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WATER

FOR ALL

AN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE IN GRADES
9-12
WATER
FOR ALL

AN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE IN GRADES
9-12
WATER
FOR ALL
This educational resource was produced by World Vision
Canada and adapted by World Vision Resources, World Vision
United States, 2008.

World Vision United States is grateful to World Vision New


Zealand and World Vision Canada for allowing this resource to
be adapted for use in the United States.

Copyright © World Vision, Inc. 2008. All rights reserved.

Editorial Director: Milana McLead


Editor-in-Chief: Jane Sutton-Redner
Project Editor: Laurie Delgatto
Copy Editor: Brooke Saron
Design: Journey Group, Inc.
Sales and Distribution Manager: JoJo Palmer

The Water for All study guide may be reproduced only with the
written permission of World Vision Resources, Mail Stop 321,
P.O. Box 9716, Federal Way, WA 98063-9716,
wvresources@worldvision.org.

Printed in the United States of America

ISBN 978-0-9817927-6-7

Scripture taken from the HOLY BIBLE, NEW INTERNA-


TIONAL VERSION®. NIV®. Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984
by International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan.
All rights reserved.

During the preparation of this resource, all citations, facts, fig-


ures, names, addresses, telephone numbers, Internet URLs, and
other cited information were verified for accuracy. World Vision
Resources has made every attempt to reference current and valid
sources, but we cannot guarantee the content of any source and
are not responsible for any changes that may have occurred since
our verification. If you find an error in, or have a question or
concern about, any of the information or sources listed within,
please contact World Vision Resources.
Overview
Water is essential for life. Water is crucial for sustainable development, including the pres-
ervation of our natural environment and the alleviation of poverty and hunger. Water is
indispensible for human health and well-being.
The United Nations has declared the years 2005–2015 the International Decade for
Action, Water for Life. These will be critical years to focus global attention on the urgency
of fulfilling the international commitments that have been made regarding water. These
commitments include the Millennium Development Goals—specifically goal seven, ensur-
ing environmental sustainability—and the specific target to reduce by half the proportion
of people without access to safe drinking water by 2015.
Educating young people on the magnitude of the problem and international work be-
ing done to apply sustainable solutions, and providing them the space to fully participate
in continued learning and action for change, are integral parts of teaching youth to be
responsible global citizens.

Objectives
Through the video and study guide, participants will:
» examine patterns of personal water use and reflect on global patterns
» learn about the water situation in the Sahel region of Africa
» critically
 examine the complexity of the issue of safe water and impact on poverty,
education, health, environmental sustainability, and partnerships for development
» explore and experience planning for community development

Video Synopsis
Most people in Niger lack access to enough safe water—it is one of the driest and poor-
est places in the world. The Water for All video gives insight into the significance of water
to people’s lives and future opportunities. The video can be viewed or downloaded at
worldvisionresources.com. Simply click on the “free resources” icon and then go to “video
resources.”
Total running time: 22 minutes

Leader Preparation
View and download the video from worldvisionresources.com. Choose which activi-
ties you will incorporate into a specific session based on time and objectives. Photocopy
relevant pages, prepare newsprint and other relevant materials, and set up viewing space
and equipment.

Time Required
30–60 minutes per activity

Table of Content
» Down the Drain..............................pg.6 » Video: Water for All.............pg.15
» Scavenging for Water Facts.............pg.9 » Water Use.............................pg.18
» Know the Lingo..............................pg.12 » The Earth Is the Lord’s.........pg.20
» Water: A Complex Problem............pg.14

W AT E R F O R A L L 5
Down the Drain
I N THIS ACTIVITY, the participants determine how much water they use
every day in their home life and compare those findings to average values for
people in other parts of the world.

» a one-gallon clear container of water


MATERIALS NEEDED

» a sheet of newsprint
» a marker
» a roll of masking tape
» copies of handout 1, “Personal Water Use Chart,” found on page 24, one for each participant
» pens or pencils, one for each participant
» calculators (useful in the interest of time)
» for optional Internet-based activity, computer access for each participant or small group

Activity Steps
1 E X P L A I N T H AT personal water use is defined as “any water that is consumed or used
at the household level.” Other personal water uses include personal cleaning, kitchen uses,
consumption for drinking and cooking, and outdoor yard use. Encourage the participants to
begin thinking about the ways they use water in their everyday lives. To build understanding
about water quantities, have the participants take a good look at the gallon of water.

