P lu_r

IIr III

III

.ll\tllIltlp.Pt.ll

i

len Ill, 1.1

-_0

Acknowledgments
Thanks are due to the following friends and supporters
encouragement they have gi yen me during the preparation ofthis <book: Humi Huzita, for putting me in touch with the publishers, and insisting that I start the work in the first place;

for the help and

Kunlhileo Kasahara and Tomoko Fuse, for assuring' the publishers of my good
intentions: Jean-Claude Correia, for his broad viewpclnt.and epenmind, David Petty, for his painstaking proof-reading; J Onn Smi th,. for his critical approval of my work; Paul J ackson, for helping me to. remove m y"b,linkers ri from time to time; MaX Hulme and Martin Wall? for their frienBly and eile.outagmg,l'Uva:1ry;

Neil and Hazel McAlIist~l';for the meticulous photographic work; Doreen Montgomery, for her advice with the complexities of the publisher's

contract;
The late
IW,(:lO

Yoshizaki, his successor Yukishige Takahashi,

Toshihiro

Kuwahara and Akiko Shibata of Japan Publications, Inc. who have demonstrated

so much fMth in me:
AU my friends ill the mternational origami movement who have shown appreciation for my work; The British Origami Society which bas given meso manyopportunities in the origami world, I thank you all deeply.

17

CONTENTS
Foreword 5

Preface 7 Acknowledgements

Stained Glass Bans Spiky Star 87

85

17

Double Cube

90

Signs and Symbols 20 Symbols and Suggestions 21

The Silver Rectangle, A size paper and The {2proport-ion 22
Toys and Working Models 23

Venetian Double Cube 92 Warerbombio Dodecahedron 96 Double Star Flexicube 98 Wet Folding Techniques 104 Animals 105 Lamb and Corgi

Emu "24
Exhibitionist

26

106

Book 28
Wallking Man

so

Mouse 108 Guinea Pig 110 Rabbit 111
Goose 1.14 Squirrel 119 Foxhound 123

Spectacles

34

Talking Fox 15 N utand Bolt :36

Thoughts on Diagramming

43

Fox

125

Boxes and Containers
Pentagonal Envelope

44 45

Horseman i28 Rmnoceros 135
Elephant

Gift Box 46 Star Container Bottle 50

46

Square versus Equilateral Triangle Lioness 150
Lion

140

149

159

Yacht 52 Box and Lid 54 Cigarette Packet 5~<

Lion Cub 163 Horse 16B Dragon 172
Rules Traditional and Personal 178

Matchbox 62 Money Box 64 Honeymoon Box

67

M odnlar Origami 70 Modula:t Theories 71 The Rhcimbic< Dodecah'edron and its three Stellatior_r.s 73
Sunken Silver Cube 74 Sunken Silver Icosahedron 75

Human Figures Mask 181
Crown 187

180 183

Chri stmas Tree Fairy

Sunken Silver Star 76 30 Point Sunken Star 78
Dimpled Silver Dodecahedron 79 Si:lv~r Dodecahedra 80 "Woven" Strip Dodecahedron, 82 True Woven Dodecahedron 83 Stellated Dodecahedron 84

Wand 188 Father Chri stmas and his Sack Father Christmas 193Basic Form for Figures 197 Oarsman 198 Seat and Rowlock 199

191

Oar 200 Boat 200 Cox 201 Three Wise Men 204 WiseMan I 206

18

Wise Man TIl07 Wise Mrul rn 209, Hallowe'en Wl,tcb 210
Ba:t V(l
Broomstick '211.

Showjumper

212

Sf George 214 Spear 21$ Shield 215·
veppetto

216

Pinocchi» 22.0 Spelling,..Book 224
Groups and Scenes
Afshtray 226

225

Re.indeer 228
S]~igh 230 ><SXlUai"eSi)\her Star 232 Rotating Double Cube Series Single Cube 2'34

233 235

Icleas for Cretltive Approach

Contacts 136
Bibllography
Index 239

2~7

19

Signs and S,,;ymbQls
MOUiitaill! fold

;
I

I ~
I

"

I

!~
Fold over and over

I

,.

Dottedlines show aprevious .,.' position .

:

and a
previous ...·· fold ","

I

Equal divisions

Valley fold Preorease a
mountain fold

Equal divisions

or 2J1 angle

Precrease a valley fol,d.

,,'

EXl;;ti,ng crease lines

X~ray view of a layer behind and a mountain fold The next drawing shows the paper re-positioned

:
I I

~

I

I
,I

o

ri
90 degree. angle

I

... and larger

The next drawing is smaller

Fold to make the circled

Outside reverse fold

20

---~~------------------------~------

Symbols and Suggestions
MthO'ugb the level of the' work included in this book may appeal more, 110 the
experienced folder; who should be welt acquainted with the standard folding symboEs which are used internationally, 1 nevertheless feel it is appropriate to include some word of additionalexplanation at .this point. I believe that the symbols pioneered by Akita Yoshizawa in Japan.iand continued in the West by Samuel Randletrand Robert Harbin, do offer the best means available CIt describing a way Gi1f folding an origami de'sign .There mustoe dQ,l,~))ts, however, aboutthe overall effectiveness of drawings like (ttis for the beginner, who frequently is discouraged when faced with apparently, cemplicated diagrams and symbols.But again this rs not a book that will uecessarily fall within the, scope of a. novice p aper-folder, although' I hope' that those new to origami may find something worth trying.

For the sake of' uniformity, 1 have 1\01 introduced new sym~Qls!but YOl.!, may noriccsome slight variations tQ the norm.For example I have not always included the repeat symbol as it should be quite Qbvio1;lS in ,it $ylrimetriit;al de:sign

lhat a U1ElJl;i}.euvre, has £0 be repeated on similar flaps, or.onthe layers behind. Akira Yoshizawa's practice of folding in the air, farner than on a flat surface-is an attractive principle for me ..This means that you are fiUlly in coetact wrth the paper, and are not hindered by the apparently "comforting" surface of the table ..

Nevertheless"the. need to have the support of a flat surface in the early stages of
the folding ofa large design with a sizeable sheet, will at rimes be essential You'll be able to pi,ck up the paper wfietl it becomes more manageable in the later sta,ges. WtlLen folding living creatures, it's worth remembering that precision in the
final sta:g~s may-not always he appropriate. In fact it tan be worthexperimenting with handling the paper quite roughly in order to obtain a more naturalistic

result, Another small point: when it's necessary 11:0 run a crease between two polnts, I find it easier to "squeeze in" a' mountain fold, If a valley fold is lIttempted then invariably the.points you are trying to connect areebscured,

WheIIImaking a vllileY'f~tct from one poirit-to anothet~ one of these-points is

usually obscured when

Therefore it's easier to tum over
and make a mountain fold

the fold is made: see the. circled area,

you. come across, experimenting with them toexplore their. folding soitabl~ties, Paper isall around. us, and you should not feel it essential to use commercially manufactured origami pa,per. Types of paper for which I have a particular fondness include common brown wrapping paper which .givesthe impressior; that the finished design has been made from wood. Fabriane pape.r, from Italy, which comes in a variety of weights, is good for wet folding. which Jill describe later. Canson from France bas similar qualities, and theavailabl€'.! colours are brighter.

