩ 3y ϭ 5 2x Ϫ 6y ϭ 24 Write a linear system that has: a) no solution b) exactly one solution c) infinite solutions B 7. b) Identify two lines that form a linear system with no solution. Write a second equation so that each system has a different number of solutions.qxd 12/7/09 5:03 PM Page 448 Exercises A 4. a) Without graphing. Marc wrote the two equations in a linear system in slope-intercept form. Explain your reasoning. Two lines in a linear system have the same slope. . how many solutions are there? Explain your reasoning. 9. b) The second line does not intersect the line Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 1. y A C B x 0 a) Identify two lines that form a linear system with exactly one solution. The first equation of a linear system is given. The graphs of three lines are shown below.5 4 B Ϫ0. a) x ϩ 2y ϭ 6 b) 3x ϩ 5y ϭ 9 x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ2 6x ϩ 10y ϭ 18 x y 1 c) 2x Ϫ 5y ϭ 30 d) ϩ ϭ 2 3 2 4x Ϫ 10y ϭ 15 x y 1 ϩ ϭ 2 3 4 448 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations 8. c) The second line coincides with the line Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 1. Write a second equation to form a linear system that satisfies each condition. determine the slope of the graph of each equation. a) A and B b) A and C c) B and C Equation Slope y-intercept A Ϫ0. The table below shows some properties of the graphs of 3 linear equations. 6. Explain what you did for each system. 11. Use the equation 3x Ϫ 4y ϭ 12 as an equation in three different linear systems. a) The second line intersects the line Ϫ2x ϩ y ϭ 1 in the first quadrant. i) Ϫx ϩ y ϭ 5 ii) Ϫx Ϫ y ϭ 10 iii) Ϫ2x ϩ 2y ϭ 10 iv) x ϩ y ϭ 5 b) Which lines in part a are parallel? c) Which lines in part a intersect? 5. What information do you need to determine whether the linear system has no solution or infinite solutions? 12.wncp10_7_6. How many solutions will this linear system have? Explain.

There were 44 more people on Sunday than on Saturday. Use examples to explain why the only possible solutions of a linear system are: no solution. Prana has a savings account and a chequing account with a total balance of $85. b) Explain what happens when you try to solve the system using elimination. 13. Nadine has a cup of nickels and a cup of dimes. What are the masses of a large container and a small container? 18. Ax ϩ By ϭ C Dx ϩ Ey ϭ F 24. a) Write a linear system that has no solution. one solution.6 Properties of Systems of Linear Equations 449 . one solution. 7. What was the attendance for each day? 17. b) Explain what happens when you try to solve the system using elimination. or infinite solutions? 23. cost $5 for an adult and $3 for a student. You do not have to solve the problems. show that the system does not have exactly one solution. a) Write a linear system that has infinite solutions. i) 2x ϩ 3y ϭ 4 ii) 2x ϩ 3y ϭ 4 4x ϩ 6y ϭ 8 4x ϩ 6y ϭ 7 iii) 2x ϩ 3y ϭ 4 4x ϩ 5y ϭ 8 b) How can you compare corresponding coefficients to help you determine whether a system has no solution. Tickets for a guided tour of La Maison Gabrielle-Roy in Saint-Boniface. Manitoba. 1 kg 1 kg 1 kg 14. a) For what values of k does the linear system below have: i) exactly one solution? ii) infinite solutions? 5 1 xϩ yϭ2 2 3 5 kx ϩ y ϭ 3 2 b) Explain why there is no value of k for which the linear system has no solution. Justify your answer. or infinite points of intersection.qxd 12/7/09 5:03 PM Page 449 For questions 13 to 17. How much money does Prana have in each account? 16. His parents doubled the amount in each account and the new total balance is $170. In the linear system below. Use the terms “slope” and “y-intercept” to describe the conditions for two lines to have 0. The total attendance at a weekend Pow Wow was 568. How many coins are in each cup? 15. Given the graph of a linear system. no solution.wncp10_7_6. How many adults and how many students visited La Maison Gabrielle-Roy? Reflect 21. The total number of coins is 300 and their value is $23. 1 kg 1 kg 1 kg 1 kg 5 kg 20. Seventyfive tickets were sold for $275. 19. or infinite solutions. tell whether the linear system that models each problem has one solution. AE Ϫ DB ϭ 0.25. or infinite solutions. 1. a) Determine the number of solutions of each system. is it always possible to determine the number of solutions of the linear system? Use examples to explain your reasoning. C 22.

The solution of the new system is the same as the original system. or algebraic strategies. This means that: ■ Substituting (x. You can create an equivalent system by adding or subtracting the like terms in the equations of a linear system.qxd 12/7/09 5:07 PM Page 450 S T U DY G U I D E CONCEPT SUMMARY Big Ideas ■ Applying the Big Ideas A system of two linear equations is solved when the set of ordered pairs that satisfies both equations is determined. y) into the two equations of a linear system determines whether the ordered pair is a solution. ■ You can determine the number of solutions by graphing or by comparing the slopes and y-intercepts of the graphs of the linear equations. infinite solutions. or no solution. ■ A system of two linear equations may have one solution. The solution of the new system is the same as the original solution. 450 ■ How do you determine the number of solutions of a linear system? ■ What are some different strategies you can use to solve a linear system? ■ Reflect on the Chapter Why does multiplying or dividing each term in each equation or adding or subtracting the equations not change the solution of a linear system? Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . or adding or subtracting the equations produces an equivalent system. ■ You can create an equivalent system by multiplying or dividing each term in a linear equation by a constant. ■ Multiplying or dividing the equations in a linear system by a non-zero number.wncp10_BM. You can determine this solution using graphs.

6x ϭ Ϫ12 x ϭ Ϫ2 Substitute for x in equation 1. or their slopes and y-intercepts. 3. so there is exactly one solution. Draw the graphs after determining their intercepts. To solve a linear system algebraically: [7.2. 7. The coordinates of the point of intersection are the solution of the linear system. 1) –6 –4 –2 y 2x – y = –5 2 0 x 2 4 The solution is: x ϭ Ϫ2 and y ϭ 1 Solve a linear system algebraically. Add the equations.5] 2. Verify the solution by substituting the coordinates into the equations. Verify the solution by substituting for x and y in both equations to check that the coordinates of the point of intersection satisfy both equations. Use substitution or elimination.4. 7. Compare the slopes and y-intercepts of the lines.qxd 2/26/10 11:06 AM Page 451 SKILLS SUMMARY Skill Description Example Solve a linear system by graphing. so there is no solution: 2x ϩ 4y ϭ 6 4x ϩ 8y ϭ 10 Study Guide 451 . To solve a linear system by graphing: For this linear system: 2x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ5 4x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ7 [7. use Step 1 or Step 2: [7. The graphs of the linear system below have the same slope and the same y-intercept. 2(Ϫ2) Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ5 yϭ1 The solution is: x ϭ Ϫ2 and y ϭ 1 The graphs of the linear system above have different slopes.3] 1. Compare the graphs of the equations. For this linear system: 2x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ5 1 4x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ7 2 Use elimination. 1. 6 4x + y = –7 (–2. 2.6] 2. 1.wncp10_BM. so there are infinite solutions: 2x ϩ 4y ϭ 6 4x ϩ 8y ϭ 12 The graphs of the linear system below have the same slope and different y-intercepts. To determine the number of solutions in a linear system. Determine the number of solutions of a linear system.

10) and (–2. George and Sunita started with different steps: Ϫx ϩ 4y ϭ 10 1 4x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ10 2 George’s Method Equation 1: plot (0.95t ϩ 5. 1. a) The situation is: In 2009.1 7.5. Yvette made $475 by clearing snow from 25 driveways. Justify your choice. To solve the linear system below by graphing. . 4x Ϫ 2y ϭ 1 3x Ϫ 4y ϭ 16 b) Tell whether the solution is exact or approximate.) 3. One weekend. Solution B: teams from Saskatchewan have won 12 times and teams from outside Saskatchewan have won 29 times.2 For questions 1 and 2. 2. x Ϫ y ϭ 15 2x ϩ y ϭ 6 7. She charges $15 for a small driveway and $25 for a large driveway.wncp10_BM. Explain how you would solve this linear system by graphing on grid paper. 4. held its 41st annual basketball tournament. Saskatchewan.5 4 Equation 2: graph y ϭ 4x ϩ 10 a) Explain what each student will probably do next. create a linear system to model the situation. Teams from outside Saskatchewan have won the tournament 17 more times than teams from Saskatchewan. 0) Sunita’s Method 1 Equation 1: graph y ϭ x ϩ 2.50p ϭ 76. a) The situation is: Yvette operates a snow-blowing business. then identify which is the correct solution for the related problems.qxd 12/7/09 5:07 PM Page 452 REVIEW 7. 0) Equation 2: plot (0. b) The related problems are: How many small driveways did Yvette clear? How many large driveways did she clear? (Solution A: Yvette cleared 10 small driveways and 15 large driveways. and how you know. the Bedford Road Invitational Tournament (BRIT) in Saskatoon. Solution B: Yvette cleared 15 small driveways and 10 large driveways. b) Choose either method.) 2. 6. Kyle wrote this linear system to model a problem he created about the cost of tickets and popcorn for a group of people to go to a movie theatre. You do not have to draw the graphs. a) Which linear system is modelled by this graph? Explain how you know. Solve the linear system by graphing. a) Graph to solve this linear system.5) and (–10. b) The related problems are: How many times have teams from Saskatchewan won the BRIT? How many times have teams from outside Saskatchewan won the BRIT? (Solution A: teams from Saskatchewan have won 29 times and teams from outside Saskatchewan have won 12 times. What problem might he have written? 9.20 tϪpϭ3 452 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations 6 y 4 2 –2 0 x 2 6 8 b) What is the solution of the linear system? Is it exact or approximate? How do you know? 5.

3 b) Solve this related problem: How many measures of each size did Paul use? 13. Solve each linear system by substitution. What does each line in the graph represent? c) Solve this related problem: How much sodium is in 1 bowl of cereal and in 1 slice of bacon? Is the solution exact or approximate? How could you find out? 9. a) x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ5 x ϩ 3y ϭ Ϫ15 b) 7x ϩ y ϭ 10 3x Ϫ 2y ϭ Ϫ3 5 1 c) x ϩ 3y ϭ 2 6 16 1 x Ϫ 5y ϭ 3 9 d) 0.6x Ϫ 0.07y ϭ 0. Natalie ate 1 bowl of cereal and 3 slices of bacon that contained a total of 620 mg of sodium.2y ϭ Ϫ0.3 8.wncp10_BM. 1 a) 2x ϩ 3y ϭ 13 b) y ϭ x Ϫ 2 6 5x Ϫ 2y ϭ 1 1 yϭϪ xϩ2 6 x 3y 25 c) 4x Ϫ 5y ϭ 20 d) ϩ ϭ Ϫ 2 4 16 8x ϩ 5y ϭ 19 Ϫ2x ϩ 4y ϭ 20 7. b) Write a linear system to model the situation. a) Why did Laura multiply equation 1 by 4 and equation 2 by 6 before she solved this linear system? 3 1 1 Ϫ xϪ yϭϪ 1 2 4 2 1 5 19 xϩ yϭ 2 3 6 3 b) Why will the new linear system have the same solution as the original system? c) Solve the linear system.2 Ϫ0. When the same tables are placed side by side. a) Draw a diagram of the first 3 tables to illustrate each arrangement. a) Write a linear system to model this situation: Table salt contains 40% sodium.03x Ϫ 0.17 11. b) This graph represents a linear system for the situation in part a. 4 3 1 Paul used 1 more cup measure than 4 2 cup measure. Use graphing technology to solve each linear system. and health experts recommend that people limit their sodium intake. He measured 5 cups of flour 4 2 1 using a cup measure and a cup measure.4 10.qxd 12/7/09 5:07 PM Page 453 7. c) Solve the linear system to solve this related problem: What is the width and length of each table? Review 453 . Owen ate 2 bowls of cereal and 4 slices of bacon that contained a total of 940 mg of sodium. their perimeter is 306 ft. When 30 identical rectangular tables are placed end to end. For breakfast. 12. a) Write a linear system to model this situation: Paul made bannock to celebrate National 3 Aboriginal Day. their perimeter is 190 ft.

b) Identify the numbers using the clues that are sufficient.5x ϩ y ϭ 0. a) Write a linear system to model the situation above.wncp10_BM. a) In the linear system below. The key in one type of basketball court has the shape of a rectangle and a semicircle. Verify that you are correct. 3x Ϫ 4y ϭ 8. 454 Chapter 7: Systems of Linear Equations . a) Write two linear systems where one system has infinite solutions and the other system has no solution. Clue 3: The sum of the two numbers is 57. with 5 perimeter approximately 68 ft. The length of the 6 rectangular part of the key is 7 ft. the difference is 99. Grace and Olivia have 2-digit numbers on their hockey jerseys. When you divide each number by 3 then add the quotients. b) How can you use graphs to show the number of solutions of each linear system? c) How can comparing the slope-intercept forms for the equations in the linear system help you determine the number of solutions? 19. a) Explain how calculating the slopes of the graphs of the equations of a linear system helps you determine whether the system has only 1 solution. longer than its width.5 15. 17. 20. How many triangles and how many squares were in the design? 7. Forty percent of the triangles and 60% of the squares were blue. Solve each system by elimination.6 18. Clue 1: The difference between the two numbers is 33.6 6x Ϫ 3y ϭ 15 21.5 2 b) What would be your next step in solving the linear system? c) Solve the linear system. a) Ϫ3x Ϫ y ϭ 5 b) 2x Ϫ 4y ϭ 13 2x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ5 4x Ϫ 5y ϭ 8 16. When you triple each player’s number then subtract.qxd 12/7/09 5:07 PM Page 454 14. Determine the number of solutions for each linear system. Clue 2: The sum of the two numbers is 57. the sum is 20. Sofia sketched a design for a blanket. b) Are the slopes of the graphs sufficient information to help you distinguish between a system that has no solution and a system that has infinite solutions? Use an example to explain. what are the length and the width of the rectangular part? 7. Use an example to explain. a) Which clues do not provide sufficient information to identify the two numbers? Explain.5 1 4x ϩ 2y ϭ 9. They wrote three sets of clues to help some friends identify these numbers. which number would you multiply one equation by to help you eliminate y in the next step? Explain. Eighty-three of the shapes were blue. Describe the strategies you used. b) Solve this related problem: To the nearest foot.3 d) 2x Ϫ y ϭ Ϫ5 Ϫx ϩ 2y ϭ 0. She made the design with 150 shapes that were equilateral triangles and squares. Their difference is 33. 3 1 1 a) Ϫx ϩ 5y ϭ 8 b) Ϫ x ϩ y ϭ Ϫ 2 4 4 2x Ϫ 10y ϭ 7 y 1 3 xϪ ϭ 4 8 8 c) 0.

a) Solve each linear system. x ϩ y ϭ 3 2 6 1 1 1 xϩ yϭ 6 4 6 3. B. y ϭ 3x Ϫ 2 y ϭ 3x ϩ 2 B.25 2 2 A. He wrote this linear system to model the situation. 6. b) Solve this related problem: How many squares and how many triangles were used? Practice Test 455 . and red right triangles. The design used 90 shapes and covered an area of 1500 cm2.6y ϭ Ϫ1. b) Solve your problem. the new system will have the same solution as the original system. Show how you know your solution is correct.5y ϭ 0.2 Ϫx ϩ 0.3x Ϫ 0. Use the linear systems in question 2 as examples to help you explain why a linear system may have no solution.5x ϩ 0.2y ϭ Ϫ1 0. B.wncp10_BM.5 1 y Ϫx ϩ ϭ Ϫ1.05 1 1 1 D.50 sϪaϭ4 a) Write a problem that can be modelled by the linear system above. C. 4. The solution of the linear system is: x ϭ 1 and y ϭ Ϫ0. If you multiply equation 1 by 3. 5. each with area 25 cm2.75s ϩ 2.50a ϭ 15.8 4 1 iii) x Ϫ y ϭ 3 3 5 1 3 xϩ yϭ 6 2 2 b) Use one linear system from part a to explain the meaning of the point of intersection of the graphs of the equations of a linear system. choose the correct answer: A. a) Write a linear system to model this situation: A stained glass design was made of yellow squares. Liam created a problem about a group of students and adults planning to travel on the Light Rail Transit (LRT) in Calgary. each with area 12. There is one solution because the slopes of the lines are different.qxd 12/7/09 5:07 PM Page 455 PRACTICE TEST For questions 1 and 2. you can eliminate x. then add the new equation to equation 2. D. 1.75 2. If you replace equation 2 with 4x Ϫ 2y ϭ Ϫ5. or D 1. exactly one solution. C. y ϭ 3x Ϫ 2 y ϭ Ϫ4x ϩ 5 C.5 cm2. i) Ϫ3x Ϫ 4y ϭ Ϫ2 x ϩ 2y ϭ 3 ii) Ϫ0. or infinite solutions. Which system has exactly one solution? A. 4x Ϫ 2y ϭ Ϫ0. Alberta. Which statement below is true for this linear system? 3x Ϫ 2y ϭ 4.

qxd 12/7/09 6:39 PM Page 456 PROJECT R E L AT I O N S A N D F U N C T I O N S E x e rc i s Ramp d a n d B o d y e M i n It Up! C ross training involves varying the types of exercises you do in each workout. for three physical activities. For example. you might run and lift weights in one workout. Activity Mass (kg) Rate of Energy Use (Cal/h) Mass (kg) Rate of Energy Use (Cal/h) Mass (kg) Rate of Energy Use (Cal/h) Mass (kg) Rate of Energy Use (Cal/h) Stationary bike 50 350 60 420 70 490 80 560 Swimming 50 400 60 480 70 560 80 640 Walking uphill 50 300 60 360 70 420 80 480 ■ 456 Relations and Functions Project Choose one physical activity from the table. Swimming: energy used – 480 Calories per hour Stationary bike: energy used – 420 Calories per hour PART A: INVESTIGATING RELATIONS This table shows the approximate rate at which energy is used. Use graphing technology if it is available.Project3. Graph the ordered pairs. then swim in the next workout. in Calories per hour. to use different muscles and different amounts of energy. The rate at which energy is used is related to the mass of the person doing the activity. Write four ordered pairs for this activity. Is there a linear relationship between mass and the rate at which energy is used? How do you know? .

■ Alex has a mass of 60 kg. Determine the rate at which energy is used in Calories per unit time. Create a linear system to represent this situation. 457 . calorie. Many linear relations have been discovered during these studies. ■ Investigate other linear relations related to exercise. Use the slope-intercept form of the equation. graphing. and physical activities. and kilocalorie. much research has been conducted in these areas. ■ Conduct investigations. Use the linear system to solve this problem: How much time did Alex spend on each activity? PART B: INVESTIGATING OTHER LINEAR RELATIONS ■ Do some research about other physical activities that are not listed in the table in Part A. ■ Write an equation to represent the relation between mass and the rate at which energy is used for each of the other activities in the table. and so on. along with explanations of your strategies for solving the problems ■ A display of the graphs that you made. ■ Use your equations to create a table of values for a mass that is not listed in the table above. Explain what you did. linear systems. create situations. nutrition. points of intersection. PROJECT PRESENTATION Your completed project can be presented in a written or an oral format but should include: ■ A list of investigations you conducted. then pose problems that involve: linear relations or functions. He used 345 Calories in 45 min by riding a stationary bike followed by a swim. the situations you created. including an explanation of how and why you created them and how you interpreted them EXTENSION Because exercise and nutrition play an important role in the health of people.qxd 12/7/09 6:39 PM Page 457 ■ Write an equation to represent the relation between mass and the rate at which energy is used. You might use an internet search using key words such as: joule. ■ Write a brief report on the linear relations you discovered and how you know they are linear. kilojoule. and the problems you posed. ■ Identify different types of energy and how they are measured.Project3.

A tree is supported by a set of four guy wires. and the volume to the nearest cubic unit. a) 290 cm to feet and the nearest inch b) 5 yd. to the nearest centimetre c) 8 km to miles and the nearest yard d) 6500 in.qxd 12/7/09 6:20 PM Page 458 CUMULATIVE REVIEW 1 1. 458 7. to the nearest metre e) 82 000 mm to feet and the nearest inch f) 16 mi. 7 in. The radius of the circle is 21 in.Math10_CumReview 1-7. An equilateral triangle is inscribed in a circle. calculate the surface area to the nearest square unit. a) Write each radical in simplest form.5 m above the ground. a) 14a3b2 Ϫ 28b3c2 ϩ 21a2c3 ϭ 7b2(2a3 Ϫ 4bc2 ϩ 3a2c3) b) n2 Ϫ n Ϫ 12 ϭ (n ϩ 4)(n Ϫ 3) c) 36r2 Ϫ 64s2 ϭ (6r ϩ 8s)(6r Ϫ 8s) d) 6m2 ϩ 23m Ϫ 18 ϭ (6m Ϫ 9)(m ϩ 2) e) w2 Ϫ 22wx ϩ 121x2 ϭ (w ϩ 11x)2 f) 30c2 ϩ 11cd Ϫ 30d 2 ϭ (5c Ϫ 5d)(6c ϩ 6d) 4 9 cm Ί Ί i) Ί 45 ii) 3 128 iii) 4 932 iv) Ί 539 b) Write each mixed radical as an entire radical. a) (9 ϩ s)(9 ϩ s) b) (3a Ϫ 5)(2a Ϫ 3) c) (2n ϩ 3p)(5n Ϫ 4p) d) (8s Ϫ t)(8s ϩ t) e) (w ϩ 4)(Ϫ2w2 ϩ 7w Ϫ 8) f) (4 ϩ 3x Ϫ 2x2)(Ϫ2 ϩ 2x ϩ 3x2) 6. To the nearest tenth of a degree. Find and correct the errors in each factorization. Show your work. 21 in. Simplify. c) sphere Chapters 1–7 4. calculate the measure of the angle of inclination of a guy wire. a) (aϪ1bϪ2)2(a4bϪ1) c) 13x 3yzϪ2 Ϫ52xϪ2 y 4z 2 b) ± Ϫ2 11 c d c 4 d Ϫ4 ≤ Ϫ 1 Ϫ d) 1 3 Ϫ18a 2 bϪ5 5 Ϫ3 3a 2 b . Determine the side length of the triangle to the nearest tenth of an inch. The guy wires are attached to the tree at a height of 4. to the nearest hundredth of a kilometre 2. a) right square pyramid 10 cm 12 cm b) right cone 18 in. Convert each measurement. For each object. 3 5. Chapters 1–7 5 iii) 2 Ί 15 iv) 5Ί 17 8. 2 Ί i) 12Ί 3 ii) 3 3 7 3. All the guy wires are anchored to the ground at points 3 m from the base of the tree. Expand and simplify.

a) The older student is shorter. Graph A 1. Evaluate.064)3 (0. a) Explain why the table of values below represents a function. b) The student with the lesser mass has longer hair. Graph D Distance to Yoshi’s home 6:20 PM Distance to Yoshi’s home 12/7/09 Height (cm) Math10_CumReview 1-7. He has a snack. These graphs give information about two students. a) After playing basketball in the park. d) Write an equation for this function in function notation.064)(0. This table represents a relation. v 190 Hair Length against Mass Distance to Yoshi’s home 5 3 Length of hair (cm) 9.36 b) Identify the independent variable and the dependent variable.27 4 4. c) Write the domain and range.Page 459 1 3 3 3 a) a b a b 4 4 5 c) ≥ aϪ b 6 Ϫ b) (Ϫ3. then goes back to the park on his skateboard. 13. Describe a possible situation for the graph. C ($) 1 170 A Graph B Time Time Graph C Distance to Yoshi’s home Volume of Gasoline (L). Show your work.18 3 3. 7 2 Height against Age 11 Ϫ 2 (Ϫ3. 2.qxd Time Time b) Choose one of the graphs in part a that did not describe Yoshi’s journey. Justify your choices. What does this number represent? f) Determine the value of v when C(v) ϭ 50. Which graph best matches this situation? Explain your choice. d) The shorter student has the lesser mass. c) The older student has longer hair. e) Determine the value of C(25). b) Represent this relation as: i) a set of ordered pairs ii) an arrow diagram 11.5) 12.09 2 150 0 Cost.064)3 11 3 (0. Cumulative Review 459 .064) 5 10. What does this number represent? B 15 17 19 Age (years) 20 B A 10 0 40 60 80 Mass (kg) Which statements are true? Justify your answers.5) 1 8 4 ¥ d) 8 5 (0. Name Sport Perdita Felicien track Donovan Bailey track Nancy Greene skiing Annamay Pierse swimming Justin Morneau baseball Steve Nash basketball a) Describe the relation in words. Yoshi walks home.

