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JAN. 2-8, 2013
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Listen Up!
Student exhibit combines
art and music. PAGE 2
KATIE MORGAN/The Montgomery Sun
Hundreds of children and parents gathered in one of the Princeton Airports hangars in Montgomery Township on Christmas Eve,
Monday, Dec. 24, 2012, to meet Santa Claus at the airports annual Santa Fly-in event.
Santa Fly-in event
Town,
schools
plan for
changes
By HEATHER FIORE
The Montgomery Sun
Montgomery Township and the
Montgomery Township School
District (MTSD) have a lot in
store for 2013, and are kicking off
the new year with an assortment
of new programs, projects and
procedures.
For the MTSD, theres a large
initiative that is being imple-
mented this year, which involves
a partnership with the Teachers
College at Columbia University,
according to Superintendent
Nancy Gartenberg.
We partnered with the Teach-
ers College at Columbia Universi-
ty to implement a new reading
and writing program, so we are
focusing our attention there in-
tensively, from kindergarten
through fourth grades, she said.
Its also including grades six
through eight as much as we can,
but the real focus is in kinder-
garten through fourth grades.
Thats the real emphasis for us.
please see GARTENBERG, page 9
2 THE MONTGOMERY SUN JAN. 2-8, 2013
The Corner of Route 518 and 206
Skillman, NJ
(609) 921-1776
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Community Banking With You In Mind
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Is Your bank telling you
Youre not big enough?
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Listen Up!
combines
art, music
By HEATHER FIORE
The Montgomery Sun
For the last six years, the
Princeton Symphony Orchestra
(PSO) and Montgomery Upper
Middle School (UMS) and Lower
Middle School (LMS) teachers
have worked together to create an
artistic niche for students inter-
ested in both music and art
known as Listen Up!
Listen Up!, which is part of the
Special to The Sun
Sixth grader at Montgomery Lower Middle School Brandon Li painted
this picture of a detailed elephant in response to the song
Scheherazade for the Listen Up! exhibit in December 2012. The ex-
hibit is on display until Jan. 25.
please see TEN, page 5
JAN. 2-8, 2013 THE MONTGOMERY SUN 3
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Skating open house
set for Jan. 13
The 2013 National Skating
Months Its Great to Skate
Open House welcomes potential
skaters for an afternoon of intro-
duction and fun for the whole
family on Jan. 13 from 2:45 to 4:15
p.m. at the Princeton Day Schools
Lisa McGraw Skating Rink,
which is located at 650 Great Road
in Princeton.
The open house will allow
young and old to experience fig-
ure and hockey skating and learn
the basics in a fun-filled, friendly
and warm environment. Skate
rentals will be available for a
small fee. National Skating
Month, now in its 12th year, will
allow 700 member clubs and over
1,000 registered Basic Skills skat-
ing schools to reach out to new
members in their region by offer-
ing the fundamentals of skating
across the United States.
For more information visit
www.princetonskatingclub.org or
email princetonsc@aol.com.
Open house, alumni
panel at Waldorf School
The Waldorf School of Prince-
ton, which is located on Cherry
Hill Road in Montgomery Town-
ship, will be holding an Open
House and Alumni Panel on Sat-
urday, Jan. 12 from 10 a.m. until
noon.
For more information, go to
princetonwaldorf.org or call (609)
466-1970, ext. 115.
Donations sought for
Sandy relief effort
The Lawrence Lions invite all
residents to donate to the Sandy
Relief effort. Lions will purchase
drywall and insulation for the
beach communities with dona-
tions received.
Donations should be mailed to
Lawrence Lions, P.O. Box 6192,
Lawrenceville, NJ, 08648.
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4 THE MONTGOMERY SUN JAN. 2-8, 2013
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Youth orchestra
auditions on Jan. 13
The Greater Princeton Youth
Orchestra (GPYO) will be holding
auditions for all ensembles on
Tuesday, Jan. 13 at Montgomery
High School, which is located at
1014 County Route 601 in Skill-
man, for the second half of its
concert season.
