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WHAM Nuclear Powr AFf Final

WHAM Nuclear Powr AFf Final

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10/16/2011

Nuclear power is increasing worldwide – that’s the first card in our 1AC that says nuclear
power is flourishing in Europe and Asia.

U.S. using Nuclear Energy Now
Gilbert J. Brown, professor of nuclear engineering and the coordinator of the Nuclear Engineering Program at
UMass-Lowell, 8-2-07, The Boston Globe, Energy and the Simpsons, lexis, bc

There are now 104 nuclear electric power reactors safely producing 20 percent of the nation's
electricity
. Finally, nuclear is being widely recognized as a safe, economical source of energy. And because it
produces none of the greenhouse gases believed to be a major factor in climate change, environmental groups
are taking a more favorable stance on nuclear energy as well. Unlike the '90s when energy consumption was
an unquestioned way of life, energy conservation is now the hot topic in the United States. A recent Gallup
poll reports that Americans rank energy issues as the the Number 4 priority for Washington, coming in
behind only Iraq, terrorism and national security, and the economy. As some of the world's greatest
consumers of energy, we are looking for cleaner and more efficient sources to meet the growing
demand for electricity
- expected to rise 40 percent in the United States by 2030 .

Nuclear Impacts Inevitable—UK, Germany, and France Using Nuclear in Squo
Macer Hall, Political Editor, 1-11-08, The Express, Nuclear power gets go ahead, lexis, bc
MINISTERS yesterday gave the go-ahead for a new generation of privately run nuclear power stations to
help secure Britain's energy for the rest of the century.

They claimed the multibillion-pound reactors
will not be subsidised by taxpayers - but admitted the Government could be forced to intervene in an
emergency. Business and Enterprise Secretary John Hutton confirmed the move in the House of Commons
yesterday He said: "Nuclear power has provided us with safe and secure supplies of electricity for half a
century
." He claimed the controversial power was "safe and affordable." The decision follows an
acceptance by the Government that "green" power sources, including wind turbines and solar panels, cannot
guarantee the nation's energy supply. Ministers are to streamline planning processes to allow new reactors to
be built. Last night Gordon Brown said that the new nuclear power stations were in the "national
interest
". "I said that this would be the year when we made the right long-term decisions for the future of the
country and one of these decisions is that we have safe, secure energy. "We do not want to be dependent
on other countries and we want a low-carbon form of energy
, " Mr Brown said. Foreign energy firms
including the French-owned EDF, German power company E.On and British Gas parent Centrica
have all showed their eagerness to take part. EDF is hoping to build four nuclear power stations in the
UK.
Industry insiders predict new atomic power stations could be under construction over the next decade,
with EDF ready to open a new generator by 2017. Tory frontbencher Alan Duncan welcomed the
commitment to nuclear power.

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Nuclear Energy is inevitable worldwide.

Dipka Bhambhani, 2-11-08, Inside energy with federal lands, Spending for DOE nuclear programs up 40%
in fiscal 2009 budget request, lexis, bc
Vienna, 18 September: Making a strong pitch for international nuclear energy cooperation with India, Atomic
Energy Commission [AEC] chairman Anil Kakodkar made it clear on Tuesday [18 September] that nuclear
power was an "inevitable option" and pressed for "reformation" of global thinking on it.
"There is a
need for reformation of global thinking that is necessary and consensus on closed fuel cycle has to be
reached by those going to participate in the future nuclear renaissance,"
Kakodkar said. He was
speaking at the scientific forum, an integral part of the General Conference of the International Atomic
Energy Agency (IAEA) being attended by more than 500 participants. "The world has to move forward
with nuclear power as an inevitable option based purely on partnership on objective, reliable and
predictable basis with holistic mutual understanding and trust as a pre-requisite,"
he said. Kakodkar's
carefully-worded comments come amidst a raging political debate on the India-US nuclear deal in India with
Left parties and the opposition closely watching his approach at the IAEA. The Left parties have warned the
UPA government of a "political crisis" if it went ahead with operationalising the deal. An India-specific
safeguards agreement and changes in guidelines of the 45-member Nuclear Suppliers Group are required to
put the deal into force.

