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Today's Woman - August 2010

Today's Woman - August 2010

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Why we INK

Gun totin’
mamas packin’
PINK!
Faux it!
tans, sugar & butter
What ’s not to
Advocate defends families
August 2010
253954
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| Today’s Woman Idaho Press-Tribune • sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010
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TOday’S WOmaN
We hope you enjoy the second edition of Today’s
Woman. This quarterly magazine pays tribute to
women and all that we do.
Send your comments to todayswoman@idahopress.com.
Visit us on the web at idahopress.com/todays_woman.com
for more stories, ideas and photos.
Follow us at Facebook.com/todayswomantreasurevalley
To advertise: Angela Sammons at 465-8136
For story ideas: Vickie Holbrook at 465-8110
For copies to display at your business: Shelley Thayer at 465-8185
Today’s Woman is a product of the Idaho Press-Tribune, 1618 N.
Midland Blvd., Nampa, ID. Copyright 2010.
1
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We’ll make kicking the habit
safe and easy, with our
ONLINE BILL PAY.
Sign up today at:
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VP, Sr. Relationship Services Officer
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THE FIRST STEP IS TO ADMIT YOU HAVE A PROBLEM.
THE NEXT STEP IS TO SIGN UP FOR
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We, the women of the Today’s Woman
staff, promise that this magazine will:
Foster conversations among Treasure Valley women.
Celebrate local “she” power.
Embrace community.
Ignite, empower and liberate women.
Delight in “she” things.
And yes, even have a rip-roaring good time!
Today’s Woman staff
Vickie Schaffeld Holbrook, editor
Angela Sammons, retail advertising manager
Trish Usabel Grohs, marketing director
Randy Lavorante, news editor and designer
Greg Kreller, Multi-media editor
Mackenzie Johnson McFadden, designer and contributor
Shantel Bugby, ad-visor and contributor
Melissa Valencia, sales
Shelley Thayer, customer service manager and contributor
Betty Schober, sales and contributor
Other contributors
Kendel Murrant, content editor
Sharon Strauss, reporter
Machele Hamilton, columnist
Sherry Squires, freelance writer
Debbie Kushlan, freelance writer
Rhea Allen, Peppershock Media president and CEO
Laurie Boston, Southwest District Health Department
2
Today’s Woman | sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
And a special thank you to our overworked interns Gracy Howard, a student at Patrick
Henry College in Virginia, and Haley Robinson, a Boise State University communications
major. We appreciate the tireless contributions of these two extraordinary young wom-
en who wanted hands-on experience in the world of journalism and decided to come to
the Idaho Press-Tribune this summer. Both have devoted their energy and talents
(and maybe some of their sanity) to a multitude of projects, including Today’s Woman.
Gracy Haley
Guilty
plea-
sures
Summer Sunset Sparkly
By the glass:
Use hurricane glass if available
Fill with 1 oz. pineapple juice and approx.
2-3 oz. of *Asti Spumanti, a sparking
white wine, leaving room at the top of the
glass to drizzle 1-2 oz. grenadine. Do not
stir. Let the grenadine ooze down into the
pineapple/Asti for a drink that’s pretty as
well as tasty! Garnish with a pineapple and
cherry spear.
By the batch:
In a pitcher mix
1 bottle *Asti Spumanti with 6-8 oz.
pineapple juice.
Add 4-6 oz. grenadine.
Mix and serve chilled over ice.
Try mixing several different batches to fnd
your ‘perfect’ recipe proportions!
Graphic designer Mackenzie Johnson Mc-
Fadden shared this recipe. She says it’s a
FABULOUS drink for summer evenings and
light social gatherings! Or a great alterna-
tive to Mimosas for an early brunch.
*Martinelli’s Sparkling PEAR juice will keep
your drink alcohol free.
iWant an e-Reader!
Need constant connection? By Christ-
mas there will be about 80 wireless
e-book readers. Prices range from
$150 to $1,500, depending on what
bells and whistles you want. Put it on
your wish list.
C
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Lost in the dark?
A battery operated headlight is perfect
for camping trips, road trips or even
power failures.
3
| Today’s Woman Idaho Press-Tribune • sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010
Keep them soft
Keep your lips soft with Burt’s Bees Lip
Balm. The all-natural product is a must
for many women.
Flask
Found at Classy Casuals
in Nampa, Treasure Valley
Marketplace.
Boise State and
University of Idaho
Beaded Watches
Made by Jenifer Dixon of Bumble Beads,
jend@q.com or fnd her at the Nampa
Farmers Market.
Purse Holder/
Key Clip
Found at Idaho Bag Lady in
Nampa.
PINK Purse
Found at The Story & Co.
in Caldwell.
Boise State and
University of Idaho
Scentsy Burners
Call Casie Stevenson to order!
(208) 455-2729
(208) 841-6872
www.justawickaway.com
$25 Gift Certificate
for Caldwell’s NEW Simply Stylin’ Salon.
Chocovine French
Cabernet Sauvignon
Winners will receive 2 bottles!
Regularly priced $9.99 at World Market.
G
I
V
E
A
W
A
Y
S
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Today’s Woman | sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
I
daho Press-Tribune Business Manager
Rhonda McMurtrie manages the fnances
by day and fnds time for craft projects on
the weekends. She made these bright pots in just
a few hours, but that time must be spread out
over a few days so the multiple coats of paint and
sealer thoroughly dry before moving on to the
next one.
Imagine the uses for these pretty pots. Gifts,
catchalls, … they’re not just for plants. Here’s
how she did it
Supplies  
✿ Clay pot and saucer, $3-$15, Depending on
size you choose
✿ Acrylic craft paint, $1.24
✿ Scrapbook paper, decorative and solid. One
sheet of each will do a pot. About $4.
✿ Embellishments, if desired: layered fowers,
$3.99; gemstones, $3.99, glitter fowers, $3.99
✿ Clay Pot Sealer*, $6.49
✿ Sponge or craft paint brushes*, $1.49 and up
✿ Mod Podge*, $5.99
✿ Craft Acrylic (Gloss) Sealer, $5.99
*Will do multiple pots
Rhonda purchased everything at Michael’s, but
could probably be found anywhere craft items are
sold. If you are a regular crafter, you may
already have some of the items, such as
the sealer, brushes, possibly even the
scrapbook paper and embellishments.
When choosing your decorative paper,
keep the size of the side of the pot in
mind. If you choose a large design, it
may not translate well to a smaller pot.
Steps
1. Seal inside of clay pot and saucer with the
pot sealer to make it leak-proof. I put on
several coats.
2. Paint the entire saucer, and the
outside of the pot with color of choice.
I chose to paint down the inside of the pot a ways
for looks.
3. Cut decorative paper into the sizes and
shapes of your choice. If mounting it on another
paper, cut that paper a little larger than the deco-
rative so it leaves a quarter-or half-inch border.
Glue them together.
4. Using the Mod Podge and a sponge brush,
spread on a thin coat and place your decora-
tive paper, pressing frmly to adhere. Rub
edges to seal paper tightly to pot. Rub out air
bubbles. Work one area at a time, making sure it’s
attached frmly before moving to the next.
5. Attach any embellishments with the Mod
Podge. Some scrapbook embellishments come
with sticky back, but I still used a little of the
Podge to make certain it was frmly sealed.
6. Once all pieces are on, spread a layer of
Mod Podge over the top of everything. This will
help seal. It’s better to put on more than one thin
coat rather than one thick coat. It tends to look
milky if you do. Rhonda put on 3 coats.
7. After the Mod Podge is dry, spray the entire
pot and saucer with the acrylic sealer, following
instructions on the can. Rhonda put on two
to three coats. Let it dry thoroughly (at least 24
hours) before putting
the pot on the saucer.
B
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Idaho Press-Tribune • SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010
 5
| ToDAY’S WomAN
All I wanted was a
pot for my plant
whimsical
Jennifer Deroin
T
een checking accounts: Do those Words belong in the same sentence?
Yes they do, and can, for the simple reason of helping your teen to
learn best money management practices before they head out on their
own and learn the hard way (like we did). As a minor, most banks will require
that a parent be a joint signer (owner) on the account until the age of 18. This
means you the parent are responsible for everything that happens on the ac-
count. Here’s what you should know and consider before making the plunge:
Does your teen earn an income or have a set allowance? If not, a checking
account probably does not make sense simply based on their inability to fund it.
However, if they have income, a checking account with a debit card allows them
to practice the basics of depositing, tracking debits (especially when a debit card
is in the picture), using online banking, and balancing their account. If they
don’t have payments such as auto insurance, it is unlikely they will use checks
so there is no need to order them. If they do have payments, online bill pay is
typically free, and probably preferable, and they can set up a recurring payment
so they don’t “forget” and insurance accidentally gets cancelled. Remember,
this is the technology generation. They will use direct deposit, online banking,
debit cards and electronic bill pay. Teach them how to read historical informa-
tion found online, how to check their balance (including at ATMs), and how to
track spending in-between online banking visits. Make sure you have access to
this online information, too, for parental monitoring.
Debit Card 101: It’s critical they understand how to monitor their balance so they
don’t get into expensive trouble with their card. However (sneaky parent trick), you
can ask your banker to set a daily spending limit on the card for an amount you are
comfortable with ($10, $20, up to the bank’s standard limits which can typically
be around $1,500 for debit purchases). This limit does not include their daily
ATM limits. Additionally, new laws require the card holder to “opt-in” to allow
the debit card to overdraw the account. Don’t opt-in for your teen unless you
have a specifc reason (they’re traveling and need a safety net perhaps). By not
opting in, when they walk up to the counter to purchase their $1.32 package of
gum, it won’t cost them an extra $32 if it overdraws the account!
Find out if your bank has an “automatic overdraft protection plan.” Deny this
type of coverage for the teen’s account (there is not always an application for
something like this — so ask). It’s not a good lesson to learn about how to go
into debt at a young age, creating habits that are hard to break.
