Contents

Preparing Your Typescript ....................................................................................... 4
The Preliminary Pages ..........................................................................................4
The Main Text and Endmatter ................................................................................4
The Footnotes .....................................................................................................5
The Bibliography ..................................................................................................6
Fonts and Software ..............................................................................................7
Figures and Illustrative Material .............................................................................8
Tables ..............................................................................................................10
Music ...............................................................................................................11
Ashgate House Style .......................................................................................... 1
Your Text and the Law ........................................................................................ 15
Delivering Your Typescript .....................................................................................16
After You Have Delivered Your Typescript ..............................................................17
The Production Process ...................................................................................... 17
Proof Corrections ............................................................................................... 18
Indexing ...........................................................................................................19
e-Books...................................................................................................................20
What is an e-Book? ............................................................................................ 0
Security................ ............................................................................................ 0
Cost of Permissions ............................................................................................ 0
Promotion.......................................................................................................... 0
Marketing and Sales .............................................................................................. 21
The Marketing Questionnaire ............................................................................... 1
Direct Mailing ....................................................................................................1
Internet Promotion.............................................................................................
How Can I Help Sell My Book? .............................................................................
On Publication ...................................................................................................... 23
Gratis Copies ....................................................................................................
Bulk/Buyback Discounts .....................................................................................
Appendix I ............................................................................................................. 25
How to Supply Images Correctly: Quality and Size ................................................. 5
Sample Music Example ....................................................................................... 6
Sample Table ....................................................................................................7
Sample Typescript Pages .................................................................................... 8
Sample Final Proof Pages .................................................................................... 0
Appendix II ............................................................................................................32
Useful Contacts .................................................................................................
List of Memos and Forms ....................................................................................
Returning Forms ...............................................................................................
Permissions Request Covering Letter (sample) .................................................
Permissions Request Form (text) ................................................................... 5
Permissions Request Form (non-text) ............................................................. 7
Contributor Memorandum of Agreement ......................................................... 9
Public Lending Right Memo ........................................................................... 41
Font Form................................................................................................... 4
Music Form ................................................................................................. 45
Typescript Package Checklist ......................................................................... 47
Typescript Delivery Form .............................................................................. 49
4
Preparing Your Typescript
The Preliminary Pages
These are pages that appear at the beginning of a book before the main chapters. Please ensure you add these
to your typescript. You need to supply 1, , and 5. The rest only supply if relevant to your book.
1
Half-title -
title of the book only (excluding any subtitle)

Half-title verso -
dedication/frontispiece/blank page
NB: any series information is supplied by Ashgate

Title page -
title, subtitle, edition number if appropriate, and author/editor name/affliation
4 Title verso copyright information (supplied by Ashgate)
5
Contents -
list of preliminary matter (i.e. anything that comes after the
contents page before the beginning of the book), part and chapter
titles and end matter (i.e. bibliography, references and index)
6 List of Illustrations/
List of Figures
if you have more than two illustrations/fgures/maps/
music examples, compile a list of them
7 List of Maps as above
8 List of Tables as above
9 List of Music Examples as above
10 List of Abbreviations to be supplied alphabetically
11 Notes on Contributors (if appropriate) with affliations, to be supplied alphabetically,
please do not include contributors’ addresses, emails or
other contact details here
1 Foreword with name of the writer, either in the title or at the end
NB: an author or editor cannot write the foreword
1 Preface a personal message from you, with your name and date at the end
14 Acknowledgements can be combined with the preface
The Main Text and Endmatter
Action How? Tips
Page Numbering add to top right-hand corner of
every page
start each chapter at 1
Spacing/Indents entire text must be double-line
spaced (including footnotes and
bibliography)
use frst line indents, not tabs. Go to Format>
Paragraph>Indentation>Special, choose ‘First
line’>OK
Margins cm (1. in) top, bottom, left,
right
open the Word document go to File>Page
Setup>Margins
Fonts use a universal font such as Times
New Roman or Garamond. See
pages 8–9 for font sizes
if you are using Special Fonts
follow the instructions on page 7
Styles and Formatting follow the Ashgate House Style,
page 1–14
see pages 8–9 on how to format
Submitting Your Work save to 1 x CD and print
1 x paper copy
the CD and paper copy must match exactly
Indexing to be completed at proof stage see page 19
º
If you have
more than
one List
and they
are short,
then you
can combine
them
º
5
The Footnotes
Footnotes are preferred to Endnotes (see how to convert them below). References may be included in footnotes
using the author–short title format, with the reference being given in full at the frst mention in each chapter
and in a shortened form thereafter. Other reference styles, such as Harvard (‘name and date’), Modern Language
Association (MLA) and Chicago, may be used with the approval of your commissioning editor. All references must
be styled consistently (see below).
Very long footnotes should be avoided if possible. Consider whether any amplifcations or quoted material in
the footnote could be brought in to the body of the text.
How to insert footnotes in Word
place the cursor where the footnote indicator should be located in the main text
on the Insert menu, select Reference
on the Reference submenu, click Footnote
make sure Footnotes is selected in the Location section
if it isn’t already, select Bottom of page
click Insert (the footnote indicator must be a superscript Arabic numeral)
the footnote indicator will appear at the selected location. You will then be taken to the footnote
reference at the bottom of the page
enter the footnote text
How to convert endnotes to footnotes (unless your commissioning editor agreed otherwise)
go to Insert>Reference>Footnotes
in the dialogue box choose Convert all endnotes to footnotes and click OK
Book references
First reference
Patrick Collinson, The Birthpangs of Protestant England
(London, 1988), pp. 28–59.
Nicholas Temperley, The Music of the English Parish
Church ( vols, Cambridge, 1979), vol. , pp. 1–7.
Subsequent reference
Collinson, Birthpangs, pp. 8–59.
Temperley, Music, vol. , pp. 1–7.
or (if only one book is referred to by a particular author):
Collinson, pp. 8–59
Publisher names may be omitted from notes (as here) but must be included in the bibliography.
Source publication
First reference
René Descartes, Discourse on Method and Meditations,
trans. F.E. Sutcliffe (London, 1968).
The British Union: A Critical Edition of David Hume
of Godscroft’s De Unione Insulae Britannicae, trans.
and ed. P.J. McGinnis and A.H. Williamson (Aldershot,
00).
Eleanor Davies, A Warning to the Dragon and all his
Angels (165).
The Gentleman’s Magazine, November 1769.
Subsequent reference
Descartes, Discourse.
The British Union, McGinnis and Williamson.
Davies, A Warning to the Dragon.
The Gentleman’s Magazine, November 1769.
Chapter in an edited volume
First reference
Eamon Duffy, ‘The Conservative Voice in the English
Reformation’, in Simon Ditchfeld (ed.), Christianity
and Community in the West: Essays For John Bossy
(Aldershot, 001), pp. 87–105.
Subsequent reference
Duffy, ‘The Conservative Voice’.
Journal article
First reference
Leigh Ann Craig, ‘Royalty, Virtue, and Adversity: The Cult of
King Henry VI’, Albion, 5/ (00): pp. 187–09.
Subsequent reference
Craig, ‘Royalty, Virtue, and Adversity’.
Avoid using op. cit., art. cit. and idem. Ibid. is the only acceptable Latin term. For example:
1. Eamon Duffy, ‘The Conservative Voice in the English Reformation’, in Simon Ditchfeld (ed.), Christianity and
Community in the West: Essays For John Bossy (Aldershot, 001), pp. 87–105.
. Ibid., p. 88.