You should certainly be 'aware of all the paper types-which

21

The Silver Rectangle.A size pa.p'er, and the 1:-Y2 proportion
There are. many references, in (his bQQ\ to '''A'' size paper, Although ".A4" is wellknown intemationallyasthe standard paper size, in. the USA, paper measuring 8 x 11 inches is between tile sides of all "A" papers ts described- geometrically as 1~,f2. This- means tbat the long sideof the rectangle- is equal to the diagonal of -a square, whose side is equal to the short side of the rectangle. A. useful. bensfit of this rectangle. is that if it is folded in balf, short side to short side, t"bell the smaller rectangle obtained has- the same proportion as the original, and. is alse in the ratio i:~2,. Also kaown in the O'Ilgam,i world as The. Silv'er Rectangle. this p~per size is; useful to the practising papennlder for many reasons'. Itt is widely available and thus needs no advance preparation, You'lll realise. from the above that if you needasmaller version of the. design yOU! are working on, it's a simple matter to start from a sheetcut in half. The term-Silver Rectangle has given rise taman), 01 the titles of the constructions fe-atm:ing in the Modular OTigamise~ltion_ of this book, for example the DiQ1JPled Stlver Dcdecahedrcn, and the Sunken Silver Star. The measurements.of uA l' rectaegles.are based on metric units, the; latfgest size Incomrnoa USE being AO, equi valent in anea to 1 square metre. To help you i.1Hme the- piilpe:t size for various designs in thts book" here are the, mea-surements of each of the "Au rectangles .. Remember though, that if yon have an A4 sheet, you can make an. AS by simply cutting it in balf. Size Inehes

commonplace. The relationship

In

Cendmetres 1UtS x 84.1 84.1 x 59.4

Size

Inches
!!!!

CentimetreS 29.7 x 21.0 21.0 x 14.8 14.8 x 10.5

Al A2

AO - 4JJJ4x33 118 ::::::

"" 2.:3 J/8 x 161/2 A3 - 16 112 xlI 3/4.

33 1/8

x 23 3/8

A4

59.4 x 42.0 42.0 x 29.7

A7

A6

AS

= =

:n 3/4

-

,53/4 x 4 If4. 4 1I4>x 2 7./8

>::8 1/4 81/4x5 314

105 X 7..4

To form a Silver Rectangle from a U.S. sheetmeasuring 8 112x inches, all you have to dois cut a 5/8 inch wide strip from the long side, This wifl not of course be an exact "An rectangle but will have the correct proportions of 1:4[

n

How to cut a Silver Rectangle from any sheet
Long rectangle Square
.~

Short rectangle

\~ \,

1

X
a

~
\

"'

US Standard paper size

~.
~

C:::dis~ard=:J'

......

'yJ

S18 inch .

22

Toys and Working Models

Emu (p.:!4)

23

Emu
This subject is the puppet made famous by the NewZealand enteIta:ineri Rod Hull. He uses his hand to form the faceo! the bird which frequent1ya:tta~ks and humiliates those people whom it dislikes.. Although. :resembling a
ventrilequist's 9urnmy,Emu nevertalks ".
This origami version. (call it a

Crocodile DE prefer), uses an 'yOU

action mechanism used previously
by Randlett. Momotani and Jackson.

4
Ctease beltWeie:n

arrows, Oilly-

7

'Pull nut
layers

Repeaton this side

24

9

11a

Partially l?qu:asb eY,.e Reifiwrc¢ ,existing
f!:aptp make cilgulat

opening

creases

Hold like this.;

and sqqeeze to mike Emu flex hi$jaws.!

25

Exhibitionist
Also known as a "Flasaer" this design was
influenoed by the human figure designs Of Eric Kennewfty. Theaction -is not so smooth, an€),may need a little breaking in.. You m~aybe tempted to add a. message inside the man, to be revealed when he flashes: "Nothing· much to see- in: here" ... or ''1 just had a flash of Jnspirati on.
11

7

Fold IIp ]f5tb approx

Open

;26

[J
.

'

.

Figure- can be mounted
on a,greetings card with. small tab fixed to

head to make movement
Hold head and
foot; pull gently to make t'igute "flash"

11

'turn back
2 comers
to

27

A creation which d~1~s back to 1975" this book still remains one of my 'favourites, and I fold it frequently as a gift It has, I believe inspired .many other books by creators worldwide, some maybe more elegant in conceptthae this. but Lam pleased to have

._..,_

I - -I

~ ........

--

-.,,- ..-'1'-"'-"

---,!,!,,!,,!,-~;_,~
j

given others food for thought.

1

-..~----- I
I
.~'_iIi!"

--~-

~

I!!!!Iiiiii.r"~I.II!~."

-- -'--1- .... ·----

d

B'ook
2

I

'Pleat into 118ths

3

-'

T\;

I-"~ --, _. "

I

--- .....""~
;
~~/

-~'I-'

:,/

I

Preerease, then open out

I
)
,

~----------~
4

~I--.~o»
,

.,.... .
,I'

~K--~
~"'··7

I ---I -----..-..
Adjust creases

;'
L-_/

1

to form P<!$~oti,

and reform pleats

8

6
Note gap:

bottom of pages
lines up with ex isting crease

7

8

Lift pleated

section and

open all layers left and right

,28

13
14

Fold inside to lock

,

.~

J

12
the spine

.~ ~nna.Upleats

~orrn

.Space's above arid!below p~ges are equal open up. opper edge

15

11

Fold up: see 12· for exact PO,iti0

y

Open layers, left

and right: -swing up pages

29

The idea of using two half-bird base's cam€: from Alice Gray in various designs, appearillg in Robert Harbin's last paperback, o'rfg-ami 4.

proportion of the figure is good and j ustifies the liberty. In. any case I later made a L-piece
variation, 'but this is thicker and is less well proportioned. The. action method I found by accident. Try a game of football with-a small waterbombl

I had previously tried human figures: whieh were hllil')' and ill-preportiened, This 2~ph~'ee idea may raise a purist's eybrow, but the

5

Reverse fold to make halfbird bases

all layers

Valley fold

Pull down ;2.