The best money tip you can give your kids is the advice of paying yourself
frst. Learning this habit at a young age will help their “practice” become their
“performance” as adults. Encourage them to save a percentage of each pay-
check for a rainy day, a large purchase … or better yet — an education!
Before you begin the process, discuss expectations and ask for input from your
teen. Talk through the details and fnd a game plan everyone can live with. It pays
off in more than interest!
n Jennifer Deroin is vice president and senior relationship services offcer for Intermountain Com-
munity Bank. Contact her at Jennifer.Deroin@intermountainbank.com.
Com
e in &
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Teach teens money management early
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ToDay’s Woman | sUnDay, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • idaho Press-Tribune
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By Sherry Squires and Kathleen Tuck
• For Today’s Woman
E
very school has them. The popular girl who
spreads mean rumors about her
classmates and shuts out all but her closest
friends from her social circle. Or the big boy who picks
on smaller children, stealing lunch money and threaten-
ing to hurt them if they tell. They’re bullies, and they
may be targeting your child. Or even worse, the bully
could be your child.
According to the National Crime Prevention Council,
74 percent of children ages 8-11 say bullying and teas-
ing occur at their schools. The National Education As-
sociation reports that every day, about 160,000 children
miss school because they are scared of a bully. And
with cyber-bullying running rampant, the numbers are
climbing.
Determining if your child is among the bullied can
be challenging. Children are often embarrassed about
being bullied or too intimidated by the bully to tell any-
one about it fearing that it will only get worse, said Pat
Charlton, assistant superintendent for Vallivue School
District.
But there are some warning signs for parents. A
child may:
n Suddenly seem unhappy about going to school or
be sadder or more anxious than usual.
n May stop eating, not sleep well or seem moodier
than usual.
n May start avoiding certain situations, like taking the
bus to school.
If your child is being bullied, take it seriously and get
a school administrator involved right away. Kids who
are harassed are more likely to do poorly in school, be
depressed, have low self-esteem and, in extreme cases,
even turn to violence for protection.
“Bullying has been around for a long time but today it
isn’t just the traditional type of bullying we might have
experienced,” Charlton said. “Electronic bullying has
become a national epidemic. Any case of bullying has
to be taken seriously.”
The National Crime Prevention Council reports that
bullies are more likely to do poorly in school, smoke
and drink alcohol and commit crimes in the future.
If you suspect your child is being a little too heavy-
handed, don’t treat it as a passing phase.
“From a psychological perspective, kids tend
to become bullies for two reasons,” said Mary
Pritchard, associate professor of psychology at
Boise State University and director of the Family
Studies Initiative. The frst is to avoid getting bul-
lied themselves, and the second is because it gets
them attention.
Pritchard suggests parents ask themselves
two things:
Are they giving their child plenty of positive
attention and not just paying attention to them
when they misbehave?
What is going on in their child’s life — for in-
stance, are they being bullied at school or even at home?
Boise State public policy associate professor Elizabeth
Fredericksen, who has extensively studied bullying in
the workplace, said insecurity also could play a role.
“Unfortunately, just as in adult bullying, when people
feel powerless in their private lives, they are likely to
aggress in a public forum. Thus, if your kid is the bully,
perhaps you need to consider what messages you are
sending about managing confict.”
By partnering with teachers and school administra-
tors, and taking a close look at their own interactions
with their children, parents can have a positive impact
on decreasing bullying behavior. For more suggestions
on dealing with both sides of the bully issue, visit www.
ncpc.org/topics and click on “bullying.”
Don’t let bullies target your child
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| Today’S Woman Idaho Press-Tribune • SUnday, aUGUST 8, 2010
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Today’s Woman | sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
Concealed weapon permits 411
Canyon County records show the
amount of applications for CWPs pro-
cessed each year:
1,646 June 2009 to June 2010
2,012 June 2008 to June 2009
1,533 June 2007 to June 2008
1,513 June 2006 to June 2007
Men to women CWP ratio:
79 percent men
21 percent women
Canyon County Records Section Supervisor Debbie
McRae said the ratio of men and women owning CWPs in
Canyon County has been steady for the past four years.
How to get a CWP
1. You must frst take a frearms course. These courses,
often a one day, 8-hour class, are offered at numerous
locations and range in price from free to $65, depending
on public or private instruction and range practice time.
Contact the Canyon County Records Section — 454-7488
or ccsorecords@canyonco.org — for a list of local frearms
instructors.
2. Once you have proof of frearms familiarity, you can
apply for a CWP at the Canyon County Sheriff ’s Offce. The
application fee costs $34, and you pay another $30 upon ap-
proval. CWPs must be renewed every fve years; the renewal
fee costs $15.
✪ For more information visit canyonco.org and www2.state.
id.us/ag/faq/concealedweaponspermit.htm
Girls with guns
By Kendel Murrant ✪ kmurrant@idahopress.com
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| Today’s WoMan sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
W
omen who carry guns. There are only a couple of fa-
mous ones: Annie Oakley, the amazing Western sharp
shooter, and, um … Charlie’s Angels?
But today in Canyon County, hundreds of women own frearms.
Many female gun-toters have CWPs — concealed weapon permits
— and carry for protection. More than 300 CWPs were processed
for women applicants in Canyon County last year. And some lady
shooters carry far more than just protection — they also enjoy
hunting and other frearms-related recreation.
Why women carry
Roberta Regnier, owner of Alpha Omega Services, is relatively
new to frearm ownership. After starting the Nampa gun shop
with her husband, she got a CWP a few years ago for protection.
Since then, she’s come to enjoy recreational shooting when she
can fnd the time.
Regnier understands why recreational frearm use is a male-
dominated pastime.
“Guys like the power. Guns are loud, they’re forceful; that’s just
a general guy thing,” she says.
But Women often carry guns for protection. Those who are
knowledgeable about frearms and carry them feel confdent
about their safety, Regnier says. And that confdence makes a
world of difference in a potentially threatening situation.
“I feel like it’s important to protect ourselves. Most of the time,
showing the gun or saying you have a concealed weapon will
scare somebody (away). The best defense is a strong offense. If
you appear able to defend yourself, that’s a good thing.”
‘Cute’ guns
Nope, it’s not a pickup line. Gun makers like Cobra and Kel-Tec
are marketing a line of “feminine” frearms, from a dainty Der-
ringer to a powerful — and pink — semi automatic carbon rife.
Regnier sells a wide variety of pink guns, even in children’s sizes
— proud parents and grandparents have purchased the mini
“girly” rifes for their daughters and granddaughters, she says.
“Women like colorful things — fowers, perfume … and now
they’re making ‘cute’ guns in bright colors.”
If not a gun…
Some women who don’t feel comfortable carrying a frearm
may still want to protect themselves. Here are some alternative
products you can carry:
✪ Tazer
✪ Mace
✪ Wasp spray
To learn more about keeping yourself safe, visit powertochange.
com/life/personalsafetytips
By Debbie Kushlan Bettencourt ● For Today’s Woman
Y
ou often hear about people who have a lifelong friend dating back to
childhood.
A group of women originally from Homedale consider themselves lucky
to be part of a group of eight who have been friends since childhood. All of these
women were born and raised in the Homedale area, all but one on farms. The group
started coming together as friends in 1957 in frst grade, went all the way through
school and graduated together in 1969 from Homedale High School.
Then they scattered: Marcia, Barbara and Debbie went to Boise State, Becky and
Marilinn to University of Idaho, Brenda to Brigham Young, Marilyn to College of
Idaho and Lynn to Oregon College of Education. After college, they married and
started careers and families, most of them in the Treasure Valley. Contact with each
other became more sporadic.
The common thread that kept uniting the group was Becky, who ironically lived
the farthest away. After college, she and her husband moved to Hawaii, where he was
stationed with the Navy. They then were transferred to San Diego and fnally ended
up in Minnesota. Whenever Becky made a trip to Idaho to visit her father, she wanted
to see all her friends, so they would all gather and catch up with each other’s lives.
During one of her visits to Idaho, Becky said it might be a while before she would
be back since her dad had passed away. An idea was hatched: instead of Becky always
having to come to Idaho, why don’t we go to Minnesota as a group and visit her?
Becky was ecstatic with the idea and plans were made. In August 2008, Marcia,
Marilyn, Barbara, Debbie and Lynn few to Minnesota. Becky had a schedule of
activities planned, and the group visited landmarks in Minneapolis, cruised on one of
Minnesota’s many lakes, picnicked at a lakeside concert and best of all spent many
hours at Becky’s house, talking late into the night. They enjoyed each other and had
so much fun, they decided they had to do it again.
In August 2009, the class of 1969 held its 40th class reunion in Homedale. During
that time, the group started making plans for their 2010 gathering. Debbie has a
friend with a house on the Oregon Coast. She sent the Web link out to the group and
suggested a trip to the coast. Amazingly everyone was on board and with that much
time to plan, schedules were open.
In late June, Lynn drove down from Washington, and the other seven piled into one
SUV for the road trip. Taking two cars was discussed, but nobody wanted to split up.
A week together, sometimes on the go, sometimes hanging out at the house, the
friends talked and shared and laughed, bridging the time gap effortlessly.
Even with all their changes during the years, these woman all remain true to their
early values, providing the common ground that strengthens their bond after all these
years. Growing up in a simpler time, with hard-working, stable families, they all are
honest, hard-working, caring people who will continue to fnd joy in the company of
each other for years to come.
They are already planning next year’s trip!
10
ToDay’s Woman | sUnDay, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
Friends
forever
G
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f
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n
d
s
Becky (Carter) Brown,
Eden Prairie, Minn.
Brenda (Carson)
Hogg, Caldwell
Barbara (George)
Ineck, Boise
Marcia (Richards)
Hoshaw, Homedale
Marilyn (Curtis)
Evans, Homedale
Marilinn (Cegnar)
Batt, Homedale
Lynn (Evans) Vona,
Issaquah, Wash.
