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Quantum Flash Introduction

Qflash flashes provide professional quality lighting for both digital and film cameras. Quantums proprietary QTTL Adapters dedicate Qflash seamlessly to your camera. Many features of Qflash will enhance your lighting control when used with non-dedicated/manual cameras. While powerful and extremely versatile, Qflash operation is intuitive and straightforward. Advanced features for most lighting needs are accessible as required.

Quantum Flash

WARNINGS AND CAUTIONS

Disconnect external power before changing the flash tube, or connecting or disconnecting to/from cameras, power packs, or any other equipment. OPERATE ONLY WITH A FLASH TUBE IN THE SOCKET!! DO NOT TOUCH THE FLASH TUBE SOCKET WITH METAL OBJECTS!! THIS IS A PROFESSIONAL INSTRUMENT. KEEP AWAY FROM CHILDREN!! DO NOT ATTEMPT TO OPEN THE FLASH UNIT! DANGEROUS HIGH VOLTAGE INSIDE!! Repairs can be made only by a qualified Quantum service representative.

Initial Setup
Inserting the Flash Tube Match the red dot on the base of the flash tube with the red dot in the socket of the Qflash. Push the

flash tube in until it is seated snugly into the socket.

Excessive force is not required.


Reflectors and Bare Bulb Reflectors are secured by the locking ring near the base of the reflector. Rotate the ring in the directions shown in the diagram to loosen or tighten the reflectors. When inserting a reflector, first slowly rotate it until the notch in the reflector drops fully into head of the Qflash. Then tighten the locking ring. If you do not let the reflector drop fully into the Qflash before locking it, the reflector may become loose during use.

Bounce and Swivel Head


The head position is locked and can be changed with a single button (see diagram). Press and hold this button, then adjust the head to the desired position. Release the button, and slightly move the head until it clicks and locks the head into the vertical and horizontal planes.

Connecting Qflash to a Camera


There are two ways to connect a Qflash to a camera- wired and wireless. For wired connection use either of these methods: Connect a household two-prong sync cord (supplied) to the sync connector of Qflash. Connect a QF series TTL adapter to the camera hot shoe. For wireless connection Use the FreeXWire system. Note: When using a household type (two-prong) sync cord, if you have difficulty getting the flash to fire, remove the two-prong plug from the Qflash and reinsert it in the opposite direction. This changes the polarity of the Qflash to match the polarity of the camera.

Powering Qflash
Before turning on any power to Qflash always make all electrical connections first, both to the camera and to the power pack.
Qflash T models are powered by any Quantum Turbo Battery including Turbo 2x2, Turbo Compact, Turbo Z, and Turbo SC. Plug the Qflash power cable into the output connection of the appropriate power pack. Turn on the Turbo power. If a Check Turbo or Check Power message appears on the Qflash display, turn off the Turbo, wait one second, and turn it on again. If the message appears again, the power pack needs recharging. If a Reset Flash? message appears in the Qflash display press any button, except the Mode I button, to resume operation.

BASIC NAVIGATION

Very Important Tips

Very Important Tips


For consistent exposures with your digital camera and Qflash.
Always do a custom white balance before shooting When shooting TTL, use Aperture or Shutter priority or Manual camera

modes Set your metering area to center weight, partial metering instead of matrix or multi-spot metering. Your Qflash provides 150 watt-seconds of power compared to 50 wattseconds of a typical shoe mount flash. When shooting 6 ft. (2m) or closer, at ISO 200 or greater, with a wide open F/#, you must always diffuse the light. Otherwise your subject will be over-exposed.

Flash Ready
Flash Ready The Flash Ready indicator will blink while Qflash is recycling. It will stop blinking once the flash is ready to fire again, and the speaker will beep.

Display, Speaker, and Indicator Lights Qflash indicates the result of a flash exposure in Automatic and TTL/QTTL modes via the Display, Speaker and Flash Indicator Lights. The signals are shown in the table below: : Flash Exposure Condition Good exposure Under/Over Display Speaker/Earphon e one beep 3beeps Flash Indicator Lights rapid blink 3 blinks, pause, 3 blinks, pause long steady on

OK Undr or Over

No flash

No Flash

long steady beep

BASIC OPTIONS
You can cycle through the option menus in this section by pushing the Option button. Then select an option to change by pressing the Set button until the option you want to change blinks. Then use the Up /Down buttons to make the change. Option Menu 1:

Flash Sensor Limit for Auto Mode Flash sensor limit is an option that limits the distance that the sensor sees when the Qflash is in Auto mode. Speaker You may want the speaker off for sensitive shooting, or turn it on for audible confirmation of flash exposure. The earphone signals always sound whether the speaker function is set on or off. Flash Indicator Lights The red Flash Indicators on the four sides of the Qflash give a visual indication that a flash fired, wether the exposure was good, over, under, or no flash, indicating that the flash did not fire. You can enable or disable the lights. Reflector settings Setting the reflector type is important so that the displayed distance, guide number and f/# correspond to the reflector in use. The choices are NORM (for the reflector supplied with Qflash), DIFF (for diffusers supplied with Qflash, and optional QF67A wide-angle diffuser or softbox QF68), BBE (optional Bare Bulb Enhancers QF62Bs and QF62Bg) and TELE (for optional QF63B Tele photo reflector). The reflectors must be repositioned manually. Distance Units Set your preference for the display of metric (M) or US distance (Ft) units. Guide numbers also change accordingly.

Option Menu 2:
Exposure Compensation Quantum calibrates Qflashes to American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards with laboratory equipment traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). From time to time, photographers may wish to fine tune Qflash exposures to match their exposure meters, to compensate for variations in cameras or films, to match particular styles, for effects, or for individual taste. There are two compensations available- one for Manual and one for Auto mode. In QTTL modes Qflash does not control exposure and compensation will not apply. The compensation also does

not apply whenever Wireless or Wired appears in the display.

Setting Compensation Press Set until the compensation you wish to change blinks. Adjust compensation Up /Down in 1/3 steps up to +2 or -2 stops. All exposures for that mode will be compensated by the amount selected. You cannot limit compensation settings to individual programs in program mode.

For calibration to a particular light meter you may use this procedure. It is very important to note the meter measurement type (incident, reflected) used for each procedure!
Restoring Factory settings Qflash options and settings are preset at the factory. You can restore the factory settings by the following method: 1. Turn Turbo OFF. Connect Qflash to Turbo 2. Press and hold any button (except Test M). 3. Turn Turbo ON. 4. The Qflash will display a reset message. 5. Press Mode I to reset the Qflash and restore the factory settings. If you push any other button or fail to push the Mode I button within 4 seconds, the Factory settings will not be restored.

MANUAL MODE OPERATION


The camera exposure may be set to any mode, and Qflash will emit the fixed amount of light shown on its display. Manual Mode with sync only connection

Power, F/number and ISO are all user adjustable. The Set button will cycle through them in that order.

Power settings are adjustable in 1/3 steps from full power to 1/64th power like this: 1/1, 1/1-, 1/2+, 1/2 ,1/2- 1/32, 1/32-, 1/64+, 1/64. Using ISO and Aperture settings, Qflash calculates the optimal flash distance. Match these settings to your cameras film speed and aperture. Flash Compensation setting allows you to fine tune your Qflash in manual mode from +2 to 2 stops in 1/3 step increments.

Manual shooting made easy


Nothing can beat the combination of a flash meter and a flash set manually. Automatic and TTL are a compromise based on the need for speed. Setting the flash for a manual power setting and taking an incident meter reading takes time and resources the average photographer may not have. So we use automatic flash exposure and know that in some situations the sensor may be fooled. The Qflash allows for easy manual shooting without metering. Below is an example of how this is accomplished. In this example Qflash will produce an F8.0 at the subject (8 ft), and it will be quickly accomplished without metering.

Start by selecting the F number and Film speed you are using on your camera. If you have connected a QTTL adapter these are already chosen for you. Now adjust the power setting until the Qflash distance shown matches the subject distance as closely as possible. Reminder: If the distance to the subject changes (you move in for a head shot, or move out for a full length) you must change the flash distance readout by changing the power setting.

Automatic Mode with Sync only Connection


Using only a plain sync cord, Qflash displays Auto Mode. F/# and ISO are set on the Qflash display manually. Press Set to select f/#, then press the Up /Down keys to change the setting. Similarly, press Set twice to select ISO and change it. Flash distance displays the working distance between your Qflash and Subject based on the current settings. Moving outside this range may result in an Under or Overexposed picture.

Auto Sensor Limit


Setting Qflash to Auto exposure makes picture taking fast and easy. However, an automatic flash has a flaw: the sensor on the flash expects the subject to be wide, flat, and fill the view of the sensor. A person standing against a wall fits this description; people in a dining room or on a gangway do not. When the background is located far behind the subject, the automatic flash struggles to produce even lighting. The result is often an over exposed subject, sometimes by as much as two stops. When the lab develops images with a greatly over exposed subject, it will print down to bring the flesh tones back into range. Or, time will be spent adjusting a digital image, with the resultant loss of detail and image quality.

To solve this problem use the Flash sensor limit.

Setting the Sensor Limit:


Press the Option button to bring up this menu. Push Set once. The sensor limit will blink. Use the Up /Down buttons to change the sensor limit. The available limits are: - No limit placed on sensor distance 20ft / 6m, 15ft / 4m, 10ft / 3m, 5ft / 2m, When the Flash Sensor Limit is set to the flash will produce the desired f/# for a subject within the flashs minimum and maximum flash distance.