"flap.s,behind leavmg sh(:irt triangular flap III same position

Flatten
legs

Make· asort of petal fold to form

trianguJartab

30

7

" c; .:~~

.'+.

Bb
Adjust position of arms
~.

Shape head by

pinching lin mountain folds at chin

Chin stands away from chest

12

Conneer upper arld Lower body
X.III

Vall:ey fold at hips triangular tab behind
butavoid creasing

31

Held like this: Move triangular tab to left and right with middle finger
to

make man w:illc

6

, l

Single piece version
4-

1

1

.32

Base complete:

finish legs; .arms
and bead as for 2 piece version

33

Spectacles
Influenced by a spectacles design of Yosnihigle Momotani, this design was created to complete ad] sguise theme I wanted for a demonstration. The: rectangle needs to be about 8 x 16 inches (40 ~20 ems) to be wearable. Try 'drawing eyes on the Je;nses.,

1
A

a
7

aJ

z

ll!

s

2

,

2xl rectangle

5

6

7

Note position of illtl;}riQ[ layers

(dotted line)

34

o
Talking Fox
A design which emerged from
jl doodle. The-basicfoldinstep
i:>

10

.,.. ·~imi.ltl::l.ti·O'shar ~··toc._. 7 IS as"... Db .ape me,

and I firsssaw it·effectively used by-Czech folder, Iva Zuber in a "Snow White and Saven Dwarves "scene. Try USing a smhll1hickisb .square to
obtain the necessarysnap to the

Squeeze in valley

folds

4
in progress

Preerease
both sides

Lift hidden point

35

The complexity of this dessgn may come lis
rather a.surprise after the preceding models in

this chapter! It was th~pmduct ofextensive trialand error as a response to a challenge: issued-by the 'Whddunnit column in the' British Origami Society magazine ill ] 976.

Here a list of then unachieved subjects was published as a stimulus to potential creators. Although you may be tempted to use foil, I don't recommend it: try instead a stiffish conventional paper such as crisp brown wrapping paper.

Nut and Bolt
Bolt
1

Complere grid

with valley folds
dlvide into I/Sths

7

Add one more mountain and valley fold

crease

6
Add mountain folds at intersection of horizontal creases and crease made in step 4

between

horizontal creases only

3

-------''''~ 1/

'~--':~:'
1-I~

4

5

_____
----~I-

~r .....-

"

__.,.,.

, i ::::

,

36

Add Y shaped valley folds

wen form
to atube

37

14 15

Hold as SHown ~ keeping paper between. thumbs. taut, collapse

Repeat process
down CIe

thread

thread secti on

21

38


.
, .

Tuck ill

corners

.

17

o

"III!"

i

•"

" ~!

~• I.'

I , , ... ,.

~'"

• 4 ,I ••

~ .. 1.'1"

II

••

'"

" '"" I ••_.

" I I ..

"':

1
~.

Nut

It ------f--- --2
I I ,, -(-1-1-· JII I' I~

use, a 2x1 rectangle
one hall the size used for the bolt

II I I ~I I I'-I=-l-L I 'j' ,I J I I I

3a

3

4

6a

J

Top v,aU~yfold is marked by the position of the

(seeSa)

crease on the

layer below

40

S'u£1'e inslde,layer
allowing a.rr(jVJh@gd~,

to collapse

Fold in half

Interlock 2 sections

12
Collapsing in pro gees s
Dotted line .shows pn~fitio1l.1

of inner layer

13
Collapsing complete

'14
Push la-yers
into holt inside

and tlau~n

In progress

Collapse other 'end

of nut

41

Thoughts on Diagramming
Unril the preparation of this book began, I resisted ,tbetask of.diagramming Illy work. I have used many rather pompous excuses from time to time to disguise my lack of enthusiasm for- this meticulous job ... "Malting a drawing fixes a design too much: it rnay be incomplete. and I prefer to be. able to return to it and .fimprave,ir in the future " or "I fold for myself, not

others, and I don't thiaktnat drawings. are r-e.a11y necessary" to recreate it!"

OI'

perhaps" For me

the folding is more important than tliediagranntling" ... "1 cam. always lay my hands. Oil an old folded example and work out hew to recreate it, tbats if 1 want Itmust be said, however. that there many useful bomsses which 'do often justify the work, It eases communication with other folders with whom you correspond! ~Q:show-off your latest work: it's far easier to send a set of diagrams, tban fa rather fragile model tharneeds to be securely packaged. Frequ.ently it sens out all UJdefined folding sequence for you, Many time,s I have "completed" a d¢Sign which contains a poor method: but making drawin!gs faries you tQ get these compromises resolved, Remember tOQ that if yom design is g90d enough. then there is the; possibility of the drawings being published in one of the many periodicals of origami organisations in the world today. Finally, YOlUr drawings previde a. tangible record of your work for the future. Somehow a set of .:l...i ., """E "'-e""'" te be a fi'I.'_'c,krrl"'re . merw.a_"'efH sratement ~ of ",JOl!lt ",'i"<' ktha UJ.agTa~I.~"" .:.e_A,u -v __ . _ ..uuU, '_ ,v tr--"'~ .4'- .... . .J . ","",Til\. MaIl th e actual finished model itself. Over the last decade or SO; I have been h:rcky to; have had experience of cfrawLng in a more conventional sense" havillig studied painting portraits and life drawrug at evening classes. To improve drawing skills (and they are. skills that can be acquired, not inborn in an individual) I recommend that you study at an art class. 1 gave found that this. is a fascinating and stimulating ,activilly which HHps my origaml werk: it has e4rc-outa.{ed toy sense of form and proportion which. has in turn emphasized the integrity of my, origam] SUbjects. The ability to draw-makes you look at the world around you in a quite new and more analytical
_ILL __,_ ..

I have fervently resisted the, recent fashion of' plaking drawings by computer, which to rile look vel)' cold and lacking.in sometimes appealing imperfections, I prBrer the simple. tools. of pencil, pen and drawing board. Fi!tallYI it is most important to give the §;J:eatest priority to the drawing of the Iinished design: it ls jhis that will tempt the, reader to fold your work, and

way:.

therefOTf} this drawing will deman4 your best efforts! I wish you the best of luck!

43

Boxes and Containers
There is 80methimg irresistible about a small box: it has .a completeness and a simplicity of fOnTI" which makes it am .ideal origami subject. Tomoko Fuse has shown us that. Not all apparently simple boxes in origami have a simpl€: folding method, however, but the challenge of folding a. box to a. precise format is always intrJ;guin~. In this chapter; there are a variety of boxes, and! containersc some of which are practical, others which area technlcal challenge, providing container

This wal

pentagol

It pointe
theA

U:

and contents-from a single sheet. The cigarette, packet and matchbox could even
be described as trompe I'oeil,

and

have been known to trick a smoker

into

accepting-the offer of il smoke ....