The GPYO has preparatory en-
sembles for young players, and
two orchestras for more advanced
students. The advanced students
are currently beginning prepara-
tions for a performance at
Carnegie Hall in New York City.
Any interested students should
contact Mark Morris, audition
manager for the orchestra. Or
they can submit an audition ap-
plication online at www.gpyo.org.
Country Barn Dance and
Fundraiser on Jan. 11
The Princeton Elks will host
the Montgomery Township
School District Special Education
PTAs 3rd annual Country Barn
Dance and Fundraiser on
Friday, Jan. 11 from 7 p.m. to mid-
night.
There will be line dancing led
by DJ Dave Kim, along with a va-
riety of other activities. There
will also be a cash bar.
The cost is $15 for adults and
$10 for high school and college
students with an ID.
The event will be held at
the Princeton Elks Lodge, which
is located at 354 Rt. 518 in Skill-
man.
For more information, contact
Ana Santini at (908) 868-3916.
BRIEFS
Visit us online at www.themontgomerysun.com
JAN. 2-8, 2013 THE MONTGOMERY SUN 5
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PSO BRAVO! education pro-
grams, challenges middle school
students to create visual art in re-
sponse to live music they hear at
a PSO concert, according to PSO
education coordinator and for-
mer opera singer Carol Burden,
who runs Listen Up! at PSO.
"The program is intended for
middle school students, although
we had a couple of high school
students involved this year," she
said. "We felt that it was most ef-
fective for people whove been
through elementary school and
have experienced different music
teachers; we thought middle
school was a great time to ask
them to play back based on what
they were hearing.
This year, 10 students from
Montgomery UMS and LMS were
involved in the after-school pro-
gram Listen Up!
On Nov. 4, 2012, the Mont-
gomery students, along with 15
other students from a variety of
middle schools in Princeton
John Witherspoon Middle School
and Princeton Charter School,
The Cambridge School, The Hun
School, St. Paul School, and Med-
ford Memorial Middle School at-
tended PSO's concert, and were
then asked to express their reac-
tions to one of the songs per-
formed, Rimsky-Korsakov's
"Scheherazade," through the cre-
ation of original art and written
reflections.
"The students were challenged
over next 3 1/2 weeks to create a
piece," Burden said. "It was a fair-
ly short time frame since we usu-
ally give them 5 or 6 weeks, but
the Princeton Arts Council was
ready to display, so we thought 3
1/2 weeks would pose a very in-
teresting challenge. And it does-
nt stop kids now, particularly in a
community like ours that has so
much to offer, from adjusting
their calendars to make things
happen."
Burden explained how diverse
each of the artworks are and how
they depict everything from a for-
est scene, to a mysterious magi-
TEN
Continued from page 2
Ten Montgomery students involved
please see PROGRAM, page 7
6 THE MONTGOMERY SUN JAN. 2-8, 2013
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08502 ZIP code. If
you are not on the mailing list, six-month
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may call for a correction to be printed.
SPEAK UP
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Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@themontgomerysun.com, via fax at
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you can drop them off at our office, too. The
Montgomery Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium includ-
ing electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kristen Dowd
MONTGOMERY EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
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VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
T
here are all kinds of great rea-
sons to replace the $1 bill with a
$1 coin.
For example, the government says it
would save taxpayers billions of dol-
lars over the next several decades. And
who doesnt want to save billions of
tax dollars?
Vending companies, too, would like
to see the switch. Anyone who has
tried unsuccessfully to jam a dollar bill
into a machine that is, well, less than
perfect, understands the vending com-
panies sentiments.
The problem is that weve tried this
before, and it didnt end well. Remem-
ber, about a decade ago, the Sacagawea
coin? Before that, the Susan B. Antho-
ny? Before that? Well, there have been
dollar coins in the United States pretty
much since the Continental Congress
met.
Americans just dont seem to like
the $1 coin. Some complain that they
are too hard to distinguish from the
quarter. Others note that its much eas-
ier to cram 10 $1 bills into your wallet
than it is to carry 10 $1 coins in your
pocket.