With Auto Sensor Limit turned on, a Limit indicator is activated. After a flash, if the subjects distance exceeds the sensor limit currently set (5, 10, 15 or 20ft. / 2, 3, 4, 6m) the word Limit will appear in the display.

Three beeps and/or 3 blink warning may also occur (if those features are set in Options). If the subject is within the current sensor limit normal exposure indicators (OK, Undr, Over) will apply.

Using Preset Modes


When taking a photo of a subject at approximately 1 meter use Preset P1 Use Program Mode (Presets) and shoot in Manual Mode. Press the Mode button, use the up/down arrows to scroll until P (Presets) mode appears, press the Set button once and using the up/down buttons go to P1.

Press the Set button to scroll to Mode, use the up/down buttons until M (Manual) appears, wait until M stops blinking. Press the Set button until power level starts blinking, then use the up/down arrows until the power level reads 1/32+, wait for the blinking to stop. Press the Set button until F starts blinking, use the up/down arrows to change F stop to 8.0 Press the Set button until ISO starts blinking, use the up/down arrows to change the ISO to 200.

Press the Options button once for Options screen #1 Use the Set button to scroll to Reflector type and use the up/down arrows to choose DIFF Reflector. Then press the Set button again, Ft will blink, use the up/down arrows to change to Meters.

Preset P1 is now programmed using Preset Modes continued


When taking a photo of a subject at 2 metres use Preset P2. Press the Set button once and using the up/down buttons go to P2 Preset Press the Set button to scroll to Mode, use the up/down buttons until M (Manual) appears, wait until M stops blinking. Press the Set button until power level starts blinking, then use the up/down arrows until the power level reads 1/8 +, wait for blinking to stop.

Press the Set button until F starts blinking, use the up/down arrows to change F stop to 8.0
Press the Set button until ISO starts blinking, use the up/down arrows to change ISO to 200.

Preset P2 is now programmed

Using Preset Modes continued


Since you will not be using P3 P8 Presets the following steps should be used to clear these Presets. Press the Set button once and use the up arrow to scroll to P3, wait until the blinking stops Press the Set button twice until Mode starts blinking, use the up/down arrows to scroll until the word clear appears. Wait until the blinking stopsP3 has been cleared. Repeat above steps until P4 P8 are cleared.

Shooting with Preset Modes


When shooting with the preset modes, use the up/down arrows to go between P1 & P2, you just have to remember that P1 is for 1 meter subjects and P2 for 2 meter subjects.

Shooting at Embarkation
When shooting at embarkation set Qflash as follows:

Press the Mode button and use up/down arrows to scroll until Man appears in display. When the blinking stops press the Set button until power level starts blinking. Use the up/down arrows to set power level at - for shooting at a distance of 3.2 meters

Press the Set button until F starts blinking, use the up/down arrows to change F to 8.0 Press the Set button until ISO starts blinking, use the up/down arrows to change ISO to 200 When shooting embarkation or any other functions that last for a long time photographers will need two Turbos.

When shooting in bright Sunlight with subjects in shade - Qflash in Manual mode
When shooting in bright Sunlight with subjects in shade - Qflash in Manual mode It is recommended that you use diffusers. Plus, to get more capacity from the Turbo you are using you should set the Qflash to ISO 200, F8 or F5.6. To ensure a perfect photo each time you take a picture the Qflash should be set to Manual mode.

You can set the Qflash ISO and F-stop before you start shooting. Then as you come upon subjects to shoot press the Set button once, the power level starts blinking, using the up / down arrows to change the power level until the distance to the subject shows in the Qflash LCD display. This way you get a photo that is not influenced by you being in bright Sunlight and your subject being in shade.

Changing Flash Tubes


One of the benefits of using the Quantum flashes is the flash tube, it is replaceable, and this will benefit the photographers as the equipment will not have a downtime. Changing the flash tube is a simple process, but the most important thing to remember is to NEVER TOUCH THE FLASH TUBE DIRECTLY. The following 6 steps will show you how to change a flash tube. 1) Unscrew the diffuser thumbwheel.

2) Remove the diffuser 3)

3) Remove old flash tube, and locate the red dot on the inside of the mount.

Push the new flash tube halfway out of its protective foam, and locate the red dot on the mount end.

5) Line up the two red dots and push the flash tube into its mount, make sure it is pushed in fully and it is a firm fit

) Remove the protective foam cover completely from the flash tube and replace and retighten the diffuser.

Care of Turbo Batteries Turbos and their chargers should be labeled and never separated. Only use the paired charger to charge its Turbo.

Turbos should be charged after a job and the night before a job. Turbos should not be charged for more than 72 hours, it only takes 4 hours to fully charge a Turbo. A constant power source should be used. If you have extra Turbo batteries a weekly rotating schedule should be used. (Example: Eight Turbos are being used on a regular basis with two in reserve. The next week take the two in reserve with their chargers and substitute them for the number 1 and 2 Turbo sets. The week after use the 1 and 2 Turbo sets in place of the 3 and 4 Turbo sets, and so on This way all the Turbos will maintain their peak performance) You should also date each Turbo when you receive them. At the end of 18 months you should request new Turbos and once received, send yours back to corporate. Quantum Flash Can the direction of the Quantum flash be changed? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Yes, but only side to side No, it is a fixed head Yes, both up/down and side to side Yes, but only in the up/down range

After connecting a two prong synch lead to the flash you experience flashing problems, what should you do first? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Swap with someone else's flash Start crying and call the manager Remove the two prong cable, reverse it and plug it back in

Change the cable If a Check Turbo or Check Power message appears on the Qflash display when you connect a new Turbo Pack, what should you do first? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Take someone else's Turbo pack Switch off the Turbo, leave for one second, then switch it back on Recharge the Turbo pack Get another Turbo pack The Flash Indicator Lights rapidly blink on the Qflash, after taking a photo, what does this mean? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" The exposure was over exposed The exposure was good The exposure was under exposed The flash did not fire What does the "Flash Sensor Limit" feature do? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Reduces the distance of the auto flash to get a better exposure It underexposes the photographs It fires the flash at the minimum available power It fires the flash at the maximum available power How many different 'Preset' modes do we use? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 8 6 4

2 Which flash mode would you shoot Embarkation on? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Auto Manual Preset 1 TTL You can use any Turbo charger with any Turbo pack? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" False True How long does it take to fully charge a Turbo battery? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 1 Hour 4 Hours 24 Hours 72 Hours

Traveler Pack 3000

PHO-004

Two parts of the system


The Quad system comes in two parts, we will cover the functions and operations of both parts of the system. The two parts are first, the power pack, and second, the light head.

All studio equipment is heavy, sensitive and expensive. It should be treated with respect at all times, as it can also be very dangerous.

Keep the equipment clean


The Quad 2400 system is a 2400 watt system which, if abused, can be very harmful. The power packs and light head must be kept clean and free of dust at all times. All vents on both items must be kept clear to enable them to keep themselves cool via their internal fans, and most of all they should not be knocked, bumped or dropped in any way, as this can cause harm to the person dropping them, and damage to the internal electronics of the system.

This competency is to be used in conjunction with PHO-004 (Portrait Setup Basics).


Equipment Rotation All portrait equipment must be rotated on a regular basis to increase the longevity of all equipment. Many studios have higher usage than others, for this reason all studio kits should be numbered and a rotation schedule should be put in place designating which portrait kit will be at which portrait location during set cruises. A rotation can take place every two weeks, where kit one will be used at location one for two weeks, then kit one will be used at location two and so on. If there is a spare kit onboard then this should also be placed into the rotation. The Traveler System The Traveler system comes in two parts, we will cover the functions and operations of both parts of the system. The two parts are first, the power pack, and second, the light head. All studio equipment is heavy, sensitive and expensive. It should be treated with respect at all times, as it can also be very dangerous.

The Traveler 3000 system is a 3000 watt system which, if abused, can be very harmful. The power packs and light head must be kept clean and free of dust at all times. All vents on both items must be kept clear to enable them to keep themselves cool via their internal fans, and most of all they should not be knocked, bumped or dropped in any way, as this can cause harm to the person dropping them, and damage to the internal electronics of the system. The Power Pack The power pack appears very confusing, with lots of sockets and buttons. In fact it is very simple if you break it down into 3 sections. 1. The light head sockets and power strip 2. Modeling lights and test switches 3. Synch sockets and power

The Light Head Sockets There are three sockets, so in effect there can be up to 3 lights attached at any one time. On the Traveler 3000 each of the three flash head sockets has a pair of power UP-DOWN buttons and a power output bar graph indicator associated with it.

By using the three flash head sockets and associated controls almost all possible combinations from full power of 3000 Watt seconds to 125 Watt seconds at 1/8th power from 1 flash head or a combination of flash heads is possible. Here is the chart (from the pack) that shows the different combinations of output using different configurations.

Example: If you plug a lighthead into sockets 2&3 you will get an even 1000W from each channel, whereas if you plug a lighthead into sockets 1&3 socket 1 will give 2000W, and socket 3 will give only 1000W. The Light Head Sockets continued On the TRAVELER 3000 only the UP-DOWN buttons associated with an illuminated power output indicator will have any effect on the output of the Generator. To increase power press and hold the UP button. The output as indicated by the LED bar graph will increase in 1/3rd f stops until the button is released or the pack reaches maximum. Similarly, pressing and holding down the down button will reduce the output. On the TRAVELER 3000 the power from all 3 channels may be varied together, maintaining the previously set lighting ratio, by pressing either of the COMBINED UP-DOWN buttons marked 1+2+3. If, when using the combined UP-DOWN buttons, one channel should reach maximum or minimum output (full or 1/8th) the combined control will have no further effect. The power indicator of the limiting channel will start flashing as a warning. Further adjustment will have to be made by changing the individual UP-DOWN buttons.