S(1. A student said that the equation of this line is 1 y ϭ x Ϫ 3. Determine the domain and range of the graph of each function. 6). What does it represent? c) Identify the domain and range. N(0. 1). D(1. Ϫ4). K(9. 3) and M(3. or neither? Justify your choice. Are the two lines parallel. Q(2. 7) d) G(2. a) W(Ϫ3. F(Ϫ5. Describe what this point represents. 3) with each given slope. create a table of values when necessary. 2). Write the coordinates of the point where the graph intersects the axis. 3) and C(6. 5). n. The coordinates of two points on two different lines are given. How did you determine these points? 2 3 a) 2 b) Ϫ3 c) d) Ϫ 4 5 15. Ϫ6) and E(Ϫ2. Ϫ5). Ϫ3) 16. a) b) y y 2 y = f(x) 2 x –3 2 0 y = g(x) x 3 –2 –2 6 17. who attend. i) y ϭ x Ϫ 5 1 ii) y ϭ x Ϫ 5 3 3 iii) y ϭ Ϫ x Ϫ 5 2 iv) y ϭ Ϫ4x Ϫ 5 b) Each equation in part a is written in the form y ϭ mx Ϫ 5. d) What is the cost when 50 people attend the birthday party? e) How many people can attend the party for a cost of $675? 460 Chapters 1–7 20. Ϫ3). how does it affect the graph? C 900 C = f(n) 600 300 0 10 20 30 40 n 50 a) Determine the vertical intercept. a) Graph these equations on the same grid without using a table of values.qxd 12/7/09 6:20 PM Page 460 14. Draw the line through P(Ϫ1.Math10_CumReview 1-7. The cost. 2) and P(5. 8) b) J(3. This graph shows the cost for a banquet room rented for a birthday party. is a function of the number of people. i) y ϭ 4 ii) y ϭ Ϫ2x ϩ 1 2 iv) x ϭ 2 iii) y ϭ x Ϫ 2 v) x ϩ 2y ϭ 6 vi) x Ϫ y2 ϭ 1 b) Which equations in part a represent linear relations? How do you know? 18. H(2. Ϫ1) c) R(Ϫ3. 19. Are there any restrictions? Explain. perpendicular. Ϫ4). When you change the value of m. b) Determine the rate of change. X(8. a) For each equation. Write the coordinates of 3 other points on each line. then graph the relation. 2 y 2 –2 0 y = f(x) x 3 –2 a) What mistakes did the student make? b) What is the correct equation of the line? . C dollars.

i) 7x ϩ y ϩ 14 ϭ 0 ii) 2x Ϫ 5y Ϫ 20 ϭ 0 b) What is the slope of each line in part a? What strategy did you use? 24. Tickets for the school play cost $8 for an adult and $5 for a student. 31. A store sells a 1-L can of paint for $9. Use an elimination strategy to solve each linear system. describe when each form may be the best representation. The total mark possible for the exam was 108. 26. 27. Subtract the products.40. 23. b) What will Loretta’s weekly earnings be when she works 35 h? c) For how many hours did Loretta work when her weekly pay was $718? d) Can Loretta earn exactly $600 in one week? Explain.Math10_CumReview 1-7.and y-intercepts of each graph. 5 3 2 i) y ϭ x Ϫ ii) y ϩ 4 ϭ (x Ϫ 1) 4 5 3 b) For each of the 3 forms of the equation of a linear relation. for a total selling price of $2206. then determine the x. a) For each line. What are the two numbers? Problem 2 The sum of two numbers is 40. Loretta works as a cook in northern Saskatchewan. Arne scored 87. How many marks was each part worth? 29. write an equation in slope-point form. Explain why Problem 1 has no solution and Problem 2 has infinite solutions. a) Use intercepts to graph each equation. Write a linear system that models this situation.5% on part A of a math exam and 75% on part B of this exam. What are the two numbers? Cumulative Review 461 . 22. Add the quotients. a) Write an equation that relates d and t. Explain what you did for each system. The total revenue for one performance was $1122. Write the second equation so that each system has a different number of solutions.2 28. Problem 1 The difference between two numbers is 75. b) Solve the linear system in part a by graphing. Divide each number by 2. Triple each number. 7 25.qxd 12/7/09 6:20 PM Page 461 21.80.60 and a 4-L can of paint for $20. His total mark for the exam was 87. The difference is 200. Use 5x ϩ 3y ϭ 15 as an equation in 3 different linear systems. a) Write each equation in general form. with 32 more students than adults in the audience. i) ii) y y = f(x) –2 0 y 4 x 4 2 –2 –4 6 –2 0 y = g(x) x 2 –2 b) Write each equation in part a in slope-intercept form. She is paid $14 an hour plus $200 a week for working in a remote location. 5 4 4 xϩ yϭ7 2 3 9 1. a) Write a linear system that models this situation. Let t represent the time in hours Loretta works each week and let d represent her weekly pay in dollars. The sum is 20. a) 4x Ϫ 3y ϭ 10 b) 3x ϩ 4y ϭ 1 6x ϩ 2y ϭ 11 2x Ϫ 6y ϭ Ϫ21 30.5x Ϫ 4. The store has 140 cans of paint.8y ϭ 1. Use graphing technology to solve this linear system.

Sidney b) $18. a) 55. page 22 Answers will vary depending on the conversion ratios used. 2 in. = 4 yd. No. 11. a) Michael 13. 20. a) 40. a) CN Tower: approximately 1815 ft. b) 4 rolls 7. Chapter 1: Checkpoint 1. 9 in. b) $197.5 cm c) 9. 2 mi. d) 93 mi.8 mm 5. a) 101 in. Answers may vary. 1 ft. 8. 10 in.3 m c) 111 m. 1062 ft.9 m 1. 144 sections of casing 28 in. For example: a) Foot b) Inch c) Foot d) Inch e) Mile 9. c) 11 yd. 18. Calipers cannot be used for large measures. 8. 3. a) Chapter 1 Measurement.59 16. 13. 16. of laminate b) 122 cm d) 273 yd. 8. 703 yd. a) 10 560 ft.99 4.82 11. ii) 3 yd. 10 ft. a) 132 in. 9 in. 10. 1 ft. 17.4 Surface Areas of Right Pyramids and Right Cones.1 Imperial Measures of Length. = 7 yd.7.5 km e) 9. 100. Answers may vary. a) 896 cm 2 9. a) $351 000 22. Calipers require a steady hand to ensure an accurate reading.6 m d) 1. iii) 6 mi. page 25 3. a) 36 in. Tennessee River 10.6 m 462 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . Answers will vary depending on the conversion ratios c) $49. 165 in. c) 84 in.2 m 8. 62 mi. 9 in. 4. 1 ft. 15. 2 ft. a) 168 in. c) 1 mi.Customer Support b) 7008 ft. 2 b) 628 yd. a) 26 yd. approximately 8 cm 7 homes a) Approximately 65 hectares b) Approximately 259 hectares b) CN Tower 14. page 34 2 b) 220 cm 2 2 b) 294 cm 2 b) 1649 cm 2 b) 2356 cm 4.. 2 6. 10 in. 4. 9 in. 27 tulip bulbs 19. 21 ft. a) 14 yd. $158 400 000 1. f) 5 ft. page 11 3. e) 330.2 Math Lab: Measuring Length and Distance. 2 . page 2 i) 2 ft. 9. a) Inch 5. 6 in.7 km f) 50. c) 1 mi. 3 in. a) 1. 18. 1 ft. page 15 2 5.9 cm b) 256. 1 ft. 2 ft. 12. a) 151 in. = 17 yd.6 m by 54. a) 52 ft.96 15. Yes.2 m c) 4. 364 ft. b) 8 ft. c) 4 ft. 6. 427 yd.6 cm b) 1. 1. b) 189 ft. a) 39 ft. b) 5280 yd. 17. a) 24 mats Willis Tower: approximately 442. 142 km is close to 87 mi.3 Relating SI and Imperial Units. 80 yd. used. a) The warehouse 12. The odometer is accurate. a) 1 in. For example: a) Foot 7. a) $119. 2 7. b) 15 yd. 14. 1:2 349 000 21.

I assumed the hides had equal areas.33 c) Approximately 7 in.7 m 21.10. 3 3 12. 16. 2 3 7. a) 18 m 2 b) 168 yd.6 m 17.3 m 3 13. 1520 cm 2 13. a) 2261. a) Right square pyramid and right cone b) Right rectangular prism 18. 0.7 cm 2 3 b) 34. 8.2 m 11. a) 69.2 cm 14.9 cm 10.94 2 12. a) 5 in. a) b) 640 ft.0 mm 3 b) 268 m b) 7. 2. 3 b) 50 yd. 15. 188 ft. 5. 2 16.0 cm 3 b) 2948. page 42 4. a) 193.9 m 20.9 cm b) $11. The Louvre 2 19. 3 b) 1920 ft. 3 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) 87 m b) 176 ft. 3 6. b) 441. a) 288 yd.0 m . a) 1. 3 3 3 b) 231. 61 ft.Customer Support 463 . 2 2 14. a) 524 cm 2 11. 923 285 ft. a) 1571 cm 3 b) 804 m 3 b) $3. a) 37. a) 96 yd.5 Volumes of Right Pyramids and Right Cones. 3 3 9.

4 m 2 2 b) 1387 cm . 18.0 m 3 18. a) Approximately 69% 15. 82. 2 d) 314 in.4 kL 21.3 cm . a) Inflated balloon's circumference is 3 times greater b) Inflated balloon's surface area is 9 times greater c) Inflated balloon's volume is 27 times greater 3 b) 3.0 m .3 m 3 Chapter 1: Checkpoint 2. c) 15.0 cm 4. a) 314 cm c) 201 ft. a) 339 m .7 Solving Problems Involving Objects. 5 9. SA = πd . 3 b) 109. a) Object in part c 8. 12 in. 886. 24.9 kL 2 b) 21 m 2 b) 10.21. 20.7 cm 7.6 m . Approximately 5 in.4 cm 2 1. b) 8. 49. a) 5 in. 425 m d) 7. V = πd 6 23. a) 9. a) 170 cm c) 95 in. a) 784 m b) 12. a) b) Assumptions: Ball is created from one solid piece and has greatest possible diameter. 2. 239 spheres 2 16.5 km b) 17 m 3 1. 3.2 cm 2 2 2 b) Approximately 38 in. a) 4. Approximately 1 082 696 932 000 km . 10 yd. 42 pumps 20. 3 approximately 1 093 440 264 000 km 15.5 m c) 3. c) No. a) 11 cm. a) 15 cm b) 23 cm 1. 19. a) 80 ft.6 m b) 2. a) 973. a) 273. 353. a) 22.5 m 4 6. a) Hemisphere b) Hemisphere 2 12. 434 in. 3 2 3 5. 277 in. b) 6. or 2204 mL 3 .5 cm 3 22. 3 3 b) 6 m 3 c) 1947 m 5. a) b) 2065 kL 2 13. 45 cookies 464 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 3 b) 1. page 59 3 d) 92 cm 2 3 2 2 5. 3. 3 7. 452 m 3 b) 191 yd.8 m 16. 191 yd. 5 in. page 54 2 3 17. 1 3 2 22. 7946 cm 2 d) 99 cm 3 3 4.3 cm 7. 401 ft. a) 41 ft.7 m c) 17.7 m.7 cm c) 1127 m 2 2. . 3 d) Basketball 2 17. 529. 2854.2 m 19. a) 2.3 m 2 b) Approximately 16. page 51 2 2 3.Customer Support 2 b) 2413 cm 3 c) 6612 cm 3 d) Approximately 2204 cm .1 L b) 8 cups 11. 4. a) 524 cm c) 268 ft. a) 511 185 933 km 2 b) 357 830 153 km 3 c) 1 086 781 293 000 km 3 d) 1 078 037 876 000 km 3 14.4 cm 2 3. 3 c) 4855 cm .1 km .6 Surface Area and Volume of a Sphere. 882. a) 16. 183 in.0 cm . there is also some air inside the tea bag.7 m b) 1040 ft.4 cm 10. 2 2 b) 32 m 2 3 6. 2482.

page 75 6 7 3 tan D = 2 5 tan H = 4 5 tan K = 7 14° 68° 27° 61° 3. 2 3 4. 5810 ft. 11. a) 8 2 b) 173 in. 125.0 cm b) 6.2 cm 3 3 3 b) 133 m .3 cm 2 b) 647.8 km c) 48. b) Foot c) 75 in. 3 3 d) 221 mm c) 5. 19. 3 in. . 320 in. 382 in.7 cm 9.3 2 3 a) 480 cm . 12. b) 136 yd. 21. 12 cm b) Square-based bin 18. 4 c) Yard 3. a) tan A = b) b) 2.Customer Support 465 . a) b) 8822 in. 2 2 12. B 2. 23. 10. tan C = b) 51° d) 87° b) 45° d) 69° ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 2 3 b) 108 ft. a) 42 ft. b) 1527 ft. 28. 4. 84 ft. d) 1 ft. For example: a) Inch a) 763 ft. a) 26. a) 2. 5 Approximately 98 cm3 523 in. a) 12. 5. 27. tan J = 5 7 .9 mm Answers will vary depending on the conversion ratio used. Approximately 26. 3 15.8 m 3 5. b) 8800 yd.3 3 8. 25. 9.1 The Tangent Ratio. 144 m 3 b) 15 in. 10 2 13.2 m . The volume of the right cylinder is 3 times the volume of the right cone. 8. 3 3 10. . 2 used. 3 in. or 8 yd. 24. 1215. Answers will vary depending on the conversion ratios used. a) 1060 in. 2 in. tan M = 5 .8 cm Chapter 2 Trigonometry. b) 85 cm 2 2 c) 898 mm d) 192 m 2 160 yd. a) 8 ft.2 m 3 b) 6 in. a) 11 m 3 c) 7 ft. page 67 1. 2 b) 11 878 cm b) 10 mm Chapter 1: Practice Test. by 15 in. 670 750 strides 2 2 a) 75 ft.1 m 2 11.0 m c) 2 c) 6 m 7 in. a) 254 in. by 12 in. C 3. a) 69. 1 in. Answers will vary depending on the conversion ratios 7. 93 cm 16.3 cm 2 b) 24.8 cm 2 14. c) 3 mi. Chapter 1: Review.3 cm . 7 in.4 m 13. c) 1820 in. 2 ft. 2 ft. 8 in. b) 2. No. a) 856.. a) A ruler with inches marked 6. Answers may vary. approximately 132. 595 cm 3 a) 113 981 cm a) 8 cm 3 22. tan F = 3 4 . 1 ft.3 cm d) 215.5 m b) 6. a) 1300. 1282 yd. a) c) 7 6 2 . 6. a) 24 in. page 68 2. page 64 1. d) 4. d) 3 yd. a) Circular-based bin 17.2 m 2 20.

or 1 10 c) 2. 20.7°. QRS = 53. 40. a) tan 60° > 1 b) tan 30° < 1 8. 22° a) 19.8 cm 5. QPT = SPT = 56. 2 2 3 4 5 b) 1 100 .6 cm e) b) 4. 22.6° ˙ ˙ iii) G = 63. QRT = SRT = 26. b) ii) D = 63.2 cm d) b) 2. a) 36. a) 5.4° b) 68. Approximately 30 m 11.1° c) 20. 69. 25° 18.Customer Support b) 3.4° 16.4 cm 2 12.3°.4° . a) Approximately 38.4°.8 cm c) 2.6°. page 82 3. 187 m f) 9. RQT = RST = 63.6° ˙ ˙ 14. assuming the balloon is directly over the store 15. a) 3. The side opposite the acute angle has the same length as the side adjacent to the angle.2°. Y = Z = 64. PQR = PSR = 97. Approximately 60 m 14.4° 11. a) 7. PTQ = PTS = QTR = RTS = 90. or .0° b) 49. X = 50. Sketches will vary.4°. R = PQS = 22. . 1 1 1 1 1 23.5 cm 4. a) 11° c) 6° b) 14° d) 9° 12.4 cm c) 5.8 m 7.9° ˙ ˙ 22. P = RQS = 67. a) There is no least possible value. Approximately 58 m. the tangent can be arbitrarily close to zero. Whitehorse 13. PQT = PST = 33.0°. a) 2. For example: 17.6 cm b) 10. 146° 20.5°.0 cm d) 7. a) 1.6°. QR = SR = 6. 22° 15. B = 63. 3.3 cm 13.7 cm ˙ ˙ 16.1°. the tangent can be arbitrarily large. H = 26.8 m 8.8 cm 6.3° d) 82.6° ˙ ˙ c) No 10.6 cm.0° i) A = 26. QPS = 112.6°. F = 26.4° ˙ ˙ 9. 76° 21. .5 cm b) 1.5°.7° b) Approximately 63. . a) 2.4°.1 cm c) 3. a) 36. 466 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . b) b) There is no greatest possible value.0° PQ = PS = 3.2 Using the Tangent Ratio to Calculate Lengths.0 cm 10.6.

3420… iii) 0. a) 11. 40° b) i) 1 ii) 0 iii) 0 18.5° 4. a) 41° b) 78° c) 26° d) 66° 16. H = 26. hypotenuse: AH ii) Opposite: TK. a) iv) 1 2.2 cm c) 5. a) 34° b) 35° c) 39° d) 33° 8. a) b) sin 5° = 0. a) 25.7 cm b) F = 63.1736… ii) 0. 1. a) 14.00 ˙ ˙ c) sin 19° = 0.5 m 3.7 cm b) 8.7 m c) J = 38.4 The Sine and Cosine Ratios.95 ˙ ˙ d) sin 81° = 0.9848… 15. Q = 40. hypotenuse: AT 4.54 ˙ ˙ i) 0.1° ˙ ˙ 5. page 86 1. 61° ii) sin A = 0.96 b) i) Opposite: GH. a) sin 57° = 0.3°. page 88 1. so hypotenuse = hypotenuse. cos 81° = 0. 9. page 95 d) P = 49.9°. 79.3 Math Lab: Measuring an Inaccessible Height.09.Customer Support 467 .c) 2. 17. The sum of the angle shown on the protractor and the angle of inclination is 90°.5 cm c) 1.0°. 25 m Chapter 2: Checkpoint 1. Approximately 23.1 cm b) 1.3°.2 cm b) 7. a) C = 16. cos A = 0.4 cm ANSWERS Enfocus Software . K = 52.60. d) 2.84.9 cm 5. 11. cos 5° = 1.7 cm b) 3.28.3 cm c) 7. a) 14° b) 50° c) 33° d) 39° 7.5 Using the Sine and Cosine Ratios to Calculate Lengths. 31° 5. cos A = 0.0 cm d) 12. adjacent: AG.7660… v) 0.7° ˙ ˙ 11.4 cm d) 7.0° ˙ ˙ 2. page 101 3.3 cm 10.3° 12.7 cm 4. a) 1. D = 73. For example: a) The opposite and adjacent sides of an acute angle have the adjacent opposite same length. cos 57° = 0.7° ˙ ˙ c) 11.8660… vi) 0. cos 19° = 0.99.16 ˙ ˙ 6.33.6427… iv) 0.4° i) sin A = 0.80 13. Sketches will vary. a) 14° b) 56° c) 53° 3.5 cm d) 3. 13. a) 3. adjacent: AK.

a) 3 in.3 cm. 2813 m 4.7 Solving Problems Involving More than One Right Triangle. cosine b) 4. 11.9396… 13.1 m 17.3 cm by 4. 29.2 cm ˙ ˙ b) Y = 43°.0 km c) 4. 2.9848… ii) 0. a) d) E = 61°. 8. a) 30° 10.1°. a) b) 29 m c) 50 m iv) 0.0 cm.5 cm 13.8 cm. a) 4° b) 15. tangent c) 11. 15 m. a) 98.7°.2° ii) 15. page 111 3.1° b) 1144 cm 8. 58 m Chapter 2: Checkpoint 2.7 cm.3°. CE = 6. a) 4.3 cm 14. a) 5.1° 13. Approximately 18 in.3 cm d) 3. approximately 54° b) 48° 11. 47. a) 19 ft. B = 60.0 cm 5. 18.6 cm. 4. Approximately 126°. 15.8 cm 2 b) 28.3° b) 20 m 16.7 cm b) 4.0 cm.0 m 11.0 m iii) 0. 186 mm b) 123.7 cm c) 14.6 cm c) 5. a) 6. a) Sine b) Tangent c) Cosine d) Tangent 4. a) 5.Customer Support 3 b) 24.2 cm b) 51. 19 m 14.0 cm 12.3 m b) The surveyor could use the tangent ratio or the Pythagorean Theorem. CD = 12. 65° 2 b) 17 407 ft.6 cm 468 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) 4.6 cm ˙ ˙ 7. a) Pythagorean Theorem b) Sine ratio c) Pythagorean Theorem d) Pythagorean Theorem 6. a) 5. Z = 29.3 m 21. XY = 6. a) 423 cm b) 272 cm 5.7 cm 11. 7.4 cm 20.0 cm 8.9 cm 10. Approximately 8.6 cm. 35 m. a) 13. cosine 5. a) 31° b) 118° 2 12. 13° i) 0.8660… 3.7 m 7. 7.7° ˙ ˙ ˙ 18.5 cm.3420… 14.7 cm.0 cm b) 6. TU = 23. 15. WY = 8. a) 48. a) c) 11.6427… vi) 0.6.0 m 19. sine d) 14.5 cm.7660… c) 2. page 104 1.6 Applying the Trigonometric Ratios.1°. 105.0° 6. a) T = 57°. 4. VU = 19. a) b) 2. 51°.3 cm ˙ ˙ b) 100 mm c) ZB = 11. b) 21 ft. a) 23 m viii) 0.5 vii) 0. 7. a) 93. 51. Approximately 3. b) 33. a) 53 m 2. 9. 36 cm 2 16.6 cm 9. 105. page 118 3. 65°.7° d) 15.1736… 4.1 cm i) 21.2 km 2.9° .9 cm. 9.4 m v) 0. 173 ft. 2 b) 15 in. a) 68 km b) 31° 10. a) 1147 cm b) 5.5 m c) 56° 12. a) Approximately 139 ft.

0 cm 8.0 cm 1. 16.3 cm ˙ ˙ c) K = 63°.0 km 1. 3 in. 2316 ft.4° 22° 50 ft. 18.7° ˙ ˙ ˙ b) H = 52°. 6° 4.0°. sine 12.0 cm. 1 ft. 21. 19.0° b) 62. Chapter 2: Practice Test. 15. a) tan 20° < 1 b) 8. DE = 6. Approximately 6 yd.7° ANSWERS Enfocus Software . D = 27. used.9 cm.5 m 5. B 2. 18. 3 b) Sphere. 52. 10. 75. 3 192 ft. 17. 2 2 a) 342 m b) 208 ft.7 cm b) 13. 239.0 cm b) Could also use trigonometric ratios i) Approximately 4.1 mm2. 13.4°. page 130 ii) 3.5 m.1 cm. RT = 6.4 m. a) i) 3. a) S = 24.9 cm. QPS = 58.6°. 191 m2.3 cm ˙ ˙ 59° x = 20. Answers will vary depending on the conversion ratio used. 5 12 ii) 13 13 5 12 iii) iv) 13 13 b) sin D = cos B. 22.5° 26 yd. or 1. 20. 327 m 7. FH = 4. QPR = 43.0° b) 65° 2. RS = 14. d) 5 ft. ˙ PRQ = 46.3°. 20. y = 40.2 cm ii) Approximately 4.6°. 19. 17. a) 13. 15.2 222. 201 ft.6 cm 23. a) 11. by 94 ft. 3.7 cm. sine c) 4. 3824 in.3 cm c) 21. RPS = 14.0°. a) 3. 30 m 11.1 cm 2 b) 13. cosine 6. 14.0°. 6. E = 57.0 cm.9° 2 a) 35. 14. EF = 3.. No 2 a) Hemisphere. page 124 1. C = 32.76 2.5 cm.2° 36.7 cm. GH = 2. The road above The Narrows is higher by approximately 5 ft. 12. 276 km i) 11. 170 m3 4478 in.3°. 16. b) $59. cosine b) 28°.0 cm ˙ ˙ 85. sin B = cos D 64. 8.6 mm3 a) 31.0 cm.9° b) 68. a) 35° b) tan 70° > 1 b) 11. a) 61.21. KM = 2.4 m ˙ ˙ b) M = 46.9 cm. a) 823 cm b) 279 400 m c) 3 mi.5 m 5. page 127 1. 9.Customer Support 469 . 4. sine d) 4. a) 73°. 10. 203 cm 6. 138 in. QRS = 180. Answers will vary depending on the conversion ratios 6.2 cm a) 13. PSR = 31.0°.5 cm ˙ ˙ 5.4 cm. 17.6 cm by 2.0 cm.9° a) 3. MN = 7. PRS = 133.7 cm Cumulative Review Chapters 1 and 2. a) 23 yd.8 cm a) CE = 5.7°. cosine b) 4. The triangle is an isosceles right triangle. 9.2 m Chapter 2: Review. 7. JM = 3. C 4.2 m 22. MP = 10.5 cm.