2 A S K T H E L A R G E GROUP the following questions. Record responses on a sheet of news-


print and post it where all can see:
» What activity in our daily lives consumes the most water?

» How many gallons per person, per day, do the following activities require?

» showering » using a dishwasher


» bathing » using the washing machine
» brushing teeth » watering the lawn and garden
» flushing the toilet » washing the car (with a hose)
» washing dishes by hand

W AT E R F O R A L L 6
Down the Drain (continued)
3 D I S T R I B U T E A COPY of handout 1, a pen or pencil to each participant. Review the
answers to the questions from step 2 as noted on the chart. Then ask the participants to
complete the remaining sections on their own. Clarify the following before they begin:
» Column A is based on each participant’s personal water use.

» Column C is column A multiplied by column B.

» Values for column D are group estimates from the newsprint.

» Values for column E are taken from column C.

4 O N C E E V E RY O NE has completed the handout, engage the participants in a large-group


discussion using the following questions:
» Were you surprised at all by any of your findings?

» How did the group’s estimates compare to the calculated values?

» What were the top three ranking activities, in terms of personal water usage?

Use a calculator to find the group average for personal water use per day. Add each total
for column C and divide by the number of participants.

» How do you think this average compares to the average for water use in all of the
United States and the continents of Africa, Europe, South and Central America, and
Asia?

7 W AT E R F O R A L L
Down the Drain (continued)
5 U S E T H E F O L L OWING chart to examine daily water use trends around the globe.

CONTINENT DOMESTIC WATER USE*


Country (gallons per day per person)

AFRICA 17
Egypt 53
Ethiopia 3
Mozambique 2
South Africa 44

EUROPE 71
Albania 91
United Kingdom 30

N O RT H A M E R I CA 137
Canada 208
United States 173

C E N T R A L A M E RICA 87
Costa Rica 145
Honduras 7

S O U T H A M E R I CA 75
Peru 43
Venezuela 101

ASIA 31
Azerbaijan 77
Bangladesh 11
China 16

Ask the participants for possible explanations for the differences.

6 I N V I T E T H E PA RTICIPANTS to form pairs and share their responses to the following


question:
» How have your feelings about water and water use been altered as a result of this activity?

7 I F T I M E P E R M I TS, invite the participants to create graphic representations (pie charts, etc.)
to demonstrate their own personal water use trends, group results, the United States’ overall
use, and the water use of other countries in the world.

Note: If Internet access is available, have the participants try an online game version of the
water calculator to interactively compute personal daily water consumption values and view
graphical results. Calculators can be found on the Water Footprint Web site and the National
Wildlife Federation Web site.

W AT E R F O R A L L 8
Scavenging for Water Facts
I N THIS ACTIVITY, the participants explore the global water crisis and the
involvement of international institutions in this ever important issue.
M AT E R I A L S

» access to computers, one for each small group of two or three


NEEDED

» copies of handout 2, “Water Facts,” found on pages 25-26, one for each small group of two or three
» pens or pencils, one for each small group of two or three

Activity Steps
1 D I V I D E T H E L A RGE GROUP into small groups of two or three. Each small group will
need a computer with Internet access, a copy of handout 2, and a pen or pencil.

2 E X P L A I N T O T HE PARTICIPANTS that in their small groups, they will be visiting the


Web sites listed on the handout and using the questions as tools to help them locate informa-
tion about the global water issue. Direct them to record their responses in the spaces provided
on the handout. Allow ample time for the small groups to complete the assignment.

3 G AT H E R E V E RYONE BACK into the large group and review their answers. The following
guide provides the questions and the correct information for each:
» What have you learned about the United Nations’ International Decade for Action?
[The UN has declared the years 2005–2015 the International Decade for Action, Water
for Life.]

» What is the link between the International Decade for Action and the Millennium De-
velopment Goals? [The specific related Millennium Development Goals are (1) halving
the number of people without access to safe water (and basic sanitation) by 2015, and
(2) ending the unsustainable exploitation of water resources.]

