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Achieving Outstanding Outcomes

(Clifton Science 11/07/2012)

Planning for outstanding

Differentiation
Challenge Engagement Developing dialogue about learning with students Written feedback Verbal feedback Formative assessment Skill sets and mind sets AsL Questioning Promoting thinking Deeper learning

RWCN
Resilience Independence Collaboration

Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes (SOLO) Hierarchy Observed Outcome Extended abstract: I
have several ideas aboutI can link them to the bigger pictureI can look at these ideas in a new and different way.

Visual

Level 7+

Grade A*/A

Type of outcome Generalise, predict, evaluate, reflect, hypothesise, theorise, create, prove, plan, justify, argue, compose, prioritise, design, construct Generalise, predict, evaluate, reflect, hypothesise, theorise, create, prove, plan, justify, argue, compose, prioritise, design, construct Sequence, classify, compare and contrast, explain causes, explain effects, analyse, form an analogy, organise, distinguish, question, relate, apply Sequence, classify, compare and contrast, explain causes, explain effects, analyse, form an analogy, organise, distinguish, question, relate, apply Describe, list, outline, combine, follow an algorithm Define, identify, name, draw, find, label, match, follow a simple procedure

Intermediate: I have
several ideas aboutI can link them to the bigger pictureI can look at these ideas in a new and different way (there are some errors)

Relational: I have several ideas aboutI can link them to the bigger picture Intermediate: I have several ideas aboutI can link them to the bigger picture (there are some errors) Multi-structural: I have
several ideas about

3 2 B

E F/G U

Uni-structural: I have one


relevant idea about

Pre-structural: I am not
sure about

Why is this important? Related jobs: Spiritual, moral, social, cultural

This SoW builds on the following KS1 and KS2 material:


KS1:

Grouping materials 1. Pupils should be taught to: a. use their senses to explore and recognise the similarities and differences between materials b. sort objects into groups on the basis of simple material properties [for example, roughness, hardness, shininess, ability to float, transparency and whether they are magnetic or non-magnetic] c. recognise and name common types of material [for example, metal, plastic, wood, paper, rock] and recognise that some of them are found naturally d. find out about the uses of a variety of materials [for example, glass, wood, wool] and how these are chosen for specific uses on the basis of their simple properties. Changing materials 2. Pupils should be taught to: a. find out how the shapes of objects made from some materials can be changed by some processes, including squashing, bending, twisting and stretching b. explore and describe the way some everyday materials [for example, water, chocolate, bread, clay] change when they are heated or cooled.
KS2

Grouping and classifying materials 1. Pupils should be taught: a. to compare everyday materials and objects on the basis of their material properties, including hardness, strength, flexibility and magnetic behaviour, and to relate these properties to everyday uses of the materials b. that some materials are better thermal insulators than others c. that some materials are better electrical conductors than others e. to recognise differences between solids, liquids and gases, in terms of ease of flow and maintenance of shape and volume. Changing materials 2. Pupils should be taught: a. to describe changes that occur when materials are mixed [for example, adding salt to water] b. to describe changes that occur when materials [for example, water, clay, dough] are heated or cooled d. about reversible changes, including dissolving, melting, boiling, condensing, freezing and evaporating e. the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle Separating mixtures of materials 3. Pupils should be taught: a. how to separate solid particles of different sizes by sieving [for example, those in soil] b. that some solids [for example, salt, sugar] dissolve in water to give solutions but some [for example, sand, chalk] do not c. how to separate insoluble solids from liquids by filtering d. how to recover dissolved solids by evaporating the liquid from the solution e. to use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated.

What are we preparing students for? material taken from the Cams Hill Consortium
Core POS (e.g. AQA C1)
C1.1 The Fundamental ideas in Chemistry Atomic structure, up to and including energy shells. Periodic Table grouping because of electron shells. Gp 0.

Additional Science (AQA C2)


C2.1 Structure & Bonding Electronic structure of first 20 elements in Periodic Table. Ionic compounds and ionic bonding. Covalent compounds and covalent bonding. Metallic bonding. Representing each of these types of bonding diagrammatically. Electrons occupy energy levels (shells or orbits), lowest filled first. Symbolic formulae for compounds. Metallic giant structures and delocalised electrons. HT Delocalised electrons in metallic bonding C2.3 Atomic structure, analysis and quantitative chemistry Mass number, RAM, RFM. Empirical formulae. Detecting & analysing elements & paper chromatography HT - Calculations of RFM and empirical formulae. Mass Spectrometer

Triple Science (AQA C3)


C3.1 Periodic Table Historical development - Newlands, Mendeleev. Arrangement of Groups and Periods. Properties of each Group and the uses of their elements. HT Explanation of trends in terms of energy levels and electrons

C1.4 Crude oil and fuels Oil is mixture of compounds, separated by fractional distillation. Hydrocarbons - saturated alkanes, structural formula, general formula, trends in properties.