Whatever the reason, Americans
have rejected a move to the $1 coin. Re-
peatedly and resoundly.
So lets forget about this idea and
focus on a few other monetary
thoughts that make more sense.
How about making $1 bills that last
longer than five years? That reduces
the need to pull old ones from circula-
tion and replace them with new ones.
And lets figure out a way to make
producing a penny cost less than a
penny, and make producing a nickel
cost less than a dime. Switch metals, or
just do away with them altogether. Es-
pecially the pennies. Not much you can
get for a penny these days.
But keep the $1 bill. At least for now.
At least until inflation puts it into the
category of the penny: not really worth
producing any longer.
in our opinion
The $1 coin
Havent we tried this already? And failed?
Dollar bill blues
Yes, removing the $1 bill from circula-
tion and replacing it with a $1 coin
would save tax dollars. Except, nobody
really wants to use $1 coins. Weve tried
to use them in the past, but society has
rejected them. So why bring up the
idea again?
As we begin 2013, I would like to take a
brief look back to recognize Mark Confor-
ti, who just completed his term on the
Township Committee.
When called upon to fill a vacant seat,
Mark stepped up and served our communi-
ty with thoughtfulness and integrity. He
was instrumental in many of our success-
es throughout the year. Most notably with
our debt refinancing plan that saves Mont-
gomery taxpayers $600,000 and eliminates
two future balloon debt payments (making
our annual budgeting process more stable
and predictable).
Even though Mark is leaving the Town-
ship Committee, he will stay active on sev-
eral important
boards/commit-
tees. This doesnt
surprise me. Mark
is truly dedicated
to our community.
Hes the only resi-
dent in recent his-
tory to serve on
the Township
Committee, Plan-
ning Board, Zon-
ing Board, and
Board of Educa-
tion. It is clear to
me and many oth-
ers that Mark has made Montgomery a bet-
ter place to live. For that, we should all
thank him.
I would like to congratulate our former
mayor and current Somerset County Free-
holder Mark Caliguire on his election to a
full three-year term. Throughout 2012,
Mark was a valuable resource to make sure
Montgomerys needs were being met by
our county government. One of Marks
greatest accomplishments as mayor was
the preservation of the 250-acre Skillman
Park. As freeholder, he continues to work
on the parks design and development and
Im sure we will see a lot of progress in
2013.
Mayor recognizes Conforti, congratulates Caliguire
Ed Trzaska
MAYORS MESSAGE
Send us your Montgomery news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@themontgomery-
sun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
cian, to oceans and shipwrecks.
Sixth grader at Montgomery
LMS Brandon Li, who is new to
Listen Up! this year, explained
what attracted him to the pro-
gram and what he enjoys most
about it.
"I wanted to join it because it
gives me an opportunity to share
my artwork with the others and
learn from others as well," he
said. "It really requires the partic-
ipants to think about the music
and translate the musical art into
visual art. Comparing with other
art programs, this one stretches
beyond Montgomery and beyond
just drawing art."
For this year's exhibit, Li creat-
ed an elaborate elephant painting
and explained how the contrast of
the "bouncy and relaxing" music
in "Scheherazade" translated into
his creation.
"My painting was inspired by
the strong and dramatic music of
the Festival of Bagdad, the voice
of the Sultan himself, and the
smooth and relaxing violin solos
in 'Scheherazade,'" he said. "The
strong, expressive part of the
music carries a sense of drama
and adventure. It brought me an
image of an elephant dancing,
with vivid contrasting colors in
the background, symbolizing the
strength and emotion. However,
the violin solos made me feel like
I was flowing in a river, surround-
ed by harmonious color. So, I
changed my idea of background
to match the flow very calm and
peaceful with blues, greens, yel-
lows, and purples."
Li also detailed how he added
"a little touch of Middle Eastern
culture" with the decoration of
the accessories on the elephant,
which was inspired by the begin-
ning of the song.