» What are the Millennium Development Goals? What have you learned about them?
[There are eight Millennium Development Goals:

» eradicate extreme hunger and poverty

» achieve universal primary education

» promote gender equality and empower women

9 W AT E R F O R A L L
Scavenging for Water Facts (continued)
» reduce child mortality

» improve maternal health

» combat HIV and AIDS, malaria, and other diseases

» ensure environmental sustainability

» develop a global partnership for development]

» Where do you think “safe drinking water and basic sanitation” falls in the list of goals?
[Safe drinking water and basic sanitation” links directly with goal seven, ensuring envi-
ronmental sustainability.]

» What is the target year for the Millennium Development Goals? [The target year is
2015.]

» What is the overall goal of the Human Development Reports? [The overall goal of the
Human Development reports is to put people at the center of human development by
stressing human choices and freedoms versus economic goals.]

» Who creates the Human Development Reports? [The Human Development Reports are
commissioned by the United Nations’ Development Program.]

» The World Health Organization (WHO) explains that working on water and sanitation
contributes to the Millennium Development Goals. Explain how. [The WHO outlines
that their work on water and sanitation contributes to the Millennium Development
Goals in the following ways:

» health through safe drinking water and basic sanitation

» health through Integrated water resources management

» health through improved water in health-care settings]

» What do these findings tell you about the issue of water? [These findings demonstrate
that the water issue is extremely broad and impacts many aspects of human well-being.
Water is linked to all the Millennium Development Goals. Improving access to safe
water and improving sanitation would mean making improvements in all these areas.]

W AT E R F O R A L L 10
Scavenging for Water Facts (continued)
» What is it about the Sahel that makes it a region all its own? [Sahel is an Arabic word
for “border”or “margin,” which is appropriate, as this area borders the arid Sahara
desert region of north Africa, and the wetter, more tropical region of the south. It is an
area of low rainfall, frequent drought, and few natural resources. The countries primar-
ily affected are Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan,
and the “Horn” (an area that includes the countries of Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, and
Somalia).]

» What have you learned about rainfall and water in the Sahel region? [The Sahel receives
only between four and eight inches of rainfall a year, and this amount is slowly decreas-
ing. People and their livestock move in herds according to the rain. The large number
of livestock overgraze during the rainy season, causing excessive desertification of the
Sahel. With the region becoming slowly more arid, the chronic instability of the environ-
ment, and livestock populations rising, it is difficult to develop the area, and a tradi-
tional way of living prevails. Many questions are asked about the desertification of the
area, and many people have tried to answer them, but it still remains a mystery why the
rainfall in the region is slowly decreasing.]

11 W AT E R F O R A L L
Know the Lingo
I N THIS ACTIVITY, the participants become familiar with the terms and
concepts surrounding community development and the issue of water.
M AT E R I A L S
NEEDED

» copies of handout 3, “Water Lingo,” found on pages 27, one for each participant
» pens or pencils, one for each participant

Activity Steps
1 B E G I N B Y N O T ING that in a few minutes the participants will be viewing a video called
Water for All. Provide a brief overview of the video by making these key points:
» In the video we will be viewing, we will hear about life in Niger, one of the driest and
poorest countries in the world.

» We will also meet Abida, her family, and the people of her community. We will find
out about their daily lives, their hopes for the future, and how the community has been
transformed by sustainable access to safe water for all. And we will discover how this all
came about.

» We will also hear the story of Zalifa and her community in Niger, which lacks a safe
water source.

» But first let’s see how familiar you are with a variety of terms you may hear while
watching the video.

2 D I S T R I B U T E to each participant a copy of handout 3 and a pen or pencil. Review the


instructions with the participants and get them started. Note that it is quite possible that the
participants may not be familiar with all the terms listed. Tell them it is okay to take a guess if
need be. Allow enough time for them to complete the assignment.