C2.2 How structures influence the properties and uses of substances. Simple molecular and giant covalent and giant ionic compounds and their different properties. Behaviour of diamond, graphite, fullerenes and metals, delocalised electrons and their effects on structure and alloying. Shape memory materials & alloys. Nanoscience and nanotechnology (nanotubes). Properties of polymers linked to conditions of manufacture. Thermosoftening / thermosetting. HT Intermolecular forces weaker than covalent bonding. Thermosoftening / setting linked to intermolecular forces HSW = 19

Sequence 1 What do they have in common? Context The content is a reminder of that from KS2 (grouping and classifying materials). It is then extended to more fully bridge the gap between KS2 and KS4. As it is firmly rooted in KS2 content, expect a variety of responses when assessing students prior knowledge. This content directly relates to the properties and uses of metals/non-metals (e.g. graphite) that is covered at KS4; it is therefore critical that students learn to associate the properties of a substance with its potential uses. This work also forms the foundation for introducing particle theory later in this module. Students are asked to: a. Make relevant observations about a materials properties. b. Compare materials and so deepen their understanding of the properties of a substance; this will feed into why specific materials are used for a particular use. For example, iron and copper both conduct electricity but copper is used for household wiring because it is less dense, more malleable, more ductile etc. c. Link the properties of a material to its uses. Keywords Conductor (electrical and thermal) Insulator (electrical and thermal) Hard / soft Strong / weak Malleable / flexible / brittle Magnetic Density

What do they have in common? Subject material: Identifying properties of materials. Sequence 1 Rich question: Could I make a nail out of jelly? Learning intention (WALT) 1: Describe a material accurately. SOLO level: Multistructural Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Makes one relevant observation when describing a material. Makes a range of relevant observations when describing a material. Identify other materials that are similar to the first material. Writes a general list of properties that might be used to describe a material. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 2: Compare and contrast materials in terms of their physical properties. SOLO level: Relational Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Identifies one property that might be used to compare and contrast materials. Identifies two or more properties that might be used to compare and contrast materials. Identifies and describes similarities and differences between materials. Reflects on why it is important that we think about the properties of materials. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 3: Suggest alternative uses for different materials. SOLO level: Extended abstract Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Identifies one use for a material. Identifies uses for several materials. Explains why a material is used for a particular job by referring to the materials properties. Suggests alternative uses for a material and justifies their decision. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Sequence 2 What are solids, liquids and gases? Context This sequence bridges the gap between properties of substances and particle theory by having students relate the properties of a substance to its state (previous work concentrated on the type of material). Particle theory is introduced in a later lesson and students are then asked to explain the properties of ach state using the particle model. Students will have done a limited amount of learning on this topic as it is mentioned in the KS2 POS (grouping and classifying materials). However, be aware that some primary schools do a substantial amount of work on changes of state and even extend it so as to include particle theory. This sequence focusses on classifying materials as solids, liquids or gases and then identifying their properties; particle theory should not be included yet. Students are asked to: a. Use their existing knowledge to identify substances that are solids, liquids or gases. They might go as far as to explain which properties they think solids, liquids or gases have. b. Classify a collection of substances as solid / liquid / gas. They will need to explain their decisions. This is a good opportunity to try to stretch all students to extended abstract by asking them to properties that apply to all solids, liquids and gases. c. Students are asked to classify more awkward substances that are not easily classified as solid/liquid/gas. This is a demanding activity that, if well structured, will challenge all students but enable many of them to access higher order thinking. The latter activity will also help students to realise that scientific knowledge and understanding is not concrete; it can be challenged (in this case by materials that are not easily classified). Keywords Compress Pour Dense Fluid Flow