Debbie Kushlan
(Bettencourt), Meridian
A big thank you!
To Debbie Kushlan
(Bettencourt) who
told this special
story and gathered
the photos for publi-
cation.
And by the way:
An interesting
reunion with a ffth
grade teacher, Evelyn Cates, adds a special touch.
When Debbie’s husband died in 2006, Evelyn spot-
ted her name in his obituary and fgured it had to
be the same Debbie Kushlan who had been in her
class years ago. An e-mail to Debbie confrmed that,
and after e-mailing back and forth a few times,
they made a coffee date and a new friendship was
formed. They now enjoy tailgating together at Boi-
se State games and meeting for dinner with some
of her other students. Evelyn, a vivacious, bubbly
woman, accepted an invitation to the class reunion
and reunited with many of her students. They were
her frst class out of college, and according to Ev-
elyn, her favorite of all her classes thereafter.
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| Today’s Woman sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
Evelyn Cates
From left, back row: Barbara (George) Ineck, Brenda (Carson) Hogg, Marcia (Richards) Hoshaw,
Marilyn (Curtis) Evans, Marilinn (Cegnar) Batt and Becky (Carter) Brown.
From left, front row: Lynn (Evans) Vona and Debbie Kushlan (Bettencourt).
12
W

hen Rebecca Lovelace goes
home, she isn’t apt to share the
details of her work with her two
sons, 12-year-old Kent and 10-year-old Kyle.
“I try very hard to shelter the boys from
what I do,” says the 42-year-old married work-
ing mom. “They don’t know who the Family
Justice Center serves.”
What exactly does this domestic violence
advocate tell her children about the cycle of
violence? That goes on every day, right here in
towns like Nampa and Caldwell, where in half
of the cases of abuse against women, children
are also being battered and abused?
“Not every family is a loving, wonderful
family,” she tells them. “There are just some
families that struggle with a lot of things.”
Lovelace grew up in a stable two-parent
home, the youngest of three children. Yet her
passion led her to a career helping the most
troubled families heal.
“This is where life led me. I’m a frm believer
that things happen for a reason,” she said.
R
ebe
ca L
ovelace p
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ts fam
ily —
an
d
ju
stice —
f
rst
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By Sharon Straus
Rebecca Lovelace spends
time with her husband, Kent,
and sons Kyle and Kent at
their Nampa home.
Riding a new wave
Lovelace is executive director of the Nampa Family Justice Cen-
ter, one of about 60 established centers nationwide. Many more
are in some stage of development across the state and the country.
Lovelace gets phone calls every week from people asking how to
start up a family justice center in their communities.
It’s the new wave of helping abuse victims, and it’s called collab-
orative investigations — the linking together of police, prosecu-
tors and social service workers all under one roof, so that victims
get what they need, when they need it. In 2004 Lovelace helped create it after Nampa police Det.
Angela Weekes returned from a domestic violence training in San
Diego, where she toured the city’s frst justice center.
“‘Oh my gosh, you won’t believe what I just saw,’” Lovelace re-
members her friend telling her. “‘We have to do this in Nampa!’”
Lovelace was committed to the justice center long before the
center was even built, helping Detective Weekes identify resources
and grants.
“She understood the value of this concept. She’s been 110 per-
cent behind it, even before it was an organization,” said Weekes,
who is the Nampa detective now assigned to the center.
The Nampa Family Justice Center was the frst of its kind in
Idaho, and one of the frst 15 in the nation.
Spearheading a groundbreaking justice center was never in
Lovelace’s life plan. Moving from California to her husband’s
native Idaho, yes. Working with people, yes. Utilizing her psychol-
ogy degree, yes. But leading a nationally-recognized justice center
wasn’t something Lovelace had pictured herself doing.
C
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13
She’s a homebody
Lovelace strives to fnd the balance between
family and her commitment to the Family Justice
Center. So when she leaves work for the day, this
working woman focuses all her energy on her
family. That’s not uncommon among women in
this feld.
“When you do this type of work, you have
to fnd a way to separate your work from your
family life and walk away at the end of the day
as much as possible,” said Angela Weekes, a
Nampa police detective. “So keeping your family
completely from work is crucial. I strive to do the
same thing. It helps you keep your sanity.”
Lovelace tries hard to keep her workdays to
eight hours.
“Come fve o’clock, I want to be out of here,
pick up kids from school, make dinner, take care
of them.”
Away from work, Lovelace is all about enjoying
family time. Her boys keep her busy with school,
football and golf. Her husband, Kent, built her a
“scrapping shed” so she could scrapbook to her
heart’s content.
Offering hope and a light at the end of the
tunnel to those who need help the most keep
Lovelace coming back to work everyday. “Not everybody grows up in healthy homes,”
Lovelace said. “I think it all comes back to mak-
ing a difference in people’s lives. Knowing you
can help people get through trauma, get through
experiences that life has thrown at them.”
R
ebe
ca L
ovelace p
u
ts fam
ily —
an
d
ju
stice —
f
rst
Rebecca Lovelace poses in her scrapbooking
shed at her Caldwell home.
14
Today’s Woman | sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
Q&A with Rebecca Lovelace
What’s your guilty pleasure? Sleep. I love to sleep.
What do you do for “me time?” Scrapbook, watch movies
What do you do to stay healthy? Healthy?? :) Not much...
Secret to happiness? Family and friends
What will you always buy? Scrapbooking stuff, clothes
Where do you love to shop? Target
Silly fear? Driving over overpasses. It will be my luck that the
overpass collapses when I’m stuck in traffc.
First dollar earned? Carl’s Jr. when I was 15. My frst job.
Early bird or night owl? Early Bird! 10 p.m., I’m toast.
Will you share your favorite quick dinner recipe with us? Recipe?? No. I’m not very domestic
and not a very good cook. Favorite dinner would be beans and tortillas that I make on Sundays.
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Kent and Kyle enjoy sledding
south of Nampa.
Honey Goodman
Age: 42
Career: I am employed as the
Community Relations Director for
Treasure Valley Hospice. I provide
support and education to individu-
als and their families as they face a
critical illness.
Family: Jeff, my wonderful
husband of 20 years; my beautiful daughter Toni, age
9; and my funny and sensitive son CJ, age 7.
Life motto: My personal mission statement is to love
and to serve others. My favorite Bible verse is found in
Matthew 20:28 NLT: “Just as the Son of Man did not
come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as
a ransom for many.”
Guilty pleasure: Peppermint mocha
Favorite recipe: Grandma’s Rum Cake. One of
my favorite memories is making Rum Cake with my
grandmother. There is something special about hanging
out with the women you love in the kitchen. Additionally,
for me as a woman, my recipe for life success can be
found in Proverbs 31. When you are feeling lost as a
woman, it is the perfect place to go for soul food.
Wendy Williams
Age: 50
Career: Currently a “domestic
engineer.”
Family: I have four grown kids
who are immeasurable blessings
to me (and truly good people):
Justin, Jordan, Jake and Chelsea.
I also have three daughters-in-law
— Marci, Cortney and Anna — and two nearly perfect
granddaughters, Brook and Avery. I am a recent widow,
but was married to a passionate, godly man for almost
32 years, Cliff Williams. What a privilege to have loved
him, served in ministry with him for almost 30 years,
and been married to him! I miss him very, very much!
Community involvement: I have been active at The
Rock (C&MA), the church I helped Cliff “plant” (start from
scratch) for almost 8 years now. Part of the core values
of The Rock include being involved in our community in
ways that our community is blessed by us … commu-
nity Easter Egg hunts, downtown Halloween parties, and
Vacation Bible Schools that we intentionally offer to our
community, not only “church people.”
Monica White
Age: 34
Career: Principal of Syringa
Middle School in Caldwell
First dollar earned: Picking
worms and selling them to Paul’s
Market in Riggins.
Family: I was born to Bob and
Patty Young. My mom is currently a teacher in Emmett.
My father passed away fve years ago after a 12-year
battle with cancer. He was an amazing music teacher
and track coach in the valley for years. … I married
Josh White in 2001. Josh teaches history at Caldwell
High School and coaches football for the Cougs. We
have two boys: Willie is 6 and Brodie is 4.
Life goals: My main goal in life is to raise my own
children to become solid contributing members of so-
ciety. … I would also like to press forward in my career
to ensure that all students have not just the opportunity
to learn, but the opportunity that best suits them as an
individual.
Favorite place to shop: Ski Swap.
Savvy Chicks profles have been edited for length. To read the full
profles, along with recipes, visit idahopress.com/todays_woman.
Q
&
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| Today’s Woman Idaho Press-Tribune • sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010
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By Gracy Howard ● For Today’s Woman
W
omen love to bring home the trophies of
a successful shopping expedition. Finding
the perfect item can be an adventure, full
of fun, frenzy and enjoyment.
Many believe that consignment stores only enhance
the joys of shopping: The items available are unique,
the experience is more friendly and personal, and
brand-name items are available for a fraction of
their retail price.
“Consignment shopping is about the thrill of the
hunt,” Amy LaJocies, owner of Again Consignment
in Eagle, said. “It’s almost a high to fnd something
you really want and not have to pay very much for it.
It’s really exciting.”
“You get way more for your dollar, and can buy
high-end labels that you may not normally be able
to afford,” Ruth Story, owner of Story and Co. in
Caldwell, said. Story carries consigned, new and
vintage merchandise. She just received a shipment
of 500 to 700 pieces of 1960 vintage clothing in
mint condition.
Justin Barney, owner of Plato’s Closet in Boise, sees
the consigning industry as a branch of the green
movement.
“People are more aware of and interested in
reducing waste and reusing resources,” he said.
LaJocies believes that a woman’s love of change
and new things has spurred on consignment sales.
“My business is based on the fact that women like
to change their mind,” she said. “I have ladies who
bought stuff last week, and are already selling it.