It is vital that footnotes are set up correctly in the Word document.
Each chapter’s footnotes must start at 1.
·
º
6
The Bibliography
The bibliography appears at the end of the book and includes full references to every citation in the book and
further reading.
If necessary, bibliographical entries can be subdivided into separate lists to cover manuscript sources, printed
primary sources and secondary sources.
Manuscript sources
Manuscript sources should be arranged alphabetically by institution:
Bodleian Library, Oxford, 8º.C46.Th(2)
British Library, Royal MS 12A.53
National Library of Scotland, Advocates MS 31.6.9
Public Record Offce, Surrey, SP 1/57/28–33, 244
Printed primary sources
Printed primary sources that do not have named authors can be listed alphabetically by title:
A True and Perfect Relation of the Barbarous and Cruell Passages of the King’s Army, at Old Brainceford,
neer London (London, 1642).
Acts of the Parliament of Scotland, ed. T. Thompson and C. Innes (Edinburgh, 1814–75).
Davies, E., A Warning to the Dragon and all his Angels (165).
The Gentleman’s Magazine, 1747–185.
If the author is known, then the work should be listed alphabetically by author’s surname:
Thomson, R.M. (ed.), The Archives of the Abbey of Bury St Edmund, Suffolk Records Society, 1
(Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer 1980).
Secondary sources
These should be set out as follows:
Brigden, Susan, ‘Youth and the English Reformation’, Past and Present, 95 (198): 7–67.
Fitzmaurice, James, ‘Autobiography, Parody and the Sociable Letters of Margaret Cavendish’, in Stephen
Clucas (ed.), A Princely Brave Woman: Essays on Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle (Aldershot:
Ashgate, 00).
Guy, John, Tudor England (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988).
Temperley, Nicholas, The Music of the English Parish Church ( vols, Cambridge: Cambridge University
Press, 1979).
Useful Abbreviations and Contractions
º
vol. vols followed by a space before the number
p. pp. followed by a space before the number
ed. eds for editor/s
edn for edition
fol. fols for folios, followed by a space before the number
It is vital that the bibliography is ordered alphabetically,
for authors with more than one work, order by year of publication with the earliest frst.
An incorrectly ordered bibliography can be costly to correct.
·
Please note
A comma that follows an italicized title must be in the regular text format rather than italics, for example:
The Archives of the Abbey of Bury St Edmund, Suffolk Records Society.
7
Fonts and Software
Special or Foreign Fonts
1
If you are using special or foreign fonts, please read below and see page 4.
It is vital you supply us with a font sample before you submit your fnal typescript.
Text and Software
We need you to supply your typescript in a version of MS Word (Word for Mac is acceptable). Please avoid
WordPerfect as it can cause compatibility problems.
We cannot use software such as LaTex. If you had planned to use software other than a version of Word,
please contact your commissioning editor well in advance of submitting your typescript.
If your text only uses standard unicode fonts such as Times New Roman or Garamond, with no special or
foreign fonts, then please just list the font used on the Typescript Delivery Form.
Text with Special or Foreign Fonts
If your text uses special or foreign fonts then we need you to supply a sample of your font (both printed and
electronically, see the Font Form on page 4) before you supply your fnal typescript. This is because we need
to test it and confrm that it is compatible with the software used in the publication process.
Allowing us to check the font at an early stage should eradicate problems that often cause delays.
Fonts and Licences
Please remember fonts can have copyright issues too. Please check the font you are using and supplying to
us is without copyright or you have fullflled any criteria to use it in your published book (both printed and
electronic versions). We need copies of any purchase agreements you might have to keep on fle.
Font FAQs
Problem
- ×
there is Greek
and/or
Arabic in the text
download Gentium and use it for the Greek/Arabic text
(cut and paste link below into your browser):
http://scripts.sil.org/cms/scripts/page.php?site_
id=nrsi&item_id=Gentium
free to use, without copyright and it is compatible with our
software
Please note: Use either Gentium or Gentium Alt only.
Gentium Basic or Gentium Book Basic are not suitable
if you are using your
own font then we need
a sample (electronic and
paper) before you supply
your typescript so we can
test it
there are music
symbols
within the text
download Bach and use it for the music symbols
(cut and paste link below into your browser):
http://www.mu.qub.ac.uk/~tomita/bach-mf.html
free to use, without copyright for Ashgate Publishing and it
is compatible with our software
we strongly recommend
you use the Bach font and
not your own fonts
for more information on
music see page 11
For all other font or software issues please contact us before submitting your typescript.
1
Special or foreign fonts are any non-standard fonts including maths fonts used to create equations.
º
º
º
8
¡
Figures and Illustrative Material
1
Using Figures and Illustrative Material
An appropriate fgure or illustration can be extremely helpful. It can explain concepts or highlight an argument
and break up the text. But it is not always necessary. If you answer yes to most of the following then it is
probably appropriate.
Question Answer Action
Does it add to the text rather than
repeat what you have said?
yes/no check how much explanatory information you need to
provide with it
Will it reproduce well in black and
white?
yes/no bear in mind a colour image may not work well in black and
white; print it in black and white to check
Do I own the copyright? yes/no remember if you don’t specifcally own the copyright
someone else possibly will, see page 15
Do I know the copyright owner? yes/no identify the copyright, the owner and use the Permissions
Request Forms (pages 5 and 7) to obtain permission (you are
responsible for any charge associated with using the fgure or
illustration)
Do I have written permission for all
copyright (and the cover image?)
yes/no if you have not obtained written permission for print and
electronic media then we cannot use the image
Do I need another fgure or
illustration?
yes/no fgures and illustrations add time and costs to the book,
please use them sparingly
Placing in the Text
Please indicate if you have a preference. If not we will best ft the fgure or illustration to the page.
Please note: All colour images will be converted to black and white unless you have prior agreement
with your commissioning editor that they will remain colour. Please supply artwork in greyscale.
1
Figures and illustrative material includes half-tones, glossy photographs, line drawings, maps and cover images. For
information on supplying tables see page 10.
Quick Checklist
- Label all electronic and original figures and illustrations clearly (such as ‘Figure 1.2’)
- Add captions to the text and indicate where they will appear (see page 9)
- Send us permissions with the figures or illustrative material; we cannot start the
editorial process without these documents (see page 15 for more details)
- Indicate clearly any cropping you require on the paper copy and ensure you
have the permission to crop the image
× Do not embed the figures and illustrations in the text; removing them may
hold up the production process. Please save and supply separately from the text
º
º
Please Remember
Incorrectly supplied or poor quality fgures and illustrative material will affect
the production process and may adversely affect the quality of your book.
·
¬
©
©
÷
Landscape is sideways on the page
and ideally always full-page
Portrait is vertical on the page
9
Supplying Figures and Illustrative Material
All fgures and illustrations must be supplied ready for publication. See page 25 for a sample.
Supplying
electronically
all fgures and illustrations must be saved separately and individually
from the text, clearly labelled and accompanied by a paper copy
for example the fle name could be:
Fig 1.1.tif
Supplying
glossy prints or
transparencies
ensure all are clearly labelled on the back and indicate if they need
to be returned and to whom
Sizing please supply to the size they will be reproduced in the book, NOT smaller,
they can be no larger than the page = 115 mm x 195 mm (4.53 in x 7.68 in)
Format high resolution (at least 300 dpi) for photos including flm and video stills
high resolution (at least 1200 dpi) for line drawings, see ‘Formats’ below
Numbering all fgures/illustrations must be numbered consecutively within each chapter,
for example in Chapter 1, illustrations would appear as:
Illustration 1.1, Illustration 1.2, Illustration 1.3 and so on
if they appear in the Introduction they would be prefxed with I, for example,
Illustration I.1, Illustration I.2, Illustration I.3
Where it will
appear
clearly indicate where it will appear in the text using square brackets and whether
it is portrait or landscape and we will place it as close to the indicator as possible
for example:
[insert Figure 2.1 here – portrait]
Captions should be added to the text below the insert instruction, but remember the longer
the caption the less space there will be for the fgure or illustration
for example:
Figure 3.6 Percentage of minority workers in Asia
permissions/copyrights should appear on the List of Figures or List of Illustrations
pages not in the captions, unless specifed by the copyright holder
it is acceptable for the source to appear underneath the caption, for example:
Source: Adams 2001.
Permissions you must provide us with copies of all the relevant permissions copyright documentation,
see pages 33–37 for the Permissions Forms, remembering to include the fgure or
illustration number to which the permission applies.
please remember cover images usually require their own speci.c permissions
we cannot publish the book unless we have all the correct permissions paperwork
Formats
Please be aware that some institutions (for example, the Tate or Pierpont Morgan) stipulate that any reproduction
of work in their collection must be made from their own transparency/print/electronic fle.
Format
- ×
Original glossy
photographs