What are solids, liquids and gases? Subject material: Properties of and classification of solids, liquids and gases. Sequence 2 Rich question: Are solids, liquids or gases the most common? Learning intention (WALT) 1: List some solids, liquids and gases. SOLO level: Multistructural Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Names one solid, liquid and gas. Lists several examples of solids, liquids and gases. Explains why they classified each substance as solid, liquid or gas. Predicts the properties of solids, liquids and gases. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 2: Use the physical properties of substances to classify them as solids, liquids or gases. SOLO level: Relational Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Identifies one correct property of solids, liquids and gases. Correctly identifies a range of properties for solids, liquids and gases. Correctly classifies substances as solids, liquids and gases and explains their responses by referring to appropriate properties. Makes general statements about the generic properties of solids, liquids and gases. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 3: Classify some awkward substances as solids, liquids or gases and justify their answer. Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Identifies one material that is hard to classify as a solid, liquid or gas. Identifies two or more states that the substance might be in. Compares the properties of the substance to the generic properties of solids, liquids and gases. Classifies the substance as solid, liquid or gas and fully justifies their decision. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Sequence 3 - What are solids, liquids and gases used for? Context http://www.kwoodward.dsl.pipex.com/sfa/slg.htm This sequence relates the properties of solids, liquids and gases to their uses. It precedes a sequence in which students explore the particle model as a way of explaining the properties of solids, liquids and gases. Students are asked to: a. Recall the properties of solids, liquids and gases. b. Relates the properties of named solids, liquids and gases to their uses. c. Generalise about the roles that solids, liquids and gases are used for (see link above for a starting point). Keywords Compress Shape Flow Spread out

What are solids, liquids and gases used for? Subject material: Properties of solids, liquids and gases. Sequence 3 Rich question: What would it be like to drive a car with concrete wheels? Could a chair be made from a liquid? Learning intention (WALT) 1: Lists properties of solids, liquids and gases. SOLO level: Multistructural Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Gives a property of solids, liquids or gases. Lists the properties of solids, liquids and gases. Compares and contrasts the properties of 2 states. Reflects on what we use different solids, liquids and gases for. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 2: Relates the uses of named solids, liquids and gases to their uses. SOLO level: Relational Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Names one property of a given substance. Names a range of properties of named substances. Relates the properties to how the substance is used. Response should be fully explained. Evaluates the use of a substance in a particular role. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 3: Generalises about the uses of solids, liquids and gases and relates them to their properties. Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Decides whether a solid, liquid or gas would best be used for a job. Decides whether solids, liquids or gases would best be used for a range of roles. Explains their decisions by referring to the properties of solids, liquids and gases. Makes general statements about the jobs that solids, liquids and gases are used for. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Sequence 4 How do we explain the properties of solids, liquids and gases? Context This is the students first formal introduction to particle theory; whilst some students may have been exposed to it at KS2 it is not part of the KS2 POS and their ideas are often full of misconceptions. Overall, students are asked to use the particle model to explain the properties of solids, liquids and gases (see previous sequences). Students explore: a. The arrangement and motion of particles in solids, liquids and gases. b. Relate the particle arrangements in solids, liquids and gases to their properties. c. Evaluate particle theory as a model for explaining the properties of solids, liquids and gases. This model will be updated at KS4 to include atomic structure and bonding. For example, students will have to relate the bonding in covalent compounds to their properties. It is therefore critical that students have this opportunity to develop this type of thinking. Keywords Particle Vibrate Regular Attract Arrangement Movement / motion

Subject material: Particle theory Sequence 4 Rich question: Can the Universe be explained by billiard balls? Is the Universe just a giant game of snooker? Learning intention (WALT) 1: Describe the arrangement and motion of particles in solids, liquids and gases. SOLO level: Multistructural Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Makes a relevant comment about the arrangement of particles in solids, liquids and gases. Describes the arrangement and motion of particles in solids, liquids and gases. Compare and contrast the motion and arrangement of particles in solids, liquids and gases. Predict the arrangement of particles in sand/blu-tak/toothpaste Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 2: Explain the properties of solids, liquids and gases using the particle model. SOLO level: Relational Success criteria
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Makes one correct statement about the arrangement/motion of particles and the properties o solids, liquids or gases. Makes a range of correct statements about particle arrangements/motion and properties of solids, liquids and gases. Correctly explains a range of properties of solids, liquids and gases by referring to the arrangement and motion of particles. Explains the properties of sand/blu-tak/toothpaste using the particle model. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 3: Evaluate the effectiveness of the particle model for explaining the properties of solids, liquids and gases. SOLO level: Extended abstract Success criteria
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Names a property of solids, liquids or gases that is explained by the particle model. Lists the properties of solids, liquids and gases that the particle model explains/does not explain. Decides whether the model is a strong model by comparing lists of properties explained/not explained by the particle model. Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the particle model and uses this to justify a decision as to whether the model is a good model. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Sequence 5 - Changes of state 1 Context Students do some work on changes of state at KS2 (changing materials) as they look at reversible processes. This sequence looks at these concepts from an experimental perspective; they will be explained using particle theory in the following sequence. The lesson introduces to several aspects of experimental work that are revisited throughout KS3, KS4 and beyond. Students are asked to: a. Outline an experimental procedure this can follow a demonstration of the experiment. b. Describe the patterns that they see in tabulated data or that displayed on a graph. c. Evaluate the experiment. Note that they do not need to explain the plateaus representing latent heat; this is a highly abstract concept that is not revisited until post-KS4. Keywords Plan Evaluate Graph Table Header Pattern Relationship