3 R E V I E W T H E C ORRECT answers with the participants using the following answer key:
» Niger: [j. a landlocked country in Western Africa]

» Guinea worm: [d. a disease caused by parasite infection]

» sustainable development: [m. meeting the needs of the present while considering the

W AT E R F O R A L L 12
Know the Lingo (continued)
needs of future generations]

» sanitation: [a. clean, hygienic conditions]

» Sahara: [f. the world’s largest hot desert]

» Sahel: [g. transition zone between the Sahara and the Sudan]

» trachoma: [k. an eye condition that can cause blindness]

» millet: [l. cereal crops grown around the world]

» Acacia: [h. a drought-resistant tree]

» erosion: [b. displacement of solids by wind, water, ice, or gravity]

» open well: [r. an uncovered water source that can be easily contaminated]

» borehole well: [c. a deep and narrow shaft in the ground used to extract water]

» queue: [n. to form a line, or wait]

» safe water: [o. water that is free of contaminants and pollutants]

» tree nursery: [e. an area where trees, shrubs, or plants are grown for transplanting]

» soil fertility: [q. the productive part of the soil, containing nutrients, water, and organic
matter]

» quality: [i. a distinguishing attribute of something or someone]

» quantity: [s. total amount or number of something]

» Zalifa: [t. from a community that lacks a safe water source]

» Abida: [p. from a community that has safe water for all]

13 W AT E R F O R A L L
Water: A Complex Problem
I N THIS ACTIVITY, the participants build critical-thinking skills about community
development solutions that last.

» copies of handout 4, “Water Problems and Solutions,” found on pages 28-29, one for each participant
M AT E R I A L S N E E D E D

» pens or pencils, one for each participant


Note: Before distributing the handout, fill in the “Participant Role” space on each copy. Try to ensure
an equal representation of each of the following roles:
» community health worker
» education worker
» agricultural worker
» a woman / mother in the community
» a man in the community
» a young girl in the community

Activity Steps
1 I F Y O U haven’t already done so, review the topic of the video with the participants.

2 D I S T R I B U T E A COPY of handout 4 and a pen or pencil to each participant. Explain to


the participants that for this entire activity, they will be taking on the roles indicated on their
handouts and that each character is working directly on a project to bring safe water to a
community in the developing country of Niger, in Africa. Tell the participants they should not
discuss their roles with one another.

3 I N V I T E T H E PA RTICIPANTS to complete all the questions in part A of the handout.

4 W I T H O U T F O C USING too heavily on the different roles that are represented in the group,
invite sample answers about the main priority for the water project (question 1). Allow for
several participants to share their responses and thoughts.

5 N O T E T H AT while they are watching the video, the participants should think about their
responses to the questions and the role of safe water in the community.

W AT E R F O R A L L 14
Video: Water for All
I N THIS ACTIVITY, the participants watch a video that offers insight into
the significance of water in people’s lives and future opportunities.

» the video Water for All


M AT E R I A L S
NEEDED

» a television and a DVD player


» a sheet of newsprint
» a marker
» a roll of masking tape

Activity Steps
1 E X P L A I N to the participants that the video they will be watching will give them insight into
the significance of water to people’s lives and future opportunities. Then gather the partici-
pants around the television, and play the video.

2 W H E N T H E PA RTICIPANTS are done watching the video, invite them to refer back to the
handout they completed prior to watching the video. Ask them to complete all the questions
in part B.

3 N O W A S K the participants to stand and mingle with one another. At this point, they are free
to divulge their roles in the project. They are to discuss their corresponding perspectives on the
water issue and their responses to the questions noted on the handout. Ask that they visit with
at least three other participants before sitting back down.

4 A L L O W T H E PA RTICIPANTS time to revisit the handout, to reflect and add additional


responses as they see fit.

5 C O N D U C T a large-group discussion using the following questions:


» Did your responses change after you viewed the video? If so how?

» What did you learn from speaking with other role-players in the group?

» Why do you think the water issue is a complex issue? Consider question 2 and all the
different areas that are impacted by gaining access to “safe water.”

15 W AT E R F O R A L L
Video: Water for All (continued)
Use the participants’ responses to the last question to create a cluster graphic organizer. Write
the word water in the center of a sheet of newsprint to represent the global issue being studied.
Post the newsprint where all can see. Then around water write as many of the connecting
issues that the participants can come up with (health, agriculture, education, time, income,
technology, etc.) and connect them with lines. Repeat the same process using these words as
the new core issues and using lines to connect to related issues. Ask the participants:
» In planning for water development projects, why do you think it is important to
consider the opinions and ideas of all the people involved, including those living in the
community who will be affected?