"Hes a young boy and has a
very developed sense of craft,"
Burden said. "I loved the trunk of
the elephant and the delicacy and
detail; I would venture to say that
was one of the things he heard in
the music that deep, lumber
quality and also all of the excite-
ment."
Li's art teacher, Arlene Mil-
gram, who is one of the teachers
involved in Listen Up! at LMS,
recommended the program to Li.
She explained how the stu-
dents were given time after the
concert to create a piece of art-
work, and how she guides the stu-
dents at the program.
"They tell me what their ideas
are and what media they want,"
Milgram said. "I am there for
technical help and occasional ad-
vice, but the artwork is independ-
ent from school projects and is en-
tirely student driven."
Milgram is the only teacher at
Montgomery LMS works with the
students in Listen Up! and said
she likes that the program isn't a
contest, but rather an experience.
"The students who are in this
program work as independent
artists," she said. "They see their
work develop from a musically-in-
spired seed of an idea to a fully re-
alized work of art. The fact that it
is displayed with other works al-
lows them to see their work in a
larger context and to experience
viewers' responses to what they
have created. The students always
gain confidence from this experi-
ence."
Milgram also detailed how Lis-
ten Up! challenges the students at
LMS and gives them a chance to
expand their imaginations.
"This boosts each childs confi-
dence as an artist and as a per-
son," she said. "Creating a visual
response to an actual symphony
is a challenge. Thinking about
what the student wants to say and
how they can best express it is
complicated. Writing an artist
statement to accompany the work
demonstrates the higher level
thinking skills that went into the
artwork. The exhibits celebrate
all that hard work."
Another teacher involved in
Listen Up! at Montgomery's UMS,
Aurelle Sprout, has been involved
since the program's inception and
oversees the eighth graders.
"I liked the idea of doing this
having an art and music connec-
tion," she said. "The uniqueness
is the PSO is reaching out to mid-
dle school students to create more
of a audience for classical music,
and this touches my heart."
Sprout explained how she
guides the students by having
them do sketches, but really en-
joys seeing their "very interesting
interpretations."
"You never know what you're
going to get," she said. "They can
represent how they wish to por-
tray the way they react its up to
them. At this age, they come with
fairly strong opinions about
things and are just eager to ex-
press themselves."
The students who choose to
participate in Listen Up! each
year are usually particularly tal-
ented art students who are also
musically-inclined, Burden ex-
plained.
"We began working with teach-
ers to identify these students who
were also interested in doing
this," she said. "Teachers at PSO
and in Montgomery have devel-
oped these types of atmospheres
where theyre playing a piece
where students are painting in re-
sponse to it. Since it's after school,
it's inviting students to come to-
gether, work together, see their
work and progress, and to listen
to music and talk about what
theyre doing."
There are two things that PSO
hopes to accomplish with Listen
Up!, which Burden detailed.
"We want to invoke a direct re-
sponse from the sixth- to eighth-
grade age group to ask what
theyre hearing, but rather than
tell us in words to do so in images.
It's a wonderful opportunity for
us, and the feedback we received
is having a chance to playback in
the artistic process is a lot; they
have a lot to say," she said. "The
other piece is that were able to
get these kids an opportunity to
come to a concert with their
friends. It's an outing with friends
thats art-related and goes beyond
the typical things middle school-
ers tend to do socially. We give
them the opportunity to go to
classical music concert with
friends and kids their age."
And, because Montgomery's
teachers are so dedicated to the
program, children are getting the
ultimate experience.
"The teachers from Mont-
gomery have really taken the pro-
gram into their hearts, and what
theyre doing here is really the
pinnacle of what can be done,"
Burden said. "They have created
sort of a community of adoles-
cent artists around this project.
The work is all their own, but the
kids have been working together
and supporting each other."
She also added how Listen Up!,
which is the only program of its
kind, has successfully provided
Montgomery's middle school stu-
dents with a unique chance to ex-
press how they feel.