Traveler Pack 3000

Modeling Lights And Test Switches


The modeling lamp light is controlled by three push button switches on the control panel.

1) Modeling ON/OFF When the LED above the ON/OFF push button switch is illuminated, this indicates that Modeling ON is selected. Press the ON/OFF push button to toggle the modeling light between ON and OFF. 2) Modeling CONTINUOUS/INTERMITTENT When the LED above the CONTINUOUS/ INTERMITTENT push button switch is illuminated, this indicates that CONTINUOUS is selected and the modeling light will stay on all the time. Press the CONTINUOUS/INTERMITTENT push button to toggle between INTERMITTENT and CONTINUOUS. With INTERMITTENT selected the modeling light will go out when the Generator is flashed and back on when returned to ready. This will indicate from the camera position that all units in use have fired. 3) Modeling FULL/RATIO When the LED above the FULL/RATIO push button switch is illuminated this indicates that FULL is selected. With FULL selected the modeling light in all flash heads in use will be at FULL output regardless of the flash output settings. Press the FULL/RATIO push button to toggle between FULL and RATIO. With RATIO selected the modeling light output from all flash heads in use will be set in ratio to their corresponding flash outputs. Synchronization & Photocell Synchronization & Photocell

To test the flash operation of the Generator press the Open Flash button The built in photocell may be used for remote triggering. When the LED above the Photocell push button is illuminated the sounder is switched ON. Press the Photocell push button to toggle between Photocell ON and OFF. It is very important that each time the pack is switched off, either at the end of a session, or at the end of the night, that the pack is discharged. This is done by switching off the green On/Off switch and

pushing the open flash button immediately. The flashes will fire and the pack is discharged. If the green On/Off switch is turned off after the flash has been fired the pack will have begun to recharge and will be stored with the capacitors charged. Sounder Control When the LED above the Sounder push button is illuminated the sounder is switched ON and it will give a short beep as the generator comes to ready. Press the Sounder push button to toggle between Sounder ON and OFF.

Memory To overcome having to reset all the controls on the Generator each time it is switched ON a memory is incorporated which maintains all controls at the settings in use when the generator was last turned OFF. With a fully charged battery the memory will hold the settings for up to 4 weeks. It should be remembered, however, that operating the controls when the Generator is switched OFF will change the memorized settings. If the Generator has not been used for a long time the memory may be lost. This may be shown by the indicators being dimly lit when the generator is first switched ON. To reset the power indicators operate the combined DOWN button until normal operation is obtained. This competency is to be used in conjunction with PHO-004 (Portrait Setup Basics).

This competency is to be used in conjunction with PHO-004 (Portrait Setup Basics).

The bottom row consists of the power connectors, with a switch showing a Hare and Tortoise. This is the recharge conditioner. This switch MUST be set to Tortoise. This will reduce the recharge time by a third, but will increase the life of the pack by conditioning the pack

better as it recharges. It also does not draw power from the supply at such a high rate. Finally, this section is also where the fuses are located. Protection of the modeling and flash circuitry is by two 20mm fuses. Both fuses are of an anti-surge type, the flash is rated at 15 Amp and the Modeling at 10 Amp. The fuses should never be replaced with fuses of a different type or rating. The Light Head

IMPORTANT: BE SURE TO SWITCH OFF THE POWER PACK AND DISCHARGE IT BEFORE YOU ATTACH OR REMOVE A LIGHT HEAD.
Traveler Pack 3000

The Light Head cont


The light head is a bit simpler in its operation. It contains 2 bulbs, the flash ring and the modeling lamp. Both of these are very sensitive, and prone to breaking if not handled correctly. Be sure to attach the storage cover on the light head before packing the lamps away.

The Light Head cont The back of the flash head is just as simple.

There is an on/off switch. This only controls the modeling lamp, and will not switch the light head on or off. There is also a fuse here, which also only controls the modeling lamp.

BE SURE TO DISCONNECT THE LIGHTHEAD BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO REPLACE THE FUSE. Packing the studio equipment
It is very important to pack the studio equipment carefully. The longevity of the equipment depends on this. There are a few points to remember when packing the equipment at the end of a studio shoot. Primarily, it is imperative that the modeling lights and lamp heads be switched off but not disconnected, then left for at least 10 minutes before being moved or packed. This will allow for the filaments inside the modeling lamp to cool. If they are moved, vibrated or shaken while they are still hot the filaments will break and the modeling lamps will not work the next time the studio is setup. The fan inside will still draw power from the power pack and help cool the lamps down faster. This will give ample time to break down the other components of the studio, i.e. the background and autopoles, before breaking down the lights. Packing the studio equipment continued Next will be the cables, be sure not to wrap the cables too tightly, or coil them up too tight. The cables contain 12 separate wires wrapped around each other, and if they are coiled incorrectly this can cause the wires inside to twist and even break, causing the light head not to function, or even short out. Below are 2 examples, one of a correctly coiled wire, and one that has been too tightly wound previously.

Be sure to attach the protective cover to the light head before packing, being careful not to touch with you hands or knock the bulbs while doing so. Packing the studio equipment continued When packing the studio equipment case, be sure to pack it in a logical manner. Obviously the heaviest part of the equipment, the power pack, should be at the bottom, this will stop the case from being top heavy when stored. Follow this with the 2 light heads, separated by the dividers. Finally all of the accessories (Cables, brackets, safety signs etc) can go in the top section. If umbrellas are used, place them in the side pockets of the pack. Below is an example of a correctly packed portrait case.

Maintenance It is necessary, every month, to clean the dust and debris from the light heads and power packs. On the power pack, this is done by using the photo lab compressor and blowing the compressed air into the vents along each side, this will clear out all the dust build up. DO NOT take the pack apart, as they contain high power capacitors which can be extremely dangerous. On the light heads, you can do this the same way, by blowing the compressed air in through the vents down each side. The side panels can be loosened if this is an easier option, be sure to replace each screw before the next use. When setting up the studio, be careful not to coil the cables of the light head too tightly around the autopoles or light stands, as this can also cause the wires to become twisted inside. Make sure they are wrapped loosely around the poles. Finally, when breaking down the studio, NEVER leave the light head plugged in to the power pack, this will cause the wires to bend at the connections which can lead the wires breaking inside and possibly shorting out the pack or light head.

Damaging the Equipment


These damaged connections can also come from not having a solid connection between the socket and the plug when the pack is test fired.

Microswitch Plunger

Finally there is the micro switch plunger located in the plug end of the light head, it is a small micro switch that prevents the power from the pack from arcing between two terminals. It is important to check these regularly, as dust can get in and keep the micro switch in, meaning the lamp will think it is connected, and as you get the plug into the power pack socket the lamp will pick up the power and arc between the terminals, causing a short between the two and probably rendering the light head useless. Troubleshooting On occasion you may need to change the flash ring. These flash tubes are designed to last a long time, as long as they are treated appropriately.

Before you begin to attempt to change the flash tubes, you will need to check that the problem is not something as simple as a blown fuse. The power pack contains the fuses for both the flash tube as well as the modeling lamp. The fuses are located just above the power On/Off switch. You can remove the fuse with a coin or small screwdriver. It is a bayonet style fitting, and the fuse will lift out easily. If your flash tube has stopped working, remove the flash tube fuse, and replace it with an equal amp fuse, the flash fuse is 15A. If the modeling lamp has stopped working, remove the modeling lamp fuse and change it with an equal amp fuse, the modeling fuse is 10A. The modeling light has a second fuse on the rear of the light head, just above the green On/Off switch. This is a 4A fuse.

(Please note, additional spare fuses can be found on the power pack, beneath the handle cover. And on the light head beneath the handle cover also.)
Replacing a Flash Tube Should you need to change a flash tube, pay careful attention to how they are replaced. Primarily, never handle the flash tube with your bare hand, as this leaves grease from your finger print, which will get very hot and will become a melting point, which will reduce the life of your flash. Next, make a note of the way the old flash is wired up before it is removed, you will notice on a working flash that there are three prongs going into the light head, and a wire connected to a ceramic part of the head, this is called the Trigger Wire.

It is very important to attach this trigger wire correctly, as the flash head will not fire if it is done incorrectly. Replacing a Flash Tube continued When you remove the old flash tube check the ceramic surrounds that the prongs go in to, if any are damaged the light head may short itself out with a new flash tube, this may have been the cause of the tube blowing in the first place.

Now, insert the new tube, be sure that you push the three prongs in evenly, and that the tube is pushed in all the way, as shown here

You will notice on the new flash tubes that there are two trigger wires.

Once you have the flash tube in the light head you can completely cut off the trigger wire furthest from the trigger mount. You only need one trigger wire for the Universal light head. Replacing a Flash Tube continued Once you have attached the remaining trigger wire to the light head, and made it secure, you must cut off ALL of the remaining trigger wire. If you leave any excess wire that touches the metal base plate the flash will not fire.

