P. 1
Strategic Plan5

Strategic Plan5

|Views: 4|Likes:
Publicado porSiena College

More info:

Published by: Siena College on May 02, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/02/2011

pdf

text

original

Living Our Tradition

Strategic Plan 2011-2016

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Living Our Tradition
Strategic Plan 2011-2016
Preamble
Siena college is proud to be a part of the 800-year-old Franciscan intellectual tradition. Siena’s future will be informed and clarified by its past and present connection to this tradition. One dimension of the Franciscan intellectual tradition speaks directly to the human heart. it begins in the 13th century with St. Francis and St. clare of assisi whose gospel-centered lives helped transform the experience of the people that they encountered. a corresponding component of this tradition specifically seeks to advance and develop the human intellect. it finds its first expressions in the medieval universities of europe. at Paris and Oxford, Franciscans like St. ­ onaventure, Duns­Scotus, and Roger­Bacon† manifested the highest commitment to intellectual developB ment and academic excellence through their teaching and scholarship. For nearly 75 years, Siena college has cultivated students in this tradition whose hearts are open to love and whose minds are open to wisdom. these goals of a Siena education are compatible with the broad-based ideals of a liberal arts curriculum that celebrates the connection between the heart and the intellect of the human person. as we move into the future, we will speak directly to the hearts and to the minds of our students so that they too may have the opportunity to be transformed by this tradition and to go forth as graduates who are attentive, intelligent, reasonable, compassionate and responsible participants in the world. Living Our Tradition—The Siena College Strategic Plan 2011 to 2016 commits the college to pass on and develop this tradition for our future students.

† items marked with this symbol are defined in the appendix.

1

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

The­Siena­College­Mission­Statement
­ The­strategic­plan, Living Our Tradition,­is­situated­within­the­wider­­ ramework­of­the­College’s­mission­ f statement. Siena College is a learning community advancing the ideals of a liberal arts education, rooted in its identity as a Franciscan and Catholic institution. As a learning community, Siena is committed to a student-centered education emphasizing dynamic facultystudent interaction. through a blending of liberal arts and professional education, Siena college provides experiences and courses of study instilling the values and knowledge to lead a compassionate, reflective and productive life of service and leadership. As a liberal arts college, Siena fosters the rigorous intellectual development of its students through a healthy exchange of ideas both inside and outside the classroom. it provides opportunities to develop critical and creative thinking, to make reasoned and informed judgments, to appreciate cultural diversity, to deepen aesthetic sensibility and to enhance written and oral communication skills. it develops in each individual an appreciation for the richness of exploring knowledge from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. As a Franciscan community, Siena strives to embody the vision and values of St. Francis of assisi: faith in a personal and provident god, reverence for all creation, affirmation of the unique worth of each person, delight in diversity, appreciation for beauty, service with the poor and marginalized, a community where members work together in friendship and respect and commitment to building a world that is more just, peaceable and humane. As a Catholic college, Siena seeks to advance not only the intellectual growth of its students, but their spiritual, religious and ethical formation as well. to this end, Siena is composed of and in dialogue with people from different religious and cultural traditions; fosters a critical appreciation of the catholic intellectual heritage in conversation with contemporary experience; provides ample opportunities for worship and service; explores the moral dimensions of decision-making in business and the professions; and affirms the dignity of the individual while pursuing the common good.

2

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Context­for­the­Present­Plan
the new millennium began with the Siena community adopting the Academic Excellence Plan. this plan set high aspirations for the college: Siena college would take its proper place among liberal arts colleges recognized for academic achievements. Living Our Tradition—The Siena College Strategic Plan 2011 to 2016, will build upon the gains that were achieved under the Academic Excellence Plan, including: the recruitment and retention of quality faculty and students; a greater emphasis upon research opportunities for faculty and students; and improved academic facilities. in addition to the positive results of the previous plan, Living Our Tradition—The Siena College Strategic Plan 2011 to 2016, — will provide the opportunity to implement a new core curriculum as well as a revised Foundations course (a first-year experience course) that were adopted by the Siena Faculty during the academic year 2009–2010. Living Our Tradition—The Siena College Strategic Plan 2011 to 2016, will incorporate a greater emphasis upon student engagement†. as a result, Siena college will allocate resources and organize programs to encourage student participation. the Franciscan tradition celebrates continuous renewal by appealing to the words of St. Francis who challenged his followers always “to begin again.” this phrase is never understood as a rejection of past accomplishments, but rather is viewed as a call for a renewed energy to live the mission. Speaking on the future orientation of the Franciscan intellectual tradition, one commentator observed that “those who cherish traditions do so not out of nostalgia, but because they have hope for the future. We study the past because it is different than the present. and to know that the past was different from the present allows us to imagine that the future also can be different.”* it is with this strong desire to make a difference in the future that Siena college proposes the following plan.