6 A S A L A R G E G R OUP, attempt to map out a revised priority list—a comprehensive list of


all the ways a community is impacted by water as well as a list of “stakeholders” that should
be consulted before, during, and after the project is complete. (Even after the project is com-
plete, factors to be considered include who will maintain the well and how the maintenance
will be paid for.)

7 C O N C L U D E T H E ACTIVITY by making the following key points:


» Water brings change. Some changes are immediately obvious, and others happen slowly
over time.

» Safe water brings dramatic improvement to health, especially for young children. They
stop suffering from diseases caused by drinking or bathing in unsafe water. There’s
also more water for washing regularly, which improves hygiene. People don’t get sick
as often, so they’re able to work harder, and they have more time and energy for other
activities.

» Food crops improve when there’s a good supply of water, providing better nutrition to
keep people healthy. With better access to a safe water source, extra time can be spent
growing crops.

» Instead of spending hours carrying water every day, children have enough time to go
to school. They’re less tired and can concentrate better on their studies and homework.
Regular attendance improves their learning, and they’re more likely to do well and con-
tinue on to high school. With an education, their future job opportunities expand.

» Usually women and girls have the daily chore of getting their family’s water. A safe

W AT E R F O R A L L 16
Video: Water for All (continued)
supply within an easy distance from home means they have more time for other things.
Traditional roles begin to change as girls gain equal access to education and women
gain skills to earn an income. Their contribution is valued, so they participate more in
community decisions. Everyone benefits.

» Healthier animals and bigger crops provide a surplus that can be sold for income.
Increased family incomes mean there’s more trading at markets and new businesses are
more successful. Families start saving and have extra income they can use to buy various
food items, household goods, and medicines, or to pay school fees. Increased income
can also contribute to community activities and infrastructure such as health clinics,
school facilities, training, roads, and transportation.

» With improved technology, it’s much quicker and easier to access water, saving time
and energy for other activities. The water is protected from contamination, providing
a sustainable and safe supply. People learn skills to maintain the technology, which can
lead to new ideas and opportunities. Access to technology helps leaders develop these
opportunities and plan changes that will benefit their communities.

17 W AT E R F O R A L L
Water Use
I N THIS ACTIVITY, the participants explore how much water there is in
the world.

» a bucket containing five gallons of water


» two mugs
» a large bowl
M AT E R I A L S N E E DE D

» a container of salt (at least a cup’s worth)


» a teaspoon
» a cup
» fifty regular-size bottles of water
» four signs with one of the following terms written on each: bathing, sanitation, drinking,
food preparation
» sheets of newsprint, one for each small group of four to six, plus one extra
» markers, one for each small group of four to six, plus one extra
» a roll of masking tape

Activity Steps
1 P O I N T O U T the bucket you have filled with five gallons of water. Tell the participants this
bucket represents the total water supply in the world. Then dip the mug into the water twice,
dumping the mugfuls into the large bowl. Tell the participants that this small amount repre-
sents the world’s fresh water, found in the ice caps, rivers, lakes, clouds, soil, plants, and rock.

2 P O U R A G O O D AMOUNT of salt into the bucket of water. Then tell the participants that
all the rest of the world’s water is salty. Show the bowl of remaining water. Note that three-
quarters of the fresh water (one and a half mugs) is locked up in the Antarctic and Arctic, and
almost one-quarter (half a mug) is deep underground and cannot be reached.

3 M E A S U R E O U T three teaspoons from the bowl into a cup. Then note that less than 1
percent of the world’s fresh water can be easily reached in lakes, rivers, the soil, the air, and
plants.