It is very important to remember to have the power pack and light heads disconnected whenever you are servicing, repairing or maintaining any part of the equipment. The Traveler system runs with very high wattage, and can be extremely dangerous if not handled correctly. How often should studio equipment be rotated between locations?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Every Month Every Week Every Three Months Every Two Weeks

How many seperate lightheads can be attached to the Traveler 3000 powerpack?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 3 4

1 2

Which of the following modelling lamp modes would allow the light to switch off when the photo is taken, and automatically come back on when the pack recharges?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Full Ratio Continuous Intermittent

If the powerpack is switched off, can the power settings for each light still be changed?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Yes No

How many different 'synch' sockets does the Traveler 3000 power pack have?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 1 2 4 3

Which recharge speed setting should the Traveler 3000 powerpack be set to?

class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Hare Tortoise

Where would you find the safety auto shut off microswitch plunger, to prevent shorting out the lightheads, on the Traveler 3000 system?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" On the side of the powerpack Next to the fuses on the powerpack In the lighthead socket On the back of the lighthead

How many 'trigger wires' does a standard replacement flashtube come with?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 3 4 1 2

How long should the lightheads be allowed to cool down before dismantling the equipment at the end of the night?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 20 Minutes 5 Minutes 15 Minutes

10 Minutes

This competency is to be used in conjunction with PHO-004 (Portrait Setup Basics).

This competency is to be used in conjunction with PHO-004 (Portrait Setup Basics).


Rotate Portrait Equipment
All portrait equipment must be rotated on a regular basis to increase the longevity of all equipment. Many studios have higher usage than others, for this reason all studio kits should be numbered and a rotation schedule should be put in place designating which portrait kit will be at which portrait location during set cruises. A rotation can take place every two weeks, where kit one will be used at location one for two weeks, then kit one will be used at location two and so on. If there is a spare kit onboard then this should also be placed into the rotation.

Two parts of the system


The Quad system comes in two parts, we will cover the functions and operations of both parts of the system. The two parts are first, the power pack, and second, the light head.

All studio equipment is heavy, sensitive and expensive. It should be treated with respect at all times, as it can also be very dangerous.

Keep the equipment clean


The Quad 2400 system is a 2400 watt system which, if abused, can be very harmful. The power packs and light head must be kept clean and free of dust at all times. All vents on both items must be kept clear to enable them to keep themselves cool via their internal fans, and most of all they should not be knocked, bumped or dropped in any way, as this can cause harm to the person dropping them, and damage to the internal electronics of the system.

The Power Pack


The power pack appears very confusing, with lots of sockets and buttons. In fact it is very simple if you

break it down into 3 sections. 1) The light head sockets (very self explanatory) 2) Modeling lights and test switches 3) Synch sockets and power 4)

The power pack is divided into two channels, A and B, and each is fitted with one head socket. An LED display for each channel indicates the available power in watt/seconds available at the head fitted to that channel.

A single Overall Power Selector reduces the packs total power by one or two f/stops and individual Channel Variator controls reduce each channels power by a further three f/stops in 1 / 3 -stop steps. The Overall Power Selector has settings for both Asymmetric (A/B) and Symmetric (A+B) modes. The

selected power in Asymmetric mode is available independently from each channel whether or not any head is fitted in the other channel. The power available is controllable by using the appropriate Channel Variator and the associated display. The full selected power in Symmetric mode is only available from Channel A, providing that no head is fitted in the Channel B socket. The total power available is shown on the Channel A Power Level Display and is controllable by means of the Channel A Variator only. In general, the Overall Power Selector should be set to the lowest setting and the Channel Variator(s) set to the highest, consistent with the flash power and the distribution between heads required. This method provides the shortest flash duration for a given power output. Whenever the power levels are changed, the pack automatically dumps any excess energy. The Test Button will flash while this is occurring. The time for the Ready Indicator to light up can be reduced by using the Test Button to flash the pack, which dumps the excess power manually.

Modeling Control

The Modeling Mode Selector provides a common control for the modeling lamps of all fitted heads. Note that most heads are fitted with a modeling lamp On/Off Switch that overrides the control on the power pack. As well as Off, the pack provides six modeling modes, each available with Intermittent flash indication: 1. Off turns all lamps off. 2. Intermittent extinguishes the lamps when the pack is fired and turns them back on again when the pack is 100% recycled and Ready Indicator lights up. This provides a visual indication that the pack has been successfully triggered and has recycled. 3. Continuous turns the intermittent mode off. 4. Proportional sets the lamp brightness in proportion to the appropriate Channel Variator setting. 5. MAX sets all lamps to full brightness. 6. Automatic 100% sets the modeling lamps of the head plugged into the channel with the highest flash power setting to 100% and the modeling lamps of the head plugged into the other channel in proportion to its Variator setting.

Test Button and Ready Indicator Light

The green Test Button is lit whenever the power pack reaches 100% charge and is ready to be triggered. This light flashes when the pack is automatically dumping excess energy after a power-level adjustment. Press the Test Button to: 1. Trigger the power pack for test purposes whenever the Test Button is lit. 2. Dump excess energy quickly while the Test Button is flashing. This avoids having to wait a few seconds for the pack to automatically dump energy. Audio Indicator An Audio Ready Signal is provided to beep when the generator is 100% recycled. Turn the Audio Switch On with the rocker switch. The red LED lights up when the Audio is on. Photocell A Photocell is provided to trigger the power pack from another flash source or IR Trigger. Turn the Photocell On with the rocker switch. The red LED lights up when the Photocell is on. Fast/Slow Charge The power pack has the facility to adjust the charging times. Ensure the switch is set to Slow

Using the Slow setting whenever possible will prolong the life of the power supply.

The Light Head

The light head is a bit simpler in its operation. It contains 2 bulbs, the flash ring and the modeling lamp. Both of these are very sensitive, and prone to breaking if not handled correctly. Be sure to always have the glass dome fitted before operation.

NEVER operate these lights without this glass dome.


Light Head continued
The back of the flash head is just as simple.

There is an on/off switch. This only controls the modeling lamp, and will not switch the light head on or off. There is also a fuse here, which also only controls the modeling lamp.

BE SURE TO DISCONNECT THE LIGHTHEAD BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO REPLACE THE FUSE.

Packing the studio equipment


It is very important to pack the studio equipment carefully. The longevity of the equipment depends on this. There are a few points to remember when packing the equipment at the end of a studio shoot. Primarily, it is imperative that the modeling lights and lamp heads be switched off but not disconnected, then left for at least 10 minutes before being moved or packed. This will allow for the filaments inside the modeling lamp to cool. If they are moved, vibrated or shaken while they are still hot the filaments will break and the modeling lamps will not work the next time the studio is setup. The fan inside will still draw power from the power pack and help cool the lamps down faster. This will give ample time to break down the other components of the studio, i.e. the background and autopoles, before breaking down the lights.

PHO-014 Bowens Quad 2400 Pack Packing the studio equipment continued
Next will be the cables, be sure not to wrap the cables too tightly, or coil them up too tight. The cables contain 20 separate wires wrapped around each other, and if they are coiled incorrectly this can cause the wires inside to twist and even break, causing the light head not to function, or even short out. Here are 2 examples, one of a correctly coiled wire, and one that has been too tightly wound previously.

Packing the studio equipment continued


Be sure to attach the protective cover to the light head before packing, being careful not to touch with you hands or knock the bulbs while doing so. When packing the studio equipment case, be sure to pack it in a logical manner. Obviously the heaviest part of the equipment, the power pack, should be at the bottom, this will stop the case from being top heavy when stored. Follow this with the 2 light heads, separated by the dividers. Finally all of the accessories (Cables, brackets, safety signs etc) can go in the top section. If umbrellas are used, place them in the side pockets of the pack.

Maintenance
There are a few items to watch out for during maintenance. Maintenance It is necessary, every month, to clean the dust and debris from the light heads and power packs. On the power pack, this is done by using the photo lab compressor and blowing the compressed air into the vents along each side, this will clear out all the dust build up.

DO NOT take the pack apart, as they contain high power capacitors which can be extremely dangerous.
On the light heads, you can do this the same way, by blowing the compressed air in through the vents down each side. The side panels can be loosened if this is an easier option, be sure to replace each screw before the next use. When setting up the studio, be careful not to coil the cables of the light head too tightly around the autopoles or light stands, as this can also cause the wires to become twisted inside. Make sure they are wrapped loosely around the poles. Finally, when breaking down the studio, NEVER leave the light head plugged in to the power pack, this will cause the wires to bend at the connections which can lead the wires breaking inside and possibly shorting out the pack or light head. These damaged connections can also come from not having a solid connection between the socket and the plug when the pack is test fired.

Microswitch Plunger
Finally there is the micro switch plunger located in the plug end of the light head, it is a small micro switch that prevents the power from the pack from arcing between two terminals.

It is important to check these regularly, as dust can get in and keep the micro switch in, meaning the lamp will think it is connected, and as you get the plug into the power pack socket the lamp will pick up the power and arc between the terminals, causing a short between the two and probably rendering the light head useless.

Troubleshooting
On occasion you may need to change the flash ring. These flash tubes are designed to last a long time, as long as they are treated appropriately. Before you begin to attempt to change the flash tubes, you will need to check that the problem is not something as an activated thermal switch. The power pack contains thermal switches for both the flash tube as well as the modeling lamp. The thermal switches are located on the side of the pack, next to the power On/Off switch.

You can reset the thermal switches by simply pressing the relevant button and reconnecting the circuit. The modeling light has a fuse on the rear of the light head, just to the left of the On/Off switch. This is a 4A fus

Changing a Flash Tube


Should you need to change a flash tube, pay careful attention to how they are replaced. Primarily, never handle the flash tube with your bare hand, as this leaves grease from your finger print, which will get very hot and will become a melting point, which will reduce the life of your flash. Next, make a note of the way the old flash is wired up before it is removed, you will notice on a working flash that there are three prongs going into the light head, and a wire connected to a ceramic part of the head, this is called the Trigger Wire.

It is very important to attach this trigger wire correctly, as the flash head will not fire if it is done incorrectly.

Changing a Flash Tube continued


When you remove the old flash tube check the ceramic surrounds that the prongs go in to, if any are damaged the light head may short itself out with a new flash tube, this may have been the cause of the tube blowing in the first place.