*Fr. Kenneth Himes, O.F.M., Ph.D. on the occasion of the inauguration of Fr. Kevin Mullen, O.F.M., Ph.D. as the tenth President of Siena college on October 2, 2007.

3

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Strategic­Initiatives
1. Siena College will build upon the success of the first Academic Excellence Plan by implementing a new Academic Excellence Plan focused on student engagement.

2. Steward and strengthen the financial resources, human resources and physical space of the College.

3. Create a culture of diversity.

4. Expand and leverage investment in Division I athletics to promote the reputation of the College and enhance student engagement.

4

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Initiative­1:­
Siena College will build upon the success of the first Academic Excellence Plan by implementing a new Academic Excellence Plan focused on student engagement.
Outcome Benchmarks the college will achieve the 90th percentile in national Survey of Student engagement (nSSe)† benchmarks: level of academic challenge, active and collaborative learning, Student-Faculty interaction and enriching educational experiences for first-year and senior students. the proportion of departmental sections (other than First-Year Seminar†) taught by full-time tenure or tenure-track faculty will increase from 65% to 70%. the proportion of full-time faculty teaching in the First-Year Seminars will increase from 28% to 70%. the percentage of classes with fewer than 20 students will exceed 50%. Student achievement is measured by Siena internal data in the following categories: Student presentations; Student publications; Distinguished Scholarship recipients; Honors Program Fellows; President’s/Dean’s list; law School admissions; Medical School admissions; Dental School admissions; Optometry admissions; Honor Society inductees; graduation Honors; and acceptance into graduate Schools. annual improvement will be demonstrated. current baseline numbers for these categories may be found in the appendix†.

1

Siena will expand significantly its high-impact educational practices† as part of the liberal arts curriculum and co-curriculum that promotes student engagement and innovative learning.

2

Student engagement will lead to student achievement, both during and after college.

3

create new teaching and learning spaces that facilitate student engagement.

Siena will present and implement a master plan for physical space. new learning spaces necessary to advance this initiative will be created.

5

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Outcome

Benchmarks Siena will achieve national recognition for its academic community engagement programs such as the carnegie Foundation for the advancement of teaching’s “engaged campus” classification and the U.S. President’s Higher education community Service Honor role.

4

Siena will gain national recognition for experiential learning† programs that prepare students for work, service, and practical positive action.

as reported in the annual “assessment of Service and civic engagement” (aSce)†, the percentage of students reporting participation in service as part of an academic course will increase from 16% to 30%; and the typical Siena college student volunteer will report at least 15% of the service they have done while at Siena was as part of a course, an increase from 9%. the “Percent of the Possible” (POP score), as reported in the annual aSce will increase from 14 (low Zone) to at least 30 (Moderate Zone). the retention rate for the freshman cohort will average above 92%. graduation rates will improve: Four-year 69% to 77%; Five-year 79% to 82%; Six-year 73% to 82%. the portfolio of materials, including but not limited to publications, media placements, siena.edu news stories and use of social media will show improvement for communications focused on academics. in fiscal year 2009–2010, figures were as follows: • Siena news academic stories: 8 features, 32 shorts – please note: in FY10 we will publish three, not four, issues. • Siena.edu news stories 150 • Media placements 350 • Facebook followers 7,400 • twitter followers 1,000 the percentage of admitted freshmen who rate Siena college’s academic reputation as very good or excellent will increase from 77% to 84% on admitted Student Questionnaire.

5

implement First-Year Seminars and core courses that strengthen student recruitment and retention.

6

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Initiative­2:­
Steward and strengthen the financial resources, human resources and physical space of the College.
Outcome Benchmarks the capital campaign will raise greater than $50 million. the Board of trustees’ annual giving will be 20% of the unrestricted annual Fund and 25-35% of the overall campaign dollars. the annual alumni participation rate will increase from 17.5% to 25%. non-alumni faculty, administrators and staff (full- and part-time) participation rate will increase from 10.4% to 25% in the annual Fund and from 16.7% to 50% overall. the targeted surplus will increase from 5% of the operating budget or approximately $3M more than the current year’s budget, and increases will be derived from non-enrollment sources.

1

Siena college will initiate a capital campaign.