361. Greatest common factor: 2. 7 21. The greatest common factor of the two numbers is 1. 1. 81. 24. 12. or 20 9. 9.Customer Support 12. and Their Roots. 66. 135. 62. 5 2 f) Perfect cube 7. 3 22. page 140 3. 1 does not have any prime factors.2 Perfect Squares. 132 17. 2000 is not a perfect cube. 729.1 Factors and Multiples of Whole Numbers. 78 c) 22. or 5280 2 3 b) 25 ft. perfect cube: 343 b) Perfect squares: 676. f) 27. 4096 14. 2 3 c) 2 · 3 · 5 . a) b) x = 4 8 . or 3 · 5 149 65 13 b) . 729. 65. 44. a) 14 f) 3 · 5 · 13 3 2 2 6. or 27 e) 2 . or 264 210 105 121 239 e) f) 600 90 27 77 g) h) 20 12 800 m No. 225. page 146 5 c) 2 · 2 · 2 · 2 · 2 · 3. 12 ft. 90. f) 2. a) 4 b) 2 · 2 · 2 · 2 · 5. 180. a) Perfect squares: 324. or 1080 12. 270 19. 124. 64. 2 · 3. d) 31. perfect cube: 1331 13. or 364 11. a) 18 in. or 40 c) 2 · 3 · 7. Perfect Cubes. 8.Chapter 3 Factors and Products. a) 2 · 3 · 5 · 19. a) 22 mm ANSWERS Enfocus Software . or 2 · 3 d) 2 · 61 4. 155. 900 d) Perfect squares: 1225. 2 least common multiple: 2 · 3 · 7. 1296. 5 20. The first 5 are: 0. 37 17 15. a) 6. 135. 93. or 42 d) 2 . a) 2. 18. b) 3. No. a) 2 · 3 · 5 b) 2 · 5 · 23 2 c) 2 · 7 · 73 2 2 d) 2 · 3 · 5 3 3 e) 2 · 3 · 5 f) 5 · 7 3 2 3 8. perfect cube: 729 c) Perfect squares: 841. e) 45. 110. a) 5 b) 2 · 5. a) 7 b) 8 c) 10 d) 11 e) 15 6. page 132 3. 45 x 2 15. 88. 30. 96 ft. 54. or 32 f) 2 · 5. a) 3 · 3 · 5. 2 3 10. or 798 2 e) 2 · 3 · 5. or 6 14. 5. 5 e) 2. 5 c) 3 d) 2. 2 5. or 1440 f) 2 · 7 · 13. or 900 11. 108. or 4 2 10. 3. These answers assume that the endpoints of each range are included in the range. or 8 2 b) 16 c) 19 5 e) 2 · 2 · 2 · 2 · 2 · 5. or 84 2 5 2 2 b) 3 · 5 · 7. or 315 2 2 c) 2 · 3 · 5. or 2 · 5 3. or 84 13. 39. 186 18. 162 4. a) 72 cm by 72 cm b) Yes a) Yes b) Yes c) 660 feet Yes 30 cm 16. or 3420 b) 2 · 3 · 5 · 11. a) 2 · 3 · 7. or 2 · 5 d) 17 e) 21 5. 35 937 ft. 36 b) 13. a) b) 65 19 13 42 c) d) 18 61 49 33 e) f) 110 17 470 b) 42 yd. 26. a) 2 b) 2 . a) Perfect square 3 d) 2 . d) 2 · 3 · 5. or 180 d) 2 · 3 · 7 · 19. 52. or 112 60 12 43 304 152 c) d) . or 4 5 2 b) Perfect square and perfect cube 3 c) Neither 2 d) Perfect square 2 e) Perfect square and perfect cube c) 3 .

a) 11x y b) 4x y 3 6. a) 2 · 3 · 5 · 7. 2x + 5 2 2 c) 12x – 8x + 16. c) 3(3k + 2) d) 2s(2s + 7) e) y(1 + y) f) h(3 + 7h) 2 8. or 360 5 d) 2 · 3 · 5. 9 + 10 b) m i) 3(2 + 5n) iii) 3(5n – 2) ii) 3(2 – 5n) iv) 3(–5n + 2) Chapter 3: Checkpoint 1. 4. perfect cube: 1000 c) Perfect square: 1156 26 cans 4. 8. 4. or 25 2 3. or 1650 103 71 b) 33 35 27 c) 70 18 980 days. 1 + 12 .Customer Support 471 . a) 3x + 12.16. 9. or 16 3 2 e) 2 . page 155 Gray algebra tiles represent positive tiles and black tiles represent negative algebra tiles. 2x. or 420 5 b) 2 · 3 · 5. a) 5. a) 3(x + 4x – 2) 3. a) 2 · 3 · 5 · 7 c) 2 · 3 · 5 · 17 e) 2 · 3 · 7 3 7 i) m(4 + m) iii) m(4 – m) b) 2 2 2 2. or 3136 2 f) 2 · 3 · 5 · 11. or 480 3 2 c) 2 · 3 · 5. 441. a) 3b (3 – 4b) 2 c) –a (1 + a) 2 e) 4y(2y – 3) 3 b) 12(4s – 1) 2 2 d) 3x (1 + 2x ) 3 f) –7d(1 + 2d ) 2 9. 961. a) 5(y + 2) d) 5 · 11 · 19 1. or 480 6 2 e) 2 · 7 . 7. a) 2 . x + 4 2 b) 4x + 10x. 6. a) 3 18. 10. 3x – 2x + 4 ANSWERS Enfocus Software .3 Common Factors of a Polynomial. or 8 f) 5 . 52 years a) 20 b) 28 c) 24 d) 33 e) 39 f) 55 a) 12 b) 15 c) 20 d) 18 e) 22 f) 21 a) Neither b) Perfect square c) Perfect square and perfect cube d) Perfect square e) Perfect cube f) Neither a) Perfect squares: 400. or 12 2 b) 6(1 + 2x ) 4 c) 5 d) 2 . page 149 2 2 b) 2 · 3 · 11 3 2 4 3 f) 3 · 5 · 7 ii) m(m + 4) iv) m(m – 4) 7. or 8 b) 2 · 3. 3. a) 3 2 17. Edge length: 6 units 2 3 3 5. 484 b) Perfect squares: 900.

a) 5(1 + 3m – 2m ) 3 3 b) 9(3n + 4 – 2n ) 2 d) –c (3 + 13c + 12c) 3 f) s(s + s – 4) c) v(6v + 7 – 8v ) e) 6x(4 + 5x – 2x ) 472 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 3  3  approximately 1583 m3 20. 2 f) –3(3 – 4b – 2b ) 2 3 10. 2 c) –7(m + m + 2) 14. a) 2. 17. SA = 2πr(h + r). a) –12x + 20x b) 4x and (–3x + 5) c) The factors are the dimensions of the rectangle.Customer Support 2 3 2 The monomial is –1 when the term has the opposite sign of the common factor. 2 d) 2(5n – 3 – 6n ) 16. a) b) 2r 2  2rh rh 22. 15. or a b 2 2 iii) 2 · 2 · 3 · x · x · y · y. a) 4x – 4 = 4(x – 1) 2 2 b) 16m – 24m – 16 = 8(2m – 3m – 2) 3 2 2 c) –8n – 6n – 10n = –2n(4n + 3n + 5) 2 a) i) 2 · 2 · s · t · t. approximately 603 m2 2 2   b) V  r 2 h  r 3 . 12. or 4st 2 ii) a · a · b. 19. Yes 2rh h 21. 2 e) 2(4 + 5x + 3x ) 18.2 2 b) 2(2 – 3y – 4y ) 11. a) 2 i) 3m(m + 3m – 1) 3 ii) –4(4 – 2n + n ) b) Expanded his solutions 13. The monomial is 1 when the term is the common factor. SA = 2πrh + 2πr2. or 12x y 2 b) i) 4st (s + 3st + 9) 2 ii) 4st (3st – s – 9) 2 2 iii) –a b(3a + 9a – 8) 2 2 iv) a b(9a + 3a – 8) 2 2 2 2 v) 12x y (3y + x + x y) 2 2 2 2 vi) –12x y (3y + x y + x) 2 a) 5x(5y + 3x – 6xy ) b) 3mn(17m + 13n – 24) 2 2 2 2 c) 3p q (3p – 2pq + 4q ) 2 2 2 d) a b (10a + 12b – 5) e) 4cd(3d – 2 – 5c) 2 2 f) 7rs (r s + 2r – 3) a) SA = 2πr(r + h) 2 b) Approximately 2639 cm a) SA = πr(r + s) 2 b) Approximately 679 cm a) Assume the area of the base of the silo is not included in the surface area. 3 b) n – 3 n 2 3n n c)    n  3 2 2 2 . V  r 2  h  r  .

4 Math Lab: Modelling Trinomials as Binomial Products. 8. 7. a) b + 7b + 10 3. 4.2 5. 13 iii) (x + 2)(x + 4) 4. a) Can be represented 6. 7. a) (x + 1)(x + 3) = x + 4x + 3 2 b) (x + 2)(x + 4) = x + 6x + 8 2 c) (x + 5)(x + 5) = x + 10x + 25 2 d) (x + 3)(x + 6) = x + 9x + 18 iii) (x + 3)(x + 4) ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) 2 i) x + 4x + 4 ii) b) Can be represented iii) (x + 2)(x + 2) c) Cannot be represented b) d) Cannot be represented 2 i) x + 5x + 4 ii) e) Cannot be represented f) Can be represented iii) (x + 1)(x + 4) c) 2 i) x + 6x + 8 ii) 3. page 166 2 i) x + 7x + 12 ii) 2 4.5 Polynomials of the Form x2 + bx + c.Customer Support 473 . a) Can be represented 2 b) n + 11n + 28 b) Can be represented 2 c) h + 11h + 24 c) Cannot be represented d) Cannot be represented e) Cannot be represented f) Cannot be represented 2 d) k + 7k + 6 2. page 158 1. 9. 10 d) 3.

4 b) i) 1. 5 v) 3.ii) 2. a) (w + 3)(w + 2) = w + 5w + 6 2 b) (x + 5)(x + 2) = x + 7x + 10 2 c) (y + 10)(y + 2) = y + 12y + 20 11. a) vi) (h + 3)(h + 5) i) (v + 1)(v + 1) ii) (v + 2)(v + 2) iii) (v + 3)(v + 3) iv) (v + 4)(v + 4) 2 c) w + 18w + 32 b) The rectangles are squares.Customer Support f) (h + 2)(h + 6) g) (q + 1)(q + 6) 474 d) (s + 2)(s + 10) e) (n + 1)(n + 11) h) (b + 2)(b + 9) . 2 iii) 1. For example: 2 a) m + 13m + 40 2 d) k + 14k + 13 2 10. Area models and/or rectangle diagrams may vary. the binomial factors are the same. a) (x + 4)(x + 6) b) (m + 2)(m + 8) c) (p + 1)(p + 12) ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 9 7. 2 c) v + 10v + 25 = (v + 5)(v + 5). a) 2 iv) 2. v2 + 14v + 49 = (v + 7)(v + 7) 9. 5 i) (v + 1)(v + 2) b) y + 12y + 27 ii) (w + 2)(w + 3) iii) (s + 1)(s + 9) iv) (t + 2)(t + 5) v) (y + 3)(y + 4) 8. v2 + 12v + 36 = (v + 6)(v + 6). 3 vi) 3.

6 integers f) 0. a) ±7. a) g + 4g – 21 b) h – 5h – 14 2 c) 22 – 13j + j 2 2 2 13. ±11. a) (1 + k)(12 + k) 2 d) k + 8k – 33 b) (2 + g)(–8 + g) c) (5 + y)(12 + y) 16. ±9. ±15.Customer Support 475 . 17. ±11. ±6. a) (b – 1)(b + 20) b) (t – 3)(t + 18) c) (x – 2)(x + 14) d) (n + 3)(n – 8) e) (a + 4)(a – 5) f) (y + 6)(y – 8) g) (m – 5)(m – 10) h) (a – 6)(a – 6) 15. 4 integers d) ±1. ±11. a) (m + 5)(m – 12) b) (w – 5)(w – 9) e) 84 – 5h – h 2 c) (b – 3)(b + 12) 18. 4 integers b) 0. ±4. ±19. 132 2 ii) x + 4x + 3. 143 b) The coefficients of the terms of the polynomial are the digits in the product of integers. ±8. 5 integers ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 6 integers e) ±9. 3 integers c) ±6. a) r – 9r – 52 2 b) s – 20s + 75 14. a) 2 2 iii) t + 3t – 28 b) 2 i) t + 11t + 28 ii) t – 11t + 28 2 iv) t – 3t – 28 i) Because the constant terms in the binomials have the same sign ii) Because the constant terms in the binomials have 2 f) m – 81 opposite signs iii) Add the constant terms in the binomials 19.2 g) n – 18n + 56 2 h) p – 11p – 102 12. a) d) (9 + z)(8 – z) 2 i) x + 3x + 2.

For example: d) a) 0. a) i) (n + 6)(2n + 1) ii) (n – 6)(2n – 1) b) i) (n + 6)(2n – 1) ii) (n – 6)(2n + 1) c) i) (n + 2)(2n + 3) ii) (n – 2)(2n – 3) The trinomials in each pair have middle terms with the same value. The constant terms in the binomial factors have opposite signs. … c) 1. a) (2w + 1)(w + 6) = 2w + 13w + 6 b) –3(m + 2)(m + 4) b) (2g – 5)(3g – 3) = 6g – 21g + 15 c) 4(x – 3)(x + 4) d) 10(x + 2)(x + 6) c) (–4v – 3)(–2v – 7) = 8v + 34v + 21 e) –5(n – 1)(n – 7) f) 7(c – 2)( c – 3) 23. –12. 0. iii) (x + 3)(3x + 2) c) 2 i) 3x + 8x + 4 ii) iii) (x + 2)(3x + 2) 476 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) 4(y – 7)(y + 2) iii) (x + 2)(4x + 1) 2 8. h2 ± 26h ± 120 3. –20. –4. –40. 2 c) 3t + 20t + 25 = (t + 5)(3t + 5). –4.20. a) 2 2 2 f) 4r + 12r + 9 iii) (t + 3)(3t + 3) 2 i) 2x + 5x + 2 ii) iv) (t + 4)(3t + 4) iii) (2x + 1)(x + 2) b) 2 i) 3x + 11x + 6 ii) b) The side lengths increase by 1 each time.Customer Support 3t2 + 24t + 36 = (t + 6)(3t + 6). 0. 0. –3. –24. –15. –6. –6. –3. a) 2 2 i) (t + 1)(3t + 1) 2 5. –2. Infinitely many integers are possible. –8. … e) 2. –30. h2 ± 17h ± 60. –18. a) 2v + 7v + 6 c) 6g + 13g + 6 2 e) 9t + 24t + 16 7.6 Polynomials of the Form ax2 + bx + c. –10. –24. h2 ± 15h ± 54. –35. –20. 0. a) (2m + 1)(m + 3) = 2m + 7m + 3 2 b) (3p + 2)(p + 4) = 3p + 14p + 8 2 c) (3w + 1)(2w + 1) = 6w + 5w + 1 ii) (t + 2)(3t + 2) 2 d) (4v + 3)(3v + 2) = 12v + 17v + 6 2 b) 3r + 13r + 4 2 d) 8z + 26z + 15 6. a) 15 + 23f + 4f 2 2 b) 15 – 29t + 12t 2 c) 90 + 11r – 2r e) –24 + 50x + 14x d) 36 – 24m + 4m 2 2 h2 ± 13h ± 30. –30. … f) 2. … 2 i) 4x + 9x + 2 ii) b) 0. . h2 ± 20h ± 96. –18. h2 ± 25h ± 84. –10. –35. a) i) (h + 2)(h – 12) ii) (h – 2)(h + 12) iii) (h – 4)(h – 6) iv) (h + 4)(h + 6) b) The first 6 are: 2 2 9. page 177 10. 3t2 + 28t + 49 = (t + 7)(3t + 7) 12. –28. –2. the constant terms in the binomial factors increase by 1 each time. … 21. a) 6c + 23c + 20 2 2 f) –36 + 60n – 25n 2 b) –21t – 32t + 5 2 d) 5t + 46t + 9 2 f) –36y + 84y – 49 c) 32r + 48r – 14 e) 35h + 29h – 30 11. –12. –8. –15. –40. but opposite signs. –28. … d) 1.

±29. a) (a – 2)(5a + 3) b) (y – 5)(3y + 2) c) (s + 4)(5s – 1) d) (2c – 3)(7c + 1) e) (2a + 5)(4a – 1) f) (2r – 3)(4r – 1) g) (d + 1)(6d – 5) h) (3e – 2)(5e + 1) 16. ±25. a) d) (m – 4)(2m – 3) 14. 9m ± 25m + 16. ±15. 10 integers c) ±3. ±23. 6 integers b) ±20. 12 iii) 3. ±29. ±13. 9m2 ± 145m + 16 i) (v + 5)(3v + 1) Chapter 3: Checkpoint 2. 8 2 2 b) Yes. 15 ii) 2. page 180 ii) (m + 4)(3m + 2) iii) (b + 1)(3b + 5) 1. ±10. ±101. ±62. a) 6x + 15. ±53. ±25. 16 integers e) ±6. 3 and (2x + 5) iv) (a + 1)(4a + 3) v) (d + 3)(4d + 1) vi) (v + 2)(4v + 3) 15. 8 integers d) ±22. a) 10(r + 2)(2r + 3) b) 5(a – 4)(3a – 1) c) 3(2h + 3)(3h – 2) d) 6(2u – 3)(2u – 3) e) 4(m – 5)(3m + 2) f) 2(3g + 5)(4g – 7) 19. ±121. (3g + 7)(5g – 6) 18.13. 4 integers f) ±1. ±8. These answers do not include cases where there is a common constant factor among the terms of the polynomial. ±52. a) j) (2x + 5)(4x – 3) 20. a) (2u + 7)(3u – 2) b) 4x + 12. 9m ± 30m + 16. a) i) (r + 1)(4r – 5) ii) Cannot be factored iii) Cannot be factored iv) (w – 2)(2w – 1) v) (h – 3)(3h + 1) vi) Cannot be factored ii) 3(c – 2) iii) –v(2v + 5) 2 iv) 2(x + 7x + 3) ANSWERS Enfocus Software . ±34. 4 vi) 3. 2 integers 21. 9m ± 26m + 16. a) (2y – 1)(7y – 3) b) (p – 2)(10p + 3) c) (2r – 7)(5r + 1) f) (3d – 4)(3d – 4) g) (3t + 2)(3t + 2) h) (5y + 2)(8y – 3) i) (2c + 3)(12c – 5) i) 4(a + 2) d) (3g + 1)(5g – 2) e) (2x – 3)(2x + 5) 2. ±26. a) i) 1. a) ±7.Customer Support 477 . 5 v) 1. 3n + 31n + 10 and 3n – 31n + 10 2 2 2 2 2 23. ±43. 9m ± 40m + 16. 12 b) iv) 3. 9m2 ± 74m + 16. 9m2 ± 51m + 16. 9m ± 24m + 16. 4 and (x + 3) b) (3k – 10)(k + 3) c) (4v – 5)(v – 4) 17. a) (y + 2)(2y + 1) b) (a + 4)(2a + 3) c) (k + 5)(2k + 3) e) (k – 3)(2k – 5) h) (n + 6)(2n – 3) ii) (n – 2)(3n – 5) iv) (n – 1)(3n – 10) v) (n + 5)(3n + 2) vi) (n – 5)(3n – 2) f) (m + 7)(2m + 1) g) (g + 6)(2g + 3) i) (n + 2)(3n + 5) iii) (n + 1)(3n + 10) 22.

a) 2c + 7c + 3 2 b) –2(y – 3)(y – 8) d) (2 – y)(25 + y) 2 b) –4m + 21m – 5 2 c) 9f – 9f – 4 d) 12z – 20z + 3 2 e) 30 – 8r – 6r 9. a) 3(x – 2)(x + 7) c) –(3 + m)(8 + m) 2 8. For example: 2 a) x + 5x + 4 6. For example: 3x2 + 10x + 8 = (x + 2)(3x + 4) 5.2 2 v) –3(r – 5r + 1) b) d + d – 6 2 c) x – 6x + 8 2 2 vi) 3a(5a – ab – 2b ) 2 vii) 4(3 – 8x + 2x ) 2 d) 30 – r – r 2 viii) 4y(3x – 2x – 4) 2 e) g + 4g – 5 b) The polynomials in part vi and part viii 3.Customer Support d) (3h + 2)(3h + 4) e) (2y – 1)(4y + 1) f) (3 – 4u)(2 – 5u) . Area models and rectangle diagrams may vary. Answers will vary. For example: x2 + 5x + 6 = (x + 3)(x + 2) 2 f) 20 – 12t + t 4. Answers will vary. a) (j + 4)(2j + 5) f) 8 + 20h + 8h 2 b) (v + 2)(3v – 5) c) (k – 4)(5k – 3) 478 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) (s + 5)(s + 6) b) (n + 5)(n – 6) c) (4 – b)(5 – b) d) –(1 + t)(11 – t) e) (z + 3)(z + 10) f) –(k – 3)(k – 6) 7.

a) 4r + 13r + 12r + 5r + 2 4 2 4. a) 27x + 43x + 16 2 e) 4r + 4rs + s 2 f) 9t – 12tu + 4u 2 b) x + 2x – 2 2 2 i) 4x + 4xy + y 6.2 15.Customer Support 479 . –3g – 7g + 10g + 18g – 8 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) 3 3 ii) 25r + 20rs + 4s 2 iii) 36c + 60cd + 25d 3 iv) 25v + 70vw + 49w 3 3 2 4 2 viii) 25v – 70vw + 49w 3 3 6 2 3 2 2 iii) 25c – 9d iv) 4v – 49w 2 2 i) 121g – 25h 3 2 c) 18x + 3x – 88x – 80 3 2 2 e) 8k + 12k – 18k – 27 b) 4r – 7r – 14r – 3 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 b) x – 3x y + 3xy – y – 3x + 6xy – 3y + 3x – 3y – 1 d) 3x + 11x – 39x – 7 9. a) 12a + 2a – 4a 2 2 2 2 d) c + 3c d + 3cd + d 2 2 i) p + 6pq + 9q 2 c) 64a – 144a b + 108ab – 27b 2 2 2 2 b) 8y + 60y + 150y + 125 2 v) 4x – 4xy + y 2 18. page 194 2 b) 2c + 2c – cd – 3d – 3d 2 c) a – 4a – 3ab + 20b – 10b 2 2 2 d) p + 2pq – 8q – pr + 2qr 2 2 11. a) 3y + y – 26y + 16 3 2 3 2 ii) 625m – 49n 2 3 3 21.7 Multiplying Polynomials. a) 9s + 41s + 52 2 3.8 Factoring Special Polynomials. page 186 3 b) 13x + 4x + 40 2 c) 18m – 2m – 42mn – 4n 2 4. a) x + 4x + 4 2 14. a) g + 3g + 5g + 3 2 3 d) 0 4 b) 2 + 7t + 6t + 4t + t 3 2 e) 3x – 28x + 10 2 c) 2w + 11w + 26w + 21 2 3 d) 12 + 29n + 22n + 8n + n 2 5. a) x + 3x y + 3xy + y + 3x + 6xy + 3y + 3x + 3y + 1 2 c) 2b + 17b – 13b + 2 3 2 2 2 c) x + 3x y + 3xy + y + 3x z + 6xyz + 3y z + 3xz + 3yz 2 3 +z 2 b) x + 3x + xy + 2y + 2 3 2 2 2 d) x – 3x y + 3xy – y – 3x z + 6xyz – 3y z + 3xz – 3yz 2 c) a + 2ab + b + ac + bc 3 –z 2 d) 3s + st + 5t + t + 6 2 b) 3b – b – 172b + 224 2 3 2 2 2 d) 50a – 235a + 228a – 63 8. a) 2 19. a) (2x + 3) = 8x + 36x + 54x + 27 2 2 3 2 2 f) y – y ii) 4s – 28st + 49t iii) 25g + 40gh + 16h 3 2 e) 4b + 2b c – 2bc 2 2 2 2 d) –8x y – 10x y + 25xy 2 2 2 b) 3 c) 40x – 50x + 15x 2 2 2 b) –6r + 3r + 3r vi) 25r – 20rs + 4s 2 3 3 2 3 2 vii) 36c – 60cd + 25d 7. a) x – x – 2y – 4y 2 3. a) 20 – 2x 2 2 b) 12f + 4f – 25fg – 3g + 12g 2 b) 10 – 2x 2 2 c) 4x – 60x + 200 2 c) 8a + 22ab + 15b 2 d) 12a + 4a – 31ab – 5b + 20b 2 3 2 17. a) x – 6x + 12x – 8 2 2 b) 2 d) 4x – 60x + 200x 2 2 10. a) 6z + 5zy + y 2 f) 7a + 2a – 7 4 16. a) x + 3x + 2xy + 3y + y 2 3 22. a) 6x + 2x – 128x – 160 2 ii) 9r – 16s 2 2 b) 6(2x + 3) = 24x + 72x + 54 iv) 100h – 140hk + 49k 2 2 2 2 i) x – 4y 3 20. a) Difference of squares b) Neither 2 3 d) 49 – 14f + f c) Neither d) Perfect square trinomial d) 8n – 18n – 7n + 16n – 3 3 2 b) 9 – 6y + y 2 2 c) –4c + 26c – c – 22c – 6 4 c) 25 + 10d + d g) 25 – d 13. x + 10x + 23x + 14 4 3 2 3 2 b) 2d + 14d + 19d + 12d + 3 4 3 4 2 e) x – 4 f) 9 – y 2 2 2 h) 49 – f 2 5. 2r – 13rs + 12r + 15s – 18s 3 2 12.