Changing a Flash Tube continued


Now, insert the new tube, be sure that you push the three prongs in evenly, and that the tube is pushed in all the way, as shown here.

Changing a Flash Tube continued


It is easy to notice the two trigger wires on the new flash tubes.

Once you have the flash tube in the light head you can completely cut off the trigger wire furthest from the trigger mount. You only need one trigger wire for the

Quad light head.

This is an example of a correctly fitted flash tube


It is very important to remember to have the power pack and light heads disconnected whenever you are servicing, repairing or maintaining any part of the equipment. The Quad system runs with very high wattage, and can be extremely dangerous if not handled correctly.

How long should the flash head be allowed to cool down at the end of the night, before breaking the equipment down?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 5 Minutes 10 Minutes There is no cool down period necessary 20 Minutes

How long should a portrait kit be designated to a certain studio before being rotated to another location?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" It should stay until it breaks down, then replaced

One Week at each location Two weeks at each location Two months at each location

Other than this competency, where can you find information about the operation of the Quad 2400?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" There is no other place to get the information! In the users manual In the SOP manual

How would you clean the dust from inside the power pack?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" There is no need, as the internal fans take care of that Blow air in through the vents along the sides Remove the dust tray from the bottom of the pack Remove the side panels and blow air inside

How many different modeling modes does the Quad 2400 pack offer? (Including Off)
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 4 2 8 6

Is it necessary to have the glass dome fitted to the

flash during operation?


class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" No Yes

How many trigger wires are required to connect to a Quad 2400 light head?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 3 1 2 4

How many of the light head connections are required to have the microswitch plunger on each powerpack?
class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" At Least One None Both

Retail Assortment Familiarization

Main retail categories

Depending on the ship, the retail assortment varies. On our largest ships, we carry a full range of products similar to what you would find in any quality Photo Shop. Because our space is so limited, we have to be very conscious of our assortment, and limit it to our best sellers. The Assistant Manager of Sales (AMS) is responsible for most of the retail operation onboard, supervising stock levels and sales, sending reports to the Image headquarters and keeping the sales areas (Photo Gallery and/or Photo Shop) up to the standards. As a Photog1 & 2 you will be spending a lot of time in the Photo Gallery, which on some ships includes the Photo Shop or at least offers the most common retail items. It is therefore important for you to familiarize yourself with the retail assortment so you can provide good Customer Service to all of the cruise lines guests. Categories include: Film Batteries One Time Use Cameras Digital Still and Video cameras Digital media (memory cards-various types) Binoculars Accessories (camera bags, straps, cleaning products etc.) Images preferred photo assortment supplier is KODAK. Therefore our ships are only offering Kodak film, batteries and One Time Use Cameras. Also, our photo shop is, by contract, the only place onboard where guests can purchase photo products.

FILM
We offer a limited range of amateur KODAK films.

KodakMax400 35mm film / single packing

KodakMax40035mm film / multipack


400 iso is the most popular format. We used to carry all speeds, both in 24 and 36 exposures. American guests typically prefer high-speed films. The Kodak Max 400 and 800 are versatile films that can be recommended for all photo situations.When guests are interested in film, always ask if they would like a multi-pack. The reason behind the question is not only up-selling but also offers good, genuine Customer Service (purchasing onboard guests have quality guaranteed, while purchasing photo goods in ports of call could coincide with a rip-off). Multi packs are three, four or sometimes five rolls of film wrapped in the same box sold as bulk and they usually cost less/roll then a single. Always remind the guests that we are visiting exciting ports of call and they want to be ready with spare film in case they encounter some great scenery. If guests are inclined to use a film for shooting pictures on the ship, using a point and shoot camera, recommend a high speed film, such as ISO800 or a minimum ISO400.

Batteries
We carry a variety of Kodak batteries, from the commonly used AAA (triple A) and AA (double A) to the special lithium based photo batteries CR2, CR123, 2CR5 and similar. Kodak has designed a special AA battery for digital cameras, which require a lot of power. They may be more expensive then regular but its performance is far superior. Always identify the needs of a customer, ask to see the camera they are purchasing the battery for (the battery type required will be printed near the battery compartment) or check the used battery. Any time you hold a guests camera in your hands, make sure not do damage it or the images inside as this could concur to major Customer Service issues (guests only have one chance to take pictures in the ports of call, they wont be there again next week, like you).

AA four pack Lithium based photo batteries


When selling batteries remember that the used ones have to be disposed of properly in the provided battery collector bins, for environmental reasons.

One Time Use Cameras


One time use cameras are a very important part of our assortment. These are inexpensive cameras that can only be used once and then are turned in for processing to the photo-processing store. They are

used instead of a regular camera or as an inexpensive option in case the guests forgot their cameras before the cruise or their camera broke etc. The underwater one time use cameras are the best sellers in the Caribbean cruises, as there are various excursions involving wonderful underwater sceneries. The main difference between the types of underwater cameras is the flash. The inexpensive one time use cameras do not have a flash therefore can only be used OUTDOORS, with appropriate natural light conditions. Remember, at times guests will only decide to purchase an outdoor camera because they are cheap, without realizing that it wont serve their needs. It is your duty as a Photog/Sales Person with fantastic Customer Service skills to identify the guests needs and sell the right product for those needs.

Kodak Outdoor O.T.U. camera

Kodak Outdoor/Indoor O.T.U. Camera (built-in flash)


O.T.U. cameras generally come loaded with a versatile 24 27 exposures film and yes, they do come as twin-pack too (two cameras, as a better deal) so consider up-selling. Most of the cruise destinations are beautiful islands and beach sceneries. Kodak Underwater Cameras are perfect for these instances and we sell very many on each ship week after week. They can be used both underwater and outdoors but remember to advise guests that are not suited for dim light conditions!

Kodak Underwater O.T.U. camera


When selling an O.T.U. camera offer your help in unwrapping it and getting it ready for the first shot. Remind the customer the rules on flash use indoors and in poor light conditions and explain how to wind it, take the shots and activate the flash.

Cameras
Onboard Image ships we carry some of the fanciest cameras available on the market. With space being so limited, as well as facing strong competition from the ports of call, we have to be very careful with our assortment and quantities we carry onboard. The digital market is constantly evolving so efforts are being made to keep the stock up to date. Take time to review the general specifications for each camera we carry. An important thing to remember is that Image guarantees the QUALITY of all the products available in our store. We do not guarantee the lowest price, but we stand behind each of our products with warranties and coaching.

Digital Media
At this time there are close to ten different types of Memory Cards available for various digital cameras and Image is proud to carry the most popular of them onboard our ships.

XD card

SD card

MS card

CF card

Always make sure the guest is purchasing the right card for his/hers camera. All cards come in different sizes, usually from 64Mb (Megabytes) and up. The cards size will closely influence the amount of pictures that can be stored on it. The price will of course vary on the type and size of the card. Binoculars & Accessories
Binoculars Binoculars are a very popular item especially on the Alaska ships, where the breathtaking itinerary and the wildlife create great opportunities for selling this item. Make sure you are familiar with the models you are carrying onboard your ship and know the differences between them. Accessories In our shops and galleries guests can find camera bags, straps, cleaning supplies, tripods and small accessories for their cameras or for the new camera they are purchasing onboard. Take a few minutes to review the accessories in our retail area so you can better help guests in this matter.

Selling tips
The most important part of the sale happens in the first 30 seconds! Approach. This is where the customer forms his impression of you, while you are identifying his needs. This is where you interact with the customer, establish a rapport and build trust. Trust in you is why they will come back, and that is what we want. Remember, you are really selling YOURSELF.

Folios
One of the best selling items in the Photo Gallery (after photos, of course) is the Folio.

Folios get delivered to our ships in boxes and they are not ready to be sold until the silver inserts are attached to the inside cover. The first thing to do is to verify what type of folios are you making: horizontal or vertical, this means wether they will hold a vertical guests photo or a horizontal one. The left side of the folio, the inside of the front cover, will always hold the stock shot therefore will always be horizontal.
Expose the glue on the inserts verso (by peeling off the paper strips) on three sides-2 long ones and one short side.

Carefully align the insert on the back of the cover, placing the short side with the paper strip still attached

towards the folding center of the folio. This will be the side the stock shot will slide under the insert. If small 6x8 folios are being made, the smaller, 5x7 insert will be placed on the back of the front cover, as a stock shot holder.
The opposite side will be either vertical or horizontal. Repeat the same procedure as above, placing the open side towards the inside of the folio for horizontals and towards the top of the folio for verticals. Place the protective white paper back inside, close the folio and slide it back inside its protective cover. When peeling off the paper strips to reveal the glue on the back of the inserts, make sure your nails do not create dents in the silver surface of the folio as this can ruin the aesthetic of the product. Ensure proper alignment of the silver insert with the folios edges in order to obtain a good looking and presentable folio. Making folios is an important part of our Galleries, as lack of made stock will create Guest Dissatisfaction and loss revenue. In the Photo Gallery, how many strips of protective paper will you remove from each insert when making folios? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 3 4 2 1 In the Photo Gallery, which insert will be placed on the back of the front cover of a 6x8 folio? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 6x8 Horizontal 6x8 Vertical 5x7 Vertical 5x7 Horizontal In the Photo Gallery, could a One Time Use Camera be used indoors? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" No, these cameras are for outdoor use only