black and white or colour
original illustrations will be returned to you after
publication
photocopies from books are not
suitable
Electronic
(digital) fles
each fgure, illustration, flm and screen still must
be saved separately and individually from the
text, we prefer:
TIF
EPS
JPEG
PowerPoint/Word (for simple fgures)
not suitable:
PDF
GIFF
WMF
PICT
BMP
Images copied from the Internet
º
fgures, illustrations, flm and video stills must be
300 dpi and above, line art 1200 dpi
º
If you
require
cropping
indicate
this on the
paper copy
Scanning
Please do not use a home scanner to scan fgures or illustrations.
They do not produce high enough quality fles to be reproduced.
Please supply us with the original and we will have it scanned.
·
10
Tables
Using Tables
An appropriate table can be extremely helpful. It can explain concepts or highlight an argument and break up
the text. However, it is not always necessary. Over-use of complex and lengthy tables can confuse the reader
and complicate your book’s layout.
Question Answer Action
Does it add to the text rather
than repeat what I have said?
yes/no check how much explanatory information you need to provide
with it
Have I obtained written
permission for copyright material?
yes/no if you are using someone else’s table you may need to have
written permission; please check
Is the table too long? yes/no if it runs over more than one page, it is too long; check with
your commissioning editor
Have I only used original material? yes/no add source details if table information is not original

Placing in the Text
How to insert a table correctly
on the Table menu, select Insert, then Table
choose the number of columns and rows you require
select or highlight the table, go to Table Properties>Cell>Cell Options, uncheck Same as Whole Table box, enter
top and bottom as 0.5 cm (0. in) and left and right as 0.1 cm (0.04 in)
Columns must align consistently
check column totals add up correctly, add a note at the foot of the table if
fgures have been rounded up or down
Captions must be set above tables. Tables must be numbered consecutively in the text,
for example in Chapter 1: Table 1.1, Table 1.2, Table 1.3 and so on, for
example:
Table 1.1 China’s Population 2006–2007
Dashes/en-rules (–) can be used instead of blank spaces within a column
Decimal points numbers containing decimal points must align on the decimal point
Ditto marks are not to be used
Line weight to be a minimum 0.5 pt font size
Notes regarding items in tables should be set below the last horizontal rule
Permissions you must provide us with all the relevant permissions/copyright
documentation, see pages –7 for the Permissions Request Forms
we cannot publish your book unless we have the correct paperwork
Source details need to follow any notes below the table
Format
All tables must be supplied ready for publication. See page 7 for a sample.



º
Format
- ×
Same software as
the text
use Word to create simple tables so they are
embedded in the text
Excel is acceptable but only
one table per workbook
Size entire table width must not exceed:
115 mm (4.5 in) portrait vertical on page
195 mm (7.68 in) landscape sideways on page
A4 size is not acceptable
(see page 8 for portrait/
landscape example)
º
º
Avoid using tabs or shading
in place of a correctly created table.
Consistency of style is better achieved
with a cell-based table
·
11
Music
Using Music
Question Answer Action
Do I own the copyright? yes/no remember, if you don’t specifcally own the copyright someone else
will, please refer to guidelines supplied by your commissioning editor
on how to determine if music is in copyright
Have I obtained written
permission?
yes/no if you have not obtained written permission then it is unusable
Supplying and Placing in the Text
Please ensure you supply us with a sample before you supply your fnal typescript, see page 37.
Presentation most music examples should appear portrait (vertical on the page) as text can
fow around the music. Text cannot appear landscape (sideways on the page)
but long music examples or a series of short examples can
Where it will
appear
clearly indicate where each music example will appear in the typescript and
whether it is portrait or landscape
for example:
[insert Example 2.1 here – portrait]
Music symbols
within the text
please use Bach font developed by Yo Tomita for all music appearing within the text
go to www.mu.qub.ac.uk/~tomita/bach-mf.html to download this free font,
for more information see page 7 or contact your commissioning editor
Numbering all music must be numbered consecutively within each chapter,
for example in Chapter 1, music would appear as:
Example 1.1, Example 1.2, Example 1.3, Example 1.4 and so on
It is not acceptable to simply number from 1 onwards e.g. Ex.1, Ex.2
Captions should be added to the text below the insert instruction e.g. [insert Example 1.1 here]
captions must not appear within the electronic music example fle (as they are part
of the text)
for example:
Example 2.1 Sonata by Beethoven
permissions/copyrights should appear in the List of Music Examples not in the
captions, unless otherwise specifed by the copyright holder
Checking all music examples must be carefully proofread before you supply them, as corrections at production
stage can be very expensive and may lead to you being invoiced.
Size all music examples must be sized to fall within the following text area and set according to
the following criteria:
max width 11 cm (4.33 in) stave height approx. 5 mm (between 4 and 6 mm)
max depth 17 cm (6.69 in) (0.16 and 0.24 in)
weight of individual stave lines 0.25 mm (0.098425 in)
Format
Format
- ×
Original format
and high-
resolution PDF
we need both the original format
(i.e. Sibelius or Finale) and high-resolution 100
dpi (press quality) PDF or EPS fles or 1200 dpi
BITMAP TIFF fles
we cannot publish the music unless the
fonts are embedded in the PDF
music must not be embedded in the
text
we need each example saved and
labelled separately
º
º
Electronic .le
names must
match the
caption exactly
º
1
Ashgate House Style
1
Abbreviations avoid where possible, if you need to use them please write in full at the frst appearance with the
abbreviation in brackets. You may repeat an abbreviation if it reappears much later in your book.
abbreviations are usually expressed without full stops: GNP, USA.
contractions are abbreviations that end with the same letter as the original word, such as eds,
edn, Mr and Dr, and should not be followed by a full stop.
abbreviations that do not use the last letter, such as ed. or Ch., should have a full stop, hence,
eds (editors) and ed. (editor) are both correct.
units of measurement do not take a full stop (mm, kg) or a fnal ‘s’ in the plural (70 cm, 100 g),
there should be a space between the number and the unit of measurement.
the abbreviations etc., i.e. and e.g. are usually best replaced by ‘and so on’, ‘that is’ and ‘for
example’.
In references be consistent in the following:
upper and lower case (vol. 1, not Vol. 1, or vice versa)
spaces after characters (vol. 1, p. 1)
no spaces between initials (A.N. Author)
use of ‘p. x’ for book and journal references.