5x + 34x + 24 14. or 9(4a + b)(4a – b) d) (11m + n)(11m – n) e) (9k + 7m)(9k – 7m) f) (10y + 9z)(10y – 9z) g) (v + 6t)(v – 6t) h) (2j + 15h)(2j – 15h) a) (y + 2z)(y + 5z) b) (2w + 3x)(2w – 7x) c) (3s – u)(4s – u) d) (t – v)(3t – 4v) e) (2r + 3s)(5r – 3s) f) (2p + 7q)(4p – 5q) Trinomials in parts a. 2 b) (3m – n)(5m + 4n) a) (2x + 7y) 2 2 c) (4r + t) d) (3a – 7b) e) (3h + 4k)(4h + 3k) f) (3f – 5g)(5f – 2g) a) 8(m + 3n)(m – 3n) 2 b) 2(2z + y) c) 3(2x + 3y)(2x – 3y) 2 d) 2(2p + 5q) e) –3(2u – v)(4u + 3v) f) –2(3b + 8c)(3b – 8c) 18. a) i) Neither ii) Difference of squares iii) Difference of squares iv) Perfect square trinomial b) ii) (–10 + r)(10 + r) iii) (9ab + 1)(9ab – 1) 2 2 iv) (4s + 1) 20. ii) 25 iii) 9 iv) (d – 8) 2 7. a) (x + 2)(x – 2)(x + 3)(x – 3) b) (a + 1)(a – 1)(a + 4)(a – 4) c) (y + 1)(y – 1)(y + 2)(y – 2) 21. or 1000 d) 2 · 3 · 5 · 17.Customer Support 11 17 247 d) 576 23 f) 160 b) 32 cm b) . 7. or 12 240 4. 8. 11. 3 · 5 · 13 2 d) 3. a) (x + 7)(x – 7) b) (b + 11)(b – 11) c) (1 + q)(1 – q) 2 ii) (b – 6) 2 2 vi) (f – 10) i) (a + 5) iii) (c + 7) v) (e + 9) i) 2 integers b) 2 2 2 2 9. 0. or 16 2 b) 5 · 7. 3. y . a) 2. 61 beads 7 9 13 c) 15 20 e) 27 6. or 20 4 c) 2 . (x – y)(x – y) a) (3d + 4f)(3d – 4f) b) (5s + 8t)(5s – 8t) c) (12a + 3b)(12a – 3b). 13. 5. 1. a) 2 · 5. 13. 3 · 7 · 11 · 13 2 2. a) 2 19. 11. a) 8(d + 2e)(d – 2e) b) 1 (10m + n)(10m – n). j2 – 28j + 196 = (j – 14)2 2 2 a) (2x – 3) b) (3 + 5n) 2 2 c) (9 – 2v) d) (5 + 4h) 2 2 e) (3g + 8) f) (7r – 2) 2 2 2 2 a) x . or 1260 3 b) 2 · 3 · 5 · 13 · 103. 0. or 4 2 3. a) 2 · 3 · 5 · 7. 39 999 h2 – 24h + 144 = (h – 12)2. 10. or 4 1  1    5m  n  5m  n  2  2   2 c) 2y (3x + 5y)(3x – 5y) d) Cannot be factored e) Cannot be factored f) 1  x y  x y  (7x + 2y)(7x – 2y). 13. a) i) ±14 15. 7. 5. –1. 3. ii) 1 integer iii) 1 integer 16.6. 5. –1. 12. 11. or 160 680 3 3 4 2 c) 2 · 5 . –2. or 35 2 d) 2 . i2 + 26i + 169 = (i + 13)2. or      196  4 7  4 7  Chapter 3: Review. a) 2 2 b) πR – πr = π(R + r)(R – r) 2 c) Approximately 314 159 cm 480 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 2 · 3 · 5 · 7 3 c) 3. a) d) (6 + c)(6 – c) 17. 2 possibilities b) g + 22g + 121 = (g + 11) . and d are perfect squares. a) 28 in. page 198 3 1. 2 · 3 · 11 2 2 b) 2. x – y b) (x – y) and (x – y). c.

540 ft. f) Perfect cube. 3 729 = 9 d) Neither e) Perfect square. a) 3(4 + 2g – g ) b) d(3c – 10c – 2) 2 c) 4mn(2n – 3 – 4m) d) y(y – 12y + 24) 2 2 e) 10x y(3 – 2y + xy) f) –4b(2b – 5b + 1) 2 13. 8. a) 5q(3p + 5pq – 7q ) b) –3(4mn – 5m – 6n ) 15. a) g + g – 20 256 = 16 324 = 18 c) Perfect square and perfect cube. 10.Customer Support 481 . b) Perfect square. a) 4m(2 – m) 2 2 b) –3(1 – 3g ) 2 2 c) 7a (4 – a) d) 3a b c(2b – 5c) e) –6mn(4m + n) f) 7b (2bc – 3a ) 2 2 3 Algebra tiles could be used to factor the binomials in parts a and b 2 2 12. a) 12 cm b) 14 ft.7. 3 1936 = 44 2 9261 = 21 b) h + 14h + 49 9. 6 x-tiles 2 18. a) Cannot be arranged as a rectangle f) 42 – r – r b) c) d) Cannot be arranged as a rectangle ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 17. a) Perfect square. 44 cm 11. a) 4x(2x – 3) b) 3y(y – 4y + 5) 2 2 c) 2b(2b – 1 –3b) d) 6m(m – 2 – 4m) 2 2 2 2 14. a) 2 c) k + 7k – 44 2 d) 81 – s b) 2 e) 144 – 24t + t c) Cannot be arranged as a rectangle d) 2 16. 729 = 27.

a) 6r + 31r + 35 22. a) (q + 2)(q + 4) b) (n + 5)(n – 9) c) (6 – s)(9 – s) d) (k + 6)(k – 15) e) (x + 4)(x – 5) f) (3 – y)(4 – y) i) (m + 3)(m + 4) ii) (m + 2)(m + 6) iii) (m + 1)(m + 12) 2 i) 3x + 10x + 8 iv) (m – 3)(m – 4) v) (m – 2)(m – 6) 20. a) 2h + 10h + 8 2 b) 3j + 16j + 5 2 b) 9y – 80y – 9 2 c) 6k + 7k + 2 2 c) 4a – 26a + 42 482 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) (u – 3)(u – 9) c) (w – 2)(w + 12) 2 b) (v + 4)(v – 5) iii) (x + 2)(3x + 4) 2 24. a) 2 i) 2x + 5x + 3 ii) 19.2 2 g) y – 14y + 33 d) 8m + 14m + 3 2 h) x – 25 23. a) iii) (x + 1)(2x + 3) b) vi) (m – 1)(m – 12) ii) b) No 21.Customer Support .

a) (2m – 3)(3m + 7) b) (4n + 1)(3n – 5) c) (4p – 5)(5p + 4) 3 2 27. 80. 8. a) i) 20: 5. a) (9 + 2b)(9 – 2b) b) (4v + 7)(4v – 7) c) 16(2g + h)(2g – h) d) 2(3m + n)(3m – n) 2 2 33. 5 4. a) 16m – 8mp + p 2 2 b) 9g – 24gh + 16h 2 2 2 c) y – yz – 2z – 2y + 4z 2 2 d) –18c + 39cd – 20d + 21c – 28d 4 3 2 29. 540. … 45: 5. 2500. page 201 2 f) 3y – 2y – 1 1. 600. 1280. 9375. … 2 5. a) 2m + 7m + 12m + 17m + 10 2 3 4 b) 5 – 11x – 3x + 11x – 2x 4 3 2 c) –6k + 25k + 10k – 33k – 18 2 3 d) 3 + 2h – 10h – 3h + 2h 4 2 30. … 45: 75. … ii) 20: 50. 2025. … 50: 2. A 2. n + 4 3 2 b) n(n + 2)(n + 4) = n + 6n + 8n 32. a) (m – 7) 2 e) 16p + 40p + 25 b) (n + 5) 2 d) (4 – 5q) 2 2 f) (6 – 11s) 2 2 c) (2p + 3) 2 e) (2r + 7) 34. 50. 1350. 45. 900. 18. 20. a) (k – 1)(4k – 3) b) (3c + 1)(2c – 5) c) (b – 2)(4b + 3) d) (a – 5)(6a – 1) e) (4x – 1)(7x + 4) f) (3x + 2)(7x – 2) 26. 4800. 45. 80. a) 22a + 3a + 7 2 b) 23c – 10c – 53 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 6250. C 3. 125. a) (g + 3h) b) (4j – 3k) 2 2 c) (5t + 2u) d) (3v – 8w) 2 35.2 d) 9w – 9w + 2 31. 160. 32. … 50: 20. 400.Customer Support 483 . 125. 3x + 14x + 16 Chapter 3: Practice Test. a) n + 2. 3200. a) 6c + 19c + 10 25. a) c + 4c + 5c + 2 3 2 b) 8r – 22r – 9r + 30 3 2 b) 72 + 86r + 24r 2 c) –2j – 5j + 35j + 11 3 2 d) 6x + 5x – 17x – 6 2 28. 20.

5) = 0.2 Irrational Numbers.     = 5  5   5   5  125 f) 0. 6.125 g) 5.25 ANSWERS 3.8 d) 3. For example: b) For 3 19 .4 h) 2. 6r + 11r + 6r + 1 2 2 Chapter 4 Roots and Powers.729 ii) 3 0.5)(0. a) b) 3 27 4 .2 c) 12t + 13t – 35 4. c) d) e) 1. page 206 1.8 b) 2. (1. page 211 For 3 19 . a) 2. b) Rational For 5 3 .5)(0. page 202 4. a) 3 2 3 2 2 3 b) 3e + 6e f + 2ef + 4f + 5ef + 10f 2 b) 2 c) –7y + 60yz – 16z 7.7 Enfocus Software . 7.5)(1. 2.1 Math Lab: Estimating Roots. 3 27 b) –5.008 0. 8t ± 11t + 3. 8t ± 14t + 3.1538. b) Any non-zero even index c) i) Any odd index ii) Any even index 5. 0. 5 f) 4 iii) ii) 3 1000 ii) 3 0. Answers will vary. For example: a) 3 216 = 6 b) c) 4 81 3 = 16 2 d) 3 343 = –7 17  4. (0.Customer Support d) Rational e) Irrational 4. a) 7.81 i) iii) 2 9. 8t ± 10t + 3 25 . 4 37 . the radicand is 25 and the index is 2.0 g) 4. a) Irrational f) Rational b) 2. a) (f + 1)(f + 16) c) b) (c – 2)(c – 11) d) 2 d) (2r + 5s) e) f) (h + 5j)(h – 5j) 2 8.6 e) 2.5) = 2. the radicand is 3 and the index is 5. 4 3 81 100 i) iii) e) (2x – 5y)(3x – y) a) 4 8 ii) 16 i) iii) c) (t + 4)(4t – 7) 2 4 3 16 9 i) iii) 2 3 4 iii) 6.5. (5)(5)(5)(5) = 625 3. the radicand is 37 and the index is 4.1 3 25 .5 f) 2. 1000 = (10)(10)(10)(10) d) –2.0016 6.04 i) 27 ii) 0.5. c) Irrational c) The index tells which root to take. the radicand is 19 and the index is 3. a) 2p + 3p – 16p + 7 ii) 4 i) 5. the square of a real number will always be positive. a) Rational b) Irrational . 7 9 49 = 7. 3 4 3 27 .1 c) 1. (–2)(–2)(–2)(–2)(–2) = –32 3 3 3 3 27 . 4 4 37 . 8 = (2)(2)(2) 484 64 10 000 For d) 3 256 0. a) The calculator returns an error message. –5. 8t ± 25t + 3. –2. a) 6.34 . 21 and 4 3 16 = 2 36 cannot be written as a terminating or repeating decimals. 4. Answers will vary. 36 = (6)(6) c) 10.6561 0.

89 . a) 19. 2 20. 3 98 . Each prime factor occurs a multiple of n times. . –2. a) Irrational number b) Rational number 21. a) b) 400 . 3 50 . a) Yes 2 units. 2 units. The cubes roots of the numbers in parts c and d will be irrational. 75 . 9. 3 units. For example: a) Side lengths: 3 units. For example: 7. a). 2 units c) Side lengths: 1 unit.6 b) d) 3 10. 3 3 4 70 . 5 units b) No 24. 22. For example: a) i) 0. Take rational numbers to the 12th power. Answers may vary. For example: a) 21 b) 125 18. which is an irrational number. a) b) c) 17. Triangles will vary. 14 12. –2. 3 units 3 units. 5 11. ANSWERS Enfocus Software . rational: 5 99 52  32 = 13.Customer Support 485 . 40 . 4. 5 units and 4 34 . Additional numbers may vary. i) True ii) True iv) False v) True iv) π b) iii) 0 15. . 4 100 3 150 3 300 .6:1. 755:481 is approximately equivalent to 1. iii) False 14. 99 14 123 . 3 b) Side lengths: 1 unit. d) Side lengths: 23. .16. 150 .6. a) 1. b) a). 98 123 10 . b) 8. Answers will vary. irrational: 3 10 .75 iii) 7 ii) 0 1 5 is approximately 1. 250 . 4 units. 500 .

6.Customer Support d) 10 6 e) 3 6 f) Cannot be simplified 20 c) 4 2 5.3 Mixed and Entire Radicals. a) 3 10 324 18 361 b) 2 3 d) 5 2 e) 3 2 f) 3 3 g) 4 3 h) 5 3 50 b) 72 98 d) 128 e) 75 f) 108 g) 147 h) 192 c) 486 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) 4. a) b) Cannot be simplified c) 6 3 18 400 4. 10. Cube root 1 Perfect square 1 8 2 Square root 1 1 27 3 4 2 64 4 9 3 125 5 16 4 216 6 25 5 343 7 36 6 512 8 49 7 729 9 64 8 1000 10 81 9 100 10 121 11 1 1 144 12 16 2 169 13 81 3 196 14 256 4 225 15 625 5 256 16 289 17 b) Perfect fourth power 9. but neither 10 nor 5 is a perfect square. a) 2 2 Fourth root g) 2 7 h) Cannot be simplified i) 4 7 11. a) 2 3 2 b) 3 3 3 c) 4 3 4 d) 4 3 2 e) Cannot be simplified f) 4 3 3 g) 3 3 5 h) Cannot be simplified i) 5 3 4 j) 5 3 3 . 25 is a perfect square. page 218 Perfect cube 3.

30. b) Additional numbers may vary. 3 1024 21. 4 5 . 4. 3 72 . 3 800 000 000 d) 2 3 . 12 .071 b) 65 . 2 6 6. For example: b) 8 3 . 4 000 000 . a) Irrational f) Irrational 5. a) 17. 9 2 . 6 5 . a) 2. 3 3 24 000 000 000 . 13 . 11 . 19. 4 60 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) 3. 2 3 25 cm c) d) 1.18 c) 3 3 i) 32 d) 150 f) 81 250 3 h) 343 e) g) b) 180 12. 14 i) The radicands start at 2 and increase by b) d) Rational e) Rational 16. 200.6568 iv) 7. 6 7 ft. 12 6 in.2426 iii) 5. 9. 2 13 c) 9 2 . 103 23. a) 8 3 .142 ii) 141. 4 2 cm.8284 ii) 4. 16 cm 25.16 13. c) 1 each time. 5 6 . 27 000 000 000 000 c) 2 2 .47 c) 1. 2 3 24 000 000 000 000 2 24. 7. 3. a) 9 16 192 4. 4 cm.Customer Support 487 . a) b) –5 c) 4 10 . 5. 6.42 b) 7.73 72 14. Neither b) No 4 b) 2. 400 000 000 b) 3. page 221 1. 32 cm . 32 . a) b) Irrational c) Irrational 15. 20.87 3. 6 2 . a) Yes 18. ii) 51 d) iii) 30 20. 5 d) 3 2. 4 6 22. 20 2 . 27 000 000 000 . a) 3 3 j) Chapter 4: Checkpoint 1. 3 50 . 20 3 . 200 2 . 3 17 . 4 100 . a). 300. 8 000 000 . a) i) 14. 7 3 . 200 3 3 . a) 2 4 3 b) 3 4 5 4 d) 2 4 11 3888 b) 4 4802 d) 5 3072 c) 5 2 972 2. 4 7 . b) 8. a) i) 2.

Approximately 76 m 18.8414… b) i.8 3  .5 5 b) 2 3 12 9. or e) 5  5   9  .744 2 19. ii. c) 27 . a) 10  3 3 8 d)   e)   . Approximately 1.253 .81. a) 3 c) 5 b) c) 9 e) 16 48 1 1 1 d) 100 5 8.4 Fractional Exponents and Radicals. or    3   8     5 c) d) 4 0. or  10  2. a) 3 5 3 f) Cannot be simplified e) 2 10 63 c) 3 e) b) 147 11. a) b) 482 . 25 1 3 b) 90 4 b) 2 14.8  3  8  . For example: 10.331 vi) 0. c) 29 3 d) 8  1 9 d) 9 . a) 3 d) 4 270 f) 32 192 396 4.25 9 5  9 4 5 c)   . v 17. 3 2 b) 8 3 . or  2.5 3 4 1. 42 i) 64 ii) 27 iii) 16 3 3 3 1 .8 2 .5 1 d) –2 36 3 f) 12.3 . 1 e) 16 1 b) 16 2 . or   d) 2 4 3 c) Cannot be simplified b) 1 3 350 cm. a) 3. or   b) 6 c) 4 3  5 2 4  1. 2.8.75 4  1.5 5 . or f) 5 5 0.9160… v) 1. a) 4 2 . or 3. or f) 32 2 3 3 5 3 1 3 27 1 3 3 1 4 15. 3 3 4 . page 227 3. or  2. 4 1 2 6. or 3 a) 5 3   2 3 1. a) 1 3 16 1 2 100 c) 100 . a) 4 d) 2 e) –3 5. a) 39 2 c) 4 9 4 d) 0. d)  64  1 3 . 3 488  4  10  . or   2 b) 48  3  5 5    9    1. a) 3 b) 5 c) 9.216 8 f) 125 b) 1 2 30 7.6 .753 .3  2 4 .   . iii. a) 1  2. f) –10 4. or  1.25  2 3 3 2 11. 16.5 5 4 13. a) 3 8 64 e) 64 . e) 25 . 4 2 .Customer Support iv) 5. a) 27 b) 3 c) 4 1.3 m 3 64 0. Areas of squares may vary. 350 cm ANSWERS Enfocus Software .

56 13. = 2–3 2 4 8 38. $2651. For example: –2 b) Approximately 81% a) 3 c) 5 h b) 25 21.  1 2 1 2 2 period of Mars: approximately 688. The exponents in the powers at the right decrease by 1 each time. a) 2 c) 16 b) 7 d) 343 27 e) –32 h) 125 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 1 = 2 . a)  1  2 1 = 5–4 54 b)    1 2 c) 2 = 3 3 1 4. = 2–1. page 236 1. 6 1 5. a) Approximately 93% 10.8 Earth days. Mars. 64 11.57 Approximately 19% 1 1 5–2. 16 1 d) 64.20. 2 7. period of Earth: approximately 363.9 × 1020 N Chapter 4: Checkpoint 2. 1 1 greater than 1. 15. the power will be 12.Customer Support 489 . a) 2 3 2 3 b)   18. Karen c)   4. No. For example: approximately 1. or 2 ( 7)2 7 3 = (–2)3 1 2 d) 2 = 4 4 1 b) 16. 4 b) 1 16 d) 27 3125 1024 1 1 a) b) 81 64 1 9 c) d) 4 4 8 32 e) f) 27 243 $1266. if the base is between 0 and 1. 14. 17. b) The exponent is negative. c) The exponent is 0.5 Earth days 22.  25 32 a) The numbers at the left are divided by 2 each time. page 233  1 3 d)    27  1 3. 1024 1 6. or  6      1 9 1  32 9 4 1 2 1 3 100 9 1 27 19. a) c) e) 9. a) c) e) g)  5 5   6  . Answers may vary. 1 1 1 0 1 b) 2 = 2 . 16. 16 1 c) 6.  20. a) 3 2 1 b) 5 3 1 1 c) .5 Negative Exponents and Reciprocals. = 2–2.0 × 10 N f) 125 10 b) 3 1 d)  4 1 f) 4 b) Answers may vary depending on researched values. For example:    2 2 20 21. 4 c) 8. a) 16. a) Approximately 2. or 6561 times as great a) The exponent is positive.

5 a 14. quotient of powers law x7 10 f) s . a) b c) 15.  3 4 3 2 5 5. or  352 . Approximately 53 s 2  3 . 75 mm 3 1 81 16 1 c) 100 e) 100 8. or 10 d) 1.5 c) 0. a) 2. a) 0. product of powers law 2 e)  10  3 4. a) x3 y 6 1 64m6 n9 12.5 d) 10 . a) x b) c) n d) 490 1 .55 1 x3 1 a4 10. a) 3 i)  32 32   32  . quotient of powers law 1 g) 5 .6 cm 2 13.25 c) 0. 3 . or 18 b) a . a) x. 251 ft. a)   3  3 5 3 125 vi) 3 2  8   8   125  . product of powers law 3 2 c) b . a) iv) 8000 12 b)   12 v) d8 c8 e) a 2b 2 c) g) 1 2 b) 3 3 iv) 1 z6 1 d) 4 c 6 6. or 3 2 35 2 5 12 c) n 2 12 3 5 7. 6.6 Applying the Exponent Laws. 10.2. page 241 7 3.5 2 5. a) 4 3 12  3 5 d)    a2 b2 b) c)   8. quotient of powers law b h) 1. 421 875 3 mm. a) n 0. 3 421 875 mm. or  400  3 ii) 5 iii)  .36 5 3 1000 g) 343 e) 11.5–1 0.25 –5 c) 18 4 .5 b) 9 . a) b) 4 d) 2 f) 625 4. a) x c) b b) 2 d) 5 b) –1 d) 4. product of powers law 1 0. quotient of powers law e) ANSWERS Enfocus Software . or  3 125        b) iii) 4 2 4 vi) 25 v) –5 1 3. $4589. 33 .Customer Support 1 a3 1 m 0.06 7. or 9 1 c d8 12  3  5 n6 m3 4b 2 25c 2 f) n 6 m3 d) h) x3 y3 9. product of powers law 3 1. 3 3 . or  32  400 . a) –32 c)  1 32 9 16 d) 1 3 f)  8 3 h) 10 b) a4 4b 4 16m8 n12 d) 81 b) d4 c2 1 b)  8 1 d) 1024 b) .

30 24 149 mm by 210 mm b) i) Dimensions.  x 3        1  3  5 3 c) 2. 9. For example: 1 2 b) 3 3 5 c) 4 7 d) 3 4 2 180 12. 24 7. a) 5 6 11 24 24 c) A piece of A4 paper has the same dimensions as a folded piece of A3 paper. 2 7 17. 3 5. 18 . 6 2 . a) b) 0. 3 4 2 . 5 3 21.8 cm a) Rational b) Irrational c) 2 5 17. b 25a 4 3. . a) 10. 5 4 i) Dimensions. 24 297 mm by 420 mm ii) Dimensions. Approximately 1. in millimetres: iii) Dimensions. a piece of A5 paper has the same dimensions as a folded piece of A4 paper. in millimetres: 1000 9 4 2 1000 11 24 1000 13 by by by 1000 7 24 1000 9 24 1000 b) 10 a9 23. 6. a) 1.16. 5 2 . 1 20.5 5 d)   19. in millimetres: ii) Dimensions. 20 .2 c) –32 d) 27 64 20. in millimetres: 3 5 The index tells which root to take. 4 3 . 4 5 ANSWERS Enfocus Software .4 2 1  2  3 8 a2 3 4 1 2 11. 3 6 . . x  x1 . in millimetres: 1000 7 by 24 1000 5 5. Approximately 35%  5 . 2 d) 3 1 3 4 a) x1  x . a) 4 c) 7 12 b) 3  50  1. 210 mm by 297 mm iii) Dimensions. 53 . 4 4 10 . a) 2 b) 1. a) m 2 b) 1 5 Chapter 4: Review.  x 6  4 . or b) 13 3 5  2 9 2 5 2 18. a) 3. a) 10 1 6 x2 y4 b) 19. in millimetres: 1000 2 9 4 by 1000 7 .3 c) 2.3 b) –2. 1 s 491 . a) b) 7 64a 2b10 b 1 1 22. x  x .   cm.0 a) 25 b) 216 c) 2401 Neither a) Rational b) Rational c) Rational d) Irrational e) Rational f) Rational g) Rational h) Irrational i) Irrational Approximately 4.6 cm 2 2 . a16c3 c14 21. 3 30 . 3 d) 30 . page 246 x4 1 2 4c 2b d)  a3 3b c)  6 a 1. x 2  x 5 2 b) x 2  x . x 1  x 3 1  1   1 c)  x 2  . a) r2 s 4. or approximately 0.Customer Support 50  2 4 5 4 1  3 2 24. a) m8 n2 b) 2.9 1000 11 by 24 1000 9 8.0 cm 15. a) c) 3 126 b) 192 4 d) 32 13.

25. 16. 125. 117 m 10 3 3 b) b) Cumulative Review Chapters 1–4. Chapter 4: Practice Test. 64. = 3–3 3 9 27 1 27 a) b) 4 8 125 c) 8 $908.25 3 2. 9. a) The numbers at the left are divided by 3 each time. page 252 8. 25. 924 c) 3. 216. 512. 28 ft. = 3–2. 729 2 a) 3a(5a – 9) b) 2p(2 + 6p – 3p) 3 2 c) –2d(4d + 7) d) 7(3w – 4 + 2w ) 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 e) 2x y (9x – 2xy + 5y ) f) 11np (3n p + n – 11p ) The trinomials that can be represented as a rectangle of algebra tiles can be factored. 4. a) 9 9. Approximately 29 L 2 3 x2 y y5 x2 7.2 a) 1.4 d9 64c 1 1. 4. 11.2° 7 2 in. 36. 64. a) Can be represented b) Cannot be represented c) Cannot be represented d) Can be represented 2 a) d + 2d – 15 6. 585 b) 14. . 26.4 cm d) r s b) 3 2 d) x y b) 30. exponents in the powers at the right decrease by 1 each time. 2 11 b) Approximately 4 Calories/day 23. the 24. 1 = 3 . 64. 10. 1 1 1 0 1 b) 3 = 3 . 32. 8. 100 b) 1. 27. 1 10 3 6. 729. 27.0 cm 262 Hz 1 8 2 a) 9m n b) 4 6 x y c) 1 4ab3 2 5 29.2 cm b) 1 in. 64.Customer Support 1 cd 3 2 d) 0.51 18. 49. a) Approximately 7122 Calories/day 5. b) 4 in. a) 4 144 c) 25 31. 28. 3 1 p 2q 8. = 3–1. a) a b 1 c) 5 a 9 30. Approximately 6.22. 3 a) 5. 1000 c) 1. 4620 8214 in. A 3.729 492 1 16 1 d) 4 b) ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) s t 12. 236 in. 10 a) 9. a) 7. a) 5 3 . page 249 1. B 2. 81. 3150 d) 2. 5 3  75 b) 2 b) 45 – 14s + s 4. 5. a) 4 3 c) 0. 343.