Star Container

(p. 46)

44

was jnspired by the simple ereated by David Callier . . me towards the exploration or Silver-rectangle in relation "" ... JO;v..., ..... forms; seep.22.

,5

4 6

Pentagonal Envelope
3

2

7

see 8 for positioning

10

·,,1/

Existing creases are

{~.

Reverse folds

<,
,1

parallel to horizontal

lower edge

Tuck ill to loot

45

Gift Box

Lid

1

Fold past Cel1ltre, -point

(exact position

not important)

5

Star Container

Pull

previous
corner

out

4

Start from Pentagonal envelope.

Insert gift then close

here

3

Precrease

valley folds

and mountain folds

Push ill to gjve volume ~

repeat on each side

46

giEtbo:\ was, influenced a blintz-Jorm box, by Yeshizawa: a relation to ,'tional masu but with ,comer~, Unlike the "\.-C,U~lU"~JJ~,~u..Wl'W1. boxes of [Om(};Jco,Puse.the li~ and Have no direct size relationship,

14

,necessary to make the' box
smaller than the lid.

13

Tllllik final ed.,ge uudetneath
It

to make symfitrioa]

11
R~verse- fold

corner at
centre

10 Repeat process in 5+6 clockwise around sq uare 9

8

Pull out corner
re verse folded in 6

47

16

17

Form box shape

19
Valley fold

twice and tuck in.

14

Tuckunder
"blinta'' edges

to lock
Size and prQPO(tio115 of box and lid can be varied by positsons of creases in Lid 1 +. 1:5

11

1,3

and Box 9

48

Preerease

Box

Repeat

clockwi lie ,

6

49

Botlle
The bottle was a development of an earlier triangular section bottle fol ded to have Pat

The
for f

non9 film This

Crawford's three-masted ship
placed inside. It was requested

Went
to ge

QYEric Kenneway for his. book Origami Papeifbldingfor Fun.
in 1979 ..

~----)-----

1

PJecrease

tuto 1/8ths

8

R~ F1arten neck
of boule

ne
e:x 2

7

·4

~B.~~
5
Make inverted "V" shaped valley folds

Precrease 21.ayers then fold down raw edge

Interlock the J ayers

carefnlty to-form this

rectangular tube sh~

6

Nowdi vide into 1I8ths vertically

e

'7
crosses 'on all layers
then add 4 vertical valley folds

Precrcase '... II1~y fold a

50

R1eletlse'layets to trap

tdp"fillvettM ",V" shape whiolil was pre¢re~:sedl in 5

bo£is: layers, within neck

---. ---

r

I

Make squaresection neck with a sort of rabbit ear front and back

14

Close base,of bottle
starting with single

layer wiihin

----........___

_\

--'---

Fold with conventional origami paper to begin with, For your second attempt, use.transparent book-covering filmcut
to a 12 inches (30 em) square.

51

1

Square folded
diagonally (COlOUl inside)

Yacht

suggested square

s-ize 3 inches
( 7.5 em.)

6

Tuck under the

vertical.edge

3

4.

Cap
suggested

.s.q~aresize 7 inches (trem.l,

<

Fold under a~90 degrees

2

.52

Glue ,he'yacht to a small rectangle @pproJcimatel¥ ilie same size as the base of the bottle" aod!insert
this Inside the bottle before you close the botttle end.
(step 14)

6

Tuck inside, then
form the other end

53

Box and Lid
Divide-into t/5ths

The Box and Lid is a particular

favourite and was created to
hold a present for a .girlfriend in 197'7 _ It is a particular favourite of mine and I love the eollapsing movement in steps 16 and 17. lit was published in Keaneway'sbook Otigqmt Paper/aiding for Fur: 'With a different fblding method.

1 r--~"'""r~--~
I

.....

2

:3
Method by Shuzo FUjimoto

5

Repeat 1-5

until l/Sth

divisions
coincide

8 Ma_rK valley fold crosses. at eaca end of central
White strip

Complete

,hDl.it.o,fitai 1!5th divisions
using crosses

as guidelines
Form into a 3D shape

54

14

Push under L'Ising existing creases

1\/
\'

/\

1../\

-\,1

J'I
"

(

--

I' . ,f I - - I ,._, f

1

"

,

'

I

~ ,I '~/-/

<!
Form
DOX

1-

- .. _

I I)

shape

Hold hidden triangle in position with th[lmb and foreflngel" of left band

Collapse layers by pushing down leftnrumh

18

Form lid

22

I

Uft

G)\lt

wlhlrte.central layers

mil flatten Tlltkundoe! central strip

ag"arrrst sid1!s of Box;

..

Outside reverse folds

Formation of box end

57

Cigarette Packet

Use a 4x L tectarttle, 20x5 inches {48x U.GlTIi) for a finishedffipd'eJ slightly 'smaller than a Iife-size "paeke; of ten"

This cigarette packet'W8S: a direct product of my admiration for Max Hulme's matchbox, which Was shown to me at my first BOS convention in 1975.

I\

pfi wI

an
it
!.aJ fo:

1

1

I

,

I f

I

I
I
I

]
I !
j

,I

l

I
'I"

I
".,

r

~~. -'---r--:~

····1-·'-1

'1-:-,

I I I-I~I
! .
j

l- t--

I

10

J
1"(

I

r
"

l-!'- !
I, w,' IF/

I"- F-¥

I

1
<I".

'"

uu,

",

I
1 1

I
I

I
I-

I~

I1,(-

~'-l-t----J

r

1

\

I j--

I

. . I~ ~;I--' -~-~I ,

~'-i
I

.

PI

3

tt

Precrease the lid section into eighths; then plieat :again i1Otm:g the location point

FOr

shaJ

4

Pleat lid seeaon behind 6

~

..

_...........

....

~.r.__.L.

I

_

I

Na

58

ma

Iwas immensely
proud of the design when I first created it.

and Lstillenjcyfclding it to;duy. although I no
kmger tackle multi -subject fpld's from asingle sheet.