Women like change, new ideas, something different.
Consignment provides a way to change their minds
and get some compensation for that, so they can
buy new things.”
To maintain a high standard for her clothing,
LaJocies has four people look at every item they ac-
cept from consigners. The store usually receives 500
items a day, but only accepts 200.
“Ladies continue to come back because me, my
manager and my staff form personal relationships
with consigners and customers,” LaJocies said. “A
lot of ladies are not necessarily coming in to shop;
they are coming in for interaction, to talk and feel
included.”
Verlynn Nobbs, owner of Elite Repeats in
Nampa, said, “A lot of people know me, and come
in to see what new is happening. They like the
socializing, visiting, and catching up on old friends
and family.”
“I love, love, love what I do, and I plan on doing it
for a long time,” LaJocies said.
The joys of consignment shopping
F
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Today’s Woman | sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
amy LaJocies,
owner of again
Consignment
Clothing
Boutique
in Eagle.
10 Commandments of consignment
1. Don’t buy something just because it’s a good deal.
If you fall in love with it, buy it, but don’t buy some-
thing you “sort of like” just because it’s only $5.
2. Always try items on. If there is a hidden tear or
stain, it will be easier to fnd if you try on the item.
Also, garments often ft differently than they look, and
size fuctuates with brand.
3. Always have a purpose in purchase and a mental
picture or list of what you are looking for. Make sure
you “need” it, have a place for it, a way to turn around
and make a proft on it, something useful to transform
it into or someone to give it to.
4. Just because it is a name brand does not mean it is
a good purchase. If it is ugly, leave it alone.
5. Be brave and try on different, bold or interesting
garments. You never know how wonderful (or awful) a
piece of clothing will be until you try it on.
6. Sign up for your favorite consignment stores’
e-mail lists. They can let you know when they have
sales/clearances and when they get in new seasonal
items, a large amount of new clothes, or several items
in a neat brand.
7. Consignment stores are a fabulous place to fnd
nice cardigans. If you think they are too plain looking,
add some embellishments. Replace buttons with fun,
new ones.
8. Look for your prom dress/evening dress at a
consignment store. It’s a great way to save money, and
most have only been worn once.
9. Never buy your panties at a consignment store.
10. Take your time. Although there are a lot of racks
to search through, diligent hunting often results in
treasure.
How to make money as a consigner
n Make monthly closet raids. If there are items
in your closet that you haven’t worn for a month or
so, it’s time to get rid of it. If you have lost or gained
weight, you can sell the items that no longer ft.
n Keep the tags on your new clothing if you have
never worn them. If you decide to get rid of that
item, you can usually get more money for it.
n Think beyond clothing. Most consignment
stores also accept shoes, jewelry, purses, accessories
and even perfume. Anything you no longer use or
like can be consigned.
n Often, you can use money earned from con-
signing as credit in the store. It makes buying new
clothing for less money a lot easier.
n When you consign your clothing, ask your
store to donate items they don’t take. It’s a great way
to get rid of excess items you don’t need and give to
a worthy cause.
F
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Got shots?
Unvaccinated children are at risk for
contracting serious childhood diseases. Every
year Idaho’s children suffer unnecessarily from
the effects of disease.
Is your child immunized?
Recommended childhood vaccines include:
DTaP [diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough]
IPV [polio vaccine series]
MMR [measles, mumps, rubella vaccine
series]
Hepatitis B vaccine series
Hib [haemophilus infuenza] (Hib disease
is the leading cause of meningitis in children
under 5 years.)
Pneumococcal [streptococcus pneumonia]
Hepatitis A vaccine series
Varicella (chickenpox)
Meningococcal [meningococcal meningitis]
Rotavirus (Severe viral gastroenteritis of
infants and children)
Infuenza (annually)
How can I possibly know what vaccines
my child needs and when?
Good news! Since July 1, clients receiving
immunizations from enrolled immunization
providers throughout the state have been
automatically enrolled in Idaho’s Immunization
Reminder Service (IRIS). IRIS is a statewide
immunization registry designed to track you
and your family’s immunization records — both
received and those needed in the future.
All children born in Idaho are added to IRIS
at birth or your medical provider can add your
family’s immunization records into IRIS.
IRIS is completely confdential and secure.
The information can only be accessed by
enrolled health care providers, schools, or
childcare programs.
For more information about IRIS or about the
recommended immunization schedule, visit
www.immunizeidaho.com, contact the Idaho
Immunization Program at 334-5931, or call
Southwest District Health at 455-5345.
3floz.com?
Yep, almost anything you need in airline-approved, 3-fuid-ounce bottles? Want to sample new product lines? Can’t commit to anything?
Oprah dubbed this nifty site “Small Wonders.” Check it out.
Does this make
me look fat?
How times do you ask, knowing
your man or friend may not want
to tell you the truth when you
model the bright yellow dress?
Now you can get a second,
third or even fourth opinion. Just
snap a quick shot and send it to
one or both of these two sites:
fashism.com or gotryiton.com.
It’s free. In the dressing room
and can’t decide what little black
dress to buy for the company
party? Got your cell phone? You’ll
have answers within minutes!
What’s new?
Want to be ahead of the curve when it
comes to setting fashion but don’t want to buy
a dozen magazines this month?
Check out tipsntrends.com for the scoop on:
Little Black Dress Tea
Vitafusion Fiber Gummies
Boudreaux’s Butt Paste
Leg Cramps PM with Quinine
Top reasons women
should log-on to Facebook
We’re women — we like to talk about things.
We use social media as a way to connect — to build
relationship. We keep up with our friends, read and
discuss things we “like.”
Facebook has become the largest social networking
tool in the world dominated by women. Let’s not lose our
stake in world domination!
We like to connect with others who are like-minded
or share common interests such as career, parenting,
beliefs, family stages, etc. We can subscribe to pages
we “like.”
We can share the ups and downs of our daily lives,
accept or reject advice as “comments,” or offer up our
own.
We can reconnect with old friends from high school
and college and build new relationships with neighbors
and extended family
Women are the majority of online social gamers, such
as FarmVille.
Don’t Do’s on FB
Profle Pic: Don’t hide behind your kid’s picture as
your profle pic. Facebook is about building your own
persona.
Photos: Remember, what happens in Vegas
stays … on Facebook! Insist people don’t snap
shots of you taking shots if you don’t want
people to know about it later, especially
if … or better yet, just don’t do stuff you
don’t want people to know about.
Don’t jeopardize your job: Don’t talk
poorly about your boss or place of em-
ployment. Also, if you call in sick, don’t
post to Facebook that you’re out at the
mall shopping or getting your nails
done — seriously, just don’t do it! Oh
yeah, and if you’re job prospecting
while at your current job, don’t
announce it on FB, again could be
w/o a J-O-B next day.
Wall post vs. direct message: Don’t post a personal-
ized, detailed message to someone’s wall; instead send
them a direct message.
Don’t Complain: Don’t complain about every ache
and ailment. No one wants to hear you complain all the
time. Really!
DON’T TYPE IN ALL CAPS.
n Rhea Allen is Treasure Valley’s queen of social
media, a wife & mother of two, marketing consultant
and president/CEO of Peppershock Media. Contact
Rhea at 461-5070 www.peppershock.com and fnd
Rhea on Facebook & Twitter @Peppershock
Do you glorify
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We found Sweet Spot at Visual Effects Salon and Spa in Boise, vesalon.com or sweetspotlabs. com.
Read more about it at
idahopress/todays_woman.com.
T
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n
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T
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| Today’s Woman sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
Does this make
me look fat?
How times do you ask, knowing
your man or friend may not want
to tell you the truth when you
model the bright yellow dress?
Now you can get a second,
third or even fourth opinion. Just
snap a quick shot and send it to
one or both of these two sites:
fashism.com or gotryiton.com.
It’s free. In the dressing room
and can’t decide what little black
dress to buy for the company
party? Got your cell phone? You’ll
have answers within minutes!
W
h
at’s n
ew
?
Want to be ahead of the curve when it
comes to setting fashion but don’t want to buy
a dozen magazines this month?
Check out tipsntrends.com for the scoop on:
Little Black Dress Tea
Vitafusion Fiber Gummies
Boudreaux’s Butt Paste
Leg Cramps PM with Quinine
Top reasons women
should log-on to Facebook
We’re women — we like to talk about things.
We use social media as a way to connect — to build
relationship. We keep up with our friends, read and
discuss things we “like.”
Facebook has become the largest social networking
tool in the world dominated by women. Let’s not lose our
stake in world domination!
We like to connect with others who are like-minded
or share common interests such as career, parenting,
beliefs, family stages, etc. We can subscribe to pages
we “like.”
We can share the ups and downs of our daily lives,
accept or reject advice as “comments,” or offer up our
own.
We can reconnect with old friends from high school
and college and build new relationships with neighbors
and extended family
Women are the majority of online social gamers, such
as FarmVille.
Don’t Do’s on FB
Profle Pic: Don’t hide behind your kid’s picture as
your profle pic. Facebook is about building your own
persona.
Photos: Remember, what happens in Vegas
stays … on Facebook! Insist people don’t snap
shots of you taking shots if you don’t want
people to know about it later, especially
if … or better yet, just don’t do stuff you
don’t want people to know about.
Don’t jeopardize your job: Don’t talk
poorly about your boss or place of em-
ployment. Also, if you call in sick, don’t
post to Facebook that you’re out at the
mall shopping or getting your nails
done — seriously, just don’t do it! Oh
yeah, and if you’re job prospecting
while at your current job, don’t
announce it on FB, again could be
w/o a J-O-B next day.
Wall post vs. direct message: Don’t post a personal-
ized, detailed message to someone’s wall; instead send
them a direct message.
Don’t Complain: Don’t complain about every ache
and ailment. No one wants to hear you complain all the
time. Really!