W AT E R F O R A L L 18
Water Use (continued)
4 G R O U P I N the following way the 50 bottles of water you have gathered:
» place 15 bottles next to the bathing sign

» place 20 bottles next to the sanitation sign

» place five bottles next to the drinking sign

» place 10 bottles next to the food preparation sign

5 D I V I D E T H E L A RGE GROUP into small groups of four to six. Provide each small group
with a sheet of newsprint and a marker. Remove 40 bottles (leaving just 10) and tell the small
groups to imagine they live in a water-stressed area (water stress is a state of extreme difficulty
caused by lack of water). 10 bottles is all the water each person has for the day. Give the small
groups time to allocate the ten bottles for the following tasks: drinking, washing clothes, water-
ing the garden, washing the dishes, preparing food, bathing, cleaning the toilet, and water for
the chickens. Note these tasks on a sheet of newsprint and post it where all can see.

6 I N V I T E E A C H S MALL GROUP to report how it would use its water. Then lead the par-
ticipants in a discussion using the following questions:
» Did you have enough water? Which tasks were the most important?

» Which water did you recycle?

Ask the participants to compare this activity with the amount of water they actually use in a
day. Then ask:
» What effect would a lack of water have on your use of water, your health, and your liv-
ing conditions?

» What can you do to protect and value water in your own daily lives?

19 W AT E R F O R A L L
The Earth is the Lord’s
I N THIS ACTIVITY, the participants explore what the Scriptures say about water.

» four sheets of newsprint » index cards, eight for each participant


M AT E R I A L S
NEEDED

» markers, one for each participant, plus one extra » three or four rolls of clear tape
» a roll of masking tape » a sheet of newsprint
» Bibles, one for each participant
Note: Using multiple sheets of newsprint, create a large mural on one of the walls in your
meeting space. On the top of the mural, write the following: “The earth is the Lord’s, and
everything in it.”

Activity Steps
1 B E G I N B Y A S K I NG the participants to share their responses to the following questions:
» In what ways is water the basis for all life?

» How do we as humans sometimes show a lack of respect for water?

Allow for several responses before continuing.

2 S H A R E T H E F O LLOWING KEY POINTS:


» Water is the cradle and source of life, and one of the most potent bearers of cultural and
religious meanings. Life, in all its forms, is impossible without water. Water is a precon-
dition for life—a given, a gift.

» Water is viewed by many faiths and cultures as a sacred element symbolizing life. To
Christians, baptism with water symbolizes the cleansing of sins and the gift of eternal
life in Christ.

» The theme of water is integral to the telling of our story of faith. Water can symbol-
ize many things for Christians: God’s care and concern, God’s provision, God’s Word,
God’s salvation. Though there is no mystical or magical power in water, it stands as a
symbol for these things.

» In the Scriptures, we hear time and time again about the importance of water.

W AT E R F O R A L L 20
The Earth is the Lord’s (continued)
3 D I V I D E T H E L A RGE GROUP into small groups of four or five. Distribute a Bible, eight
index cards, and a marker to each participant. Now ask the small groups to conduct a Bible
search to find Scripture verses that refer to water. Point out that there are over 700 uses of the
word water in the Bible, so they should not have too difficult a time locating a few. If you’d
like, you can designate certain books of the Bible for each small group to explore.
Tell the small groups that as their members find relevant Scripture passages, they should
note them in large print on their index cards, one passage to each card. Then on the backs
of the cards, they should offer brief summaries of the verses. Each group member should to
try to come up with four (no more) different Scripture passages so that each small group has
between 16 and 20 different passages when all the members are done. The group members
may want to share their passage cites aloud as they write them down so the other members are
aware of the cites that have already been listed. Share the following examples with the partici-
pants to get them started:
» In Genesis 1:20, we read of the first mention of life, and this life comes from water.

» In Isaiah 43:19, the hopes of the prophets were expressed through the promise that riv-
ers will spring up in the desert.

» In Revelations 22:1, it is revealed that in a new heaven and a new earth there will be a
“river of the water of life, as clear as crystal.”

4 I N V I T E T H E S M ALL GROUPS to report their findings to the large group by mentioning


the Scripture passages they found and providing a quick summary of each. As they do so, ask
them to tape their index cards onto the mural you have created on the wall, with the Scripture
citations facing out.

5 N O W A S K T H E SMALL GROUPS to think back on the video they viewed and the previ-
ous activities they participated in. Direct them to take some time to discuss what they have
learned about the scarcity and sanctity of water. As they share, they should note each learn-
ing on an index card. Tell the groups to come up with no more than three learnings for each
group member.

