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A Day at the University


Nadeem: Good morning.
Hadeel: Good morning.
?Nadeem: How are you
Hadeel: I am fine, thank you.
?Nadeem: Can I help you
Hadeel: Where do I find the
?Nursing School building, please
Nadeem: It is the big building in
front of you.
Hadeel: Thank you very much.

: .

Nadeem: You are welcome. Are


?you a new student here

: . .

Hadeel: Yes, and this is my first


day at the university.

Nadeem: Why did you choose the


?nursing department

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Hadeel: I want to become a nurse


to help the sick.

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Nadeem: Ah. That is very good. My


name is Nadeem. What is your
?name
Hadeel: My name is Hadeel.
Nadeem: Nice to meet you.
Hadeel: Nice to meet you. And
what do you study at the
?university
Nadeem: I study Architectural
engineering and I want to take my
Masters and P.H.D. Degrees, God
willing.
Hadeel: God willing. Why do you

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: .S

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Hadeel: Nice to meet you. And


what do you study at the
?university
Nadeem: I study Architectural
engineering and I want to take my
Masters and P.H.D. Degrees, God
willing.
Hadeel: God willing. Why do you
?study Architectural engineering
Nadeem: I want to become an
engineer to run my fathers
company.

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Hadeel: Very nice. How do I go to


?the library

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Nadeem: Go straight and it will be


the first building next to the
Cafeteria.

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Hadeel: How many stories are in


?the Engineering building

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Nadeem: There are six stories in


the building.

Hadeel: In which building is the


office of the Dean of the Nursing
?School

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Nadeem: His office is in the


University Headquarters building.
?Hadeel: On which floor
Nadeem: On the Sixth floor, on
your right hand, next to the
elevator.
Hadeel: When is your first lecture
?today
Nadeem: My first lecture today is in
half an hour.
Hadeel: OK. Goodbye.
Nadeem: Goodbye.

The topic of the audio is:



asking for a location
As you heard in this segment:
:
Hadeel: Where do I find the Nursing School building, please?
Here are the key words:
Where =
building =
School or College =
Nursing =

My first lecture today



As you heard the whole phrase doesn't differ from MSA in
pronunciation.
first lecture, when the ordinal number is indefinite, it
comes first and doesn't have to agree with the noun in gender like
. But when it is definite, the noun comes first and the
number has to agree in gender, for example:
the first lecture
the second lecture
I want to become a nurse.
.
This is what you heard in this audio segment:
:
. :
Nadeem: Why did you choose the Nursing department?
Hadeel : I want to become a nurse to help the sick.
Note the following points as you listen to this segment of the audio:
The speaker uses the interrogative particle ( why) to request specific
information about the reason. ( because) is the typical response for why
questions.
Listen to how the speaker uses the cognate ( nurse).
Listen to how the speaker pronounces ( you choose); the sound of at
the end is because he is addressing a female.
Note the similarities between the noun ( department) and the past tense
verb
( he divided).
The term ( nursing) is derived from the root
( to get sick). Also note
the similarities between the verb
( to get sick), the nouns
( sickness)
and ( patients).
( patients) is the plural of ( patient).
This is what you heard in this audio segment:
:
. :
. :
Hadeel: and what do you study at the university?
Nadeem: I study architectural engineering and I want to continue, for my Master's

and Doctorate Degrees, God willing.


Hadeel: God willing
Note the following points as you listen to this audio segment:
The interrogative particle( what) is used by the speaker to elicit information
about (what). Another form for this same purpose is the term . A very typical
question using this pattern is ( what is your name) OR . Both
forms can be used to extract information, using either a noun, such as the
example given, or a verb ( what are you doing?).
Listen to how the speaker uses the cognates ( Masters Degree) and
( Doctorate Degree).
Note the similarities between ( Doctorate Degree) and ( the female
doctor).
To run my father's company.
.
This is what you head in this audio segment:
.S :
. :
Hadeel: God Willing. Why do you study architectural engineering?
Nadeem: I want to become an engineer to run my dads company
Note the following points as you are listening to this audio segment:
( engineer). The adjective noun is derived from the root
( to
design).
Note the similarities in pronunciation of the noun ( engineering) and the
verb
( to design)
( my father) the suffix is used with the noun ( father) to indicate the
possessive pronoun (my).
This is what you heard in this segement:
:
:
Hadeel: How do I go to the Library?
Nadeem: Go straight and it will be the first building next to the cafeteria.
Note the following points as you listen to this segment of the audio:
( how) is the interrogative particle that is used to extract information about
(how). This is commonly used on a daily basis, especially in ( how are
you). It is also commonly heard in an abbreviated manner , which also
means how are you? Note that unless you are asking about one's well being,
you cannot abbreviate ( how).
in the Levantine dialect, the preposition ( to) is usually abbreviated
and pronounced . Note that the preposition can also mean (on). For
example: ( the book is on the table).
Listen to how the speaker pronounces the cognate ( the cafeteria).
When the speaker gives directions, it is necessary to use the imperative mood
(), in this example ( walk). The speaker uses a future tense verb which
he forms by the preceding verb ( to be), with the prefix ( will).
As you hear in this segment:
:
:
Hadeel: In which building is the office of the Dean of the Nursing School?
Nadeem: His office is in the University Headquarters building.
Pay attention to the following notes as you listen to this audio segment:
( in which). The interrogative particle ( in which) is used to extract

( in which). The interrogative particle ( in which) is used to extract


information about a place
Note that the term ( the dean of the school) has also the meaning of
Brigadier General, a rank in the military.
In the Levantine dialect, you can make a noun definite by adding one or more
nouns to it. For example: ( College of Nursing), the speaker adds the
noun ( nursing) to the noun ( college) to make it definite.
Note the similarities between the term ( college) and the term ( kidney).
( his office); the possessive pronoun is used as a suffix to give the
meaning (his).

As you hear in this segment:


:
:
Nada: How many stories are in the Engineering building?
Nadeem: There are six stories in the building.
Pay attention to the following notes as you listen to this audio segment:
The interrogative particle ( how many) is used to elicit information about a
number (how many).
Listen to how the speaker says ( how many floors), which literally
means "how many floor." Unlike English, the term is followed by a singular
noun.
To use a question for (how much), then will be used instead for example:

How much money do you


have?
How much does this cost?

This is what you hear in this segment:


:
:
Hadeel: On which floor?
Nadeem: On the sixth floor, on your right hand next to the elevator.
Pay attention to the following notes as you listen to this audio segment:
The preposition is used with the meaning of in, to refer to a place. Listen
again to how the speaker says ( on which).
The use of ( which) in a question requests information about (which). Do not
confuse it with in a statement. Its meaning will change to be none:
( there is no one) or ( I do not have anything).
Listen to how the speaker pronounces the cognate ( elevator).
This is what you hear in this segment:
:
:
Hadeel: When is your first lecture today?
Nadeem: My first lecture today is in half an hour.
Pay attention to the following points as you listen to this audio segment.
The speaker uses the interrogative particle ( when) to extract information
about (time). Different regions might pronounce it slightly different. You might
also hear it said as ( when).
The speaker uses the ordinal number ( first) from a different root than that of
the number ( one). Just like the English language where the number one
and "first" do not resemble each other
Do not confuse ( half) with ( text).

and "first" do not resemble each other


Do not confuse ( half) with ( text).