Changes of state 1 Subject material: Envisaged as cooling / heating curve experiment. No explanation is required (see following sequence). Sequence 5 Rich question: Do particles melt? Learning intention (WALT) 1: Outline an experimental procedure for obtaining a heating/cooling curve for a substance. SOLO level: Multistructural Success criteria
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Follows a simple procedure for completing an experiment Outlines own procedure and completes experiment Explains why they have chosen each piece of equipment Predicts the shape of the cooling/heating curve before completing experiment Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 2: Analyse the data in a table or graph and describe the relationship between time and temperature of the material. SOLO level: Relational Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Makes one correct statement about patterns in the data Makes two or more correct statements related to patterns in the data Describes the relationship between time and temperature correctly Describes the relationship carefully and precisely and includes a general trend Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 3: Evaluate an experiment related to changes of state SOLO level: Extended abstract Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Identifies one potential source of error in the experiment Identifies two or more potential sources of error Relates each source of error to the impact it could have on the results Fully evaluates the experiment Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Sequence 6 - Changes of state 2 (explaining the results) Context This sequence relates the experiment from the previous sequence to particle theory. The first activity, whilst low demand, links practical to theory. The second activity introduces changes of state (some students will remember this from KS2). The third activity is more demanding as it links the new theory to particle theory. This work is built upon at several points in KS4. For example, boiling points are the property exploited in fractional distillation. As this is taught at Foundation and Higher it is recommended that all students are exposed to this theory at this point. Keywords Solid Liquid Gas Condensation Evaporation Freezing Melting Energy Particle

Changes of state 2 explaining the results Subject material: Linking changes of state to particle theory. Sequence 6 Rich question: Do particles melt? Learning intention (WALT) 1: Label a heating/cooling graph SOLO level: Multistructural Success criteria
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Places one label in the correct place on the graph. Places all labels in the correct places Relates two states by placing labels for changes of state in the correct position on the graph Justifies their decisions as to where to put the labels Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 2: Describes, using correct terminology, the causal relationship between the amount of energy transferred into the substance and its state SOLO level: Relational Success criteria
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Correctly identifies a change of state caused by heating or cooling Identifies changes of state caused by cooling/heating Correctly describes, using correct terminology, the causal relationships between energy input/output and changes of state Forms a theory that links temperature and the arrangement and motion of particles Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 3: Composes a theory that uses particle theory to explain changes of state upon heating/cooling SOLO level: Extended abstract Success criteria
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Describes the arrangement and motion of particles in one state Lists arrangement and motion of particles in solids, liquids and gases. Relates the arrangement and motion of particles in a particular state to temperature Uses particle theory and the concept of energy to explain why a change of state occurs upon heating/cooling Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Sequence 7 - Dissolving Context Dissolving is covered at KS2 (changing materials) when students look at which substances dissolve. However, they do not go so far as to discuss dissolving in terms of particle theory. This sequence lends itself well to experimental work. In the multistructural activity, students could try to dissolve a range of substances (and subsequently classify them). This could be extended to look at the importance of gases dissolving. The relational activity explains dissolving using particle theory; this can be stimulated by a simple experiment with a coloured substance. The extended abstract activity could be covered in the context of an experiment. Dissolving is discussed further at various points throughout KS4. Keywords Solution Solvent Solute Soluble Insoluble Dissolve Temperature Prediction Evaluation Plan Procedure

Subject material: Dissolving Sequence 7 Rich question: Where does the sugar go when it is added to my cup of tea? Learning intention (WALT) 1: Follow a procedure to identify substances that dissolve and those that do not. SOLO level: Multistructural Success criteria Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract
Follows a simple procedure with support. Follows a procedure in order to identify substances that dissolve and those that do not. Classifies substances as those that will dissolve and those that do not. Evaluates their experiment.

Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 2: Use particle theory to explain what happens when a substance dissolves SOLO level: Relational Success criteria Unistructural Multistructural Relational
Makes a simple statement related to dissolving. Makes several simple statements related to dissolving. Explains or draws a diagram that shows the size and distribution of solute particles once they have dissolved. Diagram should be annotated. Plans a simple experiment that would show whether solute particles disappear when they dissolve.

Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Extended abstract

Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 3: Predict whether more solute will dissolve in a hot or cold liquid and justify their prediction using sound science SOLO level: Extended abstract Success criteria Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract
Makes one relevant statement. Makes two or more relevant statements. Makes a prediction that relates solubility to temperature. Makes and justifies a prediction (referring to particle theory).

Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Sequence 8 Filtration Context Students cover several separation techniques at KS2 (separating mixtures of materials). The challenge in this sequence comes from helping students to think more deeply about what they are doing when they filter a substance. For example, why a step in the procedure is in a particular position. They also need to explain it using particle theory. Keywords Solution Insoluble Soluble Filtrate Residue Funnel Filter paper Conical flask

Subject material: Separation techniques - filtration Sequence 8 Rich question: How can I separate the beach from the sea? Learning intention (WALT) 1: Define soluble and insoluble. SOLO level: Multistructural Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Defines soluble or insoluble. Correctly defines soluble and insoluble. Classifies a range of solids as soluble or insoluble. Correctly predicts whether a solid will be soluble or insoluble using their existing knowledge. Response must be justified appropriately. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 2: Separate a mixture of a liquid and an insoluble solid. SOLO level: Relational Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract
Retrieves one instruction for separating an insoluble solid from a liquid. List the instructions for separating an insoluble solid from a liquid. Sequences the instructions for separating an insoluble solid from a liquid. Justifies, in detail, why they have put each step in its particular place.

Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 3: Use particle theory to explain a scientific phenomenon (theorise) SOLO level: Extended abstract Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract
Describes the arrangement and motion of particles in a liquid or solid. Describes the arrangement and motion of particles in a solid and a liquid. Relates the size of grains of solid and liquid particles to the size of holes in filter paper. Uses particle theory to fully explain the process of filtration (includes correct use of key words).

Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Sequence 9 Evaporation / distillation Context Evaporation is used at KS2 as an example of a separation technique. However, it is often done at a low level. Evaporation will also be extended to its use in distillation. The extended abstract activity is essential to bridging the gap between KS2 and higher tier KS4 material. Keywords Solvent Solute Boiling point Energy Dissolve Solution

Separation techniques evaporation / distillation Subject material: Evaporation and distillation. Sequence 9 Rich question: Could I drink sea water? Learning intention (WALT) 1: Correctly define key words related to solutions and evaporation. SOLO level: Multistructural Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Correctly defines one key word. Correctly defines solvent, solute, boiling point, evaporate. Relates the key words to one another to explain how evaporation works. Includes a prediction of whether small or large particles will evaporate at the lowest temperature and justifies their decision. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 2: Compare and contrast evaporation and distillation. SOLO level: Relational Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Makes one relevant observation about evaporation or distillation. Makes two or more relevant observations about evaporation and distillation. Makes relevant comments when comparing and contrasting evaporation and distillation. Decides which is best in a given situation and justifies their response. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 3: Use particle theory to explain a scientific phenomenon (theorise). SOLO level: Extended abstract Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract
Makes one relevant comment about the arrangement of particles in a solution. Describes the arrangement and motion of particles in a solution. Relates the size of particles to their boiling point. Uses particle theory to fully explain the process of evaporation.

Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Sequence 10 Complex mixtures. Context This sequence provides students with the opportunity to combine a number of experimental techniques. Depending upon time available it could be done as a plan-do-evaluatereview cycle so that students can learn from their own mistakes and deepen their understanding. Keywords Sequence Justify Evaluate