Sink-

Valley, then

form a11'O thsr

"waterbomb base;'

9

a "waterbomb
g

base"

Tuck behind

7

Similar process: to 6
allowing diagonal folrfs il15 ~Q fotate behind

14

Ljfnhl? right hand side of the upper "waterbomb base" tbem roll each sideto form two cigarettes: note the

direction of the tolling_ precess

Lift theleft hand side. (If the lower waterbomb base and roll one more

cigarette 16

17
FOIDli

ast cigarette

Precrease the bottom of the packet, then bring the left and right .sides together

Insert to form packet

1-8

Fonnation -of
packet ~

bottom of the

60

23

Fonnation of the lid

61

Matchbox:
The matchbox: came after the cigarette packet: Iike'the Nut and HeM it was in response tome EOS Wuoti.unfllt; challenge, Many other rncveab le matehboxe s emerged from the same stimulus, but I believe mine was the. only one with 4lJ,lthenticf:') contents!

c

..

t-r.
'1 2

Use a 3'xl rectangle of redpaper, recommended size Ux4111cnes(30:xlOcm)

_________

i __

I
_J
Preerease, then mountain fold behind

Tum a small strip 8
out at the raw edge. the paper

X

I

,
I
~

I
(
J

I
\

Y.
3

l

i
\

\
6

----.or'r · ___'_~=--'o _'o
,.~ool

I -1"0 -'"0

I I 1"0_.'," _o,!"

5

Mountain fold to the left behind, theb valley fold to the left in front

62

10

fold the white

strip

~l

dOlNm;Ma'rds at

90deg.

12.
Unfold

Sta,r~tQ

form the-tray seetitm

15
Fold down

14

r»-.
Shows the formation of the other end

13

tae matches section

ofthe tray

Swing tbe partially fanned tray underneath

18 17

of the-cover into 'tbe-other

Insert one side

fond up the-end of the matches

at 90deg,

The tray slides 10 and out

The matches do not lie flat

TUCK the completed matches into the tray

63

Money Box
Use a large; squill'e: mirumum

The money box was originally a ballot box: it was inspired 'by Max Hulme's matchbox, but uses division into,1I3rds ". to produce the required
..

side length 10 inches (1:5 ern) by Shuzo Fujimoto

proportions)

and

the slot

1

Division into 1I3rd's: method

2

1'-1---

Mark only: a very approximate guess will do

~)
6

,3

4

Fold m meet the first mark, then unfold Pold to the second mark" then, repeat the process. in steps 12 until the 1/3rd divisions coineide,

5

".---II ...

l:),..... ~--_
'._ ..... ._ ... ~

~t-

7

---j---on one layer only
PreCI1ea,ge diagonals

the 'ends efthe dia:goualsas

Precrease these verticals using
'

reference, points-

Add further verticals, then preoresse further diagonals noting that the upper short di~gC:llla1&
are on all l\tyers, and the lower diagonals are on the upper white Iayeronly

64

14

Enceuragethe oollapsi ng orlhe. diagonal mitres

Form into a

13

'shapec '

rectangular tube

Intelflook
ca:re;fuUy ""-8 shown

16

.......,~

I~ _-C~ I yl <, I
......

-..iiII.--...iiiJ

.- ------ ,/1---------1/ "\.1
I'\.,

Push lip the interior layer carefully to form the slot

I'" /
/

17 12 18

'\.

1~
Precrease carefully and firmly to form the diagonal "mitres"
\,

\ 20

Fold down a single

layer Within

'

10
RepE!"t1t
Oil

other side

the

the ugpBr raw edge, followed by the raw edge

65

Thj~

hon
and
hail

apI rath

Fol,
th~

Fold 0; on all

:FQld edges inside
to lock the bottom

c

(lIthe box

Honeymoon Box
1 Thisbox was createdon my honeymoon in Italy, to centain
wife. It is ratbert:utnplicat.ed and bulky and needscareful folding but 1;. • , liassome tntercsu ng movements. Fold it several times to get

a present for my

Use a gbee:tat least lkincb!es'(30c[}1) square Pr'eclieas~. int.o e;i~hthS1 then.rerneve one row of

t:Jgb;ths from '2'!ilclju.ce;nt

sides

II

I I I /'

the b~&result.

2

P]~nt

-I-I-I-r-I-I-I~I._I_,_)_;. 1

-I~I-I-C-~-; -

.

r

I-

-

'7x7

~:rid

;t.;I~I~
I{,

_I_I_L_)_I~I

1.;-

fold to I1'1ate rectanguJar
shape-wlttr a whitecedtral ~'ltip

7
Close, adjusting the position of the layers in relation to tlre. pleat

Precrease
mountain folds

8

.c_entralwhite
strip

Swln.g point downwards
'behind

1-0

11

Lock the point with a mountain [old

Repeat at tbe other end of the white strip but 111 mirror image

67

Pull out
a corner

the end of

Formation of

the box Fid

from behind

23

Viewmside the end of the lid

29

Fold the central wlnte

16

strip to the right band edge

13

15

12
These drawings show in more detail the insertion of the top end of the ' white ~tjl'l.· The sarne procedure (in mirror image) is used at the ather end of the white strip

14

Tuck the triangle under the central white strip: the

model will become 3 D

68,

.24
Formation of the end: of the box

View imide

the box

27

Tuck the. corner nn(ier the' dia;gonal edge 'behind

28

Swing back the central whit€J' strip inside
" the box

69

Modular Origami

Stained Glass Balls (p, 8'5}and Spiky Star (p. 87)

70

Modular Theories
We have Tomoko Fuse 10 thank f'OFthe reEent ]i.epularity in Modular or Unit origami. This is the construction of ,geometrie forms from many Simply folded units, The joining of the units is ,achil!V'ed by fQ)dlng alone, and by the insertion of the flap ofone unit into Ille pocketof the next; Toft1okQ Puse'-!ia{,; managed to QP~n a new door in~this alteady establiehed style, by;creating wonderful boxes which dis:pby aneatn:eS$, a 'Pracr;ic.ality, and an. .eXpf'6Mion not previously seen ill modular work. Shy has addjt1Qnally shown herself to he great technician in the other rueas ofthe sf~h:, b:tmaking elaborate p:olynedro.ns: and puzzle-like transformaticaa fro~none; shape to another by ~ddiug further units the ccnstrnetion. A favorite design Qf mine is Ruse\s unit Lizard, with a body wbich wriggles when shaken. The uf1its.ar~a.onneetetl h}' sucba simple method. they lock together securely. and yet are able- to-move s-mootbly. providing the movement in the body which is, so eff~ctive:. To me, this techniqu~ is a brilliant use ofanepparently overworked and unpromising :starti:n:g: poiht.

to

Tcmoko Filse's Lizard

Fus.e,·s Lizard:
principleof

the meving j oin ts

At first I was quite, unattracted to the modular fashion, which seemed to me to' bl';;: form of origami "knitting'. However followieg experimentation a with a unit based on Yoshizawa's simplest butterfly, it later became an obsession. Thinking at the time that the tesuHing three-sided pyramid was original. I made a Tfilnge of geometric solids with it,and several variations of the. unit latergave rome co:m:ple~ star-shaped p~lybedita. I later found that bothTomeko Fuse and John Smith had made similarshapes with an identical unit! This is an inceeesingly

71

common occurrence, when simple shapes and geometries are: being explored.The important point is surely that the design you came: up with is original to you at the

time, even though discovered separately by others. My own modular predilections have involved the explorations of "A" size rectangles, and their relationship (albeit approximatej with the regular pentagon. Shuzo FuJimoto and David Collierpointed me ill these directions. It's. worth experimenting also with. knotted strips. The pentagonal knot &0 formed can he used to make a
dodecahedron similar tothose shown
OJ1

1 i1

page

so.

