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Danielson Aligned Lesson Plan Template for Formal Observations


Yunjung Hong
Formal Observation #2 Lesson Plan
Primary Subject Area and Grade Level: List the primary content area for this lesson. List the beginning and ending grade levels for
which this lesson is appropriate.

Mathematics
Grade 5
Fractions, decimal, and percentages unit
Interdisciplinary Connections: Provide a listing of the subject area(s), in addition to the primary subject area that is incorporated in this
lesson.
(1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy)

This lesson also incorporates what we are covering in our science unit. In science we are working on
car models and creating the perfect car to travel from point A to point B and drop an egg below so the
yolk falls into the pan. To do so, students must collect data on their car including the speed. This
incorporates the fractions aspect which comes into play when you use the centimeters per second
method.
Lesson Duration: State the approximate time frame for this lesson.
(1e: Designing Coherent Instruction)

The lesson all together will take approximately 40 minutes.


There will be 10 minutes of instruction for the mini-lesson together as a whole class.
25 minutes for activity planned.
Final 5 minutes on wrap up and completing of an exit ticket for an assessment.
Relevance/Rationale: Consider how your outcomes and plan will engage students cognitively and build understanding. Why are the lesson
outcomes important in the real world? How is this lesson relevant to students in this class (interests, cultural heritages, needs)?
(1b: Demonstrating Knowledge of Students)

This lesson will introduce decimals to the students and allow them to make a connection with
decimals to fractions, and soon percentages.
This is important to the real world because this is how money is handled. Dollar is a whole, while the
coins are its parts. It is also the basis or purchasing items, figuring out sales, in the library (Dewey
Decimal System), anything that is timed after a certain distance (track and field), etc.
Outcomes/Objectives: What will students know and be able to do as a result of this lesson? Outcomes should be written in the form of
student learning and suggest viable methods of assessment. For teachers of English language learners: What language objectives will be
addressed?
(1c: Setting Instructional Outcomes)

Students will be able to represent parts of a whole as decimals specifically to the tenths and
hundredths place.
Students will be able to rewrite fractions as decimals and vice versa.
Content Standard(s) and/or Common Core Learning Standard(s): For example: (CCSS) 4.NBT.3 Use place value
understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place. Content area teachers should include appropriate English Language Arts
Common Core Standards for Content Areas, if appropriate, in addition to content standards.
(1c: Setting Instructional Outcomes)

5.NBT.A.1 Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in the one place represents 10 times as
much as it represents in the place to its right and 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.
5.NBT.A.3 Read, write, and compare decimals up to the thousandths.
5.NBT.A.4 Use place value understanding to round decimals to any place.
Use of Formative Assessment to Inform Planning: Describe your students current levels of understanding of the content related to
the outcome for this lesson. What are some of the indicators that let you know that these outcomes and the lesson activities represent the
appropriate amount of cognitive challenge for all students?
(1f: Designing Student Assessments)

The students are aware of how to write fractions with a numerator and a denominator. They also know

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that a fraction represents a division problem. This may help their understanding of decimals because
then the division is actually done they will be able to see it turns out to be a decimals. For example;
is represented by 14 which equals to 0.25.
Students also know the place value of at least 4 digits to the left of the decimal point. This will help
students comprehend the amount of digits that go into the tenths and the hundredths.
Class Information: Describe any unique characteristics of the class (considerations may include: special needs, language levels, learning
styles, etc.). Describe how other adults (paraprofessionals, volunteers, co-teachers, resource teachers, etc.) will support student learning, if
applicable. Also include any other circumstances an observer should know about.
(1b: Knowledge of Students)

In this classroom there are 5 students with IEPs, I will have to incorporate modifications of the
students into the lesson. There are students with attention deficits which I plan on engaging with turn
and talk and engaging actions like thumbs up activities. My cooperating teachers will support students
learning by making sure students are on tasks and participate when asked. If students are falling off
track they will guide then back into the lesson. They will assist me with the behavior and classroom
management but not the content during this lesson.
I will keep a close eye on those students who are easily distracted, and have total participation
techniques throughout the lesson to keep them engaged.
I also have a media assistant that takes photographs, records videos of me while I teach. He will be
walking around and sitting in the back snapping photos of me. If he gets distracted by this task, he will
have to drop the job and focus on the lesson. I also told the student if he cannot appropriately assist me
I will have to choose another student for the job.
Math is right after lunch so students are rushing in, putting away their lunches and coats, and taking
their seats. There are 3 students that then leave the classroom for A&E which is advanced math.
Overview: Provide a brief overview of the lesson. The overview should provide the observer with a description of the lessons content and how
it relates to the larger unit. Include prerequisite knowledge required to meet lesson outcomes and relationship to future learning.
(1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy)