Subject material: Separation techniques: complex mixtures. Sequence 10 Rich question: Socks before your shoes or shoes before your socks? Does it matter? Learning intention (WALT) 1: Identify equipment relevant to separation techniques. SOLO level: Multistructural Success criteria:
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Identifies one piece of equipment that might be used in a separation technique. Identifies several pieces of equipment that might be used in separation techniques. Relates pieces of equipment to the separation technique that they are used in. Generalises about the situations that the techniques might be used in. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 2: Use a sequence of techniques to separate a complex mixture. SOLO level: Relational Success criteria
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Identifies one relevant technique that will be used. Lists all techniques that will be required. Sequences the techniques in the order that they will need to be used in. Justifies the sequence of techniques that they have chosen. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning intention (WALT) 3: Evaluates the effectiveness of a strategy. SOLO level: Extended abstract Success criteria
Unistructural Multistructural Relational Extended abstract Identifies one thing that did/did not work well. Lists things that worked well/did not work well. Explains why each item did/did not work well. Evaluates the effectiveness for their strategy for separating a complex mixture. Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer Self/peer

Learning verbs: verbs may change position as they must be put into context. Unistructural: Define, identify, name, draw, find, label, match, and follow a simple procedure. Multistructural: Describe, list, outline, and follow an algorithm. Relational: Sequence, classify, compare and contrast, explain causes, explain effects, analyse, form an analogy, organise, distinguish, interview, question, relate, apply. Extended abstract: Generalise, predict, evaluate, reflect, hypothesise, theorise, create, prove, plan, justify, argue, compose, prioritise, design, construct, and perform.

Particle Theory
(Content Assessment)
Scientists are always trying to explain why substances are the way they are and why they behave the way they do. They also use models to help them think about how things work. The main model used in chemistry is called particle theory; you have been using this model in this topic. This assessment tests your understanding of this model. Success criteria
SOLO level Criteria Makes one relevant statement about the arrangement or motion of particles in solids, liquids or gases. Describe (or draws) the arrangement and motion of particles in solids, liquids and gases. Use your knowledge of how particles are arranged in solids, liquids and gases to explain: a. Why gases can be compressed but solids and liquids cannot. b. Why gases and liquids can be poured but solids cannot. Decide whether hair gel is a solid, a liquid or a gas and justify your answer by referring to the properties of the hair gel.

If you do not understand what a statement is asking you to do, you can ask your teacher. They can explain what the statement is asking you to do but they cannot tell you the answer.

Particle Theory (How Science Works Assessment)


Many foods have salt added to them to make them taste better. However, too much salt is bad for you; for example it can damage your kidneys and cause high blood pressure. Your task is to separate the salt from some crisps. You will be given a procedure to follow. You should try your best to follow it without help. You then need to use the success criteria to find out what else you need to do in this assessment. Success criteria
SOLO level Criteria
Follows the procedure with support.

Follows the procedure without extra help from other people.

Explains why each step is included.

Explains why the procedure would not be as effective if some steps are removed (ask your teacher which steps you should write about).

If you do not understand what a statement is asking you to do, you can ask your teacher. They can explain what the statement is asking you to do but they cannot tell you the answer.

Particle Theory

(Reading, writing and communication assessment)


Water is the most important substance on Earth; our bodies are 70% water, water helps plants grow and some organisms even live in water.

Water is constantly recycled on Earth; this is called the Water Cycle. You might not have heard about this before, but that is okay; you have been given lots of information about it. You need to use this information to draw a diagram of the water cycle (you will be given a template). You then need to explain it as well as you can.

The Water Cycle

Most of the water on Earth is a liquid; it is mainly found in the


oceans, seas, rivers and lakes. The Sun heats this water so that some of it turns into a gas and rises through the atmosphere until it forms clouds. Clouds contain small droplets of liquid water. When the clouds contain enough water, the water falls back to Earth; it rains. When the rain falls on the land it runs over the land and through the soil and rocks until it reaches the oceans, seas, lakes or rivers. When this happens, minerals form rocks can dissolve in the water (this

makes the bottled water that you can buy in shops).

Particle Theory

(Reading, writing and communication assessment)


You will need to use the success criteria in the table to try to get the highest mark possible.

Success criteria
SOLO level Criteria
Place the word solid, liquid or gas in the correct place on the diagram.

Place solid, liquid and gas in the correct places on the diagram.

Relate the different solid/liquid/gas labels to each other by labelling where the different changes of state are happening.

Use particle theory to fully explain what is happening at each point on the diagram. You should include how particles move and are arranged in the clouds, in the oceans/seas/lakes/rivers and when they are moving upwards through the atmosphere. You should also explain why each change of state happens.

If you do not understand what a statement is asking you to do, you can ask your teacher. They can explain what the statement is asking you to do but they cannot tell you the answer.