2

revenue from fundraising and corporate sponsorship will increase; revenue increments will be attained via mission-centric entrepreneurial and curricular activities.

3

Siena college will present and implement a master plan for physical space allotment.

Space related decisions will reconcile to the facilities master plan.

4

a formal risk management program will be implemented.

risk management staffing and compliance reviews will indicate improvements in compliance by addressing the most significant items identified on the heat map.

5

Siena college will ensure service excellence through administrator and staff development.

all new employees will attend an orientation workshop on institutional mission, Franciscan values and other relevant employment information. every staff member and administrator will attend at least one professional development workshop per year. Sustainability practices will show continuous improvement for operational activities, and leeD certification will be a priority for new facilities. Funding for deferred maintenance will increase to reduce the current backlog total of approximately $65 million.

6

Siena college will follow sustainability best practices and reduce its backlog of deferred maintenance.

7

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Initiative­3:­
Create a culture of diversity.
Outcome Benchmarks the percentage of undergraduate international students will increase to 1.0% annually, which represents an increase from approximately 20 students to 30 students. the diversity of students will reflect annual improvements and be reported in the Fact Book.

1

Siena college will enroll and graduate a more diverse student body.

2

Siena college will establish itself as the leader among our top ten private competitors (cross-admits) for our efforts in enrolling Pell grant-eligible students.

the percentage of Pell grant-eligible students will increase to 21.5%.

3

Siena college’s Board of trustees will be more diverse.

the diversity of trustees will reflect annual improvements and be reported in the Fact Book.

4

Siena college will expand its curricular† offerings by challenging students to think critically about differing and diverse perspectives.

academic and administrative departments will develop operational plans to support this initiative.

8

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Outcome

Benchmarks Student affairs departments and the Damietta cross-cultural center will establish baseline measures utilizing the freshman and senior cirP (cooperative institutional research Program). the proportion of students indicating that “Siena welcomes people of varying perspectives, national/ethnic origins, religious faiths, lifestyles/beliefs” will increase from 87% to 92% (% of students rating campus item 5 on the noel-levitz Student Satisfaction inventory (nlSSi)† 5, 6, or 7). achieve the 90th percentile on the following nSSe’s enriching educational experiences: a. Serious conversations with students of different religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values b. Serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity than your own c. campus environment encouraging contact among students from different economic, social and racial or ethnic backgrounds

5

Siena college will enhance and expand its co-curricular† program to demonstrate that our graduates are crossculturally and interreligiously competent.

6

the college will recruit and retain a more diverse faculty and staff that will strengthen Siena’s culture of inclusion.

the diversity of faculty and staff will reflect annual improvements and be reported in the Fact Book. academic and administrative departments will develop operational plans to support this initiative.

9

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Initiative­4:­
Expand and leverage investment in Division I athletics to promote the reputation of the College and enhance student engagement.
Outcome Siena college will be a national leader in the graduation Success rate (gSr) of all its student athletes. athletic success will build upon the achievements of the academic programs and contribute to broadening our regional and national reputation as a college that promotes student engagement. athletic success will assist the process of recruiting national and international student athletes who in turn will contribute to and help to sustain a culture of diversity on our campus. athletic success will assist the process of engaging alumni and strengthening their commitment to the college. athletic revenue from fund raising, corporate sponsorship, ticket sales and other ancillary income will increase. Benchmarks

1

Siena college’s gSr as measured by the ncaa will be among the top 10% of Division i programs.

2

Siena college will achieve the 90th percentile in the national Survey of Student engagement (nSSe) measured in the benchmark – Supportive campus environment.

3

the diversity of students will reflect annual improvements and be reported in the Fact Book (not currently tracked).

4

the annual alumni participation rate will increase from 17.5 % to 25 %.

5

the Saints alive! athletic Fund will grow from $450,000 to $750,000. revenue from corporate sponsorship, ticket sales and other ancillary income increase from $1.3 million to $1.75 million.

10

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Appendix­-­Definitions
Franciscan Scholars:
St. Bonaventure (1221–1274) — Franciscan Friar; Minister general of the Order; Philosopher and theologian at the University of Paris. Duns Scotus (1265–1308) — Franciscan Friar; Philosopher and theologian at Universities of Oxford and Paris. roger Bacon (1214–1294) — Franciscan Friar; Philosopher and Scientist at Universities of Oxford and Paris.

Co-curriculum/Co-curricular:
this refers to programs and experiences that occur outside the classroom that complement the curriculum but are not formally a part of the academic experience.