The students will stay at their seats for this lesson. It will start with connecting to the previous lessons
in the unit and going over the objective. I will then teach a mini-lesson that is about 10 minutes. Then
students will break up into pairs for the activity that is planned. Students will play place value battleship. If students finish the game early, I will have a worksheet they can work on while other finishes
their games. I will wrap up the lesson by going over the objective again, and giving the homework
ticket problem. Homework ticket is an exit ticket but instead of leaving the room, the problem is
exchanged for their homework for the night. When students hand in their homework ticket, they will
then receive their homework as the final part of the lesson.
Technologies and Other Materials /Resources: List all materials, handouts, resources, and technology tools that are needed by the
student or the teacher to execute the lesson. Technologies may include hardware, software, and websites, etc. Materials and resources may
include physical resources (e.g. books, manipulatives, supplies, equipment, etc.) and/or people resources (e.g. guest speakers, librarian, etc.).
(1d: Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources)

I will need the white board for the mini-lesson. Students will copy it down in their math journals.
I will prepare the place value battleship boards.
Grouping Strategy: Describe how you will group students to facilitate learning of the outcomes of this lesson. What is the rationale for the
grouping strategy?
(1e: Designing Coherent Instruction)

The students will work in pairs for the battleship game. If there is an un-even amount of students there
will be one group of 3. I will pair the students up by similar math levels.

Academic Vocabulary: What key terms are essential to this content? What terms are essential to develop and extend students vocabulary?
(1a: Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy; 1b: Knowledge of Students)

Decimal: Another way of representing a fraction.

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Lesson Procedures: The procedures should clearly describe the sequence of learning activities and should identify where and how all
materials, technology tools and student-created technology products, and reproducible materials/handouts are utilized in the lesson. Describe the
lesson sequence:

How will the lesson launch?

How will the material be presented?

What questions will be posed to the students? What are the expected responses?

How and when will the teacher model?

What opportunities will there be for guided practice, group work and individual practice?

How and when will you monitor student understanding throughout the lesson?

What opportunities will there be for reflection and closure?

Include approximate time allocations for each portion of the lesson. Be very precise when explaining the teacher and student tasks during the
learning activities.
(1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy; 1e: Designing Coherent
Instruction)

I will have the objective written an anchor chart along with the vocabulary words and todays lesson. I
will start off by having a student read the objective.
Okay my mathematicians, yesterday we were talking about fractions correct? Well today we are
going to use our fraction knowledge to represent fractions as decimals! By the end of the lesson you
will be able to write fractions as decimals and vice versa.
Okay so I have a problem here: Betty made 3 out of 10 shots, of 3/10 shots while playing basketball.
In your journals, give me 3 equivalent fractions using the denominator 100.
While students do so, draw a place value chart. _ _._ _
Explain that the places to the right are similar to those on the left. Discuss the value of teach place
with the students.
Okay now lets go back to the problem in your journal what is the fraction of shots Betty made? So
what is the decimal? students will respond by saying 0.3as their answer. Put this into the calculator as
310 and you will get 0.3. This will show the student that it works when you do the division.
When explaining, show on the place value chart, that the decimal is represented by the word AND if
there are numbers to the right of the decimal. So if this was 1.3 it will be said as one AND 3 tenths. If
not it will just be three tenths of her shots.
If time is available, another problem can be done. Tell the students Lets try another one. How many
pennies are in one dollar? 100. So what fraction represents 43 cents? 43/100. How can we show this in
decimal form? 0.43 this works because 40 is in the tens place and 3 is one hundredth of a dollar with is
one penny and all together there are 43 pennies which is 43 cents of one dollar. This problem will be
generated from the students. It will allow the students to practice on their own. How will I write and
say One dollar and 72 cents? That will be 1.72 and one and seventy two hundredths.
After the mini-lesson, I will divide the class into pairs. Each pair will get a place value battleship
board and a space to work in the room. Students will play the game with one another. The board will
have a ones place, tenths place, and hundredths place. The student can come up place a number 0-9
into each place value creating any number they choose. Students can double numbers if they please,
for example; 4.44 is acceptable. When both the students in the pair choose a number, the older student
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makes the first move. They will ask, Do you have a 5 in the tenths place The other student will
answer miss then the next student will go until they figure out the number. Once the number is
figured out the student will say is your ship number four AND fourty four hundreths? and student
will reply ship wreck. Each pair will play until they are completed with the game and one student
has won.
I will model how to play the game for the students as written above.
Once completed, students will go back to their seats and work on a worksheet till all groups are
finished.
Once all students are back at their seats, I will begin wrapping up by saying, Alright mathematicians,
now that we completed our lesson lets go back to our objective. Are we not able to represent fractions
with 10 and 100 as their denominator as a decimal? Yeah. You can also rewrite and say fractions as
decimals. Great job today. I will be giving you a short homework ticket, which must be completed in
order to get your homework.
And tomorrow, be prepared to look at the next place value to the right of the decimal which is the
thousandths place
Differentiation: Describe how you will differentiate instruction for a variety of learners, including students will special needs, English
Language Learners, and high achieving students to ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson.
Be specific.
(1e: Designing Coherent Instruction)