JAN. 2-8, 2013 THE MONTGOMERY SUN 7
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Program is unique way to express feelings, says organizer
PROGRAM
Continued from page 5
please see EXHIBIT, page 10
WEDNESDAY JAN. 2
Walking Club: 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Meet at Harlingen Church Gym,
Route 206 at Dutchtown-Harlin-
gen Road. A two-mile DVD walk
for women walkers. Free of
charge.
FRIDAY JAN. 4
Kids Music Round: Ages newborn
to 4. 10 to 10:45 a.m. at Mary
Jacobs Library. Sing, dance and
play rhythm instruments with us,
and enjoy a special music-making
session with your child. Nurture
your childs musical intelligence
while having a great time. Pre-
sented by Kids Music Round of
Pennington. Registration
required. Call (609) 924-7073,
ext. 5.
SATURDAY JAN. 5
First Saturday Drop-Off at Somer-
set County Recycling: 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. Open to all Somerset
County Residents. Visit
www.co.somerset.nj.
us/recycle.html or call the County
Recycling Center at (732) 469-
3363 to find out what materials
are acceptable. Some examples
are any curbside recyclables,
motor oil, anti-freeze, tires (up to
8). No electronics, chemicals or
household hazardous materials.
SUNDAY JAN. 6
Winter Hike: Join naturalist Rachel
Mackow for a light-hearted excur-
sion into winter survival, human
and otherwise, and see whether
bounty still exists beneath crack-
ling leaves in wind-swept branch-
es. Mackow will highlight uses of
native and non-native plants,
including edible and medicinal
species, in this two-hour-long
nature hike. Meet at 11 a.m. at
Cherry Brook Preserve. Dress in
layers for cold weather. Wear
comfortable walking shoes. Reg-
ister by emailing mfosnj@
gmail.com. Call (609) 689-0282
in case of inclement weather.
TUESDAY JAN. 8
Toddler Sing with Pat: Ages 1 to 3.
10:30 to 11 a.m. in the Program
Room at Mary Jacobs Library. No
registration needed.
A Good Yarn: 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Mary
Jacobs Library. Discuss Rules of
Civility by Amor Towles while
knitting. Bring yarn and needles.
For more information, call (609)
924-7073, ext. 4.
Art in the Area: 7 to 8:30 p.m. at
Mary Jacobs Library. Join Chris-
tine Giviskos, associate curator of
European art, for a discuss of Le
Mur at the Cabaret des Quat z
Arts. Registration required. Call
(609) 924-7073, ext. 4.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JAN. 2-8, 2013
Lic #10199 Cont Lic #13VH01382900
The Montgomery High School
Cyber Security team, The Monty
Defenders, placed second in the
2012 NYU-Poly Computer Securi-
ty Awareness Week
(CSAW)/Adobe Security Aware-
ness Video Competition.
The theme for this year's com-
petition was "Securing Every De-
vice, Everywhere. The team cre-
ated a video that emphasized the
use of securing online accounts
with a technique called Multi-
Factor authentication. To view
their video, go to
poly.edu/csaw2012/csaw-aware-
ness and click on the team's
name.
The team consisted of three
sophomores Michael Reininger,
Sri Velagapudi, and Casey Chow.
The Monty Defenders' entry
competed against 19 others from
college and high school student
national teams. The entries were
judged by a panel of seven securi-
ty experts from Adobe, Microsoft,
VMWare, Facebook and the Na-
tional Security Agency (NSA).
The winners were announced on
Nov. 17, 2012. The first place went
to the Illinois Academy for Math-
ematics and Science, and the
third place to NYU/Polytech. As-
sociated with second place, there
is a $750 prize that the team would
donate to the school to assist the
school participating in future
cyber-security competitions.
"We are very proud to repre-
sent the school and this achieve-
ment wouldn't have been possible
without the help and support of
Mrs. Franzyshen and the school,
co-founder of the Monty Defend-
ers Michael Reininger said. We
are very thankful to Mrs.
Franzyshen, our coach, and the
school for giving us this opportu-
nity, and hope to so proudly repre-
sent the school in more cyber-se-
curity events in the future."