No, they are only for underwater use Yes, if equipped with a built-in flash Yes, all of them can be used either indoors or outdoors In the Photo Gallery how could films be up-sold onboard? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Recommending a multi-pack instead of a single roll Presenting them during the farewell show Offering guests free portraits with the purchase of a film roll Films cannot be up-sold In the Photo Gallery, memory cards come in different types and sizes class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" False True Does Image guarantee the lowest cameras price in the Photo Shop? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Yes No A guest approaches you in the Photo Gallery asking you for a battery for his camera, but is not sure on what type his camera takes. What would you do? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Guess and hope you are right Ask the guest to bring either the camera or battery so you can give him the correct one Call the AMS Tell the guest you can't help him Which of the following OTU cameras will be able to take a photo indoors? (Check as many correct answers as you think) class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter"

Kodak Flash Kodak Outdoor Kodak Underwater

The Cruise DVD


In addition to offering photographic services onboard our clients ships, Image is responsible for the production and/or duplication of the cruise DVD for each voyage. The cruise DVD has different names from one cruise line to another. The format is similar however, the running time of the program varies on the cruise line as well as each ships itinerary. At this stage of your career with Image you are only involved in promoting and selling this product. In order to provide Quality Customer Service to all of our clients guests, you must be aware of the running time of the program and its content. There are also set procedures for promoting this product as well as selling it. A big part of the sales are made during the cruise, while the footage for the program is still shot, and the DVD is available for preorders at any time through the cruise. The DVD is multi-region (playable worldwide). The DVD consists of a broad overview of the entire cruise. This will include the ports of call (you can be more specific when you learn about the ports and all of the activities that you will not only be shooting but experiencing when you arrive). The DVD also includes a look of areas behind the scenes that Guests are not allowed to visit. So the only way they will be able to see them is to watch the DVD. Some of the behind the scenes are the: Bridge Engine Room Galley (where the food is prepared) Laundry Room Pursers Desk Deck Areas . The rest of the program contains DVD clips of guest taking part in various activities around the ship during the current voyage as well as clip of the shows. Some ships give the Guest a copy of the ships statistics when they sell their DVDs. This is always appealing to those that want to know how large the ship is (how many feet long) and how much it weighs. This information is included in the DVD as well and is an incredible selling point especially with the male guests. As extra features, the DVD contains a slide show with pictures of the ship itself as well as inside it (these images will be different from the stock photographs sold in the photo gallery), a slide show with images and a brief description of other ships in the cruise lines fleet, links to the cruise lines website as well as Images website.

ualifying
The cruise DVD is introduced to the guests early in the voyage by continuously playing a DVD from a previous cruise in the Gallery, Retail area and stateroom TVs. Also, flyers and order forms are distributed to the guests in their staterooms as well as in the Photo Gallery and Retail Area. During the Farewell Show, the Cruise Director makes a big impact by presenting this product to all guests, as well

as showing a preview of the guest footage. Due to time constraints, only a quick preview is shown during these shows. Once the editing is ready, a copy of the current DVD has to be played in the Photo Gallery/Retail areas to better expose the product. While on duty in the Photo Gallery you should smile and greet each guest approaching you and build a quick rapport by asking a few questions and listen to their replies. Remember that most guest activities are covered in the DVD, as well as children activities, so chances of their child or friend being in the DVD will increase the guests desire of buying and consequently your chances of selling the product. This is very important for gaining their trust and being able to sell to them. Be sincere and keep in mind that the cruise DVD is a great way of reliving the cruise experience. You might have seen dozens of cruise DVDs and also, living on the ship wears off the excitement, but for the guests our products are valuable souvenirs of a rare, fascinating experience. Be enthusiastic in presenting the DVD, as its value will increase for guests as time passes by and the cruise will not be such a fresh memory.

Overcoming objections
The most commonly heard objections are the 'minimal footage of the shows' and personal appearances in the DVD. It is important to tell them that there are only clips of the shows included, most of the times with a different musical track. The entertainers or the production company copyright the shows and recordings are not allowed. Another important thing to remember is that is not guaranteed that a certain guest will be in the DVD. Even though the videographer will try to include as many guests as possible, during the editing process s/he will have to choose the best footage to create an attractive, sellable product for all guests. The DVD has a limited running time and it is addressed to all the guests. In the case of guests not willing to pay the DVD price, remind them of the bonus features and the allregion format of the disk. Always remind Guests that other family members may want to have a copy of the DVD. Do not forget to tell them that vacations are an important time to remember, and that Grandparents as well as Aunts & Uncles would love to see their children in the DVD. They may also be interested to see the ports of call, the behind the scenes as well as all of the Guest Activities that are included in the DVD. Always remember that even if, for you, the cruising excitement has passed, as you have done it a long time, worked hard, and seen all the insides of the business, for guests this is a rare, special occasion and sometimes unique, so they do not want to miss out on a good quality product to help them relive the time of their lives!

Closing the sale


A successful sales person knows that qualifying, presenting the product and overcoming possible objections could be useless if not immediately followed by the closing of the sale. This can be achieved by simply and politely asking for a decision to purchase. Of course, this becomes easier at the end of the cruise when the product will be finished, on your counter and you can simply hand it to the guest and ring it in the POS. During the cruise, you will have to use the supplied form to pre-order the DVD. Bear in mind that guests have various opportunities for money spending during the cruise so the sooner they order and pay for the DVD the safer it is for your sale. Pre-ordering is the easiest way for the guest too, as they have a guaranteed copy, without waiting or going through extra hassle if we sell out the stock at the end of the cruise. To pre-order the DVD, ask the guest for the cruise card and fill out a DVD Order Form:

DVD Order Form


DVDs have different names on different cruise lines and order forms may look slightly different on your ship, however, the guidelines below are standard.

Charge the value of the DVD to the guests cruise card and specify this on the order form. Place the form in the designated box for the AMSs/Videographer's attention and tell the guest when will the DVD be ready for collection; thus entails you asking the experienced Photogs/AMS/BM in advance the exact availability time. At what point in the cruise is the cruise DVD available for order? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" The last evening of the cruise The last night of the cruise, unless they need a copy of last week's DVD As soon as the AMS gets it ready The whole cruise What format is the cruise DVD available in? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" It is multi region It is PAL (Europe) The guest can request any region they choose, we make them to order It is NTSC (North America) What are some of the extra features included in the cruise DVD? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Slideshow around the ship

Crew Parties Slideshow of the 'Fleet' Internet access In the Photo Gallery, what should you do with the Cruise DVD Order Form once filled out? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Charge for the DVD, write "Paid" on it and file it for the AMS Leave it with the guest until the DVD is ready It doesn't matter, as the register knows who has bought one File it with the rest of the orders and charge the guest at the end of the cruise when they collect their DVD In the Photo Gallery a guest tells you the videographer on the pool deck filmed him. Does this mean he will definitely be on the final, edited video? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" No Yes On the Cruise DVD, are the onboard shows included as part of the footage? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" There are only clips due to copyright issues All shows are shown in the 'Special Features' section Only select shows are shown Is the Cruise DVD delivered to guest's staterooms at the end of the cruise? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Yes, but only if the guest is in the cabin to receive it No, the guests must return to the photo gallery at the designated time Yes, but only if they fit under the doors No, the DVD's are mailed out to the guests

Quality Customer Service

The Photo Gallery is the only place where all the results of the Photo Depts work as a whole are being made available for viewing and revenue is being recorded. The operation of the Photo Gallery is essential to the Customer Service and it has a major impact on the ratings established from the Guests feedback and the financial revenue. The Photo Gallerys hours are always published in the daily program and most times even announced through the PA by the Cruise Director. It is imperative that the gallery is always open in good conditions at the announced times and all areas are clean, tidy and neatly organized. All photo staff should comply with the policies and procedures regarding uniforms and personal hygiene. The Photo Manager and AMS will ensure the proper manning of the Gallery in such a way that all photos are properly displayed before the opening. Also, all stock shots, folios and cruise videos advertisements should be put out before the Gallery is open, as well as Reprint Order Forms and the Group Booking Form

Condensing
Counters should be manned at all times and there should always be at least one photographer available to assist guests by answering questions and locating their photographs. While the gallery is not busy with guests, all photographers should take initiative and inspect the gallery, re-arranging the photos on display in a tidy manner (condensing), so that the photo displays are looking good and all photos are easy to find by Guests. In order to obtain this, all photographs should be re-arranged forming lines and columns on each panel and as space permits either spread them apart by displaying them full frame either raising all photos from the lower parts of the panels at eye-level. There should be a clear separation between different events and clear marking should be used as per SOP and Cruise Line requirements. If during the condensing process you come across piles of photographs grouped by guests, keep them together in a specific place known to all photographers, as guest will often return to review their photographs and we want to ensure that they will easily locate them. This is part of the Invisible Customer Service photog offer onboard.

Upselling
While on duty at the Photo Gallerys counter, all opportunities for satisfying the Guests needs and up selling should be maximized. Try to build rapport by observing, asking questions and listening. Even in the busiest times of the Photo Gallery, there is always time for a sequence of closed questions and choice questions that can help you earn the guests trust, build rapport and up sell our products.

Reprints
If additional copies are required for any of our guests, a Reprint Order Form needs to be completed. Here is a guideline of the information required;

Each photograph printed onboard IMAGE ships will have a backprint indicating amongst other info the digital files number the photo was printed from. Make sure you are aware of the back prints formats on your ship, as this procedure is very important for the AMP and their assistant

(Most likely, the second number (DSC #) in the second line will indicate the digital file that the photo was originally printed from)

(REMEMBER: Your Name, Date, Guests Name, Guests Stateroom#, Event, Image#, Originals Held,

Copies Required and the total amount of prints required. Mention if the order is paid for or not and DO NOT FORGET to specify the day and time when the order will be ready for collection from the Photo Gallery)

Reprint Order Form


When a Reprint Order Form is completed, ensure that both the top white copy (Held by the photographer with the original print) and the yellow carbon copy (Given to the guests as a collection slip) have all of the relevant information on.