DON’T TYPE IN ALL CAPS.
n Rhea Allen is Treasure Valley’s queen of social
media, a wife & mother of two, marketing consultant
and president/CEO of Peppershock Media. Contact
Rhea at 461-5070 www.peppershock.com and fnd
Rhea on Facebook & Twitter @Peppershock
19
| Today’s Woman sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
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Today’s Woman | sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
Frame y ur shades
Face Shapes Do’s Don’ts

Oval: Proportional face, with
slightly narrow chin and higher
cheekbones
Oakley Cover Story Pink: $170
(Family Eyecare Specialists, Caldwell)
For an oval-faced girl, the sky’s
the limit! Because of the balanced
proportions of her face, she can pretty
much pull off any style. So why not try
something that’s hot this year? Mix a
retro classic aviator with a bright new
color and go have some fun in the sun.
Avoid frames that overpower your
features. Go big, but be reasonable.

Square: Sharper angles,
strong jaw, boxy chin and
wide brow.
Geek 102 black: $69.95 (Available
at Eyemart Express, Nampa)
Women with more angle to their
faces should go for round frames
to downplay the boxiness. When it
comes to sunglasses — go opposite!
If you have a square face, you need a
round pair of shades.
Beware square on square. Emphasiz-
ing the angles of the face could make
a girl look like a real block head!

Round: Similar width and
length of face, round cheeks
and very soft angles
Maui Jim Akamai Brown: $209
(Family Eyecare Specialists, Caldwell)
It’s hip to wear a square! Geometric
and rectangular glasses will make a
round face look longer and thinner, bal-
ancing out the baby face. Sunglasses
with a bar across the brow (such as
the ever so popular aviator) draw at-
tention upward and make the face look
longer. Cat-eye glasses are one fun
way to spice up a round frame.
A girl with an already round face
should stay away from oval shapes
which will add to the roundness.

Oblong: High cheeks, longer
face and nose, high forehead
Ed Hardy EHS017: $200
(Eye Care Associates of Nampa)
Juicy Couture Big Love: $135
(Total Vision, Caldwell)
Why the long face? Shorten it up with
round or square glasses that cover
the center of the face. Deep decora-
tive or embellished sides also add
width when it’s needed.
Small, disproportional glasses are a
defnite no-no for women with longer
faces.

Triangle: Forehead is
narrow. Chin and jaw are
wider than top of face
Juicy Couture Glam: $175 (Total
Vision, Caldwell)
Women with triangular faces need to
fnd sunglasses to balance out the
larger jaw. Wide styles and bright
colors attract attention to the upper
part of the face. This is another face
shape that works great with cat-eyes
and wayfarers.
With a more narrow brow and broader
chin, people of this face shape should
defnitely avoid tiny specs. It will make
the proportions much more drastic
and unfattering.

Diamond: Narrower chin
and eyeline, with high
drastic cheekbones
Lulu Guinness 488: $160 (Eye Care
Associates of Nampa)
Ted Baker Black 414: $125 (Eye
Care Associates of Nampa)
Diamond faced women have high
emphasized cheekbones, so why not
show them off? Rimless styles will
accentuate those beauties. On less
fashy days, oval glasses will soften the
contours and strike a great balance.
The advice is similar for diamonds
and triangles. Don’t draw attention
to the narrow forehead with little
glasses. Its all about proportions!
Safety
Ultraviolet (UV) eye protection matters. UV radiation from
the sun can damage not only the skin of your eyelids but
also the clear outer parts of the eye — the cornea and con-
junctiva. UV exposure also contributes to the development
of certain types of cataracts.
Choose sunglasses that block at least 99 percent
of UVB rays and at least 95 percent of UVA rays. Skip sun-
glasses that are labeled “cosmetic” and those that don’t
offer details on UV protection. (http://www.mayoclinic.
com/health/uv-protection/an00832)
Family Eyecare Specialists in Caldwell advises
everyone to wear sunglasses to protect their eyes not
only in the summer, but in the winter and on overcast
days as well. Blocking UV rays helps decrees the risk of
eye disease such as glaucoma, cataracts, and muscular
degeneration.
In Style
Ray-Ban and Oakley’s have been big sellers this year, as well as the typical
hot styles from designers such as Coach and Juicy Couture. 2010 trends
have been big plastics (Runway-Sunwear RS584 available at Eyemart Express,
Nampa $79.95), aviators, and more retro glasses such as wayfarers (Ray-Ban
2140 Red $139 (Family Eyecare Specialists, Caldwell)). And this summer, mix it
up and try any of those in a bright color!
By Haley Robinson ● for Today’s Woman
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20 plug-in warmers and over 80 “Scentsational” scents available in
Scentsy wax bars, room sprays and hanging fresheners.
Casie Stevenson ~ Independent Consultant
Superstar Director / Founder’s Circle Member
208.455.2729 / 208.841.6872
www.justawickaway.com
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| Today’s Woman Idaho Press-Tribune • sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010
I
t is that time of year again. This
month, families across America,
mothers to be exact, will pack up
their last child and send them off into
the great beyond, better known as “Col-
lege.” The realization that your life’s work
— raising your children — is about to end
can sometimes send moms into quite the
tailspin.
I am here to say, it doesn’t have to make
you a sobbing crazy woman! My husband
and I have just completed our frst year of
what is offcially called the “Empty Nest
Syndrome,” and I must admit, we handled
it very well!
Actually, we did not just “handle it,” we
went through it, survived it, and actually
lived it. One year later, life is playing out
the way it is meant to. We put everything
we had into raising our kids, and now it
is time for them to move on and discover
their own lives.
Of course it was hard at frst, no activi-
ties, no daily duties that are simply part
of having kids, but eventually you begin
to realize that a new life cycle has arrived.
When you witness your children making
grown-up decisions, or handling grown-up
problems, you can take pride in the fact
that you helped mold them into the people
they are, able to make those decisions.
Because I am a happily married mom,
when my last child left, I began to see for
the frst time in decades, my husband,
my honey, could once again become the
center of my universe. We had time just
for us. We began cooking only what we
wanted to eat (much healthier I must ad-
mit) and our grocery bill plummeted. We
did what we wanted to, when we wanted
to, and it was fantastic. A brand new level
of love and affection developed.
The bottom line is: We cannot begrudge
our children for growing up and leaving
us. This is exactly what we have spent our
life’s work doing, raising them to live their
own lives, just as we have. We have
spent years giving, caring, teaching
and loving the most precious things
to us, our children. We want every-
thing for them and would sacrifce
anything for them in a heartbeat. So
why should it be heart wrenching
to us when they take that frst step
toward adulthood?
We want them to be strong, successful
individuals, but we still want them to be
our babies. So, I can easily say no matter
how far they travel, how old they get, or
successful they become, they will still be
our babies. There will always be a time
when they simply need their mommas.
After all, this is how we raised them, to
hold our place in their hearts, yet become
their own people. So rejoice in their new-
found independence and rejoice in your
own newfound world. From experience, I
can attest it will be OK.
As they say, it is indeed the circle of life.
Empty nest? Don’t be a sobbing crazy woman!
Machele
haMilton
Machele Hamilton writes
a column about painting
and home improvement.
It is published every
other week on Saturdays.
She also writes a blog,
Don’t Get Me Started, at
idahopress.com.
H
ave you ever considered getting a tattoo?
Local women share their thoughts, tips
and advice about permanent body art.
Why do women get tattoos?
For many, a tattoo is a
symbol or representation of
something meaningful. Many
women get tattoos in honor
of a loved one or to represent
their religion
“I think it’s really neat to
tell people I got my tattoo
in honor of my dad,” Nampa resident Brooke
Rhoan said.
What designs are popular?
Floral designs, especially roses, are extremely
popular. Spiritual pieces, often containing crosses
or wings, and Chinese symbols are also trendy.
What safety precautions should you take?
Find a tattoo shop that is very clean. Operators
should regularly sterilize equipment and change
out needles with each customer. Women should
not get a tattoo while pregnant or breast-feeding.
Tattoo artists need to know of any skin sensitivi-
ties, in case you might be allergic to certain inks.
After getting a tattoo, it is important to use oint-
ment to prevent infection. Caldwell resident Clau-
dia Castellanos recommends showering twice a day
for a while to keep the tattoo as clean as possible.
How much do tattoos cost?
Costs (often linked to quality and safety) vary.
Some local shops charge $50 for a tattoo; how-
ever, keep in mind that you pay for what you get.
Often, a more expensive shop will offer better
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Today’s Woman | sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
Women: Tattoos honor the important things in life
By Gracy Howard ❧ For Today’s Woman
quality tattoos and hold to higher standards of
safety and cleanliness.
I really don’t think I would trust a cheap place,”
Castellanos said. She gets her tattoos at Munster’s
Ink, a shop in Nampa. Muster’s Ink charges
between $120 and $160 for a small tattoo, and
$80 an hour for sessions — equipment through
hospital-level sterilization.
“Michael cleans everything in front of me, every
30 to 40 minutes,” Rhoan said. “Caring for a tat-
too is not a lot of work if you go to someone who
knows what they’re doing.”
Do tattoos cause diffculties in the workplace?
Many employers require their employees to
completely cover tattoos. Rhoan made sure to
position her back tattoo so it is not visible when
she wears tank-tops.
“It’s not out there for everyone to see,” she said.
“One of the reasons I love it so much is because
it’s unexpected.”
Think before you ink:
❦ Risks include infection or allergic reactions,
scarring, knots or bumps if your body fghts the
ink.
❦ The FDA has not approved pigments for tat-
toos. According to WebMD.com, many pigments
used in tattoo inks are industrial-grade colors
suitable for printers’ ink or automobile paint.
❦ You must be at least 14 years
old to have a tattoo, but must
have written parental consent
until age 18.
❦ Tattoos don’t just wash
off when you don’t want it any
more. Think about placement
and content.