For the students who are high achieving, I will not give a game helper sheet. This will allow them to
multitask and really focus on the game. For the students who need the helper sheet, I will allow them
to use it (attached below).
During the mini-lesson, if I notice a couple students who really are just not getting it, I will pull them
aside and have a guided small group session.
Assessment Criteria for Success:

How and when will you assess student learning throughout the lesson (formative)?
How will you and your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes?
What is the criteria for mastery of the lesson outcome(s)?
Describe any (formative and summative) assessments to be used.
(1f: Designing Student Assessments)

After wrapping up the lesson, I will give the students a homework ticket. The homework ticket works
just like an exit ticket but instead of exiting students will exchange it for that nights homework
assignment. For the homework ticket every student will get half a sheet of paper with some problems
that relates to what we just covered (attached below). When finished, students will bring it up to me
and I will hand them their homework. On this assessment I will add problems that they should be able
to solve based on the lesson that was just taught and maybe one challenging problem to further test
their knowledge.
Homework ticket is attached below.
Anticipated Difficulties: What difficulties or possible misunderstanding do you anticipate that students may encounter? How will you
prevent them from occurring?
(1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy)

Students may have difficulties understanding the concept of the place values to the right of the
decimal points. If this is the case, I will have manipulative available for those who do not during the
small group session.
Also students will be finishing the place value battle ship, at different times so I will have a worksheet
prepared for them to complete after their game.
This is an easy concept for fifth graders to grasp, if I notice that they find it really easy, I will add the
thousandths place value to make it more challenging.

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Reflections: List at least three questions you will ask yourself after the lesson is taught.
(4a: Reflecting on Teaching)

1. In general, how successful was the lesson? Did the students learn what you
intended for them to learn? How do you know?
In general, my lesson went well. It seemed as if the students understood my
instruction, and according to the homework ticket everyone but 4 students got a
perfect hundred. This lesson plan was actually two lessons combined. Tenths and
hundredths were one lesson and thousandths was its own lesson. I decided to
combine these because my students math level with fractions are pretty high
and I thought they would breeze through this lesson. Like my thoughts, my
students really found this lesson simple. The objective was being able to turn
fractions into decimals and vice versa. By the end of the lesson, my students
were able to do so. I felt like I was a little rushed. This is probably because my
during first observed lesson, my mini-lesson turned out to be 20 minutes so I
wanted to shorten that time. But I felt myself talking fast and rushing. I think I
could have slowed down and still have been effective in teaching the students to
lesson.
2. If you have samples of student work, what do they reveal about the students
levels of engagement and understanding? Do they suggest modifications in how
you might teach this lesson in the future?
I saw their homework tickets along with their homework the day after. 17 out of
21 students got a perfect 100% on their exit ticket. All my students were able to
complete their homework with ease. The four students that did not get a 100%
on their homework ticket only got about an average 2 problems wrong. I think I
could pull that group of students and go over different strategies on turning
fractions into decimals by modeling and having them follow along. I think if I
gave a little more instructions and some practice problems they will be able to
further understand the lesson and be on level with the rest of the classroom.
3. Comment on your classroom procedures, student conduct, and your use of
physical space.
Before this lesson, my students had lunch. They know from their routine when
they enter lunch boxes are put away, they go to their seats, and take out their
math journals. I kept they students at their desk for this lesson because having
the students on the carpet for math is just something they are not used to and I
wanted to stay with how things have been. When the mini-lesson was over, I
paired students up for the game. After doing so, I gave each pair folders and
game boards so they can begin playing. I also let 3 pairs outside to play their
game so there can be more space in the classroom and so it does not get too
loud. For the wrap-up, I brought all the students in and back into their seats.
During the whole lesson, the students were mostly well behaved but after the
game, it was difficult to get their attention for the wrap-up because they were so
excited.
4. Did you depart from your plan? If so, how and why?