Mr. Paul Popadiuk, Mont-
gomery High School principal,
congratulated the Monty Defend-
ers team and wished them contin-
ued success in future competi-
tions.
Ms. Corie Gaylord, Mont-
gomery High School vice princi-
pal, also congratulated the team
for creating a video that is effec-
tive and entertaining and stated
that the team faced some tough
competition and can be proud of
their accomplishment.
The Princeton Elks Lodge
monthly Veterans Day meeting
and lunch will be held on Jan. 10
at noon. The luncheon will be
open to all and free for veterans.
All veterans in our community
are invited to attend, and all Elks
who are veterans are especially
encouraged to attend.
This event marks the start of a
new program for the lodge to es-
tablish a Veterans Day once each
month during most months of the
year. The Montgomery Veterans
Memorial Committee will join in
the luncheons. Their mission is to
maintain the Montgomery Veter-
ans Memorial and to develop re-
lated programs, which will be a
resource for the entire communi-
ty.
A large part of our Elks Veter-
ans Service Committee mission is
to provide direct and personal
benefits for veterans, especially
homeless veterans and those with
acute needs. Meeting and work-
ing together will benefit both vet-
erans and our community in gen-
eral.
All Elks who are either veter-
ans or who just care about veter-
ans are encouraged to participate
in these joint meetings and be-
come a member of our Veterans
Service Committee.
Future lunch meetings are
planned for the second Thursday
of the month, except July and Au-
gust.
The event will be held at the
Princeton Elks Lodge located at
345 Route 518 in Skillman. For
more information, contact Hugh
Dyer at (908) 359-7122.
Monty Defenders place second in competition
Elks to host Veterans Day meeting, luncheon
Please recycle this newspaper.
JAN. 2-8, 2013 THE MONTGOMERY SUN 9
Gartenberg explained how the
idea of this program stemmed
from reading research on unsuc-
cessful children, as well as
MTSDs standards.
One of the important things
for us is to raise resilient kids,
and in order to have success later
in life, its our goal as parents and
as educators to do so, she said.
We want to see kids when were
35 and what we wish for them
when theyre 35, and what we
wish for them is to be productive
citizens in society, to have charac-
ter, to be able to make good deci-
sions, to be resilient when things
dont go their way, to be happy, to
be psychically fit, to have coping
skills, to have perseverance
these are the things that we
want.
Along with the new reading
and writing program, Gartenberg
also explained how MTSD is con-
tinuing one of its social initia-
tives that began in 2012, which
looks at kids through a social and
emotional lens. It looks at kids
at a social and emotional level
and kids getting along and treat-
ing each other with respect and
dignity, she said. Those are
themes that were going to contin-
ue to carry through this year.
With these two programs,
Gartenberg hopes the academics
and social well being of students
in the MTSD will balance each
other out.
We know we have a stellar ac-
ademic program here, and we
need it in both of the programs,
she said. The pendulum needs to
swing into that other direction,
where not only do we focus on the
academic, but also the social and
emotional well-being of our stu-
dents and their ability to move on
into life, and we want to prepare
them with that and provide them
with that foundation.
Also on the list for major
changes this year is technology,
according to Gartenberg. We
are looking at a significant tech-
nology infrastructure overhaul
basically, she said. When the re-
cession hit in 2008 and up until
today, its been very difficult to try
and keep up with the technologi-
cal needs, and were not where
wed like to be as far as technolo-
gy advancement. We have the
backbone of the structure in
place, and what we need to do is
get some of the devices into the
hands of the students, so there is
a plan to roll out over the next five
years, beginning with next school
year, a significant amount of
tools. Gartenberg detailed how
the MTSD is already piloting
Bring Your Own Device
(BYOD) at the high school level,
where students are allowed to
bring in their device of choice to
use in the classroom.
We have an open lunch at the
high school, so kids are actively
using their devices, and also pro-
viding teacher training so teach-
ers are able to support that in the
classroom, she said. Thats a re-
ally big part of what were doing
next year.
