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University of Idaho

Department of Civil Engineering


CE 357 Fall 2015
Lab Report #2
on

Aggregates
Properties of Course and Fine Aggregate Material
Submitted by:
Courtney Sell
Kelly Yanoshek
Ry Butler
Muhannad Alhasan

Section 3 Group 3
9/28/2015

Table of Contents

Introduction.
Page 1
Properties of Coarse and Fine AggregatesPage
2
Lab Tests..
Page 3
Results Coarse Aggregate & Experiment 6 ....Page
4
Results Semilog & 0.45
Graph..Page 5
Results Fine Aggregate Data
Page 6
Results Specific Gravity
Page 7
Conclusion.
.Page 8
Appendix.
.Page 9

Introduction

Properties of Coarse and Fine Aggregates


Aggregates are very important for the creation of roads and
provides proper drainage and support for car tires. The properties
of coarse and fine aggregates are vital to the life of asphalt and
cement and make a huge difference for safety of cars on roads.
The main sources for aggregates are gravel pits, river runs and
rock quarries. The properties of the type of aggregate are
important based on its physical, chemical and mechanical
properties.
PCC (Portland Cement Concrete) contains 79 85% of its
weight as aggregates, this helps reduce the amount of cement
needed to create the concrete, which improves the quality. For
PCC rounded and smooth coarse aggregate are desirable for
mixing. HMA (Hot Mix Asphalt) contains 92 96% of its weight as
aggregate. The asphalt then acts as a binder that holds the
aggregates together, for HMA angular and rough coarse
aggregates are desirable for asphalt to hold.
Durability of aggregates also plays a key role in civil
engineering projects and requires that aggregates withstand
climate conditions. Toughness of aggregates requires that they
resist loads and provided resistance to vehicles. Absorption is
important to regulate when mixing PCC to ensure that moisture is
available to mix with concrete, there is no exact desirable amount
of absorption, while low absorption is desirable for HMA. Specific
gravity is important for concrete mix design, for asphalt only
some of the voids in the aggregate are filled which requires the
effective specific gravity to be found.

Strength and modulus are important factors to test on the


aggregates, the best way to do this is to test parent rocks of the
aggregate or a bulk aggregate sample. Gradation, or particle size,
is important for economical purposes, smaller aggregates require
more mix while larger ones have less surface area and are
therefore cheaper to construct.
There are many tests and processes that go into choosing
the right kind of aggregate for certain projects. Fine and coarse
aggregates have their own features of strengths and weaknesses
that can be used efficiently in some situations but not in others.
PCC and HMA both require different types of fine and coarse
aggregates which is key to creating safe reliable concrete and
asphalt.

Lab Tests

Results
Figure 1
Coarse
Aggrega
tes
Siev
e
Tare
Size, Wt.
mm ,g

1 in

25

506

506

1284

3/4 in

19

532

556

24

24

1260

1/2 in

12.5

487

1036

549

573

711

3/8 in

9.5

774

1215

441

1014

270

#4

4.75

537

794

257

1271

13

#8

2.36

519

522

1274

10

# 16

1.18

629

629

1274

10

%
Pass
ing
100.
00%
98.1
3%
55.3
7%
21.0
3%
1.01
%
0.78
%
0.78
%

365

375

10

1284

0.00
%

Sieve #

Pan

Wt of
Sample
Sieve, g

Cumulati
Retain ve
ed
Retained
Wt., g Wt. , g

Passin
g, g

FM

%
Re
tai
ne
d
99.
00
99.
02
99.
45
99.
79
99.
99
99.
99
99.
99
10
0.0
0
5.9
8

Experiment NO.6:

Figure 2
Sieve Size, mm

% Passing
25
19
12.5
9.5
4.75
2.36
1.18

% Retained
100.00
98.13
55.37
21.03
1.01
0.78
0.78
0.00

Pan
Sieve Size,
mm

Figure 3
25
19
12.5
9.5
4.75
2.36
1.18
0

4.26
3.76
3.12
2.75
2.02
1.47
1.08
0

100.00
98.13
55.37
21.03
1.01
0.78
0.78
0.00

113.14
100.00
82.83
73.20
53.59
39.12
28.64
0

0.00
1.87
44.63
78.97
98.99
99.22
99.22
100.00

Semilog Coarse Agg.


120.00
100.00
80.00
% Passing

60.00
40.00
20.00
0.00
0

10

12

14

16

18

20

Axis Title

Figur
e4

Figure 5

0.45 Power Graph Coarse


120.00
100.00
80.00
% Passing

60.00
40.00
20.00
0.00
0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00
Sieve Size (mm)

Figure 6

Fine
Aggreg
ates
Siev
e
Size,
mm

Tare
Wt.
,g

9.5

613

#4

4.75

#8

Retai
ned
Wt., g

Cumulativ
e Retained
Wt. , g

613

522

537

15

15

2.36

715

823

108

123

# 16

1.18

500

663

163

286

# 30

0.6

395

546

151

437

# 50

0.3

440

556

116

553

0.15
0.07
5

365

430

65

618

406

418

12

630

418
437
4

430

12

642

5016

642

3304

Sieve #
3/8 in

# 100
# 200
Pan

Wt of
Sample
Sieve, g

%
Pas pas
sin sin
g, g g
100
.00
97.
66
80.
84
55.
45
31.
93
13.
86
3.7
4
1.8
7
0.0
0

Percen
t
Retain
ed
0.00
2.34
19.16
44.55
68.07
86.14
96.26

98.13
100.0
0
514.6
4
FM
4.15
FM=SUM(%
retained)/10
0

Figure 7
Sieve Size,
mm
% passing
% Retained
9.5
100.00
4.75
97.66
2.36
80.84
1.18
55.45
0.6
31.93
0.3
13.86
0.15
3.74
0.075
1.87
Pan
0.00
FM

4.15

0.00
2.34
19.16
44.55
68.07
86.14
96.26
98.13
100.00

Figure 8

Data Table 1: This table shows the Results for Specific Gravity and Absorption of
Coarse Aggregates.

Figure 9

Data Table 1: This table shows the Results for Specific Gravity and Absorption of
Fine Aggregates.

Appendix
Figure 10

Raw data and the result 1: This table shows the data that we collected in the lab
and the final results for the Specific gravity and absorption for the coarse
aggregate.

Figure 11

Raw data and the result 2: This table shows the data that we collected in the lab
and the final results for the Specific gravity and absorption for the coarse
aggregate.