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I did depart from my plan slightly. For the most part, I followed it exactly besides
when I got towards the end. In the plan, it says to explain the game of Place
Value Battle Ship then group them and let them get started. At the heat of the
moment and the excitement of the students, I paired students up, handed out
the game boards, then explain the instructions. I think the reason for this is
because the students were very excited to play the game that I just completely
forgot to explain the directions. It was not until I handed everything out that I
thought, oh wait, they dont know how to play. I also veered during my wrap-up.
In the wrap-up according to the lesson plan, I was supped to re-read the objective
and students were to determine if I can check that off our anchor chart. Then
after I was supposed to give the homework tickets out and tell the students what
the outward look was. I was going to tell the students that this is going to help us
put fractions and decimals on the number line and placing them in order. I
followed all of this on the lesson plan, besides telling the students the outward
look. My lesson time was over and I was too rushed that I just forgot to do this
during my lesson.
5. Comment on different aspects of your instructional delivery (e.g., activities,
grouping of students, materials, and resources). To what extent were they
effective?
For the mini-lesson I taught them just like I have been for every other math
lesson. One thing I did do differently was having the students do an activity and
this activity being a game. The students love games and are very competitive so
I knew that this would be an effective activity. For the activity they were grouped
into pairs. I choose to pair them up because it was the most effective way to play
the game. I paired them up by in a very specific way. For the students who
understood the concept and are average or high math students, I just paired
randomly. It was the students who excel in math and have trouble in math that I
grouped heterogeneously. It ended up only being about 3 heterogeneous pairs. I
did this because the average students can have fun playing the game with one
another because their math levels are similar. For the students who exceled, I
gave them a partner that was slightly struggling or had a hard time with the
lesson. This is because the student who understands can guide the other student
during the game. I monitored all the groups and they all seem to work well
together and enjoy the game.
6. If you had an opportunity to teach this lesson again to the same group of
students, what would you do differently?
I would definitely slow down my pace. I would try not to rush and just make sure
that the students fully understand the lesson. In order to do so, I would follow the
me, us, you model in order to keep the mini-lesson short and simple. I would do
a problem, then do one as a class, let the students do one, then allow time for
the activity. I would also show a video or find another hook for the beginning of
the lesson. To get the students engaged from the beginning, I could have made
connections to the real world or show students a visual so they have a pre idea of
how important the lesson actually is.
7. What were some of the things you discussed with cooperating teachers?

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My cooperating teachers did enjoy the lesson. They agreed with some of the
things I had to say. They also thought that my lesson was slightly rushed. They
both knew that this is probably because I was worried about my mini-lesson
going over 10 minutes like my previous observed lesson. They said that they
could tell I was going fast just so I can make the time limit. They had said that
there is no need to rush because it makes my students and I both very flustered.
They also said that I could have made the game board a little more challenging
by having the students fill in the tenths, hundredths, and thousandths place and
not labeling it for them. Other than these two words of advice they liked the
lesson and was impressed on how well the students did with it.

Name __________________ ** this is a copy of the homework ticket**

1.831
In the number above, 8 is in the ______________ place.
In the number above, 3 is in the ______________ place.
In the number above, 1 is in the ____________________ place.
Write out the number above in words.
____________________________________________________________
Write each fraction in decimal form.

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a.

5
= _______
10

98

b. 100 =_______

20

c. 100 =_______

987

d. 1000

=_______
Write each decimal as a fraction.
a. .35= _______

b. .7=_______

c. 1.4=_______

d. .298=________

Name __________________

1.83
In the number above, 8 is in the ______________ place.
In the number above, 3 is in the ______________ place.
In the number above, 1 is in the ____________________ place.

Write out the number above in words.


____________________________________________________________
Write each fraction in decimal form.
b.

5
= _______
10

98

b. 100 =_______

20

c. 100 =_______

987

d. 1000

=_________
Write each decimal as a fraction.
b. .35= _______

b. .7=_______

c. 1.4=_______

d. .298=________

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Place value battle ship!


My number:

ONES

HUNDRETH
S
Opponents number:

TENTHS

Thousandth
s

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Thousandths Hundredths

Tenths

Ones

Place value battle ship helper worksheet:

1 2 34567890
1 2 34567890
1 2 34567890
1 2 34567890
2