6 I N V I T E T H E S M ALL GROUPS to report back to the large group their learnings as noted
on their index cards. As they do so, ask them to tape the cards onto the mural.

7 S T I L L I N T H E I R SMALL GROUPS, ask that each participant take his or her final index
card and write a prayer that focuses on the issue of water. It could be a prayer of thanksgiving
for the water we have, a prayer for those who do not have water, a prayer for safe water, and
so forth. The prayer does not have to be lengthy or fancy; simple and heartfelt is fine.

8 C O N C L U D E T H E ACTIVITY by gathering the prayer cards and then inviting the partici-
pants to pray with you. Use a few of the prayers noted on the cards.

21 W AT E R F O R A L L
Handouts
and
Resources
HANDOUT 1

Personal Water Use Chart


Activity A. Average B. Given C. Total D. Class E. Ranking of
Number of Times Estimates of Daily Estimates of Water Use
Activity is Done Water Use Water Use Daily Water Use Activities
Per Day (from Column C)

Taking a shower
50 gallons
(10 minutes)
(19 / minute)
(standard shower head)

Taking a shower
23 gallons
(10 minutes)
(9 / minute)
(low-flow shower head)

Taking a bath 39 gallons

Brushing teeth
2 gallons
(water running)

Flushing the toilet


3 gallons
(standard-flow toilet)

Flushing the toilet


1.9 gallons
(low-flow toilet)

Washing dishes by hand 10 gallons

Running a dishwasher 12 gallons

Doing a load of laundry 31 gallons

Watering the lawn 300 gallons

Washing a car 50 gallons

TOTAL Daily Water Use by Household Member = =

Handout 1: Permission to reproduce is granted. © 2008 by World Vision, Inc.

24 W AT E R F O R A L L
HANDOUT 2

Water Facts
United Nations (un.org/waterforlifedecade)

» What have you learned about the United Nations’ International Decade for Action?

» What is the link between the International Decade for Action and the Millennium
Development Goals?

Millennium Project (unmillenniumproject.org, un.org/millenniumgoals)

» What are the Millennium Development Goals? What have you learned about them?

» Where do you think “safe drinking water and basic sanitation” falls in the list of goals?

» What is the target year for the Millennium Development Goals?

Human Development Reports (hdr.undp.org)


» What is the overall goal of the Human Development Reports?

» Who creates the Human Development Goals?

W AT E R F O R A L L 25
HANDOUT 2

Water Facts (continued)


The World Health Organization (who.int/water_sanitation_health)
» The World Health Organization (WHO) explains that working on water and sanita-
tion contributes to the Millennium Development Goals. Explain how.

» What do these findings tell you about the issue of water?

Africa and the Sahel (allafrica.com, pbs.org/wnet/africa/explore)


» What is it about the Sahel that makes it a region all its own?

» What have you learned about rainfall and water in the Sahel region?

Handout 2: Permission to reproduce is granted. Copyright © 2008 by World Vision, Inc.

26 W AT E R F O R A L L
HANDOUT 3

Water Lingo
___ Niger a. clean, hygienic condition

___ Guinea worm b. displacement of solids by wind, water, ice, or gravity

c. a deep and narrow shaft in the ground used to


___ sustainable development
extract water
___ sanitation d. a disease caused by parasite infection

___ Sahara e. an area where trees, shrubs, or plants are grown for
transplanting
___ Sahel
f. the world’s largest hot desert
___ trachoma
g. transition zone between the Sahara and the Sudan

___ millet h. a drought-resistant tree

___ Acacia i. a distinguishing attribute of something or someone

___ erosion j. a landlocked country in Western Africa

k. an eye condition that can cause blindness


___ open well
l. cereal crops grown around the world
___ borehole well
m. meeting the needs of the present while considering
___ queue the needs of future generations

n. to form a line, or wait


___ safe water
o. water that is free of contaminants and pollutants
___ tree nursery
p. from a community that has safe water for all
___ soil fertility
q. the productive part of the soil, containing nutrients,
___ quality water, and organic matter

r. an uncovered water source that can be easily


___ quantity
contaminated
___ Zalifa s. total amount or number of something

___ Abida t. from a community that lacks a safe water source

Handout 3: Permission to reproduce is granted. © 2008 by World Vision, Inc.