Shuzo Fujimoto's Pentangle

TOIIllok':® Fuse's work relies on color combination and decorative effect. I prefer to make constmctlens in plain colored paper, or using one colorclone for all units. In this way the spectator is not tempted to admire decorative paper or the kaleidoscopic patterns created by many-colored constrncnons but will have to concentrate on the shapes of the-design alone. The Double/Star Flextcube is a.companati vely recent creation bated on aplastic toy which bas always fascinated me, You may find that a Iittle glue is helpful here, though I have made several non-glued. examples which work satisfactorily when handled carefully ..Francis Ow devised a neat method of locking tile units by folding alone, but I unfortunately receive-d his .suggcstions after the diagrams far the design werecomplete, I'd like to suggest further study of the polyhedron known as the Rhombic Dodecahedron, which to me isa shape of most pleasiu-g proportion. H.:NLCundy and A.P.RoIlett, in their book Mathematical ·Models (Oxford University Press
1961) suggest interesting ideas with a simple pyramid which can be combined to

form three stellationsof the Rhombic Dodeeahedron as well as the figure itself. The shape of this pyramid looks easy to achieve from an IIA size rectangle, but I haven't yet succeeded .in producing a satisfactory solution to build these polyhedra despite 'several attempts, Incidentally the firststellation of the. Rhombic Dodecahedron is the same shape as the Star ofthe Double Star Flexieube,
U

Rhombic Dodecahedron and .Three Stellations

The dotted .~i)1e'sshowtheposetioo {If the pyrarnli~ which. c-an be used to build all these polyhedra,

Geomed-y of the P-¥tamid
:in relaricn to

an A r~cta~g;le

73

Sunken Silver Cube and Icosahedron
11- design which ex~ne& the relationship 'between the diagonal of the ··Ar' rectangle and the cube. The unit used is simple to fold. 'Iheapproximafion in the -Icosahedron

development is acceptable to me, at least,
although Kunihiko' Kasahara has published

an Improvement froma slightly differ~nt rectangle with a more precise geometry.

(12 units needed)

,1

I~

~

~--tT

2 3

• ,

r

USe- an A 7 reeta,n.gle: (elle eighth of an A4) Seep. 22.

8

7

Unit complete

Fold in 1jalf
and interlock

10

11

Join four units like thi~s -b1J:t:leoov.e four flaps

free. I.llnt1;erneath (see 10 & 11)
This makes a square dish shape

74

Icosahedron
2
1

3

A triangular sunken
pyramid is formed

4
Add 7 more units til:! make pentagonal cluster of sunken pyramids Join three units: leave three flaps. free underneath.

Continue building

the structure in the same way, adding 20 more units to make the icosahedron.
There is a small inaccuracy in the geometry of the units which makes a small holeat the

centre of the sunken pyramids.

'is quite stable.

Neyeitheless;, the construction

12

'13

Turn the dish shape over then
l

add four mote unitsinserting each flap into Its.app:ropriate pocket . A furtherfour units wil] complete the Sunken Cube. pockets as before

Flaps are insertedinto
but diagram 13 omits some arrows. for clarity.

75

Sunken 'Silver Star
This unit and tbe-oonstructirmsare related to those shown on the previous pages. The unit hasan identic a] triangle added which protrudes from the completed figure. In creating the design, I was influenced by a pointed star desigp by TOIT):Qk_o use, I 113ve tried also F to. make another longer-pointed 'variation on the same theme, but the unit in this case proved bulky and the locking WM less secure,

1
Use an A6 , , _vl_e (A4di-" "d d
into quarters)

see. p.22.

2

Fold in half,

lining up the lower left &
upper right Open up

quarter diagonals

unfolding the, upper right &

lower left corners

76

15

Interlock-s units noting care:fuQy
the Insertion of

'flaps: into pockets,

4

Now add 8 more.

unies

connected.

12

similarly to form 12 pointed sunken 'star

Unit complete: It [lOW lies completely flat

Ensure that
thesame thing

is happening

front and back 10
Interlock the layer" carefully within. The small right-angled comer (circled) sh auld slide inside the pocket without being accidentally folded over.

Hold the UIlLt like

this, and raise your bands upwards and together

to collapse the unit

along existing creases.

77

30 Point 'Sunken-Star
1:
Triangular -sunken pyramid complete.

Connect 3 un its to form triangular sunken

3

Add 12 more-unies to form this pentagonal

py~d .. Payarteetion to jnserning the flaps. ofeaeh unit
rnto the correct pocket

shape, comprisjng'_.5 sunken pyramids combined

of the next.

(see step 14 of the 12 point sunken stat')

Continue adding further units t'D build the completed ~t3ll'

(3Q units in all are required)

78

Dimpled Silver Dodecahedron
Inspired by ICunihiko Kasahara's similar design app~aring in Origami -Omnihus ..I wanted to make the same shape from a :more aecessible rectangle. 1 spent several hours on a tram jeumey experimenting with .angles, throwing aw~y malty partially completed constructions in the prbc.eSs..Some care is needed.in the folding to avoid bulkiness en the: exposed folded edges. 1

t~ meet imaginary line connecting ~omer if!) 1I41Uatrk
Valley

14
Open, and rep~e.at Oil each cotner 2.
.'.

A6 rectangle

(one quarte.t of A4) see p. 22,

12
11
Inteil'lod: the
Within

layers

3·0 uni ts areneeded .for the. complete structure

S-amG<prooess as S then open

·4·

7 5

VaUeyfold carefully DOting the refer~nce

points

Repeat 4 Wee
more times,

79

Silver Dodecahedra
Avariationef the Pentagonal Envelope (page 45) andaeirnpler larger alternative were early experiments with A rectangles .andpentagon-related modular designs. The smaller version was dubbed j'BOTTOMH (Brill's Own Toilet Tissue Origami Module) at a BaS .oonvention, when we found that some paper towels in the toilet were A size, and a fragile example of the: 'construction was possible! --

vii

0 ~~-

III

1
~
\

\

X,
\

\

\

'\

10

2

Each construction requires 12 A6 rectarrgles; see p.22.

9

7 3
Theseedges slsouldbe'
parallel

Insetlock 3 units like tltis

Fold the left hand comer
to the right han.d edge Unfold

5

Interlock the two while folding in haIl

so

viii
~.