❦ Don’t let peer pressure or
drugs/alcohol drive your decision
to get a tattoo.
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| Today’s Woman sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
Women: Tattoos honor the important things in life
Tattoo artist Michael
Munster of Munster’s Ink in
Nampa works on Brooke
Rhoan’s back tattoo
Jennifer Deroin
1.
First identify what your holiday gift-giving budget will be.
Don’t forget the extras that can add up such as gift wrap-
ping supplies, holiday meal expenses, freight and/or
postage, and that ornament you can’t pass up! They seem
small but combined can equal a chunk of change that can
throw off the family’s monthly budget.
2.
Divide that amount into the months you have
until it’s time to go shopping and determine
how much income you will have in that time
frame that you can allocate toward the season — are they in
sync? Think realistically here — are you going to include that
paycheck you won’t get until Dec. 20?
3.
Set up a “special use” account at your bank that has
no service charge.
4.
Set up an automatic transfer from your main
household checking account for the amount
you’ve designated to fund your “special use”
account. You can typically set up a recurring transfer
through online banking, or ask your local branch to set it
up. This service should be free. Then don’t touch it!
5.
If your budget is squeezed too tight to save, remember the true
reason to celebrate with family and fnd other ways to show a loved
one you care with handmade gifts, acts of kindness, or a letter de-
tailing all the reasons you think they’re so terrifc. One of the most trea-
sured gifts given to my spouse was a simple journal that had one word
on each page describing a characteristic about him that I admired. He
pulls that out from time to time and remembers all the reasons why
he’s special.
An alternative to a special use account is a reloadable VISA Gift
Card. The card may be purchased at some banks and/or retailers.
You can load the card each month (or when you have some extra
cash) and then spend it during the holiday season wherever VISA
is accepted. Read all the fne print to determine what an activa-
tion charge may be, and possible re-load fees.
Give yourself the gift of a stress free holiday knowing you’ve
saved and won’t be using credit cards. Your January mail box
will thank you.
n Jennifer Deroin is vice president and senior relationship services of-
fcer for Intermountain Community Bank. Contact her at Jennifer.Deroin@
intermountainbank.com.
Start Christmas Fund today to avoid January bills
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ToDay’s Woman | sUnDay, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • idaho Press-Tribune
253943
SHANTEL
BUGBY
Shantel Bugby posts a Deal of
the Day on Facebook.com/
todayswomantreasurevalley.
Also, sign up for weekday e-
mails for links to other hot deals
where you can save oodles of
money on things you probably
don’t need but want.
Thirteen Trendy Places for Back to School for All Ages:
1. caseit.com
2. thespunkymonkey.com
3. padoodles.com
4. fashionplaytes.com
5. beso.com
6. bluefy.com
7. shopstyle.com
8. thinkgeek.com
9. homestoragewarehouse.com
10. freshtrend.com
11. zappos.com
12. thefashioncode.com
13. cwtfashion.com

Nine CHEAP sites to Buy (and Sell) Textbooks:
1. bigwords.com
2. cheapesttextbooks.com
3. bookrenter.com
4. cash4books.net
5. buycheaptextbook.com
6. campusbooks.com
7. betterworldbooks.com
8. locazu.com
9. textbooks.com
Back to school
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| Today’s Woman Idaho Press-Tribune • sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010
By Gracy Howard h For Today’s Woman
L
ocal gyms are offering new classes that are fun, enjoyable,
and challenging. The best part: These classes cater to
women — their body types, their tastes and their interests.
Anytime Fitness, a gym in Nampa, has created a collection
of classes that appeal to women, with plenty of fexibility in dif-
fculty and schedules. And instead of having to pay for a mem-
bership, Anytime Fitness operates a “pay as you go” system. To
register for any class, visit nampaftstudio.com and sign up.
Here are some recommended classes to try out:
h Zumba
Zumba combines Latin rhythms and aerobic moves to create
a fun, exhilarating workout. It burns calories, strengthens the
core, relieves stress and produces energy — all with fun, easy-
to-follow dance moves. Offered 6:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday
and Friday and 6 p.m. Thursday.
h Cardio Kickboxing
Cardio Kickboxing uses jabs, hooks and kicks to create a
great full-body workout. Get ready to burn calories, build
strength, and lose weight with this fun cardiovascular workout.
Offered 9 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday and 11
a.m. Saturday.
h Yoga
Yoga combines toning, stretching, and strength-building
moves to energize and warm the body. It builds fexibility,
strengthens the core and increases balance. Yoga relieves stress
and boosts energy, as well. Offered 7 a.m.
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 9
a.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Satur-
day, and 7:15 p.m. Thursday.
h Pilates
Pilates strengthens the core, in-
creases balance and tones the body. It
is a full-body workout, but concentrates
on the abdomen and back. From building
fexibility to losing inches, Pilates is a great workout
for every age and body type. (Anytime Fitness plans to
offer a Pilates class in the near future)
Join the Zumbathon!
h Anytime Fitness will raise money for school supplies with a Zumbathon in the park-
ing lot at 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 21. For more information, call the gym at 465-4400.
Get fit,
have fun
18
Today’s Woman | sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
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Today’s Woman | sUnday, may 9, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune

I feel lik
e, fo
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in
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26
‘I’m
only doing this to inspire som
eone’
Marcy Ainsworth with her mother, Bertie Ainsworth (92)
18
| Today’s Woman sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
Marcy’s tips for success
c Accept that you are in it for life
c Think about and write down everything that
goes in your mouth
c Focus on your goals rather than immediate
gratifcation
c Balance good eating with exercise
W
hen Marcy Ainsworth
retired two years ago
after 17 years in day
surgery with Mercy Medical Cen-
ter, she was seriously overweight;
she felt self-conscious, and was
often exhausted. But since deter-
mining to get in shape and eat
right, she has lost 90 pounds and
58 inches. She has also been
able to drop a lot of her medica-
tions. At the age of 67, she goes
to the gym regularly and follows
a Weight Watchers plan to keep
on track.
“I feel good. I have energy, and
I feel like my mind is more alert,”
she said. “I fnd that doing things
with my friends, like hiking or
day trips, is much easier. I enjoy
those outings, whereas I avoided
them before.”
It hasn’t been easy. Ainsworth
has to be constantly vigilant
about what she eats, and is care-
ful not to keep foods in the house
that are “red button issues,” as
Weight Watchers calls them.
Her age also makes it more dif-
fcult, because habits are more
grounded and she has less
energy.
However, the benefts of her
life changes far exceed the dif-
fculties. She wants other wom-
en to know that if she can lose
weight at 67, they can too.
“I have pride in myself,” she
said. “I feel like, for the frst
time in very many years, I’m
taking care of the body God
gave me.”
What prompted you to go on a diet?
I wanted to be healthy, and with retirement I
fnally had the time and energy to focus on it. Also,
I wanted to honor God with my health.
How long have you struggled with your weight?
35+ years
How did you actually get started?
The week after retirement, I joined Weight Watch-
ers and started exercising four times a week.
Give us an idea of what you eat during the day?
I eat at least six fruits and vegetables, two proteins,
high fber grains, and I drink lots of water. I eat
mostly very basic food groups in as natural a state as
possible.
What do you do for exercise?
I walk 2-3 miles and ride a stationary bike 20 min.
four times a week, plus lift weights twice a week.
n Send your Diet Success stories to todayswoman@idahopress.
com along with before and after photos and how you did it. We’ll
share them on the Web and choose one special woman to feature
in the August magazine along with a makeover!
The new Marcy Ainsworth
k Can cross her legs
k Has new energy and enthusiasm for things
k Feels “normal” around other people
k Reduced her medications
k Wears clothes with a waist
k Has greater self-esteem
27
Marcy’s Vegetable Soup
“Especially in winter, I use this almost
every day— it counts as zero points
and gives me a full tummy of good
veggies.”
f Spray a large pan with Pam and
saute one diced onion, two stalks sliced
celery, two sliced carrots and two
minced garlic cloves for about 5 min.
f Add 1/2 head chopped cab-
bage, one cup green beans, one cup
chopped zucchini, 1/2 diced green
pepper, one can chopped tomatoes,
1/2 cup broken caulifower, 8 oz.
chopped brown mushrooms, four
cups chicken broth, 1/2 t. basil and
salt, 1/4 t. oregano and 1 T. olive oil.
f Bring to a boil then reduce heat
to simmer, covered, for 20 min. Don’t
overcook.
f Sprinkle with Greek Seasoning
salt.
f Serve with 1/4 cup Rice Noodles
for only one point per large serving.
By Gracy Howard • For Today’s Woman
‘I’m
only doing this to inspire som
eone’
A special thanks to Classy Casuals
at Nampa’s Treasure Valley Market-
place for allowing Today’s Woman
to take Marcy’s photos.
F
or 40 years, I’ve struggled with
pimples or adult acne. I’ve never
sought professional treatment be-
cause I never had severe acne. But I didn’t
step outside the house without makeup to
cover my blemishes.
I was forever optimistic that I would discover the magical solution.
Finally, I found the right combination of over-the-counter products that
work for me. That doesn’t mean it will work for you, but the product re-
views prove success for many.
It started more than 18 months ago when I tried a couple of products
with salicylic acid and noticed some slight improvements.
Then I picked up a tube of On-the-Spot Acne Treatment by Neutrogena.
It is a spot treatment with 2.5 percent benzoyl peroxide. I used it on specifc
spots, but then started to apply to larger troubled areas.
Knock out troublesome
blemishes with a
1-2-3 punch
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Today’s Woman | sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
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It helped, but it wasn’t the answer.
A few months later, I searched for a product that had a
stronger dose of benzoyl peroxide. I purchased PanOxyl,
an acne foaming wash and Clean & Clear’s Persa-Gel 10.
Both contain 10 percent benzoyl peroxide — 75 percent
stronger than the On-the-Spot Acne Treatment.
