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Progress for Children (No.8) 2009

Progress for Children (No.8) 2009

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Publicado porUNICEF Sverige
Runt om i världen blir barn föremål för våld, utnyttjande och övergrepp. Vissa tvingas arbeta under farliga förhållanden. Andra drabbas av våld
eller missbruk i hemmet, skolan eller i samhället. En del rekryteras olagligt av väpnade grupper andra tvingas fly från sina hem på grund av konflikter eller naturkatastrofer. Och miljoner, särskilt flickor, utsätts för sexuellt våld och utnyttjande samt skadliga traditionella sedvänjor, som könsstympning.
Runt om i världen blir barn föremål för våld, utnyttjande och övergrepp. Vissa tvingas arbeta under farliga förhållanden. Andra drabbas av våld
eller missbruk i hemmet, skolan eller i samhället. En del rekryteras olagligt av väpnade grupper andra tvingas fly från sina hem på grund av konflikter eller naturkatastrofer. Och miljoner, särskilt flickor, utsätts för sexuellt våld och utnyttjande samt skadliga traditionella sedvänjor, som könsstympning.

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Published by: UNICEF Sverige on Jul 08, 2010
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09/07/2015

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Landmines and explosive remnants of war violate nearly

all the articles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child:

a child’s right to life, to a safe environment in which to play,

to health, clean water, sanitary conditions and adequate

education. Although signifcant progress has been made in

addressing the threat from anti-personnel mines, an esti-

mated 78 countries are still contaminated by mines

and 85 are still affected by explosive remnants of war.32

In 2007, 72 countries recorded new victims of landmines and

explosive remnants of war, and children accounted for

nearly a third of these casualties.33

In many countries, children who survive landmine accidents

must end their education prematurely due to the necessary

period of recovery and the accompanying fnancial burden

of rehabilitation on families. Support for children experi-

encing psychological distress is rarely available, and the

effects linger for many years.

A signifcant step forward was taken in 2008, when 96 States

signed a new international convention banning cluster

munitions.34

But challenges remain in attempting to univer-

salize and ensure the implementation of any new treaties

as well as existing treaties such as the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty.

Even in countries that are not considered to be affected by

armed confict, the proliferation and misuse of small arms

and light weapons are equally grave dangers to children. In

most countries, however, effective and reliable data collec-

tion mechanisms to document the impact of small arms and

light weapons on children do not exist, and available

statistics on direct death and injury to children from small

arms surely mask the enormous impact of small-arms

violence on children. Recent research in a dozen countries

has noted that the victimization of children and adolescents

by small arms persists despite laws to protect them against

this form of violence.35

Progress for Children

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