3 units connected -eernplete as for the large!~eonsrructien

Fold in half and interlock the layers

3- units.

Connect 3 groups of

12

Add a final cluster of3 units to complete the larger dodecahedron.

8]

"'Woven" Strip Dodecahedron
S~1ng sheet siZ:e Aq'; see p, 22., Divide into thirds both ways assbown

:~~ - -~-_-~-~j~'-'.-"1" ---'l" _.. ~
..
"
I

~------------------~I---

1

This was inspiredby the marvellous dodecahedron unit.of Robert Neale, I was-anxious that tile finished design shouldseem to Q~ made from woven strips, which would be an hnprovement on Neale's version where the units were offset. Once again (he A rectangle proved to be. the solution to the problem with the diagonal-of the-rectangle playing an important part in the design process.

~----~------~----~I~~

3

AfL'fY: -~-,.-

Add furtl1e<f twits as shown, contimuhilg with units of 6

'to c6.tfi._pRete tbe

dl1ferent colours
cnastruetion

V
tf Interlock three units

3D un~ts needed in all

like this

development of the _p(evicms design: I realised .. mark'e a Q:Qd,eq\lheclron from s.trips which really together, 1 am. particularly pleased with the uses all of an A4'sheet with UQwaste. The
ballis -very streng. 1.
Use an A4sheet; ~ee!p. Z2., Divide. the sbcrt s-ideinto If6ths, and the imlg sideiniQ 1112ths.' Then 'cut irito 6 equal strip s. First eutslrown here.

~ ~

...

2
along tae strip ending ;at the double

t-~-F+-:-+-J+-+-i-i-++i
\_I
mtedoc1dng, divisions

In the finished construcuon each strip is formed into a ring interloclced by

\.__•. inserting one end iDto the other, overlapping~ 2 divisions. The ringsare notformed until step j

7

6th slrill added

TbiS &hduJdbe: interlocked
as described above. Finish the. construction by: weaviag the strips togetlret·.assh6WD in 5a

5 strips together.
Note the pentagon formed at the top.

and interlocking the ends of each strip. Rertlo'v.e a:i1y
l?,ape:rdilpEi

you have used,

83

Stellated Dodecahedron
Borrowing the gll(ometry of a well-known method, Q-feutting a pentagon from a square, I found that this rather c1lli'Ilo~ydesign -is possible.
Some precision is required in st'eps 4&.7 to ensure that-all the kayet's are foldedexactly together. 'The paints of the starare.notas Sharp as I would

like. 1 2
I

~---1---Interlock two units

T
I

!

i

;

II

j

i
I

3

Preerease the-

.single layer-only

-!~~-I~--I j
~I

: ''"'-+--I
~

r
I

4

Precrease

Gently open to a tube-shape.

Them- re verse' foJdl

two oppositecosners into the lube.

Add

further units to make
a pentagonal starshepe,

principle to completetae coustmcricn.

Add further units to a total number of30 on the same

designs,employs:imilar geometry to the previous star the coli,mrett side of the paper is placed inside ana then
togive the: "stained-glass' Impression. The units do hold tq-gether well until the final stages of the construction.

4

3

2

Divide into 1/3rds, and thea 1I6tbs.

Iy

Open central
edges to form a, 3D shape

Continue adding further units to a total of 30 2 unitscennected construction ....see p.

to form the completed 8:6.

S units together: into the pocketof the
insert remaining flap adjacent unit to form :n -3D star shape

8"5

This construction is .also possible using the same: unit, It is based .on a stellated icosahedron, Althoughsaable, it is less satisfaotory than the other construction as it puts strain on the joints between each unit

Tbls constructioa is based on a stellatecll
dodecahedron

(see p.age 84)

86

start with aa

A6 rectangle; See p, 22.

Spiky Star

,/

0'
9
Fold in half Precrease and open short flaps from behind

Precrease

then open up 3
Tucktl'l.

2 rigb.t-angled tattlers
Open out

5

Narrow twice

Usingthe "A" rectangle again,I w:anred to make a really pointed star. I am 'fOM ofthe:re;sollt, but there.is a small inaccuracy in the geometry of theunit. This is. insignificant in practical terms but

offends. my

$enseof

peri'ectiXHl a,1itt]e!

87

11

Method of locking

two units

4 units JOIned

This construction is based on.a cuboctahedron and is made from a combination of 3 and 4 units.joined (see above). 24 units are required in all,

Other constmctionsare possible.

88

Stained Glass BaIl

Stained Glass Ball

Spiky Star

Double Cube ~
- --

.....

-

-

-.

-

,

1681

I Was, fascinated to see this 8~om:etricsha.'i?'$-in one of M C Escrner'sptinfs (which seem to be a constant source Of inwiratiorr for Pllper-folders),
and I was determined to make 3;1l origami version. I also madeahollow "frame"'varia:tion, but this is

Method of

conneetlng
short sides Qf 'the units. 2 flaps are inserted into 2 pockets.

not so elegant. Ther-e e:xist$..-asingle sheet double Kenneth Kawamura.
cube: ofsimilar-appearance;

by American folder

1

,
I Connect the

two halves. of the cdnsttuct:-]on
to Cltlrnplet:et.

Co uni to 1
ea<;

2

3
~

Reverse fold

6 !5

90

Reverse fold

14 Carefully fold in half
inserting tile left 'hand

side into the right,

The coloured corners at the bottom will move to meet each other.

11
Method (If linking l units

Move tn progress
... dding further a alternate: co] ours lb\'h"H" :2 circles of 6 units [see 16)
Mountain behind

9

10

7

Openout completely

pyramid oU the

Form a convex

left

91

Venetian Double Cube
50-called because this variation of the Double Cube emerged during a bot" mosquito-filled, sleepless night in Venice, where I spent a brief heliday in 1985" Curiously 4 different modules-are requited, unlike the simpler design which makes use of 12 identical units,
,.

IV

v

n

1

'_I

_I_I __, __

/~....:r
Cut existing

';I,
crease ..

1I
~-

6 more rectangles

iii

of a contrasting co lour. Note the p osition of the

Use this method to out 3]!:2 rectangles 2
at the bottom T

from a square: discardthe narrow strip

3

*

6 rectangles like this are req:tlired. Note the PQ&jtion

of the exi sting crease

the drau
Intomir

will hill,

DnifB i DfUnit.

3a ,

,

5

I --,~ I

" I I

92

Form a 3D shape,

x
\

\:aUe.y and squash .as ymmetrically .

Fold all layers ;at
the right

Unit A: 3 required

B is a .min-or image
A'These drawings yo.u translate

6a
(J~t

.for Unit A

B.: 3 required
13

~.

t.'