–17. –36.Customer Support 493 . –9 4 29 282 iv) v) 13. –21. 7. –3 8 d) 4. $24 895. –28. 4. 3. a) 5c + 23c – 42 2 b) –2t – 33t + 30 2 c) –4w + 53w + 46 2 d) 3d + 12d – 25 1331 343 24. 0.25 d)  16 x 24 y8 d) 5 z x2 y3 5 c) 3b 2 a 3 2 1 2 b) 3 2 b) (6v – w)(4v + 3w) 216 343 81 d) 16 512 f) 125 25 h) .9 3 d) (2n + 1)(5n – 2) 15. 9.5 iii) 5 3  4  . For example. a) 3(c – 10)(c + 2) 2 2 4 2 b) (4 – m)(15 – m) 3  ii) b) 6. one of these: 3 2916 vi) i) 4 3 50 . 4 150 . 0. a) 25 5 c) 3 i) 2 18. 3. –5. a) 27 d) 5(4 – 3a)(5 – 4a) c) –0. or 6. –24. 3 90 . 30 ii) 3 3 4 iv) 5 17 v) 6 3 3 b) i) 4 6 iii) 2 4 9 21. … 3 ii) ANSWERS Enfocus Software . –6. 3 90 . –12. a) a) 15. Answers may vary. a) (n + 11)(n – 2) b) c) (2r + 5)(3r + 4)  96 3 2. a) (5n + 4) 26.2 c) –49 + 16g 20. a) 2 d) 6k + 13k – 63 vi) 2 4 22 75 i) iii) 22.92 4 25. –7. 4 250 . 3. –15. a) 2x + 3x – 19x + 15 2 b) 2a – ab – 6a – 10b – 12b 2 c) 12 – t – t + 9s – 3st 2 d) 2n + 3n – 8n – 7n + 4 2 17. a) a b c) (9c – 13d)(9c + 13d) 2 d) (3a – 5b) 19.42 b) 0. or   c) 17. or  3 5  4.8 5 iii) b) –5(h + 7)(h – 3) 4 50 40 63  7 4 4 i) 8.25 4 b) c) 3(8c + 3)(c – 4) 3 . or 3  2. –14. … 14.002 43 2 e) 4(t – 6) f) 2(4 + w)(8 – w) e) g) 3(6r – 7s)(6r + 7s) h) –2(5x – 3y)(7x + 2y) 2 1 8 g) 27 16.5  3 5   4    2 8 3 ii)   6 23.

(hockey. 5). 3). 2.Customer Support in kilograms. (Sockeye. racquet). ii) As a set of ordered pairs: {(penny. (Huguette Gauthier.05). (soccer. a) The relation shows the association “has a typical mass. (hockey. (nickel.10).00)} As an arrow diagram: b) i) The relation shows the association “is played with a” from a set of sports to a set of equipment. painting). (James Culleton. in dollars. racquet). (Hubert Théroux. of” from a set of salmon species to a set of masses. a) The relation shows the association “creates art using the medium of” from a set of francophone artists from Manitoba to a set of artistic mediums. (tennis. photography)} ii) As an arrow diagram: ii) As a set of ordered pairs: {(badminton.01). 6)} c) As an arrow diagram: .00). shuttlecock). 4. of” from a set of coins to a set of numbers. (loonie. stick). (Nathalie Dupont. painting). a) i) The relation shows the association “has a value. (toonie. a) As a table: Word blue 4 green 5 orange 6 red 3 yellow 494 Number of Letters 6 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . ball). stained glass). (Coho. 0.1 Representing Relations. (quarter. 1. puck). ball)} As an arrow diagram: 6. b) i) As a set of ordered pairs: {(Gaëtanne Sylvester. (Simone Hébert Allard. photography). sculpture). (tennis. 0. page 254 5. 0. 0. (Chum. (dime. (Pink.b) As an arrow diagram: Chapter 5 Relations and Functions. page 262 3.25). 9). 13). b) As a set of ordered pairs: {(Chinook. 5. (badminton.

For example: As an arrow diagram: Word beginning with Z 3 9. b) Answers may vary. 5). (10. (6. xylophone). Zen). (5. a) {(0. (5. (2. 5). a) As an arrow diagram: xenon Xerox xylem xylophone 10 5 X-ray 9 4 Word beginning with X 5 5 7 5 5 6 5 2 5 4 6 4 Number 0 3 As a set of ordered pairs: {(4. zany). 7). (6. zebra). zombie). b) As a set of ordered pairs: {(3. (4. 1983). (5. (4. and) As a set of ordered pairs: {(Hayley Wickenheiser. 1979). 6)} Some digital clocks may show the number 9 with 5 line segments. (3. b) Representations may vary. (Jennifer Botterill. Xerox). X-ray). 4). For xenophilia 8. (9. xylem). zeppelin)} As a table: Number Zen 4 zany 4 zero 5 zebra 6 zombie 7 Zamboni 8 zeppelin (8. (8. 6). (Jordin Tootoo. 1979)} ANSWERS Enfocus Software . (9.7. xenon). yes) and (et. (4. a) The diagram shows a relation with the association “translates to” from the set of French words to the set of English words. 2). 5).Customer Support 495 . zero). Zamboni). (7. (5. (5. 3). 1978). (7. (1. xenophilia)} As a table: Number of lit segments 2 example: As an arrow diagram: Digit 1 c) Chosen words and representations may vary. (Roberto Luongo. 1980). For example: Two ordered pairs that satisfy the relation are: (oui. 6). As a table of values: 6 3 8 7 9 6 10. a) The arrow diagram shows a relation with the association “is the number of letters in” from a set of numbers to a set of words beginning with the letter Z. (Jonathan Cheechoo.

–0. 12. a) Function. 4}. a) 6 children Hockey Player Birth Year Hayley Wickenheiser 1978 Jennifer Botterill 1979 Jonathan Cheechoo 1980 Jordin Tootoo 1983 Roberto Luongo 1979 b) 4 parents c) 2 grandparents 14. rectangle.39. (4. (4. (1979. 2440. 4)} b) No 496 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) d = 3t – 5 b) y = –6x + 4 c) C = 5n d) P = 2n – 7 8. isosceles triangle. 4. 6). 3). range: {4. (1. 6. domain: {2. square. younger person) b) Other associations include: “is taller than” “is involved in more school groups than” “usually wakes up earlier than” 12. 2). (3. 3} 6. 6. parallelogram. (6. (3. domain: {1. parallelogram. 2). 3660. (1. isosceles triangle. 10. 1}. hexagon. 6. right triangle. (1. rectangle. range: {3. range: {3. 3). 6. 9.1. 7. 1). (5. 7} 9. a) C(n) = 20n + 8 c) t(d) = 5d b) P(n) = n – 3 d) f(x) = –x 7. (3. 5). (1983. 0. 5. …}. Answers may vary. Jennifer Botterill). 3. (5. 1). (2. 3. …}. range: {–1.1. 0. 2). right triangle. 11. 6). (2.1. a) Function. pentagon. range: {15. 6} 11. 2. 9} d) Not a function. 6). 4). (1979. Jonathan Cheechoo). 6. (6. (2.0. 4. 4. 5. (3. pentagon. trapezoid}. (4. 5). 2.8. 4). (6. (5. rhombus. independent variable: n iii) Domain: {1. 8}. Jordin Tootoo)} As a table: Birth Year Hockey Player 1978 Hayley Wickenheiser 1979 Jennifer Botterill 1979 Roberto Luongo 1980 Jonathan Cheechoo 1983 Jordin Tootoo 11. 3). square. 1). 8. 5. 1} b) As an arrow diagram: c) Function. (4. 2). 6}. (1980. 6)} ii) {(1. 6). range: {2. (4.Customer Support b) i) Function ii) Dependent variable: T. 4). Answers may vary.00. (6. range: {3. 64} b) Not a function.00. hexagon. (2. trapezoid} Part b: domain: {equilateral triangle. a) 2 females b) 3 males 5. 6). domain: {–1. (6.00. 5). Roberto Luongo). 1). 2}.8. independent variable: A iii) Domain: {610. domain: {0. 3). rhombus. scalene triangle. 3). 4}. range: {1.39. Hayley Wickenheiser). 1. 1830. range: {1. 4. a) i) Function ii) Dependent variable: C. (3. 5. 1). (4. 3). a) Function b) Not a function c) Function 5.2 Properties of Functions. 8. domain: {1. 3. 4). 4. 3050. For example: a) Ordered pairs should be in the form: (older person. …} b) Function c) Part a: domain: {3. –4. 27. …} As a set of ordered pairs: {(1978. 5. 1). 4). (6. range: { equilateral triangle. domain: {3}. 5). a) Not a function Name From Name Age Marie Edmonton Marie 13 Gabriel Falher Gabriel 16 Élise Bonnyville Élise 14 Christophe Calgary Christophe 13 Jean Edmonton Jean 15 Mélanie Edmonton Mélanie 15 Nicole Red Deer Nicole 17 Marc Légal Marc 13 . 3. 7. (5. (2. 2).39. 12} b) Not a function. 1220. 5). a) i) {(1. For example: a) Functions: 10. (5. 2. (3. (1.As a table: 13. 2. scalene triangle. page 270 4.

a length of 12 in.b) Not functions: Age ii) m(20) = 128.2) = 5 15. t ( s )  11  2 s .521.5 2 b) i) x = –8 17 ii) x = . As a table: Material Object bark basket skin drum skin kayak stone carving stone inukshuk b) In words: This relation shows the association “has this many factors” from the natural numbers from 1 to 4 to a set of natural numbers. 2). c) i = 39. or 3. 17. a) f(1) = 6 b) f(–3) = 26 c) f(0) = 11 d) f(1. P (l )  2l  l 22. 2). Age 13 Marie Edmonton 13 16 Gabriel Falher 16 14 Élise Bonnyville 14 13 Christophe Calgary b) 13 15 Jean Edmonton 15 15 Mélanie Edmonton 15 17 Nicole Red Deer 17 13 Marc Légal 13 12. As an arrow diagram: b) The first table represents a function. range: 5  t  8 Q Z have a humerus length of approximately 26 cm.Customer Support 497 . (3.6257….5  s  3 . l ( w)  6  w . 19. Variables may differ.48. a) i) n = 9 1 . a) Letter Number Number Letter A 1 1 A D 2 1 T F 4 2 2 2 G M 3 3 M Q 10 4 F T 1 8 X X 8 10 10 10 a humerus length of approximately 43 cm. 13. a male who is 194 cm tall will have D G i) l = 25.6082…. a female whose humerus is 15 cm long will be approximately 113 cm tall. Let c represent a temperature in degrees Celsius. Let F represent the same temperature in 9 degrees Fahrenheit. or 0.3700…. 1). a) In words: This relation shows the association “is used to make” from a set of materials to a set of objects. a male whose humerus is 20 cm Name From long will be approximately 129 cm tall.48 cm. range: 0  l  6 23. a) D(t) = –80t + 300 b) 300 km 18. (2.4 5 ii) n = 16. As a set of ordered pairs: {(1. a) C = 2. a length of 100 cm is approximately equal to a length of 39 in.785. a female who is 142 cm tall will Z Chapter 5: Checkpoint 1. F ( c )  c  32 5 18 21. a) i) C(50) = 10 ii) C(–13) = –25 b) i) f = 68 ii) f = –31 c) i) C(32) = 0 ii) C(212) = 100 iii) C(356) = 180 20. ii) l = 42. domain: 1. (4. domain: 0  w  6 . The statement in part a is true. 14. 3)} ANSWERS Enfocus Software . page 275 1. a) i) f(15) = 112. is equal to a length of 30.54i b) C(12) = 30.

A temperature of 50°C occurs at a depth of 3 km below Earth’s surface. (4. b) Part b: domain: {1. (5. sea. approximately 2. 1). (1. snow}. sky. For example: a) i) {(1. (3. (7. 3). 1). (sea. and 24:00 (midnight) c) Approximately 6. Answers may vary. 3. Graph B 498 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 3). range: {1. d) d = 3. approximately 650 kg b) Bear A.3 Interpreting and Sketching Graphs. green). white)} As a table: Object sea blue sky 1 1 3 1 5 7 blue snow 1 1 green Number Colour grass Number white ii) As an arrow diagram: d) As a set of ordered pairs: {(2. (sky. 400 kg d) Bears D and H. 1).As an arrow diagram: b) i) As an arrow diagram: As a table of values: c) In words: This relation shows the association “is usually coloured” from a set of objects to a set of colours. 09:40. 3} Part c: domain: {grass. As a set of ordered pairs: {(grass. (4. a) 8 m. 7)} ii) {(1. (1. (1. blue). independent variable: d b) T = 10d + 20 c) T(5) = 70. 7)} 4.25 m 4. range: {blue. 2). 00:00 (midnight). 14:20. (4. page 281 3. approximately 0. a) Dependent variable: T. 5). (snow. 12:00 (noon). (3. 2. white} 3.Customer Support . At a depth of 5 km below Earth’s surface. 4}. 3)} As an arrow diagram: As a table of values: Number Number 1 1 3 3 5 5 7 7 As a table: Number Number 2 1 3 1 3 2 4 1 4 2 4 3 2. blue). a) Bear F. 06:00 and 18:00 b) 2 m.7 m c) Bears D and E. 2. the temperature is 70°C. 5. and 21:40 5. 1). (3. 5). 2). 1). a) The relations in parts b and c are functions. green.5 m d) At approximately 02:20.

Situation: A watering can contains 4 L of water. For example: a) Situation: A person lets go of a helium balloon. ANSWERS Enfocus Software . After 5 s of running at 7. The water is poured at a steady rate so the watering can is empty after 30 s. b) 13. 16. Answers may vary. the volume should be below 40 because Jonah turns the volume down. 15. Then he walks home.5 km away in 10 min. the graph should be a vertical line from 80 to 0 because the mute button immediately silences the television. b) 25 L.5 m/s. He sits on a park bench and reads for 10 min. It takes the person 5 s to reach a speed of 7. From 3 min to 4 min. The balloon starts at a height of 2. For example: a) 12.Customer Support 499 . a) True b) False c) True d) False b) e) False 9. 14. Situation: A person sprints down a street starting from a standstill. Answers may vary. After 10 s.8. For example: a) i) Situation: A person walks from home to a park 1. it is at a height of 15 m above the ground. At 9 min. Answers may vary. the person slows down and stops in 5 s.5 m above the ground. no 10.5 m/s.

and $3 to park from 60 min to 90 min. As the wheel goes around. page 286 1. It costs $1 to park for up to 30 min.ii) 18. a) i) The points are joined because air temperature and speed can have any numerical value between those indicated by the points on the graph. It takes 0.4 Math Lab: Graphing Data. then up again. a) 5. b) ii) Yes b) i) The points are not joined because the data are only Situation: The cost of parking in a parking garage.2 s for a grasshopper to jump 20 cm high. valid for whole numbers of years. Situation: The height of a point on the rim of a tire on a truck over time. Situation: The height of a grasshopper during one hop.2 s for it to return to the ground. then down. the point moves up to a maximum height of 50 cm. ii) Yes c) 500 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . $2 to park from 30 min to 60 min. and another 0. 17. 25 cm above the ground.Customer Support . The point starts at the lowest point on the rim.

a) b) b) Domain: {–3.2. 3. domain: {1. domain: x  2.5 Graphs of Relations and Functions. 0. 0. 65} Restrictions: the domain can be any time between 00:00 and 24:00. h range: {2. dependent variable: n The points are not connected because it is impossible to have part of a car in a parking lot. i) Independent variable: time. a) Domain: all real numbers. range: 3  y  0 d) Domain: 1  x  2 . 3} c) Domain: {–3. The domain is also restricted because the relationship shown on the graph may not be true for speeds less than 40 km/h and greater than 120 km/h. b) The relation is a function because there is only one cost for each number of cans. –2. 2. distance from the school ii) Independent variable: time. range: 0  y  3 10. For example: domain: {8:00. range: {2} c) 5. range: {4. b) Exact numbers for the range may vary. domain: x   2 . 1. d) The points on the graph should be connected. 0. range: 1  y  5 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 2. 5}. –1. 1. A vertical line drawn on each graph intersects the graph at 0 points or 1 point. 31. –1. Independent variable: t. –2. 2. page 294 4. b) No. a) Function. 7. range: 16  d  144 The relation is a function because there is only one value of temperature for each altitude. 2. c) The points on the graph should be connected. a) The points on the graph are connected because the car’s speed and skid length can be any positive number of kilometres per hour and metres. domain: –3  x  1. 12. 0. dependent variable: 14. 4. 12:00. range: 2  y  4 e) Not a function. 0. between the plotted points. range: 1  y  3 b) Not a function. 3}. 4} 13. range: y  1 b) Domain: 3  x  3 . 64. domain: all real numbers. 5} d) Function. range: {–4. a) Domain: {–2. all the possible times in one day. a) i) The distance of a school bus from the school from 8:00 to 9:00. a) iv b) i c) ii d) iii 8.Customer Support 501 . 1. 25. The range can be any whole number up to the number of parking spaces in the lot. Graph B: points are not connected because it is impossible to have only part of a student on a bus. 11. –1. For example: domain: 40  s  120 . 2. 4. range: {–2. Independent variable: number of days after January 1. 14:00. dependent variable: number of hours the sun is above the horizon. respectively. each point on the line has a different x-coordinate. 9. range: 0  y  3 c) Domain: 3  x  3 . 6. b) The points are joined because all values of altitude and temperature are permissible between those plotted. each point on the line has the same x-coordinate. a) The points are not joined because only whole numbers are permissible for the number of juice cans purchased. range: y  –1 c) Not a function. 10:00. dependent variable: number of students c) Graph A: points are connected because all values of time and distance are permissible between the indicated plotted points. 1. 3}. a) Yes. 5. a) Restrictions: the domain and range cannot contain negative numbers because it is impossible to have a negative skid distance or a negative speed. 3. Exact numbers for the range may vary. b) The points on the graph should be connected. a) The points on the graph should not be connected. ii) The number of students on a school bus from 8:00 to 9:00. 2}. 16:00}.

Answers may vary. range: 0  A  68 16. a) b) b) 502 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . c) From the table: the relation is a function because each number in the first column is different. From the graph: the relation is a function because a vertical line drawn on the graph would intersect the graph in only 1 point. The data are discrete. range: 0  A  68 Part c: domain: 0  c  96 . they would make a line segment. a) –1 b) 3 17. p (L) 0 2 4 6 8 Cost. a) 5 b) 3 18. a) Volume of Paint. but the scale is so small that if all the points were plotted. c ($) 0 24 48 72 96 Area Covered. For example: c) I connected the points because the relationship shown on the graph is true for days represented by points between the ones plotted. d) Part b: domain: 0  p  8 . For example: 15.b) Answers may vary. range: 2  y  4 19.Customer Support . A (m2) 0 17 34 51 68 Domain: 2  x  4 .

Yes 23.67 15 150 b) 21. Total money received ($) 1 c) I would choose Payment Scheme 1 because after 40 1. For example: ANSWERS Enfocus Software .27 7 70 8 2. 2.01 1 0.95 12 120 13 81. 1. range: {0.55 8 80 9 5. 5. 84} 0.03 2 20 3 0.23 10 100 11 20. a) 5 5 50 6 0.18. range: {1. 10. 29.96. page 299 10 2 13 days.15 4 Chapter 5: Checkpoint 2. 12. 19}.75} 22.47 11 110 12 40.54.91 13 130 14 The points are not joined because each point represents a planet and their number is limited.11 9 90 10 10.20. b) Domain: {1. 24. Answers may vary. a) Payment Scheme 1 Payment Scheme 2 Day Total money received ($) Day 0.31 163.07 3 30 4 0.83 14 140 15 327.63 6 60 7 1. a) b) Domain: all real numbers greater than 0 and less than or equal to 500. 1.Customer Support 503 . 0.98. The statement is false. the money received is greater and increases at a faster rate.

iii) 2. range: 1  y  5 b) Function. 18}. range: {45. range: 8  y  8 5. iv. page 308 3.6 Properties of Linear Relations. 15. dependent variable: d ii) Not linear b) i) Independent variable: t. dependent variable: a ii) Linear iii) –200 m/min 7. 17. a) Linear relation b) Not a linear relation v) c) Not a linear relation 5.Customer Support b) The relations in part a. domain: 0  x  2. v. domain: 2  x  2 . and vi are straight lines. a) . a) Linear relation c) Not a linear relation b) Linear relation d) Not a linear relation 6.5 2 504 11. ii. range: y  0 c) Function. For example: i) x y –2 4 x y –1 6 –2 8 0 8 0 6 1 10 2 4 2 12 4 2 6 0 x y –2 11 vi) ii) –1 0 12 1 12. domain: x  3 . 90} 3. 65. a) Not a function. i) Independent variable: s. 64.5 13 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) x y –2 12 –1 9 0 8 1 9 2 12 x y –2 –4 –1 –2 0 0 1 2 2 4 iv) b) No c) Domain: {14. so they are linear relations. i. a) Tables of values may vary. 56. a) Linear relation b) Not a linear relation c) Linear relation d) Not a linear relation 4. 50.

dependent variable: fee. rate of change: –50 m/min. every year. times the independent variable. I could examine the change in the first and second coordinates. Yes The first set of ordered pairs does not represent a linear relation. Otherwise. the relation is linear. 0). If the differences are constant or the points lie along a line. 19. (0. Then. 16.08/min. dependent variable: taxi fee. 400) ii) 100 ft. iv) Independent variable: number of yearbooks to be printed. I could also graph the ordered pairs. If both changes are constant. Kashala pays $0.08. 100). a) i) Vertical intercept: 0. horizontal intercept: 4. (4. For example: Create a table of values for the relation. 0) ii) 40 km/h iii) Domain: 0  t  3 . plus a constant. b) The relation is not linear because the points on the graph do not lie on a straight line. 8. The equation V = 24 000(0. C. 21. it is not linear. the fee increases by $5. (0. at every toll booth. (0. (0. dependent variable: hang glider’s altitude. the hang glider’s altitude decreases by 50 m. a) True b) True c) False d) True e) False 5. 15. dependent variable: C b) $0. range: 600  A  1000 6. For example: 10.iii) Independent variable: distance travelled. a) ANSWERS Enfocus Software . (0. 1000) ii) –50 ft./min iii) Domain: 0  t  8 . b) –$2000/year. 550. 9. 20. 17. every minute. range: 0  d  100 5. the relation is not linear. Answers may vary. rate of change: $5/yearbook./min iii) Domain: 0  t  8 . page 319 4. the fee increases by $2. cost per guest Answers may vary. 22. a) Independent variable: t. the relation is linear. every minute. every kilometre. n. a) Linear b) Not linear c) Not linear d) Linear e) Not linear a) The equation V = 24 000 – 2000n is linear.2n) is not linear.80.7 Interpreting Graphs of Linear Functions. 0) ii) –25 km/h iii) Domain: 0  t  4 . to the rate of change. 13. For example: The equation relates the dependent variable. If the points lie on a straight line. either check the differences in the numbers in each column or plot the points. the value of the truck depreciates by $2000 Yes. 12. a) Answers may vary.80/booth. No. –$0. a) 18. a) Equation 3 and Set B b) Equation 1 and Set C c) Equation 2 and Set A a) i) Linear ii) Not linear iii) Linear iv) Linear v) Not linear b) i) Independent variable: time since the hang glider started her descent. 15. the relation is linear. b) 15. the cost of the phone call increases by $0. range: 0  d  120 b) i) Vertical intercept: 100. a) i) 400. range: 400  A  1200 b) i) 1000. 11. The second set of ordered pairs represents a linear relation. horizontal intercept: 0. the relation is linear.Customer Support 505 . 14. rate of change: $2/km. for every yearbook to be printed.

0). a) 2.128 L/km. a) c) b) d) c) 2 2 7.80 from –40 to 200. b) $14 c) 4 km 11. range: 0  C  800 d) d) $560 e) 4.06 L/km. where n is a whole number. the Smart car uses less fuel per kilometre. a) Vertical intercept: 0.80 per bar sold b) Vertical intercept: –40. (0. every litre of paint covers an area of 9 m .5 h. a) It takes longer to fill the empty tank. it represents the loss when 0 bars are sold: $40. b) i) Approximately 33 sweatshirts ii) $15 15.Customer Support 16. or 2 h 30 min b) 24 km/h c) 60 km 2 d) 1 h. horizontal intercept: 50. a) ii b) iii 9. it represents the number of bars that must be sold to reach the break-even point. For example: b) The scale on the axes is so small that it would be impossible to distinguish every point on the graph. . the cost of running the backhoe for 0 h is $0.50/km. each hour that the backhoe is run increases the cost by $80. a) 9 m /L. Smart car: approximately 0. range: all multiples of 0.50. a) Answers may vary. a) $1. 2 b) 54 m c) 5 L 8. horizontal intercept: 0. a) $0. I wouldn’t want to list all the values in the range because there are 301 of them. 3 b) 25 m of fuel 506 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . when no profit is made and there is no loss: 50 bars c) Domain: 0  n  300 . every kilometre driven costs an additional $1. 12. SUV: approximately 0. Estimates may vary. b) $80/h.5 h 10. or 1 h 40 min 3 13.14. c) Domain: 0  t  10 .