W AT E R F O R A L L 27
HANDOUT 4

Water Problems and Solutions


Participant Role: _____________________________

Part A (before viewing the video)

Remembering your role, answer the following questions:

» What is your top priority for the project?

» How will bringing “safe water” to the community impact you or the work you do?

» List the three most important things you believe could help improve the lives of
people in the community:

» In your work, do you think it will be important to consult with others in the com-
munity? If so, which people from the community, or “stakeholders,” will you speak
to during your work in the community?

28 W AT E R F O R A L L
HANDOUT 4

Water Problems and Solutions (continued)

Participant Role: _____________________________

Part B (after viewing the video)

Remembering your role, answer the following questions:

» What is your top priority for the project?

» How will bringing “safe water” to the community impact you or the work you do?

» List the three most important things you believe could help improve the lives of
people in the community:

» In your work, do you think it will be important to consult with others in the com-
munity? If so, which people from the community, or “stakeholders,” will you speak
to during your work in the community?

Handout 4: Permission to reproduce is granted. Copyright © 2008 by World Vision, Inc.

W AT E R F O R A L L 29
»About World Vision
WORLD VISION IS a Christian humanitarian organi-
zation dedicated to working with children, families, and
their communities worldwide to reach their full potential
by tackling the causes of poverty and injustice. Motivated
by our faith in Jesus Christ, World Vision serves along-
side the poor and oppressed as a demonstration of God’s
unconditional love for all people.

We see a world where each child experiences “fullness of


life” as described in John 10:10. And we know this can
be achieved only by addressing the problems of poverty
and injustice in a holistic way. That’s how World Vision
is unique: We bring 60 years of experience in three
key areas needed to help children and families thrive:
emergency relief, long-term development, and advocacy.
And we bring all of our skills across many areas of expertise to each community we work
in, enabling us to care for children’s physical, social, emotional, and spiritual well-being.
Partnering with World Vision provides tangible ways to honor God and put faith into
action. By working, we can make a lasting difference in the lives of children and families
who are struggling to overcome poverty. To find out more about how you can help, visit
http://www.worldvision.org.

A B O U T W O R L D V I S I O N RESOURCES
Ending global poverty and injustice begins with education: understanding the magnitude
and causes of poverty, its impact on human dignity, and our connection to those in need
around the world.

World Vision Resources is the publishing ministry of World Vision. World Vision
Resources educated Christians about global poverty, inspires them to respond, and equips
them with innovative resources to make a difference in the world.

For more information about our resources, contact:

World Vision Resources


Mail Stop 321
P.O. Box 9716
Federal Way, WA 98063-9716
Fax: 253-815-3340
wvresources@worldvision.org
www.worldvisionresources.com

30 W AT E R F O R A L L
W AT E R F O R A L L 31
WAT E R I S E S S E N T I A L FOR LIFE. Water is crucial for sustainable development,
including the preservation of our natural environment and the alleviation of poverty and
hunger. Water is indispensible for human health and well-being. Yet too many of our
fellow human beings have little choice but to resort to using potentially harmful sources
of water. This perpetuates a silent humanitarian crisis that kills thousands of children
every day.

The United Nations has declared the years 2005 to 2015 the International Decade for
Action, Water for Life. These are critical years for focusing global attention on the urgency
of fulfilling the international commitments that have been made regarding water. These
commitments include the Millennium Development Goals—specifically goal seven, ensur-
ing environmental sustainability­—and the specific target to reduce by half the proportion
of people without access to safe drinking water by 2015.

Water for All provides insight into the significance of water in people’s lives and future
opportunities by offering lessons and activities for young people in grades 9 to 12 to criti-
cally examine the complexity of the issue of safe water and its effects on poverty, educa-
tion, health, environmental sustainability, and partnerships for development.

Copyright © 2008 by World Vision, Inc.


Mail Stop 321, P.O. Box 9716, Federal Way, WA 98063-9716
worldvision.org