Place the white copy back to back with the original print, and place it inside the provided plastic sheet protector sleeves (This allows the print to be seen one side, and the order form to be seen the other side, without having to remove either from the sleeve). This will be sent to the photo lab at the end of the shift. Hand the guest the yellow copy, and ask them to bring it back at the collection time stated to collect their prints. Obviously, the day and time will be set by the AMP in collaboration with the BM and will be communicated in advance to all team members. This procedure can create a lot of unhappy guests if not completed described above.

Image searches
The reprint order form will also be used in the unfortunate event a Guests Photograph cannot be located in the Photo Gallery and an Digital Search is requested from the Photo Lab. In this case, as much sensitive information as possible should be recorded on the form itself. The image number field can obviously not be filled out, however record the number of originals held and how many copies (in the event the photos will be located on the lab computer) should be printed. It is very important to mention if the sample photo was paid for or not. Guests do not have to pay for searches.

When filling out this form, always bear in mind that the Guest may return to collect his/her order from the Photo Gallery when you will not be there, so a fellow photog will have to provide Quality Customer Service based on the info recorded on the form.

In the event of a guest not being able to locate his/hers photographs, the first line of questions addressed should be: What event were the pictures taken at? How many persons are there in the photo? Do you remember what color were the clothes you were wearing?

Group Booking Form


An important part of our operation is Group shots, this is when larger families or groups would like to have a group photo taken. Generally our portrait set-ups cannot accommodate large groups. All ships have a form generally known as a Group Booking Form, where all group shots have to be scheduled. Always check with the AMS or BM to determine which days and times are available for group shots. The Group Booking Form will look a little like this;

Enter the Groups Name and contact info (Name and Stateroom #) for the group, as well as the Number of Guests taking part in the group shot. Record the location (the place on the ship where the group should meet the photographer), usually the Centrum or various staircases used for group shots. Make sure you check with the BM or AMS on what these locations are. The groups leader or the person scheduling the shot should be handed a reminder note for the group shot, advising the group to meet at least 10 minutes before the group shot is scheduled to take place. It is a good practice to write your name or initials near the scheduled field, so that the photographer scheduled to take the group shot can refer any questions regarding the group to you. REMEMBER: It is very important to always use the Group Booking Form when scheduling group shots. If you schedule a group shot with a group and do not enter it on the form the time may be taken by another photographer with a different group, this can lead to two large groups arriving at the group shot location at the same time and can cause problems.

Making folios
One of the best selling items in the Photo Gallery (after photos, of course) is the Folio. Folios get delivered to our ships in boxes and they are not ready to be sold until the silver inserts are attached to the inside cover. The first thing to do is to verify what type of folios are you making: horizontal or vertical, this meaning if they will hold a vertical guests photo or a horizontal one. The left side of the folio, the inside of the front cover, will always hold the stock shot therefore will always be horizontal. Expose the glue on the inserts verso (by pealing off the paper strips) on three sides-2 long ones and one short side.

Carefully align the insert on the back of the cover placing the short side with the paper strip still attached towards the folding center of the folio. This will be the side the stock shot will slide under the insert. If small 6x8 folios are being made, the smaller, 5x7 insert will be placed on the back of the front cover, as a stock shot holder. The opposite side will be either vertical or horizontal. Repeat the same procedure as above, placing the open side towards the inside of the folio for horizontals and towards the top of the folio for verticals. Place the protective white paper back inside, close the folio and slide it back inside his protective cover. When pealing off the paper strips to reveal the glue on the back of the inserts, make sure your nails do not create dents in the silver surface of the folio as this can ruin the aesthetic of the product. Ensure proper alignment of the silver insert with the folios edges in order to obtain a good looking and presentable folio. Making folios is an important part of our Galleries, as lack of made stock will create Guest Dissatisfaction and lost revenue.

Conclusions
As you can see, theres never a quiet time in the Photo Gallery. If the Gallery is not busy with guests, all the photogs on duty will be assigned tasks such as condensing, making folios, assist the AMS with their duties etc. When it comes down to condensing and making folios, never expect an AMS to delegate you to do it, take the initiative Remember - if you find yourself behind the photo gallerys desk standing without doing anything, youre doing something wrong.

In the photo gallery, what is one of the first questions you should ask a Guest when she is looking for her photograph? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Where was it taken?

What time was it taken? What were you wearing? Are you sure you can't find it? While helping a guest at the Photo Gallerys counter you are being approached by a second guest asking you for assistance in locating their photographs. How would you react: class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Call another photographer from his cabin Leave the first guest at the counter and help the second one in locating their photographs before they get upset Tell the guest you are busy and ask them to look closer at the photos on display Politely ask the second guest to wait for you while you finish helping the current guest and continue serving attentively Why is it important for photogs to keep the photo gallery condensed and organized? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" It will make the prints easier to find and can help increase sales Because the cruise line requires that it is done Because it's boring just standing around So the AMS doesn't shout! How many minutes in advance of a group shot should a groups member meet? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 20 45 30 10 In the Photo Gallery,what would you indicate in the Ready for Collection field of a Reprint Order Form? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" How many copies they would like

Write "Paid" Time and Date of pick up Your Name What should you do after unsuccessfully trying to locate a guest photograph in the Photo Gallery? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Tell the guest the photo didn't turn out Apologize to the guest and say it is not available Call the AMS, this is their job Take a digital search In the Photo Gallery, what form should be used for a Digital Search? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Call the AMS, they are qualified Reprint Order Form Piece of paper from the register We don't do Digital searches In the Photo Gallery, how many strips of protective paper will you remove from each insert when making folios? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 4 3 2 1 In the Photo Gallery, which insert will be placed on the back of the front cover of a 6x8 folio? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 5x7 Horizontal 5x7 Vertical

6x8 Horizontal 6x8 Vertical

Basics of Photography Outline


The basic areas covered in this module will be:1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Know your camera Basics Aperture & Shutter speeds Composition Using Flash Some creativity

Know your camera


Features
Almost all advanced Digital SLRs (Single Lens Reflex) today offer a wide variety of settings and overrides. From a wide variety of shutter speeds and apertures, to multiple light metering modes. The changes in basic photography have switched from 35mm film to digital imaging, the same style of camera is still being used, but the film has been replaced with a CCD (Charged Coupled Device). A CCD is basically a grid composed of extremely small light sensitive cells. When light hits the CCD each sensor, or pixel, produces an electrical signal dependant on the intensity of light it sees. From this basic grid the whole image is created. Therefore, the greater the amount of pixels on the CCD, the more detailed the final image will be.

ocal Length
The format of a digital SLRs CCD is the same as a regular 35mm, although the CCD is actually smaller than the 24mm x 36mm size of the negative, which means the focal length is changed, and what would originally be used as a mid range lens would actually become more of a telephoto. Lens choice is very important, especially when shooting guests, as if your lens is too wide angle it will be

unflattering to the guests as they would also become wide angle and nobody likes that. Portraits should be shot with a zoom lens, and the higher the zoom the better, if space permits you should always try and shoot with your lens at 50mm or more, this will give a more natural and flattering look to your images. Here is a graphic to represent the different focal lengths of a number of common lenses.

Basics Shutter Speeds & Aperture


Imagine shooting a photo of two guests who have just got off the ship in the Caribbean. They are standing behind the rail, and the only background you could use was the white ship. If you have your camera set to Auto Exposure it will assume that the ship is the brightest, and ultimately most important thing in the photograph. With autofocus on you also run the risk of focusing right between the guests and getting the ship in focus instead. If you trusted the camera at this point your photo would not come out well, and you would be unable to sell it. This is why it is very important to Take Control of your camera. There are a few basics to taking control, once you have mastered those you will be a much better photographer. The first thing you will need to understand is that the aperture and shutter speed relate to each other and work together to create an Exposure. Basically an exposure is the process of allowing light to pass through a certain sized hole for a certain amount of time. The hole size is the aperture, and the amount of time is the shutter speed. The important part of this principle is that the correct amount of light reaches the CCD. Digital photography has a lower tolerance to bad exposures than film, so it is even more important that you make sure your exposures are correct. Shutter speed and apertures work in Stops. When you halve the amount of time a shutter remains open, from 1/250th down to 1/500th this creates a 1-stop difference, meaning you would need to double the size of the aperture (open 1-stop) to create the same exposure. There are side effects to doing this, which we will go into.

Shutter Speed
Shutter speed can easily be compared to a window with a closed curtain. If you hear a car coming and you want to see it you could open and close the curtains very quickly you might not be able to tell if the car was moving or not. You will see the car, but the speed you opened and closed the curtain meant you

werent able to tell if the car was parked or moving. If you had kept the curtain open a little longer you would have easily seen whether the car was moving or not, this is how a shutter works. The shutter speed tells the camera how long the CCD will see the subject, and the movement, if any, will be portrayed in the final image.

Aperture
An Aperture is more than just a hole in the lens to let light in. The size of the aperture has as much control over the quality of the final image as the shutter speed does. The aperture controls not only the amount of light coming in, but it also controls the depth of focus of your final image. Depth of field depends upon the size of the aperture, as when you look at a photograph you are actually seeing a lot of tiny circles of light which build up the image of the subject. The bigger circles create a blurry image, while the smaller ones create a sharper image. The point on which the camera has been focused produces smaller circles. A smaller aperture will produce smaller circles of light, therefore as the circles get bigger they still remain small enough to keep everything in focus. If a larger aperture is used the circles start off big and quickly get to the point where they are too big to stay sharp, so only the point of focus will remain in focus, this is called depth of field. It is important to remember at this point that a larger number means a smaller aperture, for example f2 would be a much larger wider aperture than f16.