High-Impact Educational Practices:
Excerpt from High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter, by George D. Kuh (AAC&U, 2008) “Part 1 - High-Impact Educational Practices: A Brief Overview” the following teaching and learning practices have been widely tested and have been shown to be beneficial for college students from many backgrounds. these practices take many different forms, depending on learner characteristics and on institutional priorities and contexts. On many campuses, assessment of student involvement in active learning practices such as these has made it possible to assess the practices’ contribution to students’ cumulative learning. However, on almost all campuses, utilization of active learning practices is unsystematic, to the detriment of student learning. Presented below are brief descriptions of high-impact practices that educational research suggests increase rates of student retention and student engagement. the rest of this publication will explore in more detail why these types of practices are effective, which students have access to them, and, finally, what effect they might have on different cohorts of students. First-Year Seminars and Experiences Many schools now build into the curriculum first-year seminars or other programs that bring small groups of students together with faculty or staff on a regular basis. the highest-quality first-year experiences place a strong emphasis on critical inquiry, frequent writing, information literacy, collaborative learning and other skills that develop students’ intellectual and practical competencies. First-year seminars can also involve students with cutting-edge questions in scholarship and with faculty members’ own research.
11

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Common Intellectual Experiences the older idea of a “core” curriculum has evolved into a variety of modern forms, such as a set of required common courses or a vertically organized general education program that includes advanced integrative studies and/or required participation in a learning community. these programs often combine broad themes—e.g., technology and society, global interdependence—with a variety of curricular and co-curricular options for students. Learning Communities the key goals for learning communities are to encourage integration of learning across courses and to involve students with “big questions” that matter beyond the classroom. Students take two or more linked courses as a group and work closely with one another and with their professors. Many learning communities explore a common topic and/or common readings through the lenses of different disciplines. Some deliberately link “liberal arts” and “professional courses”; others feature service learning. Writing-Intensive Courses these courses emphasize writing at all levels of instruction and across the curriculum, including final-year projects. Students are encouraged to produce and revise various forms of writing for different audiences in different disciplines. the effectiveness of this repeated practice “across the curriculum” has led to parallel efforts in such areas as quantitative reasoning, oral communication, information literacy, and, on some campuses, ethical inquiry. Collaborative Assignments and Projects collaborative learning combines two key goals: learning to work and solve problems in the company of others, and sharpening one’s own understanding by listening seriously to the insights of others, especially those with different backgrounds and life experiences. approaches range from study groups within a course, to team-based assignments and writing, to cooperative projects and research. Undergraduate Research Many colleges and universities are now providing research experiences for students in all disciplines. Undergraduate research, however, has been most prominently used in science disciplines. With strong support from the national Science Foundation and the research community, scientists are reshaping their courses to connect key concepts and questions with students’ early and active involvement in systematic investigation and research. the goal is to involve students with actively contested questions, empirical observation, cutting-edge technologies and the sense of excitement that comes from working to answer important questions. Diversity/Global Learning Many colleges and universities now emphasize courses and programs that help students explore cultures, life experiences and worldviews different from their own. these studies—which may address U.S. diversity, world cultures, or both—often explore “difficult differences” such as racial, ethnic and gender inequality, or continuing struggles around the globe for human rights, freedom and power. Frequently, intercultural studies are augmented by experiential learning in the community and/or by study abroad.

12

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Service Learning, Community-Based Learning in these programs, field-based “experiential learning” with community partners is an instructional strategy— and often a required part of the course. the idea is to give students direct experience with issues they are studying in the curriculum and with ongoing efforts to analyze and solve problems in the community. a key element in these programs is the opportunity students have to both apply what they are learning in real-world settings and reflect in a classroom setting on their service experiences. these programs model the idea that giving something back to the community is an important college outcome, and that working with community partners is good preparation for citizenship, work and life. Internships internships are another increasingly common form of experiential learning. the idea is to provide students with direct experience in a work setting—usually related to their career interests—and to give them the benefit of supervision and coaching from professionals in the field. if the internship is taken for course credit, students complete a project or paper that is approved by a faculty member. Capstone Courses and Projects Whether they’re called “senior capstones” or some other name, these culminating experiences require students nearing the end of their college years to create a project of some sort that integrates and applies what they’ve learned. the project might be a research paper, a performance, a portfolio of “best work,” or an exhibit of artwork. capstones are offered both in departmental programs and, increasingly, in general education as well.