As online reviews indicate, 10 percent benzoyl perox-
ide is strong and effective but it also dries up your skin.
At one point my face felt like leather, but it was mostly
blemish free.
Back to the drug store again, I read more labels.
I found the Clean & Clear Advantage Acne Spot Treat-
ment, a gel (with 2 percent salicylic acid) that dissolves
surface oils so it can penetrate pores and clear up pimples
fast, sometimes in one day, according to the label. It also
makes my skin softer.
I was skeptical, but after spending hundreds of dollars
looking for the right formula, I fgured it couldn’t hurt.
Finally, I can honestly claim grand success. My skin is
soft and clear. I’m no longer embarrassed if I don’t have
my makeup on.
Morning:
Wash with PanOxyl ($9)
Apply Clean & Clear Advantage Acne Spot Treatment ($6.50) to trouble-
some areas
Don’t forget sunscreen even it’s in your foundation.
When I get home from work:
Wash with PanOxyl
Apply Clean & Clear Advantage Acne Spot Treatment
($6.50) over all troublesome areas
Apply Persa-Gel 10 ($6.50) over all troublesome areas
Apply oil-free moisturizer if needed.
I recently read up on these different prod-
ucts and learned that benzoyl peroxide and
salicylic acid are highly effective and affordable
anti-blemish ingredients.
Experts recommend starting with a 2.5 per-
cent dose of benzoyl peroxide because 10 percent
can be so irritating. It bleaches my washcloths,
so keep it away from your color treated hair and
don’t leave it on your face. The Persa-Gel is strong,
too, but has a few more ingredients to reduce dry-
ness. The salicylic acid actually makes my skin soft
because it is a peeling agent and causes shedding
of the outer layer of skin. By the way, it’s the same
ingredient found in dandruff and wart products.
These acne fghting products make your skin
more sensitive to the sun. I use a sunscreen all the
time, but I use 90 SPF protection when I’m going to
be outside.
e For more information, visit http://www.acne.org.
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| Today’s Woman sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
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Tan in a can
Y
ou’ve worked all summer for the perfect
tan. How do you extend it without
hitting the tanning salon? The Today’s
Woman team checked out these faux lotions and
offers the following ratings, based on a scale of
1 to 5, and compiled this information.
Jergens Natural Glow
Daily Moisturizer
44444
Pros
Nice light tan
Moisturizes
Affordable
Cons
Can stain clothes
Slower results
Bad smell
Body Drench Quick
Tan Tanning Mist
444½4
Pros
Good color
Even tan
No bad smell
Cons
Fades quickly
Some found it to be adobe or
reddish color
Fake Bake Instant
self-tanning spray
44444
Pros
Brown — not orange
Natural look
Even color
Cons
Diffcult nozzle to operate
Washes off quickly
L’Oreal Sublime
Bronze Luminous
Bronzer
444 4
Pros
Very natural look
Pretty glitter
Works quickly
Cons
Can be tricky to apply
correctly
Too shimmery for some
Neutrogena Instant
Bronze- Foam
444½4
Pros
Easy to apply
Instant
Good color
Cons
Doesn’t last very long
Streaky
Bad Smell
Estee Lauder
Self-Action
444 4
Pros
Looks natural
Easy to apply
No bad smell
Cons
Too dark
Fades quickly
Can be uneven
By Haley Robinson ● for Today’s Woman
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| Today’s Woman Idaho Press-Tribune • sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010
Calories 50
Total Fat 5g
Trans fat 0
Saturated fat 1.5g
Sodium 85
Cholesterol 0
“This is the one I would put on
corn on the cob.” It’s spreadable,
nice favor and great texture.
Calories 100
Total Fat 100
Fat grams 11
Trans fat 0
Saturated fat 3
Sodium 90 grams
Cholesterol 30
Omega 3 300 mg
Flavor was fne, but didn’t stand
out as the real thing in the blind
taste test. Only one in the group
of tasters actually uses regular
butter on a regular basis.
Calories 70
Total Fat 70
Fat grams 5
Trans fat 0
Saturated fat 7
Sodium 70 grams
A very new product on
the market. Made from
good oils, including
coconut and soy. Gluten
free and claims to boost
your metabolism. The
nearly white spread
seemed odd (because
it was not yellow) to the
tasters, although they
said the favor was not
bad. One said: “Too
frm, bland.”
I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter!
Four women participated in the blind faux butter test and chose the spread that says right in
its name that it’s not butter. No fancy gimmicks, just plain good. And it ranked above the real
butter, saving you half the calories.
Calories 50
Total Fat 50
Fat grams 5
Trans fat 0
Saturated fat 1.5
Sodium 80 grams
Bland favor with bad
watery texture.
Calories 50
Total Fat 50
Fat grams 5
Trans fat 0
Saturated fat 1.5
Sodium 90 grams
Nondairy, vegan and
gluten free. This was the
worst tasting sample. One
tester said “gross” and too
strong of a butter favor.
Weird and watery texture.
Mother Nature offers
alternatives to sugar
Like sweet drinks, but don’t want the calories? Or want to keep your blood sugars down? With Type 2 diabetes
on the rise in children and adults, sugary alternatives have made their way to the grocery stores. We researched
the ins and out of the popular sweeteners and a few new ones. Most of these packets equal two teaspoons.
● Erythritol (naturally derived plant sugar
that is calorie-free)
● S. rebaudiana leaf extract (sub-tropical
plant used as a low or no cal sweetener)
● Calcium carbonate (natural powder
commonly found in rocks)
● natural favors
● Won’t raise
blood sugar
● Some reviews
warn against baking
with it claiming that
it causes gastroin-
testinal distress
● Vegan
● Dextrose (a natural simple sugar- aka
glucose)
● Maltodextrin (a carbohydrate usually
made from the starch of corn, potato, or rice)
● Sucralose (a sweetener created by
modifying ordinary table sugar)
● Suitable for people
with diabetes
● Safety tested for 20
years
● Permitted as a sweet-
ener in 80 countries
● No known side-effects
● Dextrose (a natural simple sugar- aka
glucose)
● Soluble saccharin (white crystalline powder
about 500 times sweeter than cane sugar)
● Cream of tartar (white powder derived from
crystalline powder)
● Calcium silicate (an inorganic salt com-
prised of oxygen , silicone, and calcium)
● Saccharin has
been under speculation
since the 1970’s with
worries of links to blad-
der cancer. Warning
labels on Sweet’N Low
were removed in 2000
● Dextrose (a natural simple sugar- aka glucose)
● Aspartame (combination of two proteins — one
from genetically modifed bacteria)
● Silicon dioxide (naturally occurring substance
added often as an anti-caking agent)
● Cellulose (plant fber)
● ribasic calcium phosphate (mineral salt found
in rocks and bones used as an anti-caking agent)
● Cellulose derivates
● Aspatrame has
been very controversial.
There are many warnings
about the health effects.
● Found in over
6,000 products
● FDA has said that it
is safe, but independent
research found health
side effects.
● Erythritol (Naturally
fermented sugar alcohol)
● Rebiana (extract from
the leaf of a stevia plant)
● Natural Flavors
● Not FDA approved
● 2006 World Health
Organization analysis found no
evidence of negative health
impact
● 100% Xylitol (naturally
derived sugar — occurs in
various fruits and veggies)
● Natural
● Taste tests have resulted
in positive feedback for this
product, only occasional mild
aftertaste
By Haley Robinson
● for Today’s Woman
By Haley Robinson ● for Today’s Woman
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By Vickie Schaffeld Holbrook
Fantasize!
He does it and you should too! Fantasy Football
helps you learn the sport, the lingo and the positions.
So ask your male counterpart if you can join his
team or better yet, create your own and get ready to
start. The frst pro football game is Sept. 9. Here are
a few tips:
Read the newspapers, blogs and expert sites, listen to
sports radio and the commentators
Buy a Fantasy Football magazine before your draft
Chat with co-workers and your male friends, hus-
band or boyfriend
Plan for your draft and get a couple of good running
backs and receivers before you snag a quarterback.
You can play for free at espn.com
For more, read thefootballgirl.com
Web sites
tailgating.com
tailgateus.com
tailgatestotouchdowns.com
Enter our Tailgate recipe contest
Win a Boise State spirit pack and two tickets to the
Sept. 25 Boise State and Oregon State matchup.
Deadline is midnight Monday, Sept. 13.
20 ways to score big
1. Tailgate with a group
2. Plan ahead, know the rules for parking and alco-
hol use
3. Appoint a designated driver. Find a way to show
your appreciation!
4. Consider themed potlucks
5. Prepare as much food as possible before you head
to the game
6. Create a list for everything you need, then lami-
nate it so you can write with a dry erase marker and
wipe it clean for the next week. Leave some blanks to
add special items for each week.
7. If you tailgate regularly, pack everything in a
couple of tubs with lids
8. Show your team colors with paper and plastic
party supplies, balloons and team spirit gear!
9. Use insulated containers to keep your food hot or
cold
10. Be wary of ingredients that spoil quickly
11. Take a small table
12. If you must cook, make it portable
13. Bring chairs
14. Yes, alcohol is traditional, but pack plenty
of water, too
15. No traditions? Start new ones
16. Food should be ready two hours before kick off
17. Leave a clean spot, pack trash bags
18. Get a quick pop-up tent to protect food table if
it rains
19. Invest in Ziploc bags
20. Make memories: Collect photos, carry a vinyl
banner that show’s your team pride and have fellow
tailgaters sign it.
Want to be the Tailgating Diva?
Collect football cookie cutters to cut Rice Crispy
Treats, Ginger cookies or sandwiches
Watch for football bowls, cookers, plates, especially
during Super Bowl season.
Collect and share best recipes
Need to cook?
Camp cook stoves
Portable grills
The big barbeque on wheels
Real Divas have a power inverter along with cables
that you can hook up to your car battery so you keep
cocoa or soups hot, make a margarita, cook your
quesadillas or curl your hair. Just make sure your
inverter can handle the wattage necessary to run your
appliance.