Gartenberg also described how
students are going to be required
to complete the new Partnership
for Assessment of Readiness for
College and Careers (PARCC) as-
sessments in the spring of 2015,
which is already influencing the
technological advancements for
this year and the years to come.
Were part of a 46-state initia-
tive, where weve all adopted this
particular assessment in math
and language arts, and these as-
sessments, beginning in the
spring of 2015, will take place on
the computer for fifth graders
and up, so thats one of our moti-
vations, she said. We are look-
ing at iPads, but we also know at
this time, that screen size is some-
thing thats required on this as-
sessment and also that there be a
keyboard, so were trying to fig-
ure out whats best for our kids.
Currently, Apple is working on
retro-fitting the iPad with a USB
port so we can have a mouse at-
tached to it, she added. Cur-
rently, we dont have that. Theres
keyboards out there, but mice
dont fit on the iPad, so were not
going to necessarily make the
leap for fifth grade and above for
iPads for instructional purposes
because of that.
Gartenberg explained how
MTSD is looking into purchasing
netbooks and laptops strictly be-
cause of the PARCC requirement
that there be a keyboard and
mouse but also noted how the
district plans to purchase iPads
for use in the classroom and at
the lower levels. Were being
mindful and practical of what we
think is going to carry us through
the next three to five years, and
right now, were only able to de-
cide on what we know exists
today, and what we know doesnt
exist today is a USB port for the
iPad, she said. Were being cau-
tious, practical and judicious
about what we decide to pur-
chase. The MTSD currently has
document cameras and is looking
to put bright lights into class-
rooms so it provides teachers
with more of an interactive touch
board, as well some amplification
systems for sound.
Aside from technological im-
provements, the MTSD is also
working hard on a new teacher
evaluation model that is required
by the fall of 2013, which Garten-
berg further explained.
"We have selected a particular
model, and we are currently
training administrators and
teachers in that model, and were
looking to create in-house experts
to be able to train our staff," she
said. "Our goal is that administra-
tors and teachers are going to be
partnering in February and April
to share the model that weve cho-
sen, share the rubric that teach-
ers will be measured by, and fur-
ther explain the requirements."
Gartenberg explained how 50
percent of the model is going to
be actual administrative observa-
tion, whether it's walk-throughs
or physically sitting in a class-
room for a determined amount of
time, and the other half is going
to be assessed based on student
data.
"Were in the process of creat-
ing in-house assessments with
those non-tested subjects," she
said. "Right now, New Jersey only
tests for English and math, but 85
percent of our school districts are
not English and math, so we need
to create a system. Well be look-
ing at a portfolio assessment at
some point for teachers to keep
artifacts and share students
growth because we have to meas-
ure student growth, teacher by
teacher. Its a major event for
everyone."
Although the model may take
some adjustment for teachers,
Gartenberg is optimistic that it
will make things much more visi-
ble for teachers, administrators
and principals.
"I think that its long overdue
that we have a comprehensive
model that administrators have to
be trained on, and that we have to
demonstrate inter-rater reliabili-
ty so all of the administrators in
Montgomery need to be able to
look and see the same thing in an
observation and document it ac-
cordingly and appropriately, and
that hasnt been done ever," she
said. With many concerned par-
ents inquiring about MTSD's se-
curity procedures after the New-
ton, Conn., tragedy, which killed
20 children at Sandy Hook Ele-
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Gartenberg hopes to strike balance of academics, social well being
GARTENBERG
Continued from page 1
please see TRZASKA, page 10
mentary School in December
2012, Gartenberg sent a letter to
parents shortly after it happened,
detailing MTSD's efforts to en-
sure safety in all of its schools.
"All of our schools are com-
pletely locked," she said. "We have
rolling conversations about secu-
rity, and when something like this
happens, you have the tendency
to increase conversation and it
forces us to take a look at our
practices and procedures."
"We currently, like all the
school districts in the state, have
a Crisis Management Plan [Safe-
ty and Security Plan] that re-
quires us to conduct drills for var-
ious scenarios like active shoot-
ers, evacuations (including non-
fire evacuations), bomb threats,
lockdowns, shelter and place (in-
ternal lockdown), and weve been
doing that for the last couple of
years it was required in 2011,"
she added. "We have faculty and
board members trained, are in
compliance with what we need to
do, and were constantly working
with the students."