Accents must be retained in foreign words, except French upper case.
For example: ‘école’ and ‘Ecole’.
Bold should be restricted to A headings and C Headings (bold italic) in your typescript, use italics and not
bold for emphasizing words within the text.
Capital letters should be used sparingly as they are diffcult to read in a block and reduce the importance of words
that need a capital.
use capitals to distinguish the specifc from the general: ‘he is Professor of Economics at Oxford
University’, but ‘he is a professor at a university’.
Captions should be in bold, brief and informative and preceded by the relevant number (see page 9), they
should be placed with the insertion instruction (see page 24) at the point in the text where the fgure/
illustration is to appear, unless your book is to have a plate section.
table captions should appear above the table.
for art titles, following the general comment on the image please list the artist, title (in italics), dimension
of the work (in cm with inches in brackets if needed), medium, date and source. For example:
1.2 William Smith, Lady Sara Fairfax (detail), 55 × 30.5 cm, oil on canvas, 1821, National
Portrait Gallery, London
Chapters should start a new page and be numbered 1, 2, 3 (Arabic numerals) and referred to in the text as
Chapter 1, Chapter , and so on.
Credit lines should be added to the List of Figures, Illustrations, Tables, Maps or Music in the prelim pages rather than
to the captions, unless the copyright holders specifcally request that credits be located in the captions.
Commas British English
should be omitted before the fnal ‘and’ or ‘or’ in
lists unless the meaning is ambiguous.
American English
should be included before the fnal ‘and’ or ‘or’ in
lists (also known as the oxford or serial comma).
use commas sparingly, for clarity, to avoid ambiguity or to divide a sentence.
Consistency is important throughout, in capitalization, abbreviations, hyphenation, reference styles, list styles, and so on.
Dashes/
en-dashes
en dashes (–) should be used rather than hyphens in date ranges and number spans, for example
1920–30; 47–69. Also use in links such as ‘cost–beneft analysis’. (See Shortcut Keys page 14)
British English
spaced en dashes – not em dashes or hyphens
– should be used for parenthetical comments.
American English
unspaced em dashes—not en dashes or hyphens—
should be used for parenthetical comments.
Dates British English American English
should be written ‘18 August 2000’ should be written ‘August 18, 2000’.
decades ‘1990s’ without an apostrophe.
Ellipses
(omission of
text)
the correct form for an ellipsis is … with a character space either side, unless the ellipsis is followed by
a closing quotation mark or note reference number, which should be closed up to the ellipsis: thus …’.
(see Shortcut Keys page 14)
Foreign
language
short quotes (less than one line) should be provided with an English translation in the footnotes.
Longer quotes (more than one line) should be accompanied by a translation in square brackets [], set
below an indented quote or after the original in the text.
1
British and American alternatives are given where appropriate.
Please Note
Use either British or American English in your text.
A mixture of both is not acceptable and rectifying it can hold up the production process
·
1
Full stops
are not necessary after headings, subheadings, fgure captions, table headings or names and
addresses; see also ‘Abbreviations’.
Headings used to break up the text for the reader and as signposts for what is being covered in a particular
section.
every chapter should contain a logical sequence of main sections (which can be divided into further
subsections) preceded by a brief heading.
should have an initial capital for each major word and be unnumbered as far as possible.
avoid more than three levels of subheading in any chapter and ensure that your hierarchy of
headings is clear, for example:
if ‘Fruit’ is an A heading, ‘Apples’ and ‘Pears’ would both be B headings (as they are subsets of the
main subject) and ‘Granny Smith’ (a type of apple) would be a C heading.




Headings
(format for
typescript)
A headings are bold, on a new line with no extra lines of space above or below
B headings are italic, on a new line with no extra lines of space above or below
C headings are bold and italic, on a new line with no extra lines of space above or below
Hyphenation is being used less and is optional in many cases, for example: ‘microeconomic’, ‘sociopolitical’,
‘coordinate’, ‘subdivide’.
Whether you choose to hyphenate a word or not, be consistent.
hyphenation should be used in dates only when these are adjectival: for example, ‘seventeenth-
century England’ but ‘in the seventeenth century’.
do not introduce hyphens to spread words across lines.
turn off the auto-hyphenation facility in Word as it creates unnecessary and illogical word breaks.



Illustrations/
Figures/Music
should be supplied with captions and numbered consecutively within each chapter: for example,
Figure 1.1, Figure 1., Figure .1, and so on, (see pages 8–11)
Italics should be used for book and journal titles, newspapers, flms, plays, stage directions, foreign words/
phrases, songs etc. Use for emphasis only if absolutely necessary.
Language sexist language should not be used. Please substitute non-specifc pronouns – that is ‘they’ or
‘their’ or simply ‘he’ or ‘his’ – rather than working on the assumption that the masculine pronoun
also denotes women. This also avoids the clumsy use of ‘s/he’ or ‘he/she’.
racist language should not be used.
avoid colloquialism – this is especially applicable to collections of conference proceedings which have
been presented in the form of lectures; spoken language needs to be formalized when presented in
written form.
avoid ambiguity, tautology, mixed metaphors and repetition.
replace parochialisms such as ‘in this country’ with the country name.
be precise in identifying periods of time: ‘in the last century’, ‘at the turn of the century’ are phrases
which now need to be clarifed.
Please refrain from the use of jargon or obscure language.






Lists use one style for major lists and a second for lists within major lists. It is best to start major lists with
numerals or bullets and then move on to letters or dashes, for example:
1. American
2. European
a. French
b. German
. Asian.
Alternatively, bullet points may be used. The sentence before a list should end with a colon and, unless
the items in the list include multiple sentences, only the fnal entry should end with a full stop.
Numbers below 11 should be written out in full unless they are accompanied by a unit of measurement, for
example: 3 kg, 5 m or 2 per cent but two girls, and so on.
numbers that begin a sentence should always be spelled out.
numbers over ten should appear in fgures, unless they are used in general terms: for example,
‘about a hundred people’.
numbers of centuries should also be spelled out (nineteenth century).
numbers with four or more digits should be separated by commas (4,000, 400,000).
decimal points should appear as full stops on the line: for instance, 10.1.
for ‘zero’ and ‘one’ please use number keys not the letter keys ‘O’ and ‘I’.
‘billion’ is now used in its American meaning of a thousand million.
Numbers should be elided rather than written out in full: for example, 22–3 not 22–23. However, this
does not apply to teens (use 12–13 rather than 12–3) or when the frst number ends in zero, thus







14
Numbers
(continued)
40–43 rather than 40–3 and 100–103 rather than 100–3, the fnal part of dates should always be
written as 1944–46 (not 1944–6) although it is best to write dates in full in headings: thus 1944–1946.
Please use en dashes (–) instead of hyphens (-).
Parentheses
( )
used for simple interpolations, with square brackets [ ] used for editorial notes, translations in the text
or interpolations in quotations.
Part pages use Roman numerals, for example: Part I, Part II, Part III.
Per cent written in full in text but shown as % in tables and fgures. For US authors percent is acceptable.
Play
references
should be given as Act I, scene , and so on. Shakespearian references should be set as follows:
Hamlet, III, ii, 1; Henry VI, III, ii, 14.
Plurals do not use apostrophes for plurals – 1950s, MPs – unless the usage is possessive.
Possessive ‘s’s should be used – Keynes’s, Jones’s – except in classical and biblical names: thus Theophilus’, Moses’,
Jesus’.
Pre-decimal
currency (UK)
should be formatted thus: £, s, d.
Quotations/
extracts
must be an exact reproduction of the original in both spelling and punctuation.
single quotation marks for extracts of less than 50 words that appear within the text.
longer quotes should be set as a separate paragraph and without quotation marks.
notes or editorial comments within extracts should appear in square brackets and any omission
should be indicated by an ellipsis (see page 1), with a space either side.
source or acknowledgement should always be included, whether in the introductory sentence, in
brackets at the end of the quote or in a note.
see also ‘Your Text and the Law’ (page 15).
fnal punctuation should come before the source in brackets in displayed quotations/extracts.







Quotation
marks
British English
should be single
double only for quotes within quotes
closing quotation mark should precede any
punctuation, unless the text quoted forms a complete
sentence.
For example: He commented that it was ‘the best of
times’, but He commented: ‘It was the best of times’.
American English
should be double
single only for quotes within quotes
closing quotation mark should follow any
punctuation.
For example: He commented that it was “the
best of times,” and He commented: “It was the
best of times.”
Use curly (‘’) (smart) quotation marks, not straight ones (`΄).
Shortcut Keys Use these to save time, for example:
Ellipsis – Press Control + Alt + full stop keys together
En-dash – Press and hold Alt + number keys 0151 (remember to have number lock on)
Em-dash – Press and hold Alt + number keys 0150 (remember to have number lock on)
Spacing Use only one space between words and after commas, full stops and semi-colons.
Spelling British English
Use the ‘ize’ suffx (e.g organization rather than
organisation). If unsure about any spellings, refer to
the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) and use the frst
variant quoted.
American English
Use the ‘ize’ suffx (organization rather than
organisation).
For example, ‘color’, favorite’, ‘program’.
Superscript
note numbers
should be set after punctuation, unless the reference refers to text within brackets, when the symbol
should be within the bracket.
Useful
reference
works
Bliss, A.J., Dictionary of Foreign Words and Phrases in Current English (London: Routledge, 1991).
Butcher, J., Butcher’s Copy-editing, 4th edn (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 006).
Chicago Editorial Staff, The Chicago Manual of Style: The Essential Guide for Writers, Editors and
Publishers, 15th edn (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 00).
Fowler’s Modern English Usage (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).
Gibaldi, J. (ed.), MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing, nd edn (New York: Modern
Language Association of America, 1998).
Neville, C., Complete Guide to Referencing and Avoiding Plagiarism (Open University Press, 2007).
New Hart’s Rules: The Handbook of Style for Writers and Editors (Oxford: Oxford University Press,
005).
New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors (Oxford University Press, 2005).
Partridge, E., Usage and Abusage (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1999).
Roget’s Thesaurus (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 004).
Wellisch, H.W., Indexing from A to Z, nd edn (Dublin: H.W. Wilson, 1996).
Underlining should be avoided.
15
Your Text and the Law
Copyright and Permissions
Copyright law is an imprecise area. We strongly recommend that you read the Society of Authors and Publishers
Association guidelines; go to www.societyofauthors.org and www.publishers.org.uk.