TW recommendation:
Cobra CPI1000 1000W 12V DC to 120V AC
Power Inverter with USB Port
Cobra CPI-A4000BC AC Power Inverter AWG
Cables
Buy a deep-cycle battery ($75 to $250) and a trickle
charger ($32 to $100) so you can keep it charged up
between games without overcharging. It’s great for
camping, too.
Know your wattage
Crock pot: 250
Blender: 500 to 750
Quesadilla cooker: 900
Curling iron: 1875
Based on basic appliances
Glazed Pigskins
1 large jar (18 ounces) apricot or pineapple pre-
serves with ½ cup yellow mustard
Jalapeño jelly
12 ounces chili sauce with 1 cup of grape
jelly
12 ounces chili sauce with 1 can of
cranberry sauce for
2 pounds cocktail franks or
mini smoked sausages or small
meatballs
Menu ideas
Finger/portable food works best
Tacos and nachos
Pulled pork sandwiches with barbecue sauce
on the side
Grilled sandwiches, hotdogs, hamburgers,
steak, chicken
Hot soups, chili, chowder
Too cold for beer? Try hot cocoa or cof-
fee with peppermint schnapps, Baileys, Butter
Shots, Hot Damn!
D
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Ring around the toilet?
H
ard water minerals leave their
mark in bathrooms across the
Treasure Valley. No doubt you’ve
tried a host of chemicals or even the
pumice stone?
But those methods can ruin your pretty
porcelain.
For the best, environmentally friendly
solution, consider Shaw’s Pads. The
screen looks like the screen from your porch
door and it’s highly effective.
Famous cleaning expert Don Aslett has praised
and promoted the little black screen for more than
25 years.
The little cleaning pads and fexible handled pads
are affordable, ranging in costs from $1 to $6.95.
As long as you regularly use it with water and gentle
circular motion, you’ll have a white and smooth bowl.
Also use it on your porcelain sink and tile.
Buy it locally:
Lloyd’s Lumber, 12 14th Ave S., Nampa
Don Aslett’s Cleaning Center, 8958 Ardene St., Boise
Fun Clothing Jewelry Purses Girlfriend Gifts
Boise - The Marketplace
1764 W. State Street
426.9191
Nampa - Treasure Valley Marketplace
16443 N. Marketplace Blvd.
442.9191
Unique Ladies Clothing Store
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-5
256918
Semi-Annual
Clearance
UP TO
75% OFF!
c
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Today’s Woman | sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
Got
5 min-
utes?
Say thanks the right way!
When to send a note:
You receive a gift.
You were a guest at a special event.
When someone has gone out of her way to
help you.
You’ve just completed an interview for a job.
You’ve completed a sale.
You’ve received an award or special recognition.
Someone taught you something.
You leave a job.
People took time to attend your event.
When in doubt or just because!
Important tips:
Handwrite your note. Don’t use e-mail or a form letter.
Take time to write neatly. It really matters.
Send a personal note via snail mail even if you send a quick
e-mail thanks.
Make it personal. Mention the gift or act of kindness and why
it was so special.
Don’t delay! Send thank you notes as soon as possible.
Keep a stash of thank you notes handy, along with postage
stamps so you can’t put it off.
Take the time to write out your note on a separate piece of
paper before you actually write the note you will send.
Spell it right — especially the person’s name.
Slowly read your note out loud and have someone proof it
for you.
Use the pronoun “you” more than you use “I.”
In today’s age of texting and instant
messages, facebook and e-mail, the art
of writing a thank you note is often lost
in our frenzied world.
I recently hosted a party and was sur-
prised that nearly 10 of the 70 women
took time afterward to send a hand-
written note of thanks when I was the
one who was truly thankful that women
would take the time to gather for
fun — at an event that I
hosted.
In awe, I read
the notes,
reminding myself that a handwritten
note of gratitude is important and then
promptly wrote a sticky note: “Write
thank you notes more often! They mean
more than you realize!”
Handwritten notes are a must. Re-
member those penmanship lessons in
frst and second grades? Use a pen that
glides across the paper or card and give
thought to the words you choose.
Can’t fnd the right words? Shop
the card aisle or surf the Internet for
inspiration. Be genuine and gracious.
— Vickie Schaffeld Holbrook
Need inspiration?
www.thank-you-note-samples.com
www.brownielocks.com/notes.html
35
| Today’s Woman Idaho Press-Tribune • sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010
Bulbs
For an ever-blooming plethora of spring color in
late March, April and May you must plant tulip, daf-
fodil and hyacinth bulbs in late September or early
October. They must be planted before the frst hard
frost and need a couple of chilly months below 40
degrees before they bless your garden with a vibrant
color show. Crocus and bluebells offer dainty color
and should be planted in the front of other bulbs.
Generally, plant the bulbs twice as deep as the size of the
bulbs. Large daffodils should be sunk even a little deeper.
Planting tips
e Use wide to narrow wavy (instead of straight) lines
to give your fower beds a more naturalized look
e Plant in bunches so the color pops from a distance
e Choose colors that blend or offer high contrast but
don’t go wild; too many colors don’t offer a “wow” factor
e Plant in a variety of spots so you can enjoy fowers
in the front and back of your home
e Space out the bulbs enough that they can multiply
e Find early and late varieties to extend your color show
e Red or purple tulips are great contrasts to the yellow
daffodils
e Leave adequate space between bunches for
your annuals you’ll plant in late May or perennials
that come up later.
e Water frequently after planting
Don’t forget the Iris
August and September are good months to plant irises
so stately colored fags can brighten your gardens next
year in late May and June. Irises grow from rhizomes,
not bulbs, and offer a huge variety of colors and great
background foliage.
Rhizomes grow horizontally across the dirt and should
be completely covered.
Unless you have miniature varieties, plant them in the
back of fower beds so they don’t hide your other blooms.
You can buy them in August or see if you can swap
some garden plants with your neighbors or friends.
Coming to local stores this fall
2
5
3
9
4
6
Yarns • Threads • Exhibits
Le Joies des Fibres
(208) 442-YARN (9276)
1124 - 1st St. So. Historic Downtown Nampa
www.ewequilt.com Mary Chown, owner
Best Selection of fine
quality yarns & threads
for knitting, crocheting
& embroidery.
36
Today’s Woman | sUnday, aUGUsT 8, 2010 • Idaho Press-Tribune
G
a
r
d
e
n
i
n
G
spring color
For constant
garden color
Crocus
Daffodils
Tulips
Irises
Lilac (bush)
Peony
Poppies
Day lilies
Shasta daisies
Black-eyed Susans
X
X
Direct 208.855.2968
Cell 208.880.6968
Toll Free 800.815.9744
Fax 866.839.0247
cljones@golfsavingsbank.com
CL Jones
Senior Residential Loan Offcer
2300 S Eagle Rd Meridian ID 83642
®
-EMBER
FDIC
Women in Business
How to Equip
Your Home Office
Working from home is growing more popular each
and every year. Advancements in technology have
made it easier than ever before for the nation’s work-
ers to login from their home environment.
While working from home has its advantages,
one notable disadvantage concerns the furniture.
A cubicle or office at an office building comes fully
furnished at the employer’s expense, while a home
office typically must be furnished entirely by the
employee. Those about to furnish their home office
should consider the following tips.
• DON’T OVERDO IT. Home offices need not be
as crowded as the standard office building office.
In today’s computer age where most files are stored
electronically than in file cabinets, a home office
does not have to be filled with numerous file cabi-
nets, shelving units or tons of drawer space. When
working from home, especially when working from
home only part-time, the office does not have to be
fully stocked. The essentials will probably do the
trick.
• BE FLEXIBLE WITH CHOICE OF DESK. A desk
for a home office can be effective whether it’s a fold-
ing table or an aesthetically appealing oak desk. Of-
tentimes, the individual will know what he or she
needs. For example, an architect will need a larger
desk to spread out blueprints while a writer might
be fine working on a smaller desk because he or she
does not need much more than a computer.
• BE CHOOSY WITH THE CHAIR. Employers of-
ten look for chairs that discourage slouching and
will keep workers comfortable and productive
throughout the day. People working from home
should also be choosy when finding a workday
chair. Cost should not be a major consideration.
Instead, comfort should take precedence or it could
have adverse effects on an individual’s health over
the course of time. Also, be sure the arms of the
chair fit under the desk.
• INSTALL A SECOND PHONE LINE. It’s not ideal
to rely on an existing home phone line as the pri-
mary means of contact for work. Family or friends
might call and force workers to miss important
work-related phone calls. Many employers provide
a phone line connected to the actual office where
the business is located. However, they do not often
expect workers to have a work-specific line at their
home.
-Metro Editorial Services
Cooky Wilcox
Independent Team Leader
Phone: 208-440-3493
cooky_wilcox@yahoo.com
www.pamperedchef.biz/cooky
Mention this ad and receive a
FREE GIFT!
The Antique Retro Connection
Margot Lynn
JEWELRY-ART-COLLECTIBLES
1305 2nd St. So.
Nampa, ID 83651
Downtown Nampa
Ph: (208)318-0021
Cell: (208)989-5238
SALES & ADVERTISING:
Angela Sammons
465.8136
asammons@idahopress.com
EDITORIAL & CONTENT:
Vickie Holbrook
465.8110
vholbrook@idahopress.com
Choose from a variety of shifts
and responsibilities to match your
interests and skills. Positions needed
for both the Celebration Women’s
Show at the Boise Centre and the 5K
Run, Walk and Stroll. Sign up online
today! Visit celebrateall.org for more
information.
4GIKUVGT
QPNKPGVQFC[
EGNGDTCVGCNNQTI
Celebrating Women
& Girls Since 1993
An All Ages, All Abilities Event for Women and Girls
September 25, 2010
Idaho State Capitol
n
8:30am
253951

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