Nuclear power increasing worldwide.
Nicolas Loris and Jack Spencer, Staff Writers, The Heritage Foundation, July 8, 2008, FrontPage Magazine,
Nuclear Energy: What We Can Learn From Other Nations, nna
http://frontpagemagazine.com/Articles/Read.aspx?GUID=7048A616-ECFB-49E9-86FC-D2EF8F0226D2

Nuclear power is gaining momentum in the United States as the nation seeks environmentally
friendly and affordable sources of energy that can meet growing demand.
As the U.S. deliberates the
possibility of building new nuclear power plants, other nations have already begun the process. France is an
example of a country that developed nuclear energy to reduce foreign energy dependence after the oil shock
of the 1970s. It now receives nearly 80 percent of its electricity from nuclear power and is a net exporter of
electricity.[1] Germany, alternatively, decided to phase out nuclear energy for political reasons and now
imports some of this energy.[2] Japan is another country that has looked to nuclear power as a clean,
safe and reliable form of energy. Nuclear power already provides 30 percent of the country's
electricity; however, Japan is working to increase this to 37 percent by 2009 and 41 percent by
2017. [3]
Finland, ranking fifth in the world for per capita electricity consumption, has a significant
incentive to secure long-term energy solutions. Embracing nuclear energy as part of an effort to decrease
the nation's dependency on foreign energy sources, Finland has begun constructing a modern 1,600-
megawatt reactor, which will likely be a model used throughout the United States. Finland already gets 28
percent of its electricity from nuclear power, and a possible sixth reactor would increase that amount
substantially. Presently, the U.K. has 19 reactors that provide about 18 percent of the nation's electricity.
Because the U.K. is already a net importer of energy and all but one of its coal-fired and nuclear plants are
scheduled to be decommissioned by 2023, building new reactors is a must for the U.K. if it is to avoid
creating increased energy dependencies. The British government, while providing long-term politically
stable support for nuclear power, has made it clear that it would not subsidize the industry.

Nuclear energy inevitable, strong nations already pursuing it
Barnett
, David 2007. Staff writer, May 17, Canberra Times, “Nuclear energy now our only option”, p.
17/A. Lexis VF
They appear to be safe. Switkowski's commission visited Chernobyl and Three Mile Island, which led to new safety
standards and new reactor designs. Nuclear power plants now have very low incident and accident rates. Radiation
risks are very low. Britain, the United States, Japan and Korea are all increasing their production of power
from nuclear plants, having concluded that the risks association with nuclear power generation could be
managed.
We agreed, Switkowski said. Australia has a number of geologically stable sites suitable for nuclear
waste, which takes 50 years to decay. Staff will be needed for the nuclear stations. Australia would need to invest in
research and development, and in education and training across a range of fields. Australia can only benefit from the
great impetus this must give to our knowledge and to the development of new institutions. Concerted effort around
the world to abandon the use of chlorofluorocarbons has led to a shrinking of the hole in the ozone layer during the
past four years. We have been held back by fear of the unknown an unknown that incidentally is thoroughly known

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elsewhere by green activism, by ignorance and by the media that exploits issues for their emotional or political
implications, rather than on their merits. It is time to put it behind us.

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Nuclear power expanding now – Australia, Canada, China, France, Russia and the UK.
James M. Taylor 7/1/06, “WWF Australia Joins Pro-Nuclear Camp” o.z.
http://www.heartland.org/Article.cfm?artId=19337&CFID=5925006&CFTOKEN=69480619
International Momentum Growing Nuclear power is favored by leaders of such otherwise disparate
nations as Australia, Canada, China, France, Russia, and the United Kingdom.
"Economically, nuclear
power has a lot going for it," explained a May 22 house editorial in the Australian. "Though reactors
are pricey to build, once up and running, the fuel costs in OECD nuclear power plants run to about
one-third of those in coal-fired plants and a quarter of those in natural gas plants.
"Furthermore," the
editorial continued, "taking the Chernobyl disaster--the result of Soviet-era construction and
mismanagement--out of the equation, nuclear power is comparatively safe. France, which 30 years ago took
80 percent of its electricity from fossil fuels, now generates approximately that same percentage from
uranium, and has not suffered a significant accident." "At the beginning of the century, China and India's
economies began taking off, and you need energy to accomplish this," Heymer observed. "China has
recently begun looking into nuclear power, for economic and environmental reasons. In China alone,
they are going to build a substantial number--at least 40--nuclear power plants in the next 25 years.
One million tons of CO2 emissions will be avoided if these are operating. That is a significant benefit to
the environment."
U.S. Outlook Bright The international popularity of nuclear power is not being lost on
U.S. legislators. Nuclear power "is safe. The technology is here," observed Arizona Sen. John McCain (R) at
a May 22 meeting with citizens in Manchester, New Hampshire.