The commonly applied rule of permission being required only when quoting in excess of 400 words or 40 lines
should not be relied upon. If in doubt, seek permission for any published material. Copyright material published
in the UK lasts for the author’s lifetime plus 70 years. In the frst instance, applications should be made directly
to the original publisher rather than to the author of the piece; see pages –7 for our Permissions Request
Forms. Acknowledgement of source, author and publisher is essential.
e-Books and Permissions
Your book will be published in print form and there is a strong likelihood that your book will also be published in
e-Book form. Please therefore ensure that you obtain permission from copyright holders to use their material
for both print and electronic publication.
Fonts
Fonts can have copyright issues too. Please see page 7, supply us with a font sample if necessary and any
written documentation such as purchase or licence agreements.
Illustrations and Permissions
All illustrations (and cover images) requiring permission must be supplied with one or more of the following:
cleared permissions from the copyright owner of the work. You may incur a copyright fee
cleared permissions from the gallery or institution that owns the work being reproduced. You may be required
to pay a reproduction or use fee and accompany the illustration with a credit line
cleared permissions from the photographer/photographic library. This may incur a copyright and a
reproduction or use fee
Please be aware that some institutions (for example, the Tate) stipulate that any reproduction of work in their
collection must be made from their own transparency/print/electronic fle.
Film and Video Stills
These may be used providing they follow the principles of fair dealing and are not included for decorative
purpose. You must determine whether or not fair dealing applies to your use of a still and obtain permission
from the copyright holder(s) and pay all fees. They may only be used on book covers if you have the necessary
copyright permission. Stills must be provided in a format and to a quality acceptable to Ashgate (see page 9).
Internet Permissions
Screen images from the Internet are not necessarily in the public domain (or good enough quality to reproduce):
always check with the copyright holder, for example copyright for text and images found on Wikipedia remain
with the orginator, not the website and the copyright holder must be contacted if you want to use it.
Libel
Please ensure that you do not make any defamatory or injurious statement about living persons, institutions or
other organizations that could result in libel claims.
Music Permissions
Please refer to the separate guidelines on Music and Copyright supplied by your commissioning editor. Do be
aware that music can still be under copyright 70 years after a composer died. Please contact your commissioning
editor for any further advice.
Plagiarism
If you copy all or part of someone else’s work and put it in your book without crediting them, then you are
plagiarising, even if you amend the original wording. If you use someone else’s work you must make it clear
you have done so.



Documentation
When permission has been granted, you should keep the original on fle throughout the life of the book,
and send a photocopy to us when delivering your text. Any requested special acknowledgements should be
included in your Preface or in a separate acknowledgements page.
Please Remember
It is your responsibility to seek written permission for any work in copyright,
and also to settle any relevant fees, which can take considerable time to process.
Permissions must be cleared and your paperwork in order when you submit your fnal text.
Please ensure you apply early.
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16
Delivering Your Typescript
Please Remember
We need you to supply your typescript and any accompanying material
1
as a complete package.
Not doing so will hold up the production process.
Use the Typescript Package Checklist and Typescript Delivery form (see pages 47 and 49)
to ensure you supply all the information we need in the format we need it.
Any special or foreign fonts and music examples should have been submitted prior to this stage, checked and
any issues should have been solved.
Any non-text material should have been checked for quality (see pages 8–11 and 25) and be ready for
publication.
Compiling Your Typescript Package
If you have any queries on compiling your typescript please contact us.
Action What next?
my typescript is fnished cut out and complete the Typescript Delivery Form (see page 49)
ensuring you have indicated where you would like any non-text
material to appear in the text, added captions correctly and enclosed all
electronic fles (all of which must have a matching paper copy)
the Typescript Delivery Form must accompany each typescript
saving the text ensure each chapter is saved separately and clearly labelled with the
chapter number, not the chapter title or the contributor’s name. For
example Chapter 1.doc
everything saved to CD must match the paper copy exactly
labelling CDs label the 1 x text CD clearly with just your name and the title of your
book, the date and mark it as fnal text
label any CDs containing illustrations, fgures, music or tables with your
name and the title of your book, the date and mark as appropriate (for
example, 10 x fgures)
fgures/illustrations/tables/
maps/music
for each CD you need to supply a labelled paper copy printout and list of
what the CD contains
permissions ensure you supply copies of all permissions and documentation with the
typescript as we cannot publish your book without them
contributor agreements ensure that signed copies of the contributor agreements are supplied
with your typescript (see page 9) as we cannot publish your book
without a signature from each contributor
change of address memo we need your and any contributors’ current addresses to send the gratis
copies of the book
cover image if your commissioning editor has agreed to use an image on the cover
of your book, please supply it with the relevant permissions and clearly
indicate the full caption including a complete credit line with your
typescript
please remember cover images often require their own permission
1
Accompanying material includes any non-text material (fgures, illustrations, music examples, maps, cover images), any
necessary permissions and signed contributor agreements.
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17
After You Have Delivered Your Typescript
The Production Process
we receive your typescript
and it is assessed by your
commissioning editor
your typescript is allocated to an editor
who works with the Production team to
ensure the project runs smoothly
proofreading is undertaken by a freelancer under
your editor’s guidance
the freelancer or your editor will contact you with details of any
queries that have arisen
once all queries are resolved, your editor will typeset your typescript
low-resolution PDF proofs will be emailed to you for checking and indexing (see pages 30–31), if
you are not preparing your index, your editor will book a freelancer and invoice you (see page 19)
it is essential you check the proofs very carefully at this stage to ensure that you are happy with the text
it is also your responsibility to insert page numbers in the text where there are cross-references, in place
of ‘see pp. 000–000’
if we have arranged the index for you, you will be emailed a copy to approve
your editor completes all fnal checks and your
text is sent to the printer
if your text is being
peer or series editor
reviewed please allow
a at least 4–6 weeks,
further revision may be
required
Unless there are exceptional circumstances, it is important
that only typographical errors are corrected at this stage.
You may be charged for excess proof corrections (see paragraph 9 of your contract).