Camera shake
Camera shake happens when you cannot hold the camera still enough while taking a photo. It is nothing to do with focus, and not always to do with slow shutter speeds. The first step to avoiding camera shake is to hold the camera tightly, with your arms tucked in by your sides,. Camera shake will more often happen when you are using longer telephoto lenses, but of course a slow shutter speed will have an effect here. A basic rule of thumb is to make sure that your shutter speed should never exceed your focal length, meaning if you were using a 70mm lens (or focal length) then you should never have your shutter speed less than 1/70th second, if you dont have a 1/70th second, which most cameras do not, you would need to round up to the next shutter speed, which is 1/125th.

Composition

The composition used at Image is very structured, we need to be able to display a number of photographers work, in the same area, and have it look as though one photographer shot it all. Following the basic rules of composition will help you here. The primary rule in composition is the Rule Of Thirds. To follow the rule of thirds you simply imagine a grid in your viewfinder, with two vertical lines and two horizontal lines. The theory states that if you are taking a horizontal shot (as an example) your sky should take up approximately the top third and the foreground takes up the bottom third. A bonus would be to place a point of interest within the photo on one of the four bisecting lines. These are not end-all requirements, but good guidelines to get you started. Image follows these rules with all images, ensure that the guests heads fall into the area of the top third and the bottom third will contain the table, the life ring, the guests hands etc

Portraiture
The biggest revenue area for the photo dept. onboard. It is very important to get the composition right. Honestly, people should be one of the easiest subjects to photograph because they are, by far, the most

common, we are surrounded by them everyday, we know how to interact with them and we know instinctively what will annoy them and what will entertain them, this is the main area of our business, entertaining our subjects. One of the main reasons some portraits turn out different than we had intended is because of the photographer. They were either ill-prepared, had little idea what s/he wanted from the portrait shoot or simply did not shoot as per requirements. This is why we have very structured guidelines for all shoots, all you need to worry about is entertaining the guest. The majority of the guests we deal with are not professional models, this makes them feel nervous or awkward about posing for a photograph, so the last thing they need is for the photographer to be messing around with equipment, or getting the flashes to work properly. Be prepared Study the composition and the posing in the photo gallery, using the other photographers work as you guidelines. Follow all instructions to the letter and do not deviate from them by being adventurous you will get that chance on certain shoots, but you will know when that is the case! The main aim of portraits is not to get the same photo every time, but to get the guest looking natural and comfortable, trying to get their individual personality on your image, while following the guidelines of composition this is what will ultimately create the memory and sell the photograph.

Posing
Once again there are some set poses that we use, only for the fact that we are dealing with a high volume of guests in a very short time, but the secret to a great photo lies in the posing. If the guest looks awkward or unhappy in the photo, it is probably because you have posed them incorrectly. Watch the feet, as this can often govern the way the body is twisted and sometimes bent. A natural stance, with the weight on the back leg will make the guest look a lot more comfortable in the final photograph. Keep the guest relaxed by talking to them the whole way through, this will distract them from the fact that there are a hundred people stood around watching (It will also distract you from that same fact). Hands can tell you a lot about a person. In a photograph you can tell how tense or nervous a guest is by the tension and stiffness in their hands. The fingers need to be together but relaxed, the ladys hands will generally cover the gentlemans, lets face it, ladies have nicer hands! If you are dealing with a group, the task of posing them becomes more complicated. Try to position them so they fill the frame, and make sure they all placed at different heights. Dont have all of the tall people on one side of your photo, and the short people on the other, spread them out. Vary the angles of the bodies to the camera, and keeps arms and legs discreet so they do not distract in the final image. Have some kind of interaction between the people, this is most important; otherwise it will just look like a large group of individuals.

Using Flash
The invention of the strobe flash revolutionized low light photography. Harold Eugene "Doc" Edgerton is largely credited with this invention. Before that, photographers used explosive powders or cooked their subjects under hot flood lights to get adequate lighting. The earliest of these flashes were single use flash cubes, but today the majority of compact cameras come with built in flashes, there are numerous hot shoe mountable flashes and finally studio equipment. The main advantage of flash for our purposes is the elimination of shadows, wether we use the flashes indoors or outside. We use a flash for every event we shoot, from formal portraits to gangway photos outside in the Caribbean.

We use studio lighting and grip type flash units. The flash units comprise a large head mounted on a stem. They are more powerful than hot shoe mounted flashes, they recycle faster and have a lot more accessories. One important factor to remember is the Flash Synch Speed. This basically means the shutter on the camera needs to fire at a spped that will ensure the whole image is evenly lit when captured. If the shutter is set to a slow speed you will not experience a problem, as the flash will have ample time to burst while the shutter is open. The problems will come when you try and shoot with a faster shutter speed, the shutter will open and then begin to close before the flash has had time to burst, this causes the image to only be partially lit, the area of the image that the shutter had already begun closing on will be dramatically underexposed, creating an unsellable photo. Using outdoor flash is basically an art form, too little flash will cause the final print to be printed on a faster print time, causing the background to be bleached out and have very little detail, too much flash will require a longer print time, darkening the background and in some cases making it too dark (The Caribbean sun can look like dusk). Every team leader will have a light meter on these events, and will constantly inform you of the changing settings to achieve a constant exposure through the shoot. A basic rule of thumb for outdoor events will be to have your aperture on either f8, f11 or f16, with a shutter speed of either 1/125th or 1/250th. Anything other than these will produce no depth of field, motion blur due to camera shake or flash not synching.

Some Creativity
Although these styles will never be used in the events onboard, we will go through a few simple techniques for personal work. With digital photography there is no such thing as a wasted piece of film, as if the shot does not turn out the way you expected you can delete and re try. Dont be afraid of experimenting with your personal shots. The easiest shot to get is the motion shot. For this you will need a tripod, but that should be in every photographers kit. Set your camera on a tripod in a built up, it will need to be dusk or dark but still a reasonably well lit area, on the ship or in port. Set your camera to the B (or bulb) setting and open your shutter, hold on to the shutter release for a few seconds then let the shutter close. Depending on your subject, you will get some interesting results. If anything was moving in your frame during your exposure it will show up as a blur, while the buildings, or any static object, will remain perfectly in focus.

Some Creativity cont


Another good use for this is fireworks the same effect can be used. Ensure that there is no stray light from street lamps or car head lights that can over expose your shot, and set your camera up focused on the area the fireworks will be exploding, then leave you shutter open, as before, until 3 or 4 fireworks have exploded. This will fill your frame with fireworks, rather than trying to capture just one at a time.

Multiple Exposures
Multiple exposing can be a useful tool too, and with the tools in Photoshop this has become so much easier. This basically involves having two separate images and flattening them on top of each other.

The first example is of the Apollo launch, obviously the moon was not visible during the launch, but with the magic of Photoshop it is now.

The final example was an actual single image, not Photoshop edited at all. It was a sequence of images, taken with multiple 30 second exposures over the duration of an eclipse, which created a great shot.

There are many other creative possibilities, and they can only be limited by your imagination, just remember, these are for your personal portfolio only not for your onboard work

Basics of Photography
What would happen to a mid range lens designed for film based cameras when you attach it to the majority of DSLR's (i.e. Not full frame)? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" It would become more wide angle It would remain the same It would become more telephoto Which of the following items make up an 'exposure'?

class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Aperture Size of media card Shutter Speed Number of guests in the image

Basics of Photography
What will happen to a moving subject, shot with a shutter speed of 1 second, compared to the same image being shot at 1/500th of a second? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" It will appear out of focus There will be no depth of field It will have motion blur It will appear stationary How will a close up photograph, shot at f2.0, look? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" It will be out of focus Both foreground and background will be in focus The close up subject will be in focus, the background will be out of focus What is the largest source of revenue at Image? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Portraits Dining Room Gangway

Retail Who was the 'father' of the Electronic Flash Strobe? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Johnson Strobe Harold Edgerton Jack Chappell Phil Flash Nikon d300 basics grade exam What ISO do we set the Nikon D300 to when shooting Portraits? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 160 100 1600 400 The camera file-type that contains the most information is...? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" GIF JPG ERI JPG NEF RAW White balancing on a formal studio means...? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Leveling the camera on a tripod Getting the shutter speed correct Setting the camera with the color of the studio lights Wasting time at the beginning of a shoot During a portrait shoot, I can change this setting without asking the AMP or Photo Manager class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter"

The aperture The maximum sync speed of the camera Nothing at all The ISO When making the white balance image on a portrait studio, this item is necessary...? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Expo Disk Light Meter Vertical Grip Stop Watch Where can you lock the aperture and shutter speed settings on a Nikon D300 after they have been set? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" On the Multi Selector Navigator on the back of the camera On the Mode Dial You can't, there is no lock Let the AMP do it When should a neckstrap be used on a portrait camera? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Only while posing guests to free up your hands Only while talking to guests to assist in using body language Only when there are no guests at the studio, as the camera gets heavy All of the Time What is the maximum synch speed for a Nikon D300 at a portrait studio? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" 1/250th 1/125th

1/500th 1/60th When connecting a Nikon D300 to a Pentab, what setting should the "USB Option" be set to? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" Mass Storage PTP "Auto Image Rotation" should always be switched "ON" when shooting with a Nikon D300? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" True False Which 'Color Space' setting should a Nikon D300 be set to? class="box generalbox generalboxcontent boxaligncenter" sRGB AdobeRGB