(silver. a) The table shows a relation with the association “has this cultural heritage” from a set of artists to a set of First Nations heritages. For example: A car’s distance silver 47 from home as it travels away at an average speed of 85 km/h. page 326 Atomic Number hydrogen 6 carbon 8 oxygen 17 chlorine 26 iron 47 silver ANSWERS Enfocus Software .5 As a set of ordered pairs: {(carbon. a) b) There are no intercepts on the graph because the relation does not apply to people less than 10 years of age and older than 90 years of age. 20. 8). For example: a) As a table: Element Atomic Number carbon 6 chlorine 17 hydrogen 1 iron 26 oxygen 8 d) Contexts may vary. for every additional year of age.17.Customer Support 507 . it moves 1 km closer to Duke Point. 1). Squamish). but the line on the graph would stay the same. only the 1st quadrant of the graph is relevant. In this context. As an arrow diagram: b) f(5) = 425 c) t = 2. a) ii) As an arrow diagram: 2. (iron. Tlingit). Approximately –0. Morgan. so the intercepts have the same value. y-intercept: –5 ii) x – y = 5 19. For example: b) c) d) 18. a) The vertical intercept represents the person’s distance from Duke Point when starting the journey at Parksville. b) i) As a set of ordered pairs: {(Bob Dempsey. (chlorine. y-intercept: 5 ii) x + y = 5 i) x-intercept: 5. 6). b) –1. 47)} b) As a table: 1.8 (beats/min)/year. 17). the recommended maximum heart rate decreases by approximately 1 beat/min. (Judith P. (Bill Helin. Haida). (Dorothy Grant. (hydrogen. Representations may vary. Haida). (oxygen. 26). (Bill Reid. Approximately 77 years of age Approximately 126 beats/min i) x-intercept: 5. The distance between the two locations doesn’t change. (John Joseph. Salish)} Element 1 Chapter 5: Review. a) Answers may vary. Gitxsan). The horizontal intercept represents the person’s distance from Parksville after completing the journey at Duke Point. Tsimshian). c) Interchanging the dependent and independent variables would interchange the labels on the axes. for every 1 km the car moves away from Parksville. (Susan Point.

14:00. in centimetres. independent variable: distance Liam hikes I joined the points because all times between 0 min and 30 min are permissible and all temperatures between 50°C and 89°C are permissible. n c) i) Estimates may vary. 16:00. 168. V ii) Independent variable: height of the jar. a) As a set of ordered pairs: {(1. b) i) Independent variable: height of the jar. (17. For example: Graph D could represent Laura’s journey to school to pick up her bike. oxygen). (6.Customer Support i) . For example: Domain: 5  h  20 . For example: a) b) The graph represents a function because a vertical line drawn on the graph passes through one point. The points are not joined in Graph B because only whole numbers of marbles are permissible. h.0 L of water Dependent variable: volume of water in Liam’s flask. 176} b) Function. (26. Tables of values may vary. 20. 161. 170. (47. as a linear function of its height. domain: {13. 56} d) The points are joined in Graph A because it is possible for a jar to have any height between 5 cm and 20 cm and any volume between 400 cm3 and 1575 cm3. hydrogen). 18:00}. a) b) c) d) 4. carbon). h. 5. a) b) c) d) 6. She walks to school. a) b) 7. 12:00. Graphs may vary. a) –2 b) –1 12. 42. silver)} Not a function Function Function Not a function f(x) = –4x + 9 C(n) = 12n + 75 D(t) = –20t + 150 P(s) = 4s P = 5n – 300 Independent variable: n. a) b) c) d) 5. domain: {08:00. ii) Graph B represents the number of marbles in a jar as a linear function of the jar’s height. 165.As an arrow diagram: 9. dependent variable: number of marbles in the jar. b) c) d) 8. a) Not a function. 10. 11. iron). Estimates may vary. in cubic centimetres. 10:00. Graph A Answers may vary. range: {14. if 150 students attend the dance. 174. a) Linear relation b) Linear relation c) Not a linear relation 14. range: {2. the profit is $450. 15. 20}. 14. then picks up her bicycle and rides home. For example: a) b) 13. 16. 25} i) Graph A represents the volume of a jar. range: {159. 17}. 508 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . chlorine). range: approximately 400  V  1575 10. the profit is $700 when 200 students attend the dance. dependent variable: volume of the jar. a) 3. n = 200. (8. ii) Domain: {5. 10. in centimetres. 28. dependent variable: P P(150) = 450. 15. 2 times 2.

For example: Domain: {–3. the bicycle covers a distance of approximately 2 m. page 329 1. doubling the number of caps does not double the profit. ANSWERS Enfocus Software . b) i) Function ii) Representations may vary. she gives herself of a unit of insulin.ii) Table: x y –2 11 –1 5 0 3 1 5 2 11 x y –2 –1 –1 1 0 3 1 5 2 7 16. or 68 cm ii iii i 201 caps $4 i) 350 caps ii) 500 caps The profit depends on the sale of caps and the initial cost of $800 to buy or make the caps. a) 6000 m. For example: Domain: {–3. –1. …}. B 2. For example: Domain: 2  x  8 .1 m/revolution. vi 15. 15 1 b) . or 6 km b) Domain: 0  n  2800 . iii. 4. c) i) Function ii) Representations may vary. 9. in one revolution of d) 17. range: 0  d  6000 iii) c) Approximately 2. C iv) 3. range: {2. range: 1  y  4 As an equation: 1 y = – x + 3. iv. –1.Customer Support 509 . when 1 g changes by 1. Chapter 5: Practice Test. 1. 1. a) b) c) 18. 4. 2}. a) b) c) d) the wheel. Approximately 0. range: {1. a) The equation represents a linear relation because. So.68 m. v. N changes by . a) i) Function ii) Representations may vary. For every 1 g of carbohydrate that Isabelle 15 1 consumes. 2. …} As a graph: The function is not linear because the points on the graph do not lie on a line. for 2  x  8 2 The function is linear because the graph is a nonvertical line. 0. 5. 6} As a graph: v) x y –2 –6 –1 –3 0 0 1 3 2 6 x y –1 4 0 3 1 2 2 1 3 0 vi) b) i. 15 The function is not linear because the points on the graph do not lie on a line.

. 5. d) Domain: 4  m  10 . Sketches may vary. then walks the remaining 4 km home in 30 min. run: 2.0 e) 0. slope: –3 7. She talks to her friend for 10 min. slope:  1 4 3 4 d) Rise: –6. range: 2.25 h. Sketches may vary. run: 8. run: 4. a) Negative b) Positive c) Not defined d) Zero 6. a) 3 7 b) – 2 1 c) 2 1 d)  2 8.5  t  4. slope: 1 2 b) Rise: –2.25 h or 3 h 15 min Chapter 6 Linear Functions. independent variable: mass c) b) c) I connected the points because both time and mass are not discrete data. Situation: Jamie’s school is 20 km from her home. rate 1 of change:  2 4. the time d) needed to cook the turkey increases by 0. She arrives at her friend’s home 20 min after she left school. which is 4 km from her own home. a) The relation is a function because no number is repeated in the first column. slope: a) 5. b) Dependent variable: time.Customer Support 9. a) 11 510 2 b) 7 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . c) Rise: 3. run: 6. dependent variable: y.iii) Independent variable: x. for every additional kilogram. f) 3. page 330 6.1 Slope of a Line. The lines may be in different positions on the grid but they should have the same orientations as those shown. a) Rise: 3.25 h/kg. page 339 2 4. Jamie rides her friend’s bike from school to her friend’s home. The line segments may have different lengths but they should have the same orientations as those shown.

1 2 1 b) 2 c) The slopes in parts a and b are equal. c) 17. 1 a) . b) The slope of a vertical line is undefined because its run is 0. a) i) 2 ii) 2 1 iii) –3 iv) 3 i) The slopes of the segments are equal. y increases by 1. iii) As x increases by 1. on the same line have the same slope. ii) As x increases by 2. 12.Customer Support 511 . The slopes of BE and CD are equal.. a) Diagrams may vary. 1 c) 4 in. 14. For example: 11. iv) As x increases by 3. 1 a) 3 Positions of lines on the grid may vary. I cannot divide by 0. For example: a) b) Similarities: the line segments have the same slope. Diagrams may vary.b) a) i) As x increases by 1. The two different slopes are opposites. or 0. all segments i) ii) ANSWERS Enfocus Software . that is.06 15 1 b) 13 in. 16. y increases by 1. d) 18. 2 a) Line iv b) Line iii c) Line ii d) Line i 3 a) i)  5 3 ii) 5 3 iii)  5 3 iv) 5 b) The slopes of BC and ED are equal. 2 1 a)  48 b) 312 in. a) The slope of a horizontal line is 0 because its rise is 0. b) b) 15. 21. differences: they pass through different points 1 13. y decreases by 3. and the quotient of any number and 0 is undefined. 20. y increases by 2. or 26 ft. and the quotient of 0 and any number is zero. a) a) 19.

3). 8). $0.7 g/cm 3 c) The slope shows that for every 1 cm increase in the d) e) 26. –1) d) (–1. (–6. or 8. a) c) d) iv) Not defined b) Sketches may vary. –3) c) (–8. 2). a) 22. (–3. –1). For example: b) Slope of OB is 2. (–9. (–13. a) Positions of point A may vary. (–1. a) a) (–4. a) i) Positive ii) Positive iii) Negative b) d) e) 27. –3).5 g 3 i) Approximately 37 cm 3 ii) Approximately 167 cm The number of text messages is restricted to whole numbers. –7) b) (–7. For example: volume of an aluminum cube. 0). $45/month b) $505 $55 Assumptions may vary.15. i) 135 g ii) 742. (1. Coordinates may vary. 28. a) 2 b) 2 3 29. the mass of the cube increases by 2. For example: I assumed that Charin continues to save the same amount each month after the 5th month and that the savings account did not earn any interest. 840 cm. For example: I assumed that all messages cost the same. –6).iii) 25. tanAOB = 2 512 ANSWERS Enfocus Software .4 m 23.Customer Support . or 15¢ c) $4. No 30. (–7. 5).7 g. –13) 24. For example: 3 b) 2.95 48 text messages Assumptions may vary. (–2.

Customer Support 513 . 2 4 3 c) 3 d) 0 4. 3). –1) ii) Perpendicular c) i) J(–2. a) 5 b)  10. 4). 5). 2) and G(2. Both the slope and the tangent are equal to the quotient of the same two numbers.5. N(–4. (3. F(3. or approximately 0. –4). –2) ii) Neither d) i) P(0. –6) ANSWERS Enfocus Software . a) i) A(–5. a) Both lines have positive slopes. or 1. a)  b) 6 7 8 5 5. 11. i) E(–3.6. a) 4 i)  9 3 .2 Slopes of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines. i) 7 3 ii)  d) 3 7 i) –4 1 4 7. 2 c) Answers may vary. Q(6.b) c) i) 5 1 5 ii)  c) Slope of OB is 2 2 . a) Slope of AB is 4 3. page 349 b) Both lines have positive slopes. 2). K(1.5. –2). 1). –4). Yes. which are reciprocals. (3. For example: (1. the slope of the line through the golfer’s club and the slope of the line through the golfer’s feet are the same: 1 approximately  6 ii) 8.7. 31. 5) and C(–1. a) The slope is tan 30°. or approximately 1. a) Perpendicular b) Parallel c) Neither c) No d) Neither 6. 5). tanAOB = 5 5 d) The slope of a line segment is equal to the tangent of the angle formed by the segment and the positive x-axis. 1) ii) Neither b) b) The slope is tan 60°. B(1. 2) and R(–4. H(0. a) Parallel c) Neither 6. For example: (0. which are reciprocals. –1). 5) 2 d) Slope of AE is  . D(4. or 1. 3 b) Slope of CD is 1 c) – 9 1 d) 5 b) Neither d) Perpendicular 9 ii) 4 e) Answers may vary. –3) ii) Parallel 9. S(0. 3 . –3) and M(3.

c) In each case. (–9. For example: The slope of a line is 1 . a) Slope of AB is –2. (–6. The diagonals intersect at right angles. 3 so DE and EF are perpendicular: slope of DE: . The positions of the lines on the grids and their labels may vary. –2) b) 1 2 .Customer Support 6. 1). so we can use any two points that form that segment to determine the slope of the line. 7).6 h. 22. Yes. –2). 2 2 slope of EF:  3 c) Parallel 18. For example: (3. Slope of AB:  b) Slope of CD is –2. Coordinates may vary. b) D(–2. 2.1 . 1) b) (5. 0) and (0. c = –2 514 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . or 0. Trapezoid b) Perpendicular 15. or 2 h 36 min 5. page 353 1. 2 e) (4. a) 25 km/h. –5) 21. 0) and (0. the line segment that joins the midpoints of two sides of a triangle is parallel to the third side of the triangle. Jordan’s average speed b) Approximately 31 km c) 2.5.2 5 12. 1).25 4 1 b) a = 1 . For example: a) Neither b) No 14. The slopes of BC and AC are negative reciprocals. so BC and AC are perpendicular: slope of BC: –2. 2) . (6. slope of CD: 4 3 15 4 5 3 3. or 3. For example: a) (2. a) No. The slopes of DE and EF are negative reciprocals. 1 slope of AC: 2 17. a)  c) (–1. or 1. –2) d) Slope of EF is 13. 19. (6. a) a = 3 Chapter 6: Checkpoint 1. Coordinates may vary. 4. Triangles may vary. –1) 20. Rhombuses may vary. –2). 23. (2. Answers may vary. No 16. no pairs of slopes are negative reciprocals. a) Yes equal to the slope of any segment of the line.

a). that is. b) 4 . y-intercept: –7 b) Slope: 1. $15 per person. 7. d) 2. b represents the initial cost of $550 to rent the hall. No. For example: (–12. a) 4. y  x  2 . y-intercept: 0 e) Slope: 5 c) Slope:  f) Slope: 0. no two of the three slopes of the sides of the triangle 6. page 356 1. (0. –5) 6. a) Slope: 4. a) All the graphs have slope 1. then plot a point using the slope.4 Slope-intercept Form of the Equation for a Linear Function. page 362 4. Answers may vary. 8. y-intercept: 12 5. y-intercept:  8 1 . I could plot the y-intercept.7. y-intercept: 7 9 3 d) Slope: 11. 6. y-intercept: 3 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . y   x3 3 3 y c). 0). y   x  3 . y   x 1 . The graph has a slope of –3 and a y-intercept of 6. a) All the graphs have y-intercept –1. y  x 1. b) b) m represents the slope or rate of change. a) From top to bottom: 1 1 1 x  4 . b) are negative reciprocals. y  x  3 2 2 b) From top to bottom: 1 1 1 y   x  4 .Customer Support 515 . 2 2 2 1 1 y  x  2. 3 3 3 1 1 y   x2.3 Math Lab: Investigating Graphs of Linear Functions. 3. m represents the slope and b represents the y-intercept of the line.

a) y  7 x  16 3 b) y   x  5 8 7 x3 c) y  16 6 d) y   x  8 5 5 e) y   x 12 6. Sketches may vary. a) C  50t  80 9.Customer Support b) C  40t  100 .50 516 ANSWERS Enfocus Software .02 d  3. F  0. For example: b) c) a) b) d) c) e) d) f) 7.5. a) 8.

0). b) y  4 x  3 12.10. m   24 24 y  5 x  7 and y  ANSWERS Enfocus Software . y  5 x  15 and y  5 x  24 .80 n  20 b) $107. or  12 23. 5 1 y  5 x  15 and y   x .5t  700 14. the plane is descending at a speed of 80 m/min. 5 1 y  5 x  15 and y   x  15 . when the plane begins its descent. a) Graph B b) Graph C c) Graph D d) b) Graph A c) Graph D d) Graph A 21. ii) h  87. c   3 3 47 23 . a) c) 460 m d) i) The graph would be a line joining (0. a) The student may have confused the values of the slope and the y-intercept. a) Graph C d) Graph B 19. 5 1 y  5 x  24 and y   x  15 . y-intercept: 1 4 3 x 1 4 y = 8. y-intercept: –2 3 1 y x2 3 16 1 y =  . it is 900 m above the lake. a) Graph C b) Graph D c) Graph B d) Graph A 20. a) i) Slope:  ii) y   1 . or  5 3 3 ii) y  iii) d) i) ii) iii) 13. or  1 24. 5 1 y  5 x  7 and y  x  21 . a) Slope: –80. 5 1 y  5 x  13 and y  x  9 .20 b) c) 125 songs 16. a) y  4 x  1 2 x 1 3 5 c) y   x  7 3 b) y  c) 18. a) C  0. y   x  4 3 38 2 . y-intercept: 2 2 1 x2 2 iii) y = –3 b) i) Slope: 4. a) E  0. 5 1 y  5 x  13 and y  x  21 .Customer Support 517 . Parallel lines: y  5 x  7 and y  5 x  13 . 5 1 y  5 x  24 and y   x 5 4 22. y-intercept: –6 ii) y  4 x  6 iii) y = 34 c) i) Slope: 3 . 5 5 1 1 y   x  15 and y   x 5 5 y 11. 700) and (8. 1 1 x  9 and y  x  21 . h-intercept: 900. b) h  80t  900 Perpendicular lines: 1 x9.05t  34 b) $54 c) $600 17.5 1 Slope:  .

5 2 2 1 y-intercept: . (–3. –4) with slope 2. a) y  2  5( x  4) b) y  8  7( x  6) e) Slope: b) The graph is a line through (–3. (–16. (1. 3 ( x  7) 4 d) y  8  0 . (–15. –6) 7 8 f) Slope:  . –7) c) Slope: 1. x-intercept: 2. a) The graph is a line through (4. a) iii) c) b) i) ii) d) iii) iv) 518 ANSWERS Enfocus Software .5 2 i) y  4   4 ( x  2) 3 ii) y3 . 6. x-intercept: . (2.2 . or  4. x-intercept: 1. b) d) The graph is a line through (2. For example: a) Slope: –4. page 372 4. or 0. y-intercept: 3 3 3 9 2 9 y  x  . 21) 5 5. x-intercept:  . 9.Customer Support 2 ( x  3) 5 5 1 y  2   ( x  1) y  2  ( x  4) iv) 2 3 4 4 4 y   x  . Equations may be written in different forms. 2 5 5 9 y-intercept: 5 1 2 2 y  x  . Coordinates may vary. 3) with slope 1. 0) with slope –1.5 Slope-Point Form of the Equation for a Linear Function. 5) b) Slope: 3. –11) d) Slope: 5. or y  8 c) y  5   6. –2) with slope –3. y-intercept:  3 3 3 5 1 1 y   x  . a) c) The graph is a line through (–5. or 0.5 . (8.7. 0) 4 .

a) y  2  2( x  1) 22. b) Variables and form of the equation may vary. a) –2 b) y  11  2( x  3) c) y  3  2( x  4) 20. the mass of the cylinder and the liquid increases by 1. p  3470  198(t  2) b) Approximately 3866 students 19. and t represent the time in years since 2005. For example: Let v millilitres represent the volume of the liquid. For example: a) y  1  2( x  1) . and M grams represent the mass of the cylinder and liquid. y  3 x  2 d) y  5  2( x  5) . or y  7  3( x  3) . a) 1.Customer Support 519 .26 g. 14. and t represent the time. a) y  6   5 ( x  2) 2 b) y  2   b) y  6  1 ( x  1) 2 2 ( x  2) 5 3 ( x  4) 5 1 b) y  1   ( x  4) 2 24. and the graph of 16.26 g/mL.10. a) b) 11. or y  1  2( x  7) . or y  5  2( x  2) .6(t  10) b) 331 m/s 11. 9 37 y x 2 9 23. a) y  2  2( x  1) 1 ( x  1) 3 2 c) y  1   ( x  2) 3 b) y  2  15. a) Variables and form of the equation may vary. in years. Form of the equation may vary. The graphs are parallel. a) Graph C: slope 2 and y-intercept –5 b) Graph A: slope 1 and y-intercept 1 c) Graph B: slope 2 and y-intercept 5 d) Graph D: slope –1 and y-intercept –5 13. Different variables may be used.1 g d) 26.2 Q(  x1 .26( v  20) c) 64. y  y1  m ( x  x1 ) passes through the point For example: Let M represent the mass of potash in millions of tonnes. y  2 x  15 12. Assumption: I assume that the relation continues for times beyond 2007 and remains linear.2 million tonnes. M  51.6t  8. Form of the equation may vary. a) y  c) 25. or y  7   ( x  4) .5  1.  y1 ) . d) a) Let s represent the speed of sound and t represent the air temperature: s  337  0. M  0.2 million tonnes. since 2001. y5 3 ( x  2) 5 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . y  2 x  1 b) y  2   ( x  5) .3 g 17. The graph of y  y1  m ( x  x1 ) passes through the point P( x1 . a) i) y  3   ii) y  3  b) 4 ( x  5) 3 3 ( x  5) 4 21. Graphs may also be produced on a computer with graphing software. 18. For example: Let p represent the number of students enrolled in francophone schools. For every 1 mL of liquid that is poured into the cylinder. Graphs may show different windows. 14. y1 ) . Slope-point forms of equations may vary. a) Variables and form of the equation may vary. y   x  3 c) y  8  3( x  2) .

a) x-intercept: 3. y-intercept: –8 b) x-intercept: 8. a) c) b) 520 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . y-intercept: –8 d) x-intercept: 13. 25 km/h is Eric’s average speed. d-intercept: 10 km is Eric’s distance from home at the start of his ride. page 376 1. a) Standard form b) General form c) Slope-intercept form d) Slope-point form 5. c) Increase the value of b to get a line with a greater y-intercept. For example: y  5  2( x  1) 6. Decrease the value of b to get a line with a lesser y-intercept.d) Chapter 6: Checkpoint 2. Decrease the value of m to get a line with a lesser slope.6 General Form of the Equation for a Linear Relation.5. a) e) b) Increase the value of m to get a line with a greater slope. a) Slope: 25. a) y  2 x  3 b) Equations may have different forms. b) d  25t  10 c) i) 66. d-intercept: 10. y-intercept: 7 c) x-intercept: 22. Screens may vary. y-intercept: –3 6. a) 4. or 1 h 24 min 3. page 384 4.25 km ii) 1. a) 4 x  3 y  36  0 b) b) 2 x  y  7  0 c) 2 x  y  6  0 d) 5 x  y  1  0 7.Customer Support .4 h. 2.

y-intercept: 12 ii) c) f  s  12  0 d) Pairs of integers may vary. For example: c) i) x-intercept: 8. Let s represent a small pan. y-intercept: –12 ii) 0 and 12. b) b) i) x-intercept: –10. i) 2 x  3 y  42  0 ii) 5 x  4 y  100  0 iii) x  y  2  0 iv) 9 x  5 y  20  0 9.8. b) iv) The x-term should come before the y-term. a) y   d) i) x-intercept: 2. b) Letters for the variables may differ. 3 and 9. 14 and –2. 13 and –1. 12s + 36l = 504 4 x8 3 3 3 b) y  x  8 2 2 c) y  x  3 5 7 10 d) y   x  3 3 12. a). and l represent a large pan. a) i) The coefficient of x is negative. 15 and –3 11. y-intercept: –6 ii) 10. ii) ii) Neither side of the equation is 0. y-intercept: –10 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . iii) The coefficient of x is not a whole number.Customer Support 521 . a) i) x-intercept: 8. 5 and 7.

c) 2t + l = 24 b) 3 c) 5 d) –5 14. 9. a) x  3 y  12  0 b) x  3 y  11  0 c) x  4 y  11  0 d) 9 x  6 y  8  0 . pipe b) 12 pieces of 6-ft. a) c) b) d) c) d) 15. pipe would be needed 3 16. a) b) d) i) No ii) No 17. Graphs may have variables on different axes. a) 9 pieces of 8-ft. Screens may vary.13. and variables may be different.75 pieces of 8-ft. 10 2 pieces of 6-ft. pipe would be needed d) No. a) –4 b). Let l represent the number of loonies and t represent the number of toonies. 522 ANSWERS Enfocus Software .Customer Support 18. pipe c) No.

19. (0. 3). a)  3 4 1 3 d) y =  x + . (–1. 26. Forms of the equations may vary. a) Negative b) Negative c) Zero 3. y + =  (x – 1) 2 3 6 2 b) 2 3 4 5 2. x – 3y + 11 = 0. and g are equivalent. 0). page 388 1. a) Graph B b) Graph A i) ii) (1. y = x + 3 3 3 24. Sketches and coordinates may vary. a) i) ii) (–2. x + 4y +11 = 0. 9x + 6y – 8 = 0.Customer Support 523 . b) 1 1 a) y = x – 4. y =  x – 4 4 4 Chapter 6: Review. For example: 23. Equations in parts d. and h are equivalent. Equations in parts b. y + 3 = (x – 3) 3 3 b) y – 2 = 1 1 11 (x + 5). linear function A B C b) B  0 :  B 28. e. (5. linear function b) Not a linear function c) Not a linear function d) x  3 y  8  0 . f. a) B  0 :  c) y + 3 =  1 1 11 (x – 1). x – 3y – 12 = 0. –2) b) 22. 4) ANSWERS Enfocus Software . –1). 2). a) 3 x  4 y  12  0 . (9.