Please Remember
Figures/illustrations/music integrated in the text will be low resolution and not
representative of the fnished quality when printed.



it is then catalogued with the
British Library and
Library of Congress,
this can take up to 12 weeks


the marketing
questionnaire will be
sent to you
your editor will contact
you to outline your
book’s schedule

If your book is to be also published as an e-book you will only receive proofs of the printed version
as the e-book is identical to the printed version.
18
Proof Corrections
Indicating Proof Corrections
You will be emailed a proof of your book as a low-resolution PDF. You can either check it onscreen or print it
out. Remember that any non-text material such as fgures or illustrations will not appear as they will in the fnal
book as the resolution is low at this stage. Line numbers will be provided at the side of the text.
We will also email you an Author Proof Correction Form. Please use this to indicate any vital corrections and
return by email. This is the easiest format for us from which to input your corrections, see below.
Page Line
(not including running head)
Correction
1 4
add [the] so sentence reads:
the apple tree was just over the gate.
56
delete “ ” from book title:
The Tempest
Indicating Proof Corrections
Please do not print out all the proofs, mark them up then post them back to us.
Please do not use Acrobat Professional to mark up the PDF onscreen. It is also a very time-consuming method
for us to fnd corrections. Desk editors do not currently have this software so this will also hold up the production
process.
Please Note
You submitted a fnal typescript ready for publication.
As such, excessive corrections at proof stage should not be necessary.
Making extensive corrections at this stage is extremely time-consuming and can affect other areas such
as indexing. This will affect the production schedule and you may be charged for the additional work.
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Chapter Title
illuminates the possibility of the virgin Jewish daughter as a fgure of sexual and
religious deception. Yet The Jew of Malta collapses this internal/external binary
as well, representing the Christian nuns as sexually illicit and Abigail as a fgure
symbolic of truth, a Judaic essence, desired by Christian and Jew. It is specifcally
in her capacity as a Jewish virgin that Abigail plays out Protestant concerns about
the disclosure of scriptural veritas. Both the virginal and maternal body reveal
and obscure: as we have seen, early modern drama also represents the Jewish
maternal body ambivalently as an overdetermined site of truth and deception.
The Jewish mother is an important fgure of disclosure—Bethsabe’s promise of
a rightful heir that signifes David’s redemption, Rebecca’s deliverance of the
true elect in Jacob—as well as a body that stands in the way of the Christian
reader’s apprehension of what they believed to be the scripture’s true meanings. At
key moments in The Jew of Malta this mother returns, fgured metaphorically in
Abigail’s maturing body and in the image of the womb that is the lethal container
at the play’s conclusion.
It is not insignifcant that the play’s stage run was concurrent with another
Jewish body on display for a general audience. Marlowe’s tragedy enjoyed over
6 performances between 1592-96, the years surrounding the 1594 trial and
execution of Elizabeth’s doctor, Rodrigo Lopez who was charged with attempting
to poison the queen. For the audiences that focked to the theater, The Jew of Malta
played out in high theatrics, like Lopez’s body drawn and quartered in a London
courtyard, a retributive strike against the Jewish body, a symbol of treachery and
blood miscegenation. I want to also consider Abigail’s body as a spectacle to be
scrutinized by Christian readers. In early modern discourse, however, the body
of the Jewish woman is given value as a coherent site of meaning that must be
pursued and penetrated. The physical presence of the Jewish woman manipulates
the sensibilities of her Christian viewers (on stage and in the paying audience); as
it did during Elizabeth’s pageants, playing the Jewish woman on stage suggests
the authenticity of the Jewish historical past as well as the inherent limitations of
such representations as theatrical show. Abigail’s body is the play’s focal point as
it comments on and parodies modes of reading and interpretation. Her theatrics
threaten to undercut Christian claims to “playne” meaning by their suggestion
of the Jew’s exclusively possession of such a scriptural truth. Ultimately, both
Abigail and Barabas exit the play as physical spectacles that evoke and subvert
exegetical readings of the Jewish father and his sacrifced daughter as types of
Christ: the simulacrum of sacrifce promises a totalizing moment, the delivery
of meaning, but their respective deaths, like Barabas’s allusion to Agamemnon,
mocks this Christological archetype.
Abigail’s father and Father
The play begins with a sudden assault on Barabas. To procure the tribute they
owe to the Turkish Caliphate, the Christian governor Ferneze imposes fnes on
the “infdel” (1.2.62) Jews, whom he describes as cursed and thus deserving of
19
Indexing
Before submitting your typescript you will agree with your commissioning editor whether you are compiling
the index yourself or if you would like us to arrange a professional index for you (which you will be invoiced
for).
As the fnal index is completed after proof stage, the advice below is a just a brief outline; please ask us for
a copy of the Indexing Guidelines for further information.
You are Compiling the Index
If you have agreed to complete the index, you may compile it (minus the page numbers) at any time. It
may save you time to compile a key word list before your submit your typescript, although you do not
need to submit it with your typescript (see the Indexing Guidelines, available from your commissioning
editor and editor for help).
At proof stage you will only need to add the page numbers. You can fnd page numbers quickly by using the
Find or Search facility in Acrobat Reader (the software which opens your PDF proof):
press Control+F or Shift+Control+F or the binocular button on the toolbar
either a Find box or a Search window will appear
type in your word or phrase and press ‘search’ and a list of page numbers will be shown
We are Arranging the Index
If you have asked us to arrange a freelancer index, then all our freelance indexers prefer that you
do not compile any draft indexes. It does not help them to have a list of names, places or concepts to
incorporate into the index. It will only cause delays and can add extra costs.
Please rest assured that all our indexers are professional and have many years of indexing experience.
The cost is c.£1.60 ($3) per page of proofs (2008 rate); for example a 300-page book would cost £480
($900).