Note the positions of the
between the layers

small right-angled triangles

11 12

Insert the convex righthand side into the concave left

Formtoa3Dshape, them collapse carefully.

93

J

xll

xi
xif

Insert the convex right nand. side lOitO

the ooneave left

Now collapse Valley fold the small corners

ca,rj;}:fuEly

xiv

vA
Unite 3 required

iiiA

I

ix-:A
mirror image of tJ: nitC -Th.eabove.are-mirrer image 'previons steps.
drawings' of some .of the
As before, Unit Dis a

ueun

:3 requ,ired

Linking ofr the units

c
c

D

Continue linking the, uni ts on this: principle until two 6 unit pyramids have l:&~eDformed

G.QurneccU1e two pyramids like this:
inside flaps -are inserted into inside pockets, and outside flaps are :inserted into outside pocketi'l

95

Waterbombic Dodecahedron
Thetitle ot' this design stems from the-similarity of the faceted pyra,mids- I'll) a conventional waterbomb .base. The stimulus for the-construction was a dimpled ball, creator unknown, collected by Lewis-Simon, This was made 'from strips wi~hcurved 'scored creases. linked togerher with-cuts and slots. I was tempted to reproduce it without the.slots, but.was unable to rep:rOQU4.';B the.curved folds-satisfactorily. The tlIlianttesign used strai:s;hr lines r,a1Der than curves, The finailoeking pushing-in manouevres provide a good climax to the folding sequence.

Use an A4 rectangle-cur in half lengthwise. 3- strips like: this are needed,

1:1

1

~[

I

I
1

3

f --- - - ~~- --- j

21+ I
Mark the halfwey point only Adjust the.position df the ring and form a new valley fold'

4

9

Mark a square
-then valley fold

7

Tuck in to

for:rt'i a :dng

96

13

Insert inside second unit Unit complete

'Unfold reverse folds 11

Precrease, then reverse

Unlock the 3rd unit, then insert into the ist and 2nd

units

Reconnect
the 3rd unit

Reform all reverse fOlds. to Jock the fin aJ s:hape

Double Sitar Flexicube
I had been intreduced to this puzzle-like. toy by Paul Jackson. It latet):" ~pp'eMedcom:metciany in plastic. I felt it impossible to re.produce:in origami tenus until I saw a silt-piece Star puzzle by David Mitchell, His design, reproducing in paper a wood-block puzzle gave me a clueto folding this result. It needs a little care
in handlirtg and flexing.

1

J

I

I

I

2

'1--11----I
,I

: \t

,
;1

3

I

I

~

use .an

A6 rectangLe;, see p. 22. precrease, then fold in bill.

Open 8

Meth half-« ilie UJ l'

1013 10

Open to form

a 3Dsbl!.pe Preen-ease to complete
one right-hfnd unit. 24 units like this are needed, Left-hand unit. AU steps 1-10 are seen as mirror linages, 24 units needed ..

Meth

units

98

ii

.

------

I -)~--. \

-

Hinge unit. use an, k6 Ietltangle

l Q hinge units are needed

14 13

R;e.,.iQ1'11'1.the two-half-cub¢,s.,
this time including the hinge unit.

,

15

ofmserting a hinge unit into a right-hland and-a left-hand half-cube, Carefully open out
. which will accept the hinge unit.

''2' ha]f=cubes

connected by 'the hinge unit
the' arrow llidic21tes the position of the hinge,

12 ..

12a

Half-cube
made from 3 right-

hand units.

Half-cube made from
hand units

:3 left-

of connecting
LQ make a half-cube,

The aTT0WS point to the 3 edges .loto which the hinge units can be inserted.

99

16

R R

L
R
8 half-cubes linked by 8 binge units.

L

A

L 'J; R indicate hCllJ-cube,,s made from left and right handed units respectively.
The heavy black lines indicate the position of the hinse units

2. of these constructions are ne'eil,ed,

This shape

can contain the shape shown 00 the right

These structures can be forOied" by flexing the construction shown in 16

This cube will contain this three-dimensional star.

IOU

Two 8 half-cube constructions fitted together

This Shows

the other half can then be formed into an identical star.

one star emerging;

This star shape is. known as the First SteOation of the Rhombic Dodecahedron

101

Double Star Flexicube

iO;a.

Wet Folding Techniques
direct dialogue between paper and folder, the technique known as 'Wet Folding" may not be iUllnediately attractive, However it is an interesting and useful skill which isn'ttiUffclilt to ac'qulre, Indeed a lot of myste-ry has been attached to the process, which is in fact quite a straightforward one Particularlysuited to 8:n.im.!i1S and livmg forms, wet folding has been pioneered by the Japanese master, Akira Yoshizawa Its advantages include the ability to give botb sharp creases and soft curves, The finished form will be much rnore solid than its dry paper counterpart, and large models cap be folded from thickish sheets. These will support their weight and are less like:1y to collapse than the same subject folded conventionally. Essentially the technique involves lightly wetting the paper before folding, folding swiftly and smoothly, and then allowing the result to dry. You should pay attention to, the shape and three dimensionality of the model at all times.Yoshizawa has also used and described iii development caned "urauchi", where two lasers of paper of different thicknesses ate sealed together with thick

To the purist who prefers not to introduce any outside tools to influence the

:flour paste. The layered sheet is then carefully stuck to: a board by its edges- with
thin line of the same paste" and then left to dry. The. sheet is then carefully

removed frOID the board, now quite taught and wrinkle-free, It can then be

dampened again by using a spray or a wet towel, prior to folding.
I suggest the following tips may help those new to the idea of wet folding techniques, -Choosea thickish paper. I have used the heavier grades of Fabriano Of Canson paper to good efie{;t,3nd have fQiJn.d.: that even common brown wrapping paper works. too. -Don't oyer wet the _p;aper: it should be floppy, though not dripping with

moisture ..
-Useful tools ate- at spray bottle which gives an even, drip-free mist, a towel,

lightly moistened, paperclips or clothes pegs to hold layers together while drying, and. possibly also a hair-dryer to speed drying of 'the finished model. -It may be neeesssry to r~-wet tbepaper during the foldlcgprocess, but I prefer to avoid this as if& difficult to ensure that all layers within are evenly penetrated by the- water, -Make sure that you are completely familiar with the. folding sequence of your chosen design: If folding fr0ID a book or diagrams, learn the method by heart

before you begin.
-Fold swiftly and accurately, in the- air if possible, as soon as the design has reached a manageable size. I belleve it's wen worthwhile trying this process which wHJ expand your knowledge 'Of the behavior of paper while being folded. The results- will he permanent and often well-suited formal exhibitions or displays.

104

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