–2). slope of KM:  1 2 b) Neither.c) i) b) Slope: 12. Equations may vary. Coordinates and forms of the equation may vary. a) b) 21 weeks c) The slope would represent the amount Mason saved each week: $15. Yes. (4. (–1. (1. For example: 4 4 a) y  x  1 and y  x  10 7 7 7 7 b) y   x  1 and y   x  10 4 4 1 16. slope of NP: 3. slope of TU: 3. No. or 6 min 15 s 1 i) 3 ii)  3 6 5 i)  ii) 5 6 8 11 i) ii)  11 8 5. y-intercept: –1 2 3 ii) y   x  1 2 Graph C Graph D Graph A Graph B A  15 w  40 ii) y  b)  4. a) ii) (–5. a) b) c) d) i) 1 ii) –1 7. slope of ST:  1 4 . 3 9 5 2 9. a) b) c) d) 14. y-intercept: 4 slope of SV: i) Slope: 5 .25 min. –5) 3 2 160. y-intercept: 1 3 5 x 1 3 3 i) Slope:  . a) i) 2. Slope is equal to the rate of change. y-intercept: –2 4 b) 13. y  3   ( x  2) 2 17. a) –2 3 . a) Slope: –3. so AB and BC are perpendicular. slope of JH: 2. a) Perpendicular.Customer Support i)  1 . the vertical intercept would represent the amount in his bank account when he started saving: $40 15. a) b) c) 6. she covers a distance of 160 m. 1) 3 . slope of QR: –3 8. –4) ii) iii) y  2  2( x  2) b) 524 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . slope of BC:  2 11. for every 1 min Gabrielle jogs. 4). (–3. i) 640 m ii) 6. 1 Slope of AB: 2. slope of UV:  . The slopes of AB and BC are negative reciprocals.

4 and –2 25. and b represent the number of hours he babysits for the second family. 8) ii) (1. For example: a) Let C represent the cost. 1) 20. Variables may differ. Let n represent the number of new releases and m represent the number of old movies Kylie rents: a) 5n + 3m = 45 ii) b) i) 3 4 ii) 1 3 b) i) No ii) Yes ANSWERS Enfocus Software .24. Forms of the equation may vary. a) Graph B b) Graph C c) Graph A 27. Forms of the equation may vary. a). b) g – l – 6 = 0 ii) iii) y  2   1 ( x  1) 3 18.Customer Support 525 . Equations in parts b and e are equivalent. b) i) 5 x  4 y  40  0 ii) x  3 y  12  0 iii) x  3 y  10  0 iv) x  5 y  15  0 22. For example: 2 (x – 2) 3 3 b) y – 2 =  (x + 3) 5 19. 6 and 0. 5 and –1. 26. and p represent the number of people: C  44 p ii) y  1   c) Pairs of integers may vary. a) i) y  5  3( x  1) or y  7  3( x  3) a) y = 1 1 ( x  5) or y  3   ( x  3) 2 2 b) Coordinates may vary. For example: i) (2. b) 5a + 4b = 60 b) $44 c) 6 people 21. Let a represent the number of hours Max babysits for the first family. Variables may differ. Equations in parts a and d are equivalent. a) i) 28. a). For example: 8 and 2. Variables may differ. 7 and 1.

c 6. x dollars represents the cost of a jacket and y dollars represents the cost of a sweater. x represents the number of chapatti breads sold and y represents the number of naan breads sold. b) i. approximate 4 4 i) x = 4. For example: P(8. C 9. a) iii. y = 3 3 c) Slope-point form: y – 1 = (x – 3) 4 5. a) a) 2s + 2l = 20 and s + 3l = 22 8.7. 16. y = –5 . Variables may differ. y = 2 . y = –2. a) 3x + y = 17 and x = y + 3 i) 10. w + j = 60 and w – j = 10. For example: a) Slope-intercept form: y = –2x – 2 b) General form: y  1  0 ii) x = 2. B 3. y = 3 b) x =  1 5.2 Solving a System of Linear Equations Graphically. page 401 4. Answers and forms of equations may vary. exact 3 3 . 15. Solution B 11. d 5.1 Developing Systems of Linear Equations. Variables may differ. Variables may differ.Customer Support iii) x = 6. 17. Solution A C F a)  B E C F b)  A D x + 2y = –8 and 9x + 10y = 0 a) For example. a) $6570 b) 520 people Chapter 7 Systems of Linear Equations 7. x represents the length in feet and y represents the width in feet. ii) 18. 526 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 3) and y   2 37 x 7 7 4. 1. y = –1 4. page 409 3. a) x = 9. y = 2 b) x = 2. c) ii. a) 3 b) y  2   ( x  6) 2 c) 3 x  y  1  0 d) Coordinates and equations may vary. y = –3 d) x = –2. y = 3 iii) c) x = 1. 3x + 2y = 5 and –2x + 3y = 1 b) x = 3 7. Chapter 6: Practice Test. x + 2y = 20 and x + y = 13. a) x = –4. page 391 a) 2l + s = 24 and l – s = 6 2.

y = 2. a) b) x = 1.iv) x = –3. 6.2 b) c) x = 3. f + r = 391 and f – r = 141 d) x = 3.5 b) i) 2500 brochures ii) It is cheaper to use Company A when fewer than 2500 brochures are printed. approximate ANSWERS Enfocus Software .5.5 i) $30 000 ii) It would be better to choose Plan B when the clerk’s monthly sales are less than $30 000. a) x = 2.Customer Support 527 . y = –5 Approximations may vary.2. forested area: about 265 hectares. y = 2.2. Approximations may vary. Variables may differ. For example. the rest of the park: about 125 hectares. 9. y = 1 8.7. 10. a) b) The coordinates of the point of intersection represent the solution of the linear system. y = –1. Approximate 7.

exact 15. x = 8 1 in.Customer Support . Variables may differ. y = 2 b) Graph each line. x = 1. and y = 12 in. then the corresponding X-value: x = 4. Variables may differ. approximate 12. a) The slopes are negative reciprocals:  2 3 and 3 2 b) Answers may vary.8s + 8. mass of box: 150 g. a) For example. w – l = 43 and 2w + l = 107 50 wins and 7 overtime losses. then determine the coordinates of the point of intersection of the lines. exact 13. For example. f + t = 115 and 5f + 10t = 800 Seventy $5 gift cards and forty-five $10 gift cards. 4. page 412 1. approximate 528 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . For example. y = –2x – 7 7 adults and 20 students. For example. y = –x + 5 and y =  3 x +6 2 b) x = 2 and y = 3 18. mass of one golf ball: 46 g.3 Math Lab: Using Graphing Technology to Solve a System of Linear Equations. a) Look for equal values of Y1 and Y2 . 2 16. 1 y = 4x + 5 and y =  x – 2 4 b) 7. a) For example. Equations may vary. a) b + 36g = 1806 and b + 24g = 1254 19.11.8 and y = –0. Approximations may vary.1. Variables may differ. exact 14.0a = 152 and s – a = 13 17. Variables may differ.

y = 3 d) x = 1.4l + 0. y = 1 2 iii) x = –1.02s = 7200 4.Customer Support 529 . 4x. y = 4 ii) x = –4. y = 4 i) 2x. a) 2l + 2w = 128 and l – w = 16 3. divide each term in the second equation by 4: –3x + y = –6 x = 1. y = 1 iii) x = 5. 48 cedar tree and 24 spruce tree seedlings 4. divide each term in the first equation by 2: x + y = –2 For example. y = 5 6. multiply each term in the second equation by 12: 10x + 9y = 12 x = 3. a) x = 16. y = –7 c) x = –1. y = 1 For example. y = –8 5. –2y. multiply each term in the first equation by 6: 2x – 3y = 12 For example. b) x = 2.16 b) 15 students and 3 adults 3. x = 1 and y = –1 6. a) b) a) 21s + 27a = 396 and s + a = 18 8. a) b) 1 .4 Using a Substitution Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations. y = 3 i i) x = –1. 6y = –3(–2y) iv) –3x. a) i) x = 1 and y = 1 ii) x = 3 and y = 0 iii) x = 5 and y = –1 iv) x = 7 and y = –2 b) x + 2y = 3 and 2x – y = 21 c) x = 9 and y = –3 5. page 425 4. a) l + s = 15 000 and 1. 9x = –3(–3x) b) b) Plan A is cheaper when the number of visits is greater than 15. Variables may differ. Variables may differ. 10y = 2(5y) iii) 6y. y = –3 i) x =  ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 4x = 2(2x) ii) 10y. y = 1 iv) x = 2. page 415 1. 9x.2. a) x = –2. Variables may differ. y = –2 For example. y = 7 d) x = 1. a) b) 5000 large trees and 10 000 small trees 7. 5.3 and y = 1. 5y. No Chapter 7: Checkpoint 1. a) b) x = 6. a) b) 9. y = –1 ii) x = 0. y = 5 c) x = 3. y = 4 b) x = –2. 7.

5m + 0. So. $450 in the bond a) For example. a) x = 2. 7 foreign 36 girls.0375y = 162. fast tempo: 160 beats/min 4 9 a) a = . p + a = 85 and 0. y = 2. y = 2 7. y = –1 c) 4. 24. 1 a) x = 6. An adult pays $6. 4. 18. 23. her sister’s dress: 180 cones Variables may differ. x = –1. y = –4 6.25 Single-scoop cone: $3. 15 kg of green peas.75% bond Variables may differ.6p + 0. y = 4 c) x = 3. 2l + 2w = 540 and l – w = 90 Length: 180 cm. d) When I remove the x mass. 10 kg of red lentils Problems may vary. y = –3 b) x = –1.5% bond.Customer Support b) a = i) 42x + 45y = 48 and 42x + 20y = –2 ii) 28x + 30y = 32 and 63x + 30y = –3 5.92B = 63 and A + B = 75 Part A: 50 marks. 12. 16. y = 22 a) For example: 4x – 2y = –8 and 9x + 6y = 3 b) x = –1.4a = 38 20 people masks.7 g. $3000 in the 3. and 7 kg from Balance scales 1. y = 3 42 72 124 16 c) x =  . Multiply equation 1 by 5 and equation 2 by 4. b = –7 7 7 1 1 5 c) a = . a) x = 8. a) 16 km/h b) 40 km Mean mass of males: 205. 27.35.6a = 31 20 students and 25 adults Variables may differ. y = –6 5 5 c) x = –0. y = 2 .25 and 54s + 37d = 346. double-scoop cone: $4. the systems have the same solution. 140 bears did not respond.n=  3 3 d) a = 3.50. x + y = 11 and 4x + 5y = 47 8 groups of 4 and 3 groups of 5 Variables may differ.025x + 0. 13. the scales will still be balanced. 14. 19. 17. y = 3 d) x = –1. Variables may differ. 2 1 . mean mass of females: 168 g Rate of climb: 200 m/min. B = –3 7. rate of descent: –200 m/min A = 4.y=  13 13 51 17 b) r = 20.5 Using an Elimination Strategy to Solve a System of Linear Equations. 10k + 20b = 200 and 15k + 25b = 270 1 knife: 8 beaver pelts. 25.10. 20.25 d) x = 0. 18. it is like subtracting the second equation from the first equation to eliminate y. y = 3 c) s = 0.75 and a child pays $7. b) x = 3.5f = 620 and f – m = 40 Moderate tempo: 120 beats/min. y = 3 b) x = 5.5 18 Canadian. c) Two x-masses equal 10 kg. x + y = 5000 and 0.8s + 0. then add to eliminate y. x + y = 90 530 and y – x = 120 2006 attendance: 45 205. y = 0.50 Two thousand dollars in the 2. t = 2 9. then add to eliminate x. y = –3 2 3 2 Variables may differ. 11. y mass. multiply equation 1 by –2 and equation 2 by 3. the sum of mass x and mass y is 7 kg. y = 2 a) For example. c = 5 x = 5. The same mass is being removed from each pan. 65 animal masks Variables may differ. a) x = –4. Variables may differ.y= b) a = –3. 2008 attendance: 45 325 Variables may differ. y = 5 $950 in the stock. 17. 19. a) b) c) 530 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . 15. 10. 12. y = 0. b) x = 1. d) r + n = 186 and n – r = 94 46 bears responded. 1 blanket: 6 beaver pelts Variables may differ. 3x + 6y = 9. a child’s ticket is more expensive. 21. 13. So. 15.b=0 3 x = –1. a) x = –3.b= b) x = 20. mass x is 5 kg. part B: 25 marks Variables may differ. 16. 76s + 49d = 474. 20. Remove mass x from the left side of Balance scales 2 and 5 kg from the right side. So. 22.25 Joel would have to work 15 weekends before he earns the same amount as Sue. t + s = 545 and t – s = 185 Talise’s dress: 365 cones. 14. 23.b= d) x = . y = 3 i) 3x – 6y = –18 and 3x – y = 2 ii) x – 2y = –6 and 6x – 2y = 4 i) 15x – 2y = 9 and 15x + 12y = 51 ii) –30x + 4y = –18 and 5x + 4y = 17 i) 35x + 15y = 45 and 35x + 14y = 49 ii) 14x + 6y = 18 and 15x + 6y = 21 3. b = –2 b) m =  79 122 .5. 11. 22. 0.y=  d) x = . x = 5. width: 90 cm Variables may differ. y = –1 d) x = 4. s + a = 45 and 0. page 437 5 . 40 boys a) 3x + y = 17 and x + y = 7 b) From Balance scales 2.80A + 0. Then mass y balances 2 kg.

32 replicas with 7 stones $500 was invested in each bond. their y-intercepts are different. a) Variables may differ. a main course: 70 times Larger volume: 1450 mL. a) A and C. 1 a) x = –6. For example: 13. y = –1 a) Variables may differ. a) b) One solution c) One solution 10. the left side equals the right side. a) For example: x + y = 5 and 2x + 2y = 10 b) When I try to eliminate one variable. 15.y= b) x = 0. 6. a) Variables may differ. 7. 4. exact 5. a) No solution 7.Customer Support 531 . s + l = 25 and 15s + 25l = 475 7. y = 2 b) For example. 14. 6x + 3y = 5 and 2x – 6y = 24 c) For example. y = –1 2 2 c) x = –6. a) iv) –1 –1 b) i and iii. a) Variables may differ. Sunita: plot each y-intercept. I could use the solution to part a and proportions to determine the yield in bushels/hectare. a) One solution b) Infinite solutions c) No solution d) No solution 8.8. 12. I also eliminate the other variable. b) x = –2. iii and iv 5. y = 2. when (–2. i and iv.y= 5 5 Soup: 90 times. 19. page 452 1.75 d) x =  .8.y=3 2 14 2 c) x = –0.75. 17.1). a) George: draw a line through each pair of points. smaller volume: 450 mL x = 55°. page 441 1 3 . a) x = 2. x – 3y = 12 and 5x – 15y = –60 b) Solution B 4. 2c + 4b = 940 and c + 3b = 620 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . y = 2x + 2 c) For example. y = –7 b) x = . One solution 11. then use the slope to mark another point on each line. a) For example. 6x + 7y = 494 and x – y = 13 b) 45 replicas with 6 stones. ii and iii. ii and iv c) i and ii. One solution: –3x – 4y = 12 No solution: 3x – 4y = 8 Infinite solutions: 6x – 8y = 24 Infinite solutions One solution Infinite solutions One solution One solution The graphs appear to intersect at (–2. 4x + 2y = 20 and 2x + y = 10 7. Chapter 7: Checkpoint 2. a) i) Infinite solutions ii) No solution iii) One solution 3 3 a) i) k  ii) k = 4 4 Chapter 7: Review.6 Properties of Systems of Linear Equations. I also eliminate the other variable and the constant. 0 points of intersection: slopes of the lines are equal and c) The solutions are the same. 8. a) 3x + y = 11 and 3x – 5y = –1 b) x = 3. o + s = 41 and o – s = 17 b) Solution B 2.b) The solution to each system is: x = –1. a) For example: x + y = 4 and 2x + 2y = 6 b) When I try to eliminate one variable. –6. B and C b) A and B 6. y = x + 2 b) For example. 3. 5. –4x + 2y = 2 9. I need to know whether the y-intercepts are the same or different. y = –1. 22. y = 2 18. a) For example. 24. a) 40 bushels/acre for wheat. 1 point of intersection: slopes of the lines are different. then determine the coordinates of the point of intersection. –6. 58 bushels/acre for barley b) No. 24. 16.1) is substituted into each equation. page 448 i) 1 ii) iii) 1 4. 20. y = 65° 1. b) Exact. Infinite points of intersection: slopes of the lines are equal and their y-intercepts are equal.

y + r = 90 and 25y + 12. 17. 5.25. a) The relation shows the association “participates in” from a set of athletes to a set of sports. track). Where necessary. a) . basketball)} 9. a) 4. 18. 1 2 3 x  y  5 and x – y = 1 4 3 4 7 one-quarter cup measures. a) x  1. 10 2 a) 81 + 18s + s b) 2 2 c) 10n + 7np – 12p d) 3 2 e) –2w – w + 20w – 32 4 3 2 f) –6x + 5x + 22x + 2x – 8 3 2 3 2 2 3 a) 7(2a b – 4b c + 3a c ) b) (n – 4)(n + 3) c) 4(3r + 4s)(3r – 4s) d) 2 e) (w – 11x) f) 7.. a) x = 0.y= 2 2 b) The solution of a linear system is the coordinates of the point of intersection of the graphs of the lines. y = 8 Variables may differ. y = –5 c) 11. y = –0. A 532 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . swimming). length: 5 ft. 16. page 455 1. y  1. y = 5 2 3 1 iii) x = . a) Infinite solutions. for example: 19. 115 squares 11 a) x = 0. 382 cm 56. baseball). a) Cumulative Review Chapters 1–7. y = 3 19 11 x= . b) s = 6.Customer Support i) x = –4.5r = 1500 b) 30 squares and 60 triangles 5. a) b) b) x = 1.2. a) (2m + 9)(3m – 2) (5c + 6d)(6c – 5d) ii) 43 2 4 932 iv) 7 11 432 ii) 3 480 iv) i) iii) 5 2 8. y = 0 c) x = 3. a) b) c) x + y = –1 and 2x + 2y = –2 No solution. 6. 924 in. 1709 yd. d) e) 269 ft. skiing).. the answers have been written to 3 decimal places.5 36 10. a) 6a2 – 19a + 15 64s2 – t2 i) 3 5 iii) b) 457 cm 165 m 25. exact conversions. (Donovan Bailey. 60l + 2w = 306 and 2l + 60w = 190 c) Width: 3 ft. 6 in. b) c) 4 mi. b) i) {Perdita Felicien. 6 two-third cup measures 13. y = 6. c) One bowl of cereal has 170 mg of sodium and 1 slice of bacon has 150 mg of sodium. b) Variables may differ.b) Each line represents one of the equations in the linear system.3° 4 36 in. Answers may vary. 14. y = –6 2 c) x = 2. (Steve Nash. y = –1.y=  d) x = –1.25 1  5  a) 2l + 1    w = 68 and l – w = 7 2  6  b) Length: 19 ft. B 2. f) 2 3 a) 384 cm . page 458 1. for example: 2x + 2y = 5 and 4x + 4y = –5 Clue 1 and Clue 2 b) 45 and 12 No solution Infinite solutions One solution d) No solution Chapter 7: Practice Test. 384 cm b) 2 3 c) 254 cm . 9. y = –5 b) x =  . a = 2 7 ii) x = 4. a) Variables may differ.4 d) x   6. c) 12.964 10. width: 12 ft.25 16 25 c) d) 2.5.75 km 579 in. 35 triangles.071 .526 . (Justin Morneau. a) 9 ft. y  3. (Nancy Greene.3 a b5 c)  x5 4 y3 z 4 189 425 2 b) c d5 d)  6 a3b2 9 b) 12. 15. y = –2 7 63 x = –1. 3. (Annamay Pierse. exact solution.316 b) x = 12. These answers are calculated using 2. track). 4. a) 20.

approximately 46 L of gasoline can  be purchased.25. 4.18. 2. range: y  2 Domain: all real numbers. 5. …}. a) b) exactly once. 1.iv) A vertical line that passes through (2. For example: a) (–3.27.09v C(25) = 27. (0. 345. 4) 4 0 3 2 2 4 1 6 0 x y 1 0 2 1 2 –1 5 2 5 11. the graphs are straight lines. for each additional person who attends. the cost increases by $15. a) 14. a) 300. For example: i) A horizontal line that passes through (0. 4. a) Tables of values and sketches may vary. the fixed cost of renting the banquet room is $300.Customer Support 533 . (–2. 4. range: y  3 15. 3. 3. –1). v  46. (0. and v. ii) x y –2 5 –1 3 0 1 1 –1 2 –3 x y –2 2 –1 –1 0 –2 1 –1 2 range: {300. iv. …}. 315. ii. 330. …} C(v) = 1. The range can be any multiple of 15 greater than or equal to 300. dependent variable: C Domain: {1. range: {1. the cost of 25 L of gasoline is $27. 375. The domain can be any whole number up to the number of people the banquet room can hold. with $50.36. c) Domain: {0. 2. up to a number that depends on the maximum capacity of the room. 3. d) $1050 e) 25 people 17. 300). 0) ii) v) x –2 b) c) d) e) f) 12. Independent variable: v. 5) 2 iii) ANSWERS Enfocus Software . b) $15/person. 2. False b) True True d) False Graph B Domain: x  3 . Points and sketches may vary. a) c) 13.09. 1).25. 360. …}. a) Each number in the first column of the table appears y –2 vi) b) i. 16.

Part B: 60 marks 53 8 29.b) (–2. x = . a) d  14t  200 b) $690 b) i) y   c) 37 h 534 ANSWERS Enfocus Software . Equations may vary. For example: 75 adults and 105 students. (0. 1 instead of –2. (9. and 2 the y-intercept as –3 instead of 3. 9. –3) 23. For example: 4 5 ii) y  3  2( x  2) i) y  2   ( x  1) 4 6 3 6 x  . (1. a) The student wrote the slope as 21. x-intercept:  .Customer Support d) No 8 7 . 5). –1) i) –7 ii) i) 25 x  20 y  12  0 2 5 ii) 2 x  3 y  14  0 25. 1). a) Neither b) Perpendicular c) Parallel d) Perpendicular For example: 8a  5 s  1122 and s – a = 32 b) Answers may vary. a) Sketches may vary. (3. a) Equations may vary.60 s  20. 0). 6). a) d) (–6.80l  2206. (7. Variables may differ. y = 2 30. a) x = . x-intercept: . y-intercept: 1 2 22.40 and s + l = 140 26. y-intercept: 5 5 2 5 1 ii) y  2 x  1 . 6). a) b) Changing the value of m changes the steepness of the graph. 9) ii) b) 24. Part A: 48 marks. approximate (Actual answer: 74 adults and 106 students) 19. For example: One solution: x – y = 1 No solution: 5x + 3y = 1 Infinite solutions: 10x + 6y = 30 27. (4.y=  26 13 5 b) x = –3. 0). For example: i) c) (–5.y= 3 12 28. 18. a) Forms of equations in the system may vary. b) y  2 x  3 20.

for example. and 1 constant term: the term in an expression or equation that does not change. and the arrows associate elements of the first set with elements of the second set congruent: shapes that match exactly.qxd 12/7/09 6:25 PM Page 535 Glossary acute angle: an angle measuring less than 90° capacity: the amount a container can hold acute triangle: a triangle with three acute angles central angle: an angle whose arms are radii of a circle circumference: the distance around a circle. for example. for example. 2. and 8 area: a measure of the number of square units needed to cover a region composite object: the result of combining two or more objects to make a new object arithmetic operations: the operations of addition. An expression that divides into each term of a given polynomial. and division cone: see right cone arrow diagram: used to represent a relation. the coefficient is 3 common factor: a number that divides into each number in a set.333 333 … base: the side of a polygon or the face of an object from which the height is measured base of a power: see power binomial: a polynomial with two terms.wncp10_Glossary. 35. 3 is the constant term conversion factor: a number used to multiply or divide a quantity to convert from one unit of measure to another coordinate axes: the horizontal and vertical axes on a grid Glossary 535 . 9. for example. the ovals show the sets. 6x Ϫ 4 angle of depression: the angle between the horizontal through eye level and a line of sight to a point below eye level angle of elevation: the angle between the horizontal through eye level and a line of sight to a point above eye level angle of inclination: the acute angle between the horizontal and a line or line segment clinometer: a tool used to measure an angle above or below the horizontal coefficient: the numerical factor of a term. for example. Ϫ1. and 21. 4y is a common factor of 8x2y ϩ 4xy ϩ 12y apex: the vertex farthest from the base of an object common multiple: a number that is a multiple of each number in a set. but do not necessarily have the same orientation average: a single number that represents a set of numbers (see mean) bar graph: a graph that displays data by using horizontal or vertical bars bar notation: the use of a horizontal bar over a decimal digit to indicate that it repeats. 0. multiplication. 8 is a composite number because its factors are 1. 1. for example. subtraction. 34. for example. for example. 6 is a common multiple of 2 and 3 approximate: a number close to the exact value of an expression. so are Ϫ2. 3 is a common factor of 15. 36 are consecutive numbers. in the terms 3x and 3x2.3 means 1. 4. the symbol Џ means “is approximately equal to” composite number: a number with three or more factors. also the perimeter of the circle algebraic expression: a mathematical expression containing a variable: for example. 3x Ϫ 8 calipers: a tool used to measure the diameter or thickness of an object consecutive numbers: integers that come one after the other without any integers missing. for example. in the expression 4x ϩ 3.