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE):
this is an external instrument used by institutions across the country that gathers data on (1) the amount of time and effort students put into their studies and other educationally purposeful activities and (2) how the college organizes its curriculum and other learning opportunities to get students to participate in activities that are linked to student learning. the survey does not assess student learning directly, but gathers data on empirically confirmed “good practices” in undergraduate education so the college can understand where it is performing well and where the student experience could be improved. the survey is divided into five benchmark categories: level of academic challenge, active and collaborative learning, student-faculty interaction, enriching educational experiences and supportive campus environment. this survey is conducted during the Spring semester and is given to all first-year and graduating senior students. comparative data are available for this survey.

Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory (NLSSI):
this is an external instrument used by institutions across the country to assess student satisfaction in order to improve the student experience. it documents how satisfied students are with their campus experience and what is most important to them. it consists of about 100 questions and is divided into 12 scales: academic advising effectiveness, campus climate, campus support services, concern for the individual, instructional
13

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

effectiveness, admissions and financial aid effectiveness, registration effectiveness, responsiveness to diverse populations, safety and security, service excellence and student centeredness. the survey is administered every other year to all Siena students. comparative data on other four-year private institutions are available.

Student Engagement:
What students do during college counts more in terms of what they learn and whether they will persist in college than who they are or even where they go to college. that is, the voluminous research on college student development shows that the time and energy students devote to educationally purposeful activities is the single best predictor of their learning and personal development (astin, 1993; Pascarella & terenzini, 1991; Pace, 1980). certain institutional practices are known to lead to high levels of student engagement (astin, 1991; chickering & reisser, 1993; Kuh, Schuh, Whitt & associates, 1991; Pascarella & terenzini, 1991). Perhaps the best known set of engagement indicators is the “Seven Principles for good Practice in Undergraduate education” (chickering & gamson, 1987). these principles include student-faculty contact, cooperation among students, active learning, prompt feedback, time on task, high expectations and respect for diverse talents and ways of learning. also important to student learning are institutional environments that are perceived by students as inclusive and affirming and where expectations for performance are clearly communicated and set at reasonably high levels (education commission of the States, 1995; Kuh, 2001; Kuh et­al., 1991; Pascarella, 2001). all these factors and conditions are positively related to student satisfaction and achievement on a variety of dimensions (astin, 1984, 1985, 1993; Bruffee, 1993; goodsell, Maher, & tinto, 1992; Johnson, Johnson, & Smith, 1991; McKeachie, Pintrich, lin, & Smith, 1986; Pascarella & terenzini, 1991; Pike, 1993; Sorcinelli, 1991). thus, educationally effective colleges and universities—those that add value—channel students’ energies toward appropriate activities and engage them at a high level in these activities (educational commission of the States, 1995; the Study group, 1984). in sum, student engagement has two key components that contribute to student success. the first is the amount of time and effort students put into their studies and other activities that lead to the experiences and outcomes that constitute student success. the second is the ways the institution allocates resources and organizes learning opportunities and services to induce students to participate in and benefit from such activities. What the institution does to foster student success is of particular interest, as those are practices over which a college or university has some direct influence. that is, if faculty and administrators use principles of good practice to arrange the curriculum and other aspects of the college experiences, students would ostensibly put forth more effort. Students would write more papers, read more books, meet more frequently with faculty and peers, and use information technology appropriately, all of which would result in greater gains in such areas as critical thinking, problem solving, effective communication and responsible citizenship. Source: Student Success in college: creating conditions that Matter, george D. Kuh, Jillian Kinzie, John H. Schuh, elizabeth J. Whitt, and associates (Jossey-Bass, 2005), pp. 8-9.

14

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Student Service Learning:
Assessment of Service and Civic Engagement (ASCE) the assessment of Service and civic engagement is an institutional assessment tool administered nationally by Siena research institute.

Siena college aSce Five-Year Benchmarks Based on Fall 2009 assessment

Percent of the Possible Score Benchmarks 1. institutional POP will increase from 14 (low Zone) to at least 30 (Moderate Zone) 2. POP scores in each issue area will increase by at least 25% 3. POP scores for at least six issue areas will be at or above the Moderate Zone.