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Please Remember
Indexing can only be completed when your text has been typeset, as the fnal
pagination will be different from the original page numbering.
Please Note
The Chicago Manual of Style suggests an index length should be 2–5 per cent of the length of the book.
According to these specifcations, a 300-page text would have an index of between 6 and 15 pages.
An over-detailed index will confuse the reader.
0
E-books
We have a developing programme for e-book publishing. If your book has been selected for inclusion in the
e-book programme you may fnd the following information provides a useful guide. If you are unsure as to
whether your title will be made available as an e-book, please contact your commissioning editor.
What is an E-Book?
It is the electronic form of your printed book which facilitates limited copying and printing. It is low resolution
so any fgures or illustrations cannot be copied or printed from it. All our e-books are sold on a Perpetual
Access basis via third party aggregators and library suppliers, for example, the institutional library does not
directly hold the e-book PDF, they purchase access to the e-book which is held on a fully secured server. There
are different models used for purchasing but we only allow a small amount of a text to be printed. Some third
party vendors allow the e-book to be downloaded but on a fxed time basis after which access to the fle is
terminated.
Security
The servers on which the e-book fles are held are all fully secured with encryption technology and coding to
stop any unauthorized access of the PDF.
Editorial
You won’t receive proofs for your e-book as it is exactly the same as your printed book. There will be no
opportunity to add something to the e-book that wasn’t in the printed book. The two versions must be
identical.
Permissions
If you have obtained permission for an image/table/fgure/piece of text in your printed book, you will also need
the source of the permission to agree its subsequent use in e-book format. This applies to all sourced material
from reprinted chapters to images. The permission forms on pages 5 and 7 include electronic permissions.
Costs of Permissions
It may be the case that you are charged a higher fee for any sourced material that includes electronic permission;
this is something to be considered by you when selecting any sourced material in your text.
Who Sells our E-Books
Currently we are working with three third party suppliers/aggregators:
Dawsonera (www.dawsonera.com)
Myilibrary (www.myilibrary.com)
ebrary (www.ebrary.com)
We hope to increase our coverage of the world market with further aggregators and library suppliers over time.
Currently we do not sell e-books directly into the market.
Royalties
The author will receive any e-book royalties along with any accrued print royalties.
Promotion
The availability of an e-book will be indicated on our website (www.ashgate.com) and other promotional
materials. Individual aggregators will also market titles in their collections.
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Marketing and Sales
Our aim is to work with you to promote your book as effectively as we can. The following explains exactly how
we will market your book and what you can do to help promote your work.
The Marketing Questionnaire
The questionnaire is emailed to you when we receive your typescript package. If you haven’t received it, or
have mislaid it, please contact Nicole Norman (see page ).
Please ensure you give detailed answers when completing the questionnaire. It is vital to the successful
promotion of your book as it is the starting point for your book’s marketing plan. We look at the list of journals
you suggest and use it for the basis of the reviews list. We note the conferences you will be attending and any
specialist societies, mailing lists, events or exhibitions you give details of and follow up leads you provide.
Good Reviews
We prepare a review list for your book based on your suggestions from your marketing questionnaire and our
contacts and database of journals and reviewers. If you have colleagues who write for learned journals or
national newspapers, tell us about them and we will contact them about reviewing the book. We aim to send
out 10–15 review copies from the UK and the US marketing offces.
Academic journals can take from six months to two years to review a book. National newspaper coverage is
extremely diffcult and generally unlikely unless the book happens to be particularly newsworthy or topical.
Copies of published reviews are usually mailed to Ashgate. We keep a copy on fle and send a copy to you. We read
all the published reviews and highlight positive remarks and comments. Quotes are added to our database and
the Ashgate website and will be used in future catalogues.
A positive review is one of the best ways of infuencing someone to buy your book.
Pre-Publication Endorsements
Good reviews help to sell your book, so too will an endorsement from a senior scholar in your feld. Please
speak to your commissioning editor about any ideas you may have for people to approach.
Direct Mailing
Every new book published features in one or more (if your book is interdisciplinary) of our annual subject
catalogues and new titles updates. These are mailed to an extensive international list of academics, libraries,
booksellers, library suppliers, wholesalers, reps, agents and relevant specialist journals. They are also sent to
relevant conferences throughout the year. PDF versions of our catalogues are available at www.ashgate.com.
A further key component of our strategy is the use of smaller, subject specifc leafets and fyers for individual
books which are targeted at an international audience of academics and libraries but focused on subject
specialisms relevant to your book. This mix of catalogue, leafet and fyer exposure ensures your book reaches
a large international audience on a regular basis.
If you you are attending a conference and you would like catalogues, leafets or fyers please contact the
marketing department (see page 32).
Please Remember
Do complete your marketing questionnaire.
Please answer all questions in full to ensure we do not miss any important marketing opportunities.
The sooner you return the questionnaire, the more time we have to plan a marketing strategy for your book.
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Conferences
Conferences provide an important opportunity to promote your book. Our commissioning and marketing staff
attend over 100 international conferences a year. If you attend a conference or give a paper yourself, please let
us know and we will provide you with marketing materials and display copies of your book.
Please ensure you contact us at least a month in advance giving the name of the conference, contact numbers
and email addresses of the organizers.
Advertisements
We advertise in the key scholarly journals and conference programmes that are most likely to reach the
audience for your book. Occasionally we advertise selected titles in the Times Literary Supplement, the Times
Higher Educational Supplement or other publications. But generally we prefer a more targeted approach using
catalogues, leafets and fyers to advertising in newspapers.
Internet Promotion
Every Ashgate book is featured on www.ashgate.com prior to publication, until it goes out of print. Sample
pages are also available on the website for all new titles. Customers can search for titles or browse by subject
area and purchase books direct. All orders placed through the Ashgate website receive a discount.
Our books are also available through all major online booksellers who receive information from Ashgate and
bibliographic data suppliers. We provide full information, including jackets scans, to these suppliers on a
monthly basis. All titles are also included in Amazon’s Search Inside!™ [a book] programme, which means
that sample pages are available to view on www.amazon.co.uk and www.amazon.com shortly after the book is
published. We were also one of the frst publishers to participate in the Google Print project enabling readers
to view the relevant page from a book through a keyword search in a Google search engine.
Monthly email updates are sent to subscribers. All new books are featured in at least one update with a link
directly to the book’s page at www.ashgate.com.
Book Launches
Experience has taught us that book launches are not necessarily the best way to advertise your book. Generally
we prefer to concentrate on targeted marketing and promotion for your book. There are exceptions, of course,
and occasionally we might work with you and a conference organizer to host a reception.
Bookshops and Library Suppliers
Due to the specialist nature of our books, a large proportion of sales will be made to libraries. Libraries obtain
their books, for the most part, through a specialist branch of the book trade known as library suppliers. We
have active relationships with all the major library suppliers worldwide, and we ensure that they have all the
information about our books that they require. Our UK Sales department also works closely with a network
of international reps and agents to service the needs of customers throughout the world. Our US offce deals
directly with customers in North and South America.
North America
The USA and Canada is a major market for Ashgate books. We have our own US offce based in Vermont which
carries out comprehensive sales, marketing and distribution activities in North and South America. A small but
growing number of our commissioning editors are based there.
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How Can I Help Sell My Book?
Complete the marketing questionnaire, including as much information as possible,
for example, supplying full names and addresses of any Book Reviews editors.
Circulate the fyer we send you to your colleagues, university librarian and campus bookshop.
Talk to your friends and colleagues about your book. Tell your librarian and your students.
Update your online biography on your institution’s website mentioning your book and
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Annouce the publication of your book on any list servs to which you regularly participate.
If you come across marketing opportunities at exhibitions, events or
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Remember to be realistic about your book’s audience. It is unlikely your local bookshop
will stock your book, but if your book is likely to become recommended reading for
a university course, we can encourage your campus bookstore to stock it.
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On Publication
Gratis Copies
The gratis copies of your book due under the terms of your contract will be sent as soon as stock of the book
have been approved for sale. A publication date will be set for approximately four weeks after this, to allow for
review copies to be sent out and for booksellers to receive their stock. As the author or editor you are entitled
to purchase additional copies of the book at the author discount rate as detailed in your contract. Contributors
are also entitled to this discount (see below).
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The following schedules assume that there are no continuing discounts from prior buyback, bulk or author
deals. The table below is a guide only; in some circumstances the details can vary.
For more information please contact Ashgate Sales Account Manager, Sharon Heathcote
¯ sheathcote@ashgatepublishing.com W + 44 (0) 1252 351803
Quantity (no. of copies) Discount
1–9 35%
0–49 40%
50–99 45%
100–199 50%
200+ 55%
General Author Discount
Author’s can claim 35% author discount on orders of their own book or any other book from the Ashgate
website by quoting a valid personal promotional code. To request your code please contact Elaine Hill directly:
ehill@ashgatepublishing.com

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Please Remember
Do identify yourself as the author or editor (contributors must do the same) on any order forms or requests
for extra copies, in order to receive the above discounts.
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5
Appendix I
How to Supply Images and Music Correctly: Quality and Size
Your fgure, illustration or music must be high resolution and saved to the size it will be reproduced at in the
book.
Figures, illustrations or music examples cannot be reproduced if they are saved to a smaller size
than the size they will appear in the book and/or if they are low resolution
Remember:
high resolution for fgures and illustrations is 300 dpi (dots per inch) or over
high resolution for music, line drawings and maps is 100 dpi (dots per inch) or over
fgures or illustrations must be saved to the size they will be reproduced at in the book
fgures or illustrations cannot be reproduced larger than the text area of a page in the book
(approx. 115 mm x 195 mm or 4.53 in x 7.68 in) without permission from your commissioning editor
See below for an example of different image resolutions.




º
6
Sample Music Example
How to Supply Music Examples Correctly
Remember:
the music must be saved at high resolution (100 dpi or over)
do not include the caption within the music example fle; add it to the text below the insert instruction e.g.
[insert Ex. 3.1 here]
ensure all the fonts are embedded within the PDF, if supplying in this format (EPS and TIF fles are also
acceptable) (see page 11)
See below for how the music example will appear in the fnal text.



º
Ex. 3.1 ‘Sehnsucht nach Italien’
Please Remember (if you print this page)
The above example is to represent how the music example will appear in your fnal text but as this Author
Pack is written for the internet the quality above is low resolution, whereas on the printed page music
examples are high resolution. For more information contact Heidi Bishop.
7
Sample Table
How to Supply Tables Correctly
Remember:
the table should be created in the same software as the text, ideally in Word
ensure the table captions are above the table
ensure columns are clearly laid out and total columns add up (if they contain totals)
See below for an example of how you need to supply a table.