3:4 and 9:12 2 4 estimate: a reasoned guess that is close to the actual value. for example. 7. 3. 4. a(b ϩ c) ϭ ab ϩ ac divisor: the number that divides into another number domain: the set of first elements of a relation cube: an object with six congruent square faces edge: two faces of an object meet at an edge cube number: a number that can be written as a power with an integer base and exponent 3. x-coordinate. for example. for example. for example. but is not a side al on g dia equivalent: having the same value. 0. and 9 corresponding sides: matching sides of similar polygons dimensions: measurements such as length. 2. 5. written cos A cos A ϭ length of side adjacent to ЄA length of hypotenuse C hypotenuse opposite A B adjacent to A A direct measurement: a measurement made using a measuring instrument or by counting displacement: the volume of water moved or displaced by an object put in the water. 5 is the cube root of 125 cubic units: units that measure volume entire radical: a radical sign and the number under it. or the line segment that joins two points on the circle and passes through its centre corresponding angles: matching angles in similar polygons difference of squares: a binomial of the form a2 Ϫ b2. results in a given number. for example. when raised to the exponent 3. 4. width. 8 ϭ 23 element: an element of a set is one object in the set cube root: a number which. and height cosine ratio: for an acute ЄA in a right triangle. 6.qxd 12/7/09 6:25 PM Page 536 coordinates: the numbers in an ordered pair that locate a point on a coordinate grid (see ordered pair. for example. it can be factored as (a Ϫ b)(a ϩ b) corresponding lengths: matching lengths on an original diagram and its scale diagram digit: any of the symbols used to write numerals. for example. 1.wncp10_Glossary. measured through its centre. 8. 2. without calculating it exactly evaluate: to determine the value of a numerical expression even integer: a number that has 2 as a factor. the ratio of the length of the side adjacent to ЄA to the length of the hypotenuse. 5 32 Ί equation: a mathematical statement that two expressions are equal equilateral triangle: a triangle with 3 equal sides decagon: a polygon with 10 sides denominator: the term below the line in a fraction dependent variable: a variable whose value is determined by the value of another (the independent) variable dia g on al diagonal: a line segment that joins two vertices of a shape. y-coordinate) diameter: the distance across a circle. the volume of the object is equal to the volume of water displaced distributive property: the property stating that a product can be written as a sum or difference of two products. 6 expanding an expression: writing a product of polynomial factors as a polynomial exponent: see power 536 Glossary . 2 1 and .

and x ϩ 1 and x ϩ 2 are factors of x2 ϩ 3x ϩ 2 formula: a rule that is expressed as an equation fraction: an indicated quotient of two quantities function: a relation where each element in the first set is associated with exactly one element in the second set function notation: notation used to show the independent variable in a function. f (x) means that the value of the function f depends on the value of the independent variable x. for example. foot. 0. where A is a whole number. non-parallel sides hemisphere: half a sphere Glossary 537 . … inverse operation: an operation that reverses the result of another operation. yard. the number above the radical symbol that indicates which root is to be taken. 20 ϭ 2 · 2 · 5 horizontal intercept: see x-intercept factor tree: a branching diagram with a number at the top and its prime factors at the bottom hypotenuse: the side opposite the right angle in a right triangle factoring a polynomial: writing a polynomial as a product of its factors factoring by decomposition: factoring a trinomial after writing the middle term as a sum of two terms. 5 is the greatest common factor of 10 and 15 isometric: equal measure. Ϫ2. on isometric dot paper. for example. subtraction is the inverse of addition. 3 is the index in the radical 3 81 . and whose value determines the value of another (the dependent) variable index: in a radical. for example.qxd 12/7/09 6:25 PM Page 537 exponent laws: the rules that describe how combinations of powers can be written differently hexagon: a polygon with 6 sides expression: a mathematical statement made up of numbers and/or variables connected by operations face: a flat surface of an object horizontal axis: see x-axis factor: to factor means to write as a product. or other mathematical reasoning integers: the set of numbers …Ϫ3. general form: the equation of a line in the form Ax ϩ By ϩ C ϭ 0. then determining a common binomial factor from the two pairs of terms formed factors: numbers or algebraic expressions that are multiplied to get a product.wncp10_Glossary. Ϫ1. the line segments joining 2 adjacent dots in any direction are equal height: the perpendicular distance from the base of a shape to the opposite side or vertex. where m and n are integers greatest common factor (GCF): the greatest number that divides into each number in a set. 2. for example. and B and C are integers leg factored fully: factoring a polynomial so each factor cannot be factored further horizontal line: a line parallel to the horizon leg hypotenuse imperial units: measurement units such as the mile. 1. and division is the inverse of multiplication irrational number: a number that cannot be written m in the form n . and inch commonly used in the United States and in some industries in Canada independent variable: a variable whose value is not determined by the value of another variable. formula. 3. if the index is not written. the perpendicular distance from the base of an object to the opposite face or vertex isosceles trapezoid: a trapezoid with 2 equal. 3 and 7 are factors of 21. for example. n ϶ 0. Ί it is assumed to be 2 indirect measurement: a measurement made using a ratio. for example.

3Ί 5 parallelogram: a quadrilateral with opposite sides parallel and opposite angles equal monomial: a polynomial with one term. … pentagon: a polygon with 5 sides natural numbers: the set of numbers 1. 24. Ϫ and 7 3 538 Glossary percent: the number of parts per 100. 14 and 5x2 are monomials multiple: the product of a given number and a natural number. some multiples of 8 are 8. the first number is the horizontal coordinate of a point. the least common multiple of 12 and 21 is 84 legs: the sides of a right triangle that form the right angle (see hypotenuse) like terms: terms that have the same variables raised to the same powers. multiplication. for example. for example. 2. for example. division. 3. … negative number: a number less than 0 negative reciprocals: two numbers whose product 3 7 is Ϫ1. 4. subtraction. and the second number is the vertical coordinate of the point origin: the point where the horizontal axis and the vertical axis intersect parallel lines: lines on the same flat surface that do not intersect mass: the amount of matter in an object mean: the sum of a set of numbers divided by the number of numbers in the set midpoint: the point that divides a line segment into two equal parts mixed radical: a number written as a product of another number and a radical.qxd 12/7/09 6:25 PM Page 538 isosceles triangle: a triangle with 2 equal sides numerator: the term above the line in a fraction numerical coefficient: see coefficient object: a solid or shell that has 3 dimensions obtuse triangle: a triangle with one angle greater than 90° kite: a quadrilateral with two pairs of adjacent sides equal octagon: a polygon with 8 sides lateral area: the surface area of an object. 16. or raising to a power opposites: two numbers with a sum of 0. 4). for example. for example. for example. 4x and Ϫ3x are like terms line segment: the part of a line between two points on the line linear function: a linear relation whose graph is not a vertical line linear relation: a relation that has a straight-line graph linear system: see system of linear equations operation: a mathematical process or action such as addition. 2.wncp10_Glossary. for example. (2. 5.4 are opposite numbers order of operations: the rules that are followed when simplifying or evaluating an expression ordered pair: two numbers in order. the numerator of a fraction with denominator 100 perfect cube: see cube number .4 and Ϫ2. not including the area of its bases least common multiple (LCM): the least multiple that is the same for two numbers. on a coordinate grid. for example.

for example.qxd 2/19/10 10:52 AM Page 539 perfect square: see square number quadrilateral: a polygon with 4 sides perfect square trinomial: a trinomial of the form a2 ϩ 2ab ϩ b2. and an index. for example. for example. radii): the distance or line segment from the centre of a circle to any point on the circle range: the set of second elements associated with the first elements (domain) of a relation rate: a comparison of two quantities measured in different units rate of change: the change in one quantity with respect to the change in another quantity (see slope) ratio: a comparison of two or more quantities with the same unit rational number: any number that can be written in m the form n . or the expression of one number divided by another pi (␲): the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its circumference diameter. a cube Glossary 539 . 31. r :24 ϭ 3:4 proportional reasoning: the ability to understand and compare quantities that are related multiplicatively Pythagorean Theorem: the rule that states that. 81 is the radicand in Ί 81 radius (plural. and 43 rectangle: a quadrilateral that has four right angles prism: an object with 2 bases (see right prism) product: the result when two or more numbers are multiplied. n ϶ 0. where m and n are integers prime factor: a prime number that is a factor of a number. 3. for example. 2. the area of the square on the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the areas of the squares on the legs rectangular prism: see right rectangular prism rectangular pyramid: see right rectangular pyramid referent: used to estimate a measure. 11.wncp10_Glossary. and tangent ratio) radicand: the number under a radical sign. 7. 29. 3 64 Ί point of intersection: the point where two graphs intersect polygon: a closed shape that consists of line segments. x2 ϩ 3xy Ϫ 2y2 ϩ 5x power: an expression of the form an. for example. each of which is a regular polygon regular prism: a prism with regular polygons as bases. a referent for a length of 1 mm is the thickness of a dime regular polygon: a polygon that has all sides equal and all angles equal regular polyhedron: a polyhedron with congruent faces. 4 · 4 · 4 can be written as 43 primary trigonometric ratios: three ratios involving sides in right triangles (see cosine ratio. for example. the prime factorization of 20 is 2 · 2 · 5. for example. triangles and quadrilaterals are polygons polyhedron (plural. polyhedra): an object with faces that are polygons polynomial: one term or the sum of terms whose variables have whole-number exponents. where a is the base and n is the exponent. it can be factored as (a ϩ b)2 perimeter: the distance around a closed shape perpendicular: lines or line segments that intersect at right angles quotient: the result when one number is divided by another. a member of the set of numbers that have a decimal representation prime factorization: writing a number as a product of its prime factors. for example. for example. 5 is a prime factor of 30 real number: any number that is a rational number or an irrational number. for any right triangle. a radicand. it represents a product of equal factors. and 3 2 prime number: a whole number with exactly two factors. itself and 1. ␲ ϭ diameter radical: an expression consisting of a radical sign. for example. 5. or 22 · 5 reciprocals: two numbers whose product is 1. 2 3 for example. sine ratio. for example. or the expression of one number multiplied by another proportion: a statement that two ratios are equal.

the line through the centres of the bases is perpendicular to the bases rise: the vertical distance between two points. 0. written sin A sin A ϭ right prism: an object that has two congruent and parallel faces (the bases).wncp10_Glossary. a regular triangular pyramid right rectangular pyramid: a pyramid that has a rectangular base. a fraction with numerator and denominator that have no common factors.333 333 … rhombus: a parallelogram with four equal sides right angle: a 90° angle right cone: an object with one circular base and one vertex. of mass is the kilogram (kg). the ratio of the length of the side opposite ЄA to the length of the hypotenuse. the line through the vertex and the centre of the base is perpendicular to the base right triangle: a triangle that has one right angle relation: a rule that associates the elements of one set with the elements of another set repeating decimal: a decimal with a repeating pattern in the digits to the right of the decimal point. similar polygons: polygons with the same shape. and other faces that are rectangles right pyramid: an object that has one face that is a polygon (the base). and other faces that are triangles with a common vertex. the fundamental unit: of length is the metre (m). the line through the vertex and the centre of the base is perpendicular to the base right cylinder: an object with two parallel. the distance from the midpoint of the base of one triangular face of a regular pyramid to the apex of the pyramid slant height 540 adjacent to A slant height . circular bases.3 ϭ 0. other than 1. see slope scale: the numbers on the axes of a graph scale factor: the ratio of corresponding lengths of two similar shapes set: a collection of distinct objects SI system of measures: a system of units based on powers of 10.qxd 2/19/10 10:52 AM Page 540 regular pyramid: a pyramid with a regular polygon as its base regular tetrahedron: an object with four congruent equilateral triangular faces. the line through the vertex and the centre of the base is perpendicular to the base right rectangular prism: a prism that has rectangular faces length of side opposite Є A length of hypotenuse C hypotenuse opposite A B Glossary A slant height: the distance from a point on the perimeter of the base of a cone to the apex of the cone. congruent. other than 1 sine ratio: for an acute ЄA in a right triangle. for example. one polygon is an enlargement or a reduction of the other polygon simplest form: a ratio with terms that have no common factors. it is written with a bar above the repeating digits. see slope run: the horizontal distance between two points. and of time is the second (s).

wncp10_Glossary. 0. replacing one variable with a number or an expression trigonometry: the study of the properties and applications of triangles trinomial: a polynomial with three terms. the ratio of the length of the side opposite ЄA to the length of the side adjacent to ЄA. 7a2 slope-point form: the equation of a line in the form y Ϫ y1 ϭ m(x Ϫ x1). or the product of numbers and variables. for example. Ϫ5. 5 is a square root of 25 square units: units that measure area standard form: the equation of a line in the form Ax ϩ By ϭ C. 49 ϭ 72 triangle: a polygon with 3 sides triangular prism: a prism with triangular bases square root: a number which. written tan A length of side opposite ЄA length of side adjacent to Є A C x hypotenuse opposite A B slope-intercept form: the equation of a line in the form y ϭ mx ϩ b. and depth or height sphere: an object where every point on the surface of the object is the same distance from the centre of the object tetrahedron: a pyramid that has a triangular base trapezoid: a quadrilateral with exactly 1 pair of parallel sides square: a rectangle with 4 equal sides square number: a number that can be written as a power with an integer base and exponent 2. when multiplied by itself.qxd 12/7/09 6:25 PM Page 541 slope: a measure of how one quantity changes with respect to the other. 3x2 ϩ 5x Ϫ 8 surface area: the total area of the surface of an object unit analysis: a method of converting a measure in a given unit to a measure in a different unit by multiplying the measure by a conversion factor system of linear equations: two equations of linear functions in the same two variables variable: a letter or symbol representing a quantity that can vary Glossary 541 . and b is its y-intercept adjacent to A A term: a number. where A. for example.125 solving a triangle: determining the measure of each angle in a triangle and the length of each side of the triangle three-dimensional: having length. for example. where m is the slope of the line. and the line passes through point P(x1. and C are integers substituting into an equation: in an equation of a linear function. results in a given number. it can be determined by rise calculating run tan A ϭ y run change in x rise change in y 0 tangent ratio: for an acute ЄA in a right triangle. y1) terminating decimal: a decimal with a certain number of digits after the decimal point. a variable. for example. where m is the slope of the line. B. for example. y. width.

qxd 12/7/09 6:25 PM Page 542 vertex (plural. 3 ϭ 0 ϩ 3 .wncp10_Glossary. for example. the second number in an ordered pair y-intercept: the y-coordinate of a point where a graph intersects the y-axis Zero Principle: the property of addition that states that adding 0 to a number does not change the number. vertices): the point where 2 sides of a shape meet. 1. or the point where 3 or more edges of an object meet vertical axis: see y-axis vertical intercept: see y-intercept vertical line: a line perpendicular to the horizontal volume: the amount of space occupied by an object whole numbers: the set of numbers 0. 2. 3. … x-axis: the horizontal number line on a coordinate grid x-coordinate: on a coordinate grid. the first number in an ordered pair 542 Glossary x-intercept: the x-coordinate of a point where a graph intersects the x-axis y-axis: the vertical number line on a coordinate grid y-coordinate: on a coordinate grid.

176 of a polynomial. 152 factoring. 27 of a right cone. 290 G general form of an equation. identifying relations from. 174. 212. 78 distributive property. 370 domain. 378–383 geodesic dome. 73 angles. 160. 311–318 of linear systems. 162–165. 135–139. 84–86 coincident lines. 115 angle of elevation. 31 area model. 174. 192. 56–58 compound interest. multiplying. 287–293 properties of. graphing. 412. 139. 18. 360 Devi. 378 of a line parallel or perpendicular to a given line. solving linear systems with. 276–280 of functions. 315 functions.wncp10_Index. 188–193 of polynomials. 334 Descartes. a difference of squares. 204 D decomposition. 135. 189–193 C capacity. 114 cube. 160. 106–109. 171 factoring polynomials with. 17. 323 grade of a road. 168–176 polynomials of form x2 ϩ bx ϩ c. 422 exponent laws. 161. 151 factors. 268. 265–270 B bar graph. 445 common factors. 394–400. 289–293 of linear function graphs. 93 determining with tangent ratios. 182 multiplying two polynomials with. 4–10. 257–261. 411. 287–293 of linear relations. 217 equations. 443 graphs. 160. 151–154 foot. 23 algebra tiles. 169–176. general form of a linear relation. 159–165. 182–185. 159. 150–153 angle of depression. 27. 233 conversion factors. 323 golden rectangle. 265–270. 237–241 exponents. 443–447 of relations. 191 vs. 69 golden ratio. 193 a perfect square trinomial. 144–146. 270 in standard form. 28. 9 cosine ratio. 264–270 vertical line test for. 370. 94 angle of inclination. 172–176. 268–270. 151–154 composite numbers. 212. 27 binomials. of a pyramid. 159–165 trinomials. surface area of. 36 centimetre. 169 area of a triangle. 175 polynomials. 265–270 entire radicals. 250 diameter of a sphere. 371 of a linear function. 45 clinometer. 403–408. 269. Shakuntala. 20 centre of a sphere. 188–193 polynomials of form ax2 ϩ bx ϩ c. 138. 165. determining with sine and cosine ratios. determining volumes and surface areas of. 168–176. 73 sine and cosine of. 343 graphing technology. 428–436 properties of linear systems. 416–424. 175 dependent variable. 358–361 Index 543 . 91–94 calculating lengths with. 378–383 interpreting and sketching. 442–447 equivalent linear system. 260. 248. 72. René. 261 representing relations with. 169. 313–318 E element of a set. 92 tangent ratio for. 204 function notation. 174. 168. 190. 289. 190 by decomposition. 267. 70. 258–260 representing functions with. 301–307. 369. 358–361. 72 apex. 45–50 differences of squares. 287–293 slope of a line segment. 146 cube root. 421. 136. 304 of linear systems. 98–100 solving triangles with. 193 direct measurement. 30 arrow diagram. 366–371 of linear relations.qxd 12/7/09 6:26 PM Page 543 Index A acre. 17–21 fourth root. 135 composite objects. 161–165. 332–339 slope-intercept form of a linear function. 443. 183 dodecagon. 260 base of a pyramid. 27 factor tree. 37 F face of a pyramid. general form of a linear function equation. 378–383 in function notation. 175.

301–307. 300–307 graphs of. 157. 403–408 x. 14 units of. 78 infinite. 396–400 with fractional coefficients. 265. 109 perpendicular line. 205 perfect square trinomial. 313–316 greatest common factor. 183 of form ax2 ϩ bx ϩ c. 78–81 measuring. irrational numbers on. 231 with rational exponents. 312 general form of. 168–176 of form x2 ϩ bx ϩ c. 217 Mouton. 106–109 prime factor. 182–185 multiplying using distributive property. 243 polynomials.and y-intercepts. 237–240 power of a product law. 23 height. 14. slope of. 209 O octagon. 332–339 linear equations. 4–10 relating to SI units. 190 perimeter of an octagon. 165 H hectare. 18 mixed radicals. 268. 225 in rational form. 443.qxd 12/7/09 6:26 PM slope-point form of linear function. Gabriel. 4–10. 31 of a right pyramid. 225 primary trigonometric ratios. 16–21 inch. 334 index. 10. 335 power of a power law. 366–371 linear relations (see also relations). 30. 239 irrational numbers. 289. 142. 17–21 independent variable. 348 perfect cube. 447 input/output machine. 205 perfect square. 91 solving triangles with.wncp10_Index. 136. 366–371 slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines. 435 solving graphically. 4–6. 162. 346 negative slope. 137–139 Lemaire. 19 multiplying binomials. 33 Le Système International d’Unités (see SI system of measures) least common multiple. 224 with negative exponents. 276–280 line segment slope. 237 power of a quotient law. simplifying algebraic expressions with. 268. 161. 416–424. 18. calculating with sine and cosine ratios. 144. 266. 138. 135–139. 250 length. 27 of a sphere. 222–226. 17. 267. 144. 351 metre. 145. 237 powers. 428–436 solving by substitution. 4–10 line graphs. 302 P parallel line. 208. 77. 204 indirect measurement. 213 . 193. 335 number line. 189. 442–447 solving by elimination. 225 1 of form a n . 46 hemisphere. 98–100 544 Index Page 544 calculating with tangent ratio. 394–400 linear function. 169–171 polynomials. 158 common factors of. 109 ordered pairs. 229–234 negative reciprocals. 311–318 linear systems (also system of linear equations). 234 platonic solids. 143. 207–210 K kilometre. 346 parallelogram. 378–383 slope-intercept form. 237–241 proportional reasoning. of a right cone. 139. 403–408 M Martin. 49. 17–21 millimetre. 121 Pythagoras. 18 mile. 145 prime factorization. 346–348 pi (␲). 50 horizontal intercept (also x-intercept). 269 integer exponents. 422 properties of. 13. 188–193 multiplying. 190. 358–361 slope-point form. 7 Ptolemy. 323 Pythagorean spiral. 229–234 in exponent form. Claudius. 182–185 N negative exponents. 135–139 simplifying radicals with. Agnes. 215 product of powers law. 31. 313–316 I imperial units. 345. 19 L lateral area. 446. 159–165 positive slope. 151–154 factoring special polynomials. 345–348 solving a system of linear equations with. Alexis. slope of.

78–81 solving triangles with. 258–260 tangent ratio. 244 Forensic Anthropologist. 378 steepness. 265–270. 28 The World of Math: Careers: Computer Graphic Artist. 306. 90–94. 240 rational number. 288 representing relations with. 145. 98–100 solving triangles with. 4 regular tetrahedron. 146 of a hemisphere. 332–339 of a parallel line. 302–307 SI system of measures. 333–339. 435 solving triangles. 50 of a sphere. 444 of a linear function. 237–240 R radicals. 396 elimination strategy. 106–109. 443–447 determining equation of a linear function from. 318. 406. 71–74 calculating lengths with. 428–436 estimating graphically. 346 of a perpendicular line. 158 tetrahedron. 16–21 similar triangles. 366–371. 6 run. 27. 334 rational bases of powers. 179 Electronics Technician. 185 sine ratio. of a composite object. 417–424. 31. graphing. 71 simplifying. 204 standard form of an equation. 346–348 roots. 214 algebraic expressions with integer exponents. Brook. surface area of. 404–408 substitution strategy. 346–348 Page 545 S scientific notation. 28 relations (see also linear relations). 404–408. 333–339. 333–339 surface area. 287–293 representing. identifying linear relations from. 313–318 rate of change. 27. 44 Tool and Dye Maker. 204. 289–293 of linear function graphs. 358–361 slope-point form of a linear function. 351 Claudius Ptolemy. 144. 40 right prism. 31. 316. 39 right triangles. 45–50 range. 359 of a line segment. 273 Marketing. 50 volume of. 27. of a right pyramid. 106 sphere. 214 radicand. 91–94 calculating lengths with. 345. 302. 142 ruler. 46–48. 222–226 simplifying algebraic expressions with. 143. 346–348 slope-intercept form. simplifying numerical expressions with. 26–33 system of linear equations (see linear systems) T tables. 114 slant height. properties of. 213–217 Rubik’s cube. 239 algebraic expressions with rational exponents. 78–81. 32 slope. 313. 71–74. 427 Financial Planner. 225 rational exponents. 4 relating to imperial units. 37 right pyramids. 378–383.wncp10_Index. 204. 181 Systems and Babylonians. 49 sets. 45 surface area of. 28. 447 Index 545 . 98–100 solving with primary trigonometric ratios. 58 of a cube. 303. 208 in simplest form. 265–270. 386 Petroleum Engineer. 209 reciprocals. 57. 204 radius of a sphere. 115–117 Taylor polynomials. 267. 240 numerical expression with rational number bases.qxd 2/19/10 10:54 AM Q quotient of powers law. 215 sums and differences of two polynomials. 429–436 solving by substitution. 45–48 of right pyramids and right cones. 207–210 exponents of. 305 representing functions with. 113–117 rise. 38 of a right cone. 257–261. surface area of. 416–424. 106–109. 26–33 volume of. 208–210. 106–109. 145. 366–371 solution of a linear system. 216 mixed and entire forms. 307. 36–39 right rectangular prism. 358. 213–217 multiplication properties of. 96 The World of Math: Historical Moment: Agnes Martin. 205. 26–31 volume of. 48–50 square root. 435 solving by elimination. 223 rational number bases. 158 Taylor. 121 François Viète. 238 real numbers. 256–261 right cones (also right circular cones). 348 referents of linear measure. 230–234 rectangle. 238 radicals using prime factorization. 358–361. 39–41 right cylinder. 205.

7–10 relating SI and imperial units. 28. 158 U undefined slope. 30 solving with primary trigonometric ratios. area of. imperial. 189–193 factoring by decomposition. 110 The Slope of a Road. 36–41 W whole numbers. 61 Renewable Energy. 16–21 units. 56 of a hemisphere. of a composite object. 17–21 y-intercept (also vertical intercept). 39 of a sphere. 164 modelling as binomial products. 335 unit analysis. 9 unit conversion.qxd 12/7/09 6:26 PM Page 546 The Decimal System of Measurement. 40 of a right prism. 162–165 in ascending and descending order. 141 Platonic Solids. 113–117 trinomials. 359 . 157. 289. 158 The World of Math: Profile: Festival du Voyageur. 145 multiples of. 445 determining equation of linear function from. 248 The Origin of the Inch. 313–316 vertical line test for a function. 313–316. 144 X x-intercept (also horizontal intercept). 91 solving right triangles with. 175 factoring of. François. 243 Taylor Polynomials. 4–10 V vertical intercept (also y-intercept). 360 The World of Math: Math Fact: A Linear System with Three Variables. 4–10 of length. 106–109 trigonometry. 181 546 Index volume. 358. 100 triangles. 134–139 prime factors of. 290 Viète. 323 Why Is m Used to Represent Slope?. 4–10. 234 Cryptography. cube root of. 444. 48–50 of right pyramids and right cones. 313–316 Y yard. 14 Theano. 163. 50 of a right cylinder. 97. 37 of a right rectangular prism. 323 transit. 343 Theano. 435 Computers and ␲. 153. 19 The Golden Ratio.wncp10_Index. 135–139 square root of.

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