Frequency Benchmarks 1. % of Students reporting more than 11 hours of service per month will increase from 24% to 35% 2. % of Students reporting 0-5 hours of service per month will decrease from 40% to 27% 3. % of Students reporting participation in service as part of their Siena experience will increase from 49% to 60% 4. % of Students reporting leadership level engagement in service will increase from 17% to 20% 5. % of Students reporting participation in service as part of an academic course will increase from 16% to 30% 6. the average Siena student volunteer will report at least 15% of the service they have done while at Siena was as part of a course (up from 9%)

15

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Percent of the Possible (POP) Based upon the Percent of the Possible service at an institution, POP Scores are a quick and easily understood reference point for levels of service. a high performing school scores between 40 and 60, a moderate performing school performs between 20 and 40. the measure includes self-reported indicators of service participation, frequency, and depth. three questions form the basis of the POP measure: 1) Do you participate in service addressing issue X? a. Yes (1) b. no (0) 2) How often would you say you did that type of service? a. Once a year (1) b. Several times a year – once a month (2) c. Several times a month (3) d. Weekly or more (4) 3) Which best describes your level of involvement? a. i would participate at an event or short term drive. Usually it was one-shot type involvement. (1) b. i was involved on a regular basis for a period of time. One example would be a regular commitment to be there once a week for an entire semester, or another would be to participate on a service trip for most of each day for a period of time. (2) c. i was deeply involved in a project or cause and dedicated to it. rather than thinking of my service as a chore or time commitment, i was drawn to serve by the issue or problem and worked towards its resolution. (3) an individual’s responses are multiplied to create area level individual scores ranging from 0–12. these totals are summed across the institution and divided by the maximum score.

(Service * Frequency * max(Depth)) n*12

the issue area level scores are averaged to create the institutional Percent of the Possible. Both institutional and issue area scores are then normalized with .33 equaling a POP Score of 100.

16

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Siena­College­Learning­Goals
as a learning community and liberal arts college grounded in its Franciscan and catholic heritage, Siena affirms the following learning goals: Learning Goal 1. Informed reasoning (Reason) Students will think critically and creatively to make reasoned and informed judgments. through engagement with contemporary and enduring questions of human concern, students will solve problems in ways that reflect the integration of knowledge across general and specialized studies, and they will demonstrate competence in information literacy and independent research. Learning Goal 2. Effective communication (Rhetoric) Students will read a variety of texts with comprehension and critical involvement, write effectively for a variety of purposes and audiences, speak knowledgeably and listen with discernment and empathy. Learning Goal 3. Meaningful reflection (Reflection) Students will comprehend that learning is a life-long process and that personal growth, marked by concern and care for others, is enhanced by intellectual and spiritual exploration. Learning Goal 4. Regard for human solidarity and diversity (Regard) Students will affirm the unity of the human family, uphold the dignity of individuals and delight in diversity. they will demonstrate intercultural knowledge and respect. Learning Goal 5. Reverence for creation (Reverence) Students will demonstrate a reverence for creation. they will develop a worldview that recognizes the benefits of sustaining our natural and social worlds. Learning Goal 6. Moral responsibility (Responsibility) Students will commit to building a world that is more just, peaceable and humane. they will lead through service.

Approved­by­the­Board­of­Instruction,­November­18,­2008

17

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

2009-2010­Academic­Year­Stats­
Student Presentations
School of liberal arts School of Business
Student­Conference­in­Business

40 45 10

School of Science

Student Publications
School of liberal arts School of Business School of Science 3 8 5 (School­of­Science) 4 8 1 13

Distinguished Scholarship Recipients
clare Boothe luce Scholarship educating Scientists for tecH Valley School of Business - aacSB

Honors Program Fellows
School of liberal arts School of Business School of Science

(Seniors­Completeting­Honors­Thesis) 15 2 8 25

Presidents’ List Fall 2009 Dean’s List Fall 2009 Presidents’ List Spring 2010 Dean’s List Spring 2010 Law School Admissions Medical School Admissions Dental School Admissions Optometry Admssions

162 650 216 677 23 out of 24 Acceptance Rate 19 out of 23 Acceptance Rate 82.6% acceptance rate 3 out of 3 100% Acceptance 2 out of 2 100% Acceptance Up­54 Up­27

18

Strategic Plan 2011– 2016

Academic Celebration Participants
School of liberal arts School of Business School of Science 105 46 43 194 Honor Society Inductees Graduates May 2010 Female Male Alpha Kappa Alpha Graduation with Honors Summa cum laude Magna cum laude cum laude Bachelor of Arts — School of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Arts — Liberal Arts education certifications international Studies certificate theatre certificate revolutionary era Studies Master of Science in Accounting Bachelor of Business Administration Bachelor of Science — School of Business Accounting Certificate Graduate School Acceptance 378 738 403 335 32 18 52 89 159 24 90 294 4 3 1 1 19 8 294 2 40% within 1 Year

19

You're Reading a Free Preview

Descarga
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->