Months No. of sunny days No. of rainy days No. of grey skies
January 12 11 13
February 14 13 12
March 12 11 10
April 6 4 26
May 14 16 10
June 18 15 8
July 24 22 3
August 26 21 9
September 24 21 12
October 15 11 15
November 7 8 21
December 8 5 22
Table 2.3 Contrasting Types of Weather in 1956
Note: Any one day could include all types of weather shown above.
Source: Ashgate Crystal Ball Weather Systems 1975.
º
8
Chapter 1
The Fairfaxes of Haldon
John Fredericks
On 18 August 1642, Sir John Fairfax, the seventh Earl of Haldon, was married at the
Church of St John in the neighbouring parish of Smithfeld.
1
His bride was the 18-year-
old Elizabeth Ferrers, daughter of the Duke of West Sussex.
The Fairfax Dynasty
Sir Thomas Fairfax was ennobled shortly after the Battle of Bosworth in August 1485.
His eldest son, Harry, was a long-serving member of the court of Henry VIII among
other roles.
2
In 1520 he married Lady Sarah Chivers, who brought with her some 1,250
gold pieces.
However, in September 1521, she died in childbirth, leaving Sir Harry childless. He
remarried in 1525, and at his death in 1540 was succeeded to the title by his second son,
Henry, aged 12, after his eldest boy, Thomas Robert Fairfax, was killed in a riding accident.
It was the early death of Thomas that caused the alcoholism of Lord Fairfax, and which
endangered the -future of Halden [sic] Hall. It was only due to the good management of
Lady Mary ... that the entire estate remained intact [my emphasis].
The lavish expenditure on wedding presents was recorded by Robert Jones,
the family’s steward, and is illustrated in Table 1.1. With respect to music theory,
Schoenberg’s divergent opinions from Schenker, Riemann, and Kurth attest to an
authoritarian attitude towards theoretical issues and, by extension, the originality of
ideas. Particularly interesting for the present study are his claims about his original
analytical insights.
[Insert Fig. 1.1 here – portrait]
The primary manuscripts, L and B, are defcient here; our text follows L2, with variants from
V. Extracts from this prologue are used for the Prologue of RL, in two versions.
2 The traditional number of fathers at the Council of Nicaea, AD 325.
Sample Typescript Pages Sample Typescript Pages
Chapter heading
Sub-heading
Contributor name
Chapter heading
Sub-heading
Contributor name
Superscript note
indicator
Superscript note
indicator
Main text double-
line spaced
1 pt font size
Main text double-
line spaced
1 pt font size
A heading
bold
A heading
bold
Indent paragraphs
to the default of
1.27cm using frst
line indent NOT
tabs, see page 4
for guidance
Indent paragraphs
to the default of
1.27cm using frst
line indent NOT
tabs, see page 4
for guidance
Quotation/
extract
indent cm
10 pt size
Quotation/
extract
indent cm
10 pt size
Footnotes
double-line spaced
9 pt size
Footnotes
double-line spaced
9 pt size
For Tables
see page 10
For Tables
see page 10
Figure insertion
indicator 1 pt
bold in square
brackets
Figure insertion
indicator 1 pt
bold in square
brackets
15
Page number must
appear in the top
right corner
Please note: this is an illustration of the standard typescript page layout. This is not actual size.
9
Figure 1.1 The view from Thomas Robert Fairfax’s castle
According to the theoretical tradition evoked by Althusser, ideology is not the
opposite of truth.
Outline and research argumentation
The foregoing observations suggest the need for an evaluation of Schoenberg as
a music theorist. However, as already mentioned, a conclusive assessment of
Schoenberg’s career as music theorist is not completely feasible. Nevertheless, many
attempts have been made to put Schoenberg’s ideas together in a coherent theoretical
approach. From this proposed outline, I believe that a reasonably clear picture of
Schoenberg as a music theorist may be grasped.
The tradition of German music Chapter briefy explores some aspects of
Schoenberg’s inherited knowledge of nineteenth-century music theory focusing on
the theories of A.B. Marx and Simon Sechter. His main contribution to music theory is
presented in the four-volume composition manual, Die Lehre von der musikalischen
Komposition, praktisch-theoretisch, published between 1837 and 1847. Krämer has
made a general comparison between Marx’s theory of form and that of Schoenberg.
Concordant motets are:
• Dulces exuviae by Alexander Agricola
• A statement of the tonality of departure. In simple cases the presentation of
the tonic may be suffcient, but it is usually better to elaborate a little more
• Vexilla regis/Passio domini, also by La Rue, and
• Sancta Maria succurre, set by Franciscus Strus.
Table 1.1 The lavish expenditure on wedding presents
B heading italic B heading italic
C heading bold
italic
C heading bold
italic
Figure caption
1 pt bold
16
Bullet points
double-line
spaced 10 pt size.
No line of space
before or after
Table caption
1 pt bold
followed by table
created in Word
(see page 10)
Gifts from Family Gifts from Friends
Castle estate Gold statue
3000 acres of farmland Gold jewellery
Keep it Simple
We need your text to look like these pages.
We will have to remove extra formatting, including adding extra
spaces above and below headings and complex Word styles.
·
0
Chapter 1
The Fairfaxes of Haldon
John Fredericks
On 18 August 1642, Sir John Fairfax, the seventh Earl of Haldon, was married at the Church of St
John in the neighbouring parish of Smithfeld.
1
His bride was the 18-year-old Elizabeth Ferrers,
daughter of the Duke of West Sussex.
The Fairfax Dynasty
Sir Thomas Fairfax was ennobled shortly after the Battle of Bosworth in August 1485. His eldest
son, Harry, was a long-serving member of the court of Henry VIII among other roles.
2
In 1520 he
married Lady Sarah Chivers, who brought with her some 1,250 gold pieces.
However, in September 1521, she died in childbirth, leaving Sir Harry childless. He remarried
in 1525, and at his death in 1540 was succeeded to the title by his second son, Henry, aged 12, after
his eldest boy, Thomas Robert Fairfax, was killed in a riding accident.
It was the early death of Thomas that caused the alcoholism of Lord Fairfax, and which endangered the
future of Halden [sic] Hall. It was only due to the good management of Lady Mary ... that the entire estate
remained intact [my emphasis].
The lavish expenditure on wedding presents was recorded by Robert Jones, the family’s steward,
and is illustrated in Table 1.1. With respect to music theory, Schoenberg’s divergent opinions from
Schenker, Riemann, and Kurth attest to an authoritarian attitude towards theoretical issues and, by
extension, the originality of ideas. Particularly interesting for the present study are his claims about
his original analytical insights.
1
The primary manuscripts, L and B, are defcient here; our text follows L2, with variants from V. Extracts
from this prologue are used for the Prologue of RL, in two versions.
2
The traditional number of fathers at the Council of Nicaea, AD 325.
Sample Final Proof Pages
Figure 1.1 The view from Thomas Robert Fairfax’s castle
Please note: this is an illustration of the standard page layout. This is not actual size.
1
According to the theoretical tradition evoked by Althusser, ideology is not the opposite of truth.
Outline and research argumentation
The foregoing observations suggest the need for an evaluation of Schoenberg as a music theorist.
However, as already mentioned, a conclusive assessment of Schoenberg’s career as music theorist
is not completely feasible. Nevertheless, many attempts have been made to put Schoenberg’s
ideas together in a coherent theoretical approach. From this proposed outline, I believe that a
reasonably clear picture of Schoenberg as a music theorist may be grasped.
The tradition of German music Chapter briefy explores some aspects of Schoenberg’s
inherited knowledge of nineteenth-century music theory focusing on the theories of A.B. Marx and
Simon Sechter. His main contribution to music theory is presented in the four-volume composition
manual, Die Lehre von der musikalischen Komposition, praktisch-theoretisch, published between
1837 and 1847. Krämer has made a general comparison between Marx’s theory of form and that
of Schoenberg. Concordant motets are:
Dulces exuviae by Alexander Agricola
A statement of the tonality of departure. In simple cases the presentation of the tonic
may be suffcient, but it is usually better to elaborate a little more
Vexilla regis/Passio domini, also by La Rue, and
Sancta Maria succurre, set by Franciscus Strus.
Table 1.1 The lavish expenditure on wedding presents
Gifts from Family Gifts from Friends
Castle estate Gold statue
3000 acres of farmland Gold jewellery




The Fairfaxes of Haldon 2
Typescript ¬ Proofs
Please remember that following typesetting, your fnal proofs
will look very different to your original typescript.
We ask that you present your typescript in such a specifc way (see sample typescript
pages 28–29) because this is the most effcient way for us to process your text.
For example, in your typescript you will ensure fgures, illustrations, tables
or music captions are presented in bold so they stand out from the text.
When the text is formatted the caption will not appear in bold.
If you have any queries in preparing your typescript please contact us.

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