In light of the incident, Garten-
berg also added how teachers in
all of the schools have conversa-
tions with their students about
these types of scenarios, especial-
ly recently, which vary greatly de-
pending on the grade.
"At every grade level, theres
different conversations to have,"
she said. "There are different con-
versations about safety that you
have with the little ones and then
different conversations with the
ones at the high school. Thats
where we are."
On the township level, a lot of
things are happening as well, ac-
cording to Mayor Ed Trzaska.
"You never know what a new
year will bring, but I think it is
safe to say that 2013 is going to be
challenging, yet full of opportuni-
ties to protect and improve Mont-
gomery," he said. "As of now, we
have four key goals for 2013,
which include protecting public
health and safety services, adher-
ing to Gov. Christie's 2-percent
property tax cap, preserving addi-
tional open space and protecting
our rural character, and optimiz-
ing the use of the limited com-
mercial land in town."
Trzaska explained how the
first goal protecting public
health and safety services will
include the recruitment of new
hires and cadets for the police de-
partment to replace pending fu-
ture retirees and two officers who
will be out on extended leave,
which is the first time in almost a
decade that Montgomery will
have to hire new officers.
Aside from the township's four
main goals for 2013, Trzaska de-
scribed what steps the township
will be taking in January to try to
save the taxpayers some money
on their energy bills.
"One thing we will be looking
into immediately is township-
wide energy aggregation," he
said. "State law allows a town or
county to essentially bargain for
all of its residents and business-
es. Savings could be between 10
and 15 percent, which would
amount to between $150 and $200
per year for an average house-
hold."
In addition to the township's
goals, Trzaska also noted how
much progress the Skillman Park
Committee (SPC) has made with
the development of its new loop
trail.
Somerset County Freeholder
and former Montgomery Town-
ship Mayor Mark Caliguire, who
was responsible for preserving
the 247-acre Skillman Park, just
joined the Skillman Park Com-
mittee at the SPC's last meeting
on Dec. 11, 2012.
"I'm thrilled that Freeholder
Mark Caliguire is joining the
park's advisory board," Trzaska
said. "With him joining the team
that's working on the parks de-
sign and development, Im sure
we will see a lot of progress in
2013."
Since the SPC proposed the
new loop trail to Somerset Coun-
ty in the summer of 2012, the
county has completed the
repaving of an existing parking
lot across Main Blvd. from Village
Elementary School, which is
what the two-mile trail will con-
nect to.
The SPC is also discussing pos-
sible locations for wildlife habitat
and stream bank restoration proj-
ects. Cleanup of the site is ongo-
ing, but was delayed by Hurri-
cane Sandy. The SPC's next meet-
ing is set for Feb. 26, where the
committee will discuss further
uses for the park and more de-
tailed designs.
This is just a snapshot of
what we will be working on in
2013, Trzaska said. There are
many more issues that will get
plenty of time and attention,
which includes those that are un-
planned and unexpected. Overall,
2013 will be an exciting year for
Montgomery and one that could
go a long way in protecting our fu-
ture quality of life."
10 THE MONTGOMERY SUN JAN. 2-8, 2013
Trzaska: A lot happening on township level
TRZASKA
Continued from page 9
"I think it's very interesting to
respond to an art form with an-
other art form," she said. "It real-
ly opens up new doors and is won-
derful for imaginations."
The Listen Up! exhibit featur-
ing all of the students' artworks is
on display at the Arts Council of
Princeton's Paul Robeson Center
through Jan. 25. The Arts Council
is located at 102 Witherspoon St in
Princeton.
For more information, call
(609) 924-8777.
EXHIBIT
Continued from page 7
Exhibit on display
through Jan. 25
classified
T HE MO N T G O ME R Y S U N
JANUARY 2-8, 2013 PAGE 11
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