The reprocessing program under GNEP will help to avoid proliferation

Green ’8, Michael, a physicist, 7/11, Charleston Gazette, “Nuclear power, recycling needed now” Lexis, tk
The administration has asked Congress for funds needed to establish a nuclear recycling center, which would
include the recycling plant, an advanced "fast reactor" capable of using the recycled fuel and a research
facility to develop new technologies for recycling that would make it more difficult to convert plutonium into
a bomb. But Congress has provided little money for GNEP. Some members of the House and Senate are
reluctant to acknowledge that nuclear non-proliferation safeguards are more likely to be observed by
countries if they're given an opportunity to obtain nuclear fuel for electricity production. Moreover, the
failure to provide adequate funds for GNEP shows an ignorance of nuclear power's importance globally. The
International Atomic Energy Agency forecasts as many as 1,000 nuclear plants operating by 2050, more than
double the number today. Egypt, Vietnam, Malaysia and Argentina are among the countries planning to build
nuclear plants.

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Nuclear Energy popular now – Europe Proves
Catherine Field, 5/30/08 “Nuclear power popular again as energy prices soar” New Zealand Herald o.z.
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/2/story.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10513349&pnum=2

Slammed by the surging cost of energy imported from volatile regions and befuddled about how to
meet their pledges for tackling global warming, European countries are reviving nuclear's role in their
energy strategies. Pro-nuclear countries are pushing ahead with plans for next-generation reactors,
encountering so far either minimal opposition or even acquiescence. In some anti-nuclear countries,
decisions to phase out power are being reversed or are under threat.
"We need nuclear energy as part
of the energy mix," the President of the European Parliament, Hans-Gert Poettering, said
this week
before a ceremony to honour environmentally friendly projects. Such an endorsement would have been
unthinkable two or three years ago. European memories were still seared by the 1986 Chernobyl disaster,
when a stricken Soviet nuclear plant spewed fallout over the continent. But in January this year, the British
Government gave the go-ahead to replace 14 nuclear plants that date from the 1970s. France, which
gets 78 per cent of its electricity needs from nuclear, has started work on a new-generation European
Pressurised Reactor (EPR), a model that is also being built in Finland by the French firm Areva and
Germany's Siemens.
Recent weeks have also shown weakening or defections among the anti-nuclear
camp - Germany, Austria, Denmark, Greece, Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands - which either have no
nuclear plants or are in the process of phasing them out.
Last week, Italy's new centre-right
Government said that by 2013 it would restart building nuclear reactors, reversing a 1987 referendum
vote to abandon nuclear power and shut down Italy's four nuclear plants.
In 1998, Germany vowed to
phase out its nuclear plants by 2020. Its 17 remaining plants account for 28 per cent of its electricity needs.

Chancellor Angela Merkel favours extending their lifespan - a view shared by 49 per cent of Germans,
according to opinion polls
- but has her hands tied by a coalition agreement with the Social Democrats to
keep the phaseout in place. A similar dilemma prevails in Sweden, which depends on atomic power for
nearly half of its electricity needs. In 1999, the country decided to phase out all 12 nuclear power stations
within the next 30 years. But new polls say that 48 per cent of the public want replacements to be built. In
eastern Europe, Lithuania is teaming up with Poland, Latvia and Estonia to build a new reactor, estimated to
cost between ¬2.4 billion ($4.8 billion) and ¬4 billion, by 2015. Slovakia and Bulgaria are to build new
reactors to replace Soviet-era models. Nuclear owes its European resurgence to a double whammy. First
is the soaring price of imported oil and gas and doubts about the reliability of this lifeline. Italy, which
depends on imports to meet 87 per cent of its energy needs, suffered in the winter of 2006 when
supplies of Russian gas were disrupted. The second cause is the European Union's commitments to
tackle carbon pollution - emissions from nuclear plants are negligible.
"Nuclear energy can, of course,
make a major contribution to this battle against climate change," said the head of the EU's executive
commission, Jose Manuel Barroso. "Nuclear energy also helps to enhance [the] EU's security of
energy supplies and it increases diversification of our energy sources and reduces our dependence on
imported gas."
The EU has vowed to reduced its emissions of carbon dioxide by 20 per cent by 2020,
compared with 1990 levels, and give clean energies to a fifth of the energy market. Hydro, wind, biomass
and solar are on this list, but nuclear is not, at the behest of anti-nuclear countries led by Austria. How to
meet the lofty target is a puzzle. Clean renewables are still in their infancy yet will be required to
deliver gigawatts of power when many fossil-fuel plants and nuclear power stations are at the end of
their operational life. Nuclear now accounts for 15 per cent of EU power supplies.
After keeping a low,
almost apologetic profile for years, the nuclear industry is eagerly pointing out the conundrum. France's
state firms have launched an especially aggressive sales pitch to other European countries and nations on the
EU rim. As a sign of its new confidence, the industry is calling on the EU to scrap its patchwork of
certification rules for building plants and introduce common rules to save time and costs.

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