P. 1
Lehman Brothers Chapter 11 Examiner’s Report 2 of 9

Lehman Brothers Chapter 11 Examiner’s Report 2 of 9

|Views: 9|Likes:
Publicado porCervino Institute
Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. Chapter 11 Proceedings Examiner’s Report, Volume 2 - Section III.A.2: Valuation; Section III.A.3: Survival. The Examiner in this matter was Anton R. Valukas, Chairman of Jenner & Block.
Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. Chapter 11 Proceedings Examiner’s Report, Volume 2 - Section III.A.2: Valuation; Section III.A.3: Survival. The Examiner in this matter was Anton R. Valukas, Chairman of Jenner & Block.

More info:

Published by: Cervino Institute on Mar 13, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/12/2014

pdf

text

original

On January 19, 2008, the Friday before Barron’s piece was published, R. Scot

Sellers, Archstone’s CEO, wrote an e‐mail to Lehman, Tishman Speyer and Archstone

personnel, to set forth a “compilation of talking points that should be helpful in

addressing many of the allegations in the article.”1458  In this e‐mail, Sellers made the

following arguments:

1453 As discussed below in the Comparable Companies portion of the Analysis section, Lehman deemed
AvalonBay to be one of the three “primary comps” to Archstone.
1454 Andrew Bary, Apartment‐House Blues, Barron’s, Jan. 21, 2008, at p. 2, available at
http://online.barrons.com/article/SB120070919702802265.html#articleTabs_panel_article%3D1.
1455 Shannon P. Pratt & Roger J. Grabowski, Cost of Capital: Applications and Examples 564 (3d ed. 2008).

1456 Andrew Bary, Apartment‐House Blues, Barron’s, Jan. 21, 2008, at p. 2, available at
http://online.barrons.com/article/SB120070919702802265.html#articleTabs_panel_article%3D1.

1457 Id.

1458 E‐mail from R. Scot Sellers, Archstone, to David Augarten, Tishman Speyer, et. al. (Jan. 19, 2008)
[LBHI_SEC07940_111678].  Jonathan Cohen told the Examiner that Lehman knew the article was going to

393

● Public markets are not good predictors of real estate values;1459

● Values ascribed by public markets are not transactionable;1460

● Replacement costs are a good indicator of value;1461

● Weakening single family home markets will increase rent growth;1462

● Archstone assets are more desirable than other real estate assets;1463

● The article “missed” the value of Archstone’s platform and development
franchise.1464

be published and that the author did not want to incorporate Archstone’s and Lehman’s view as to value.
Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 10.
1459 E‐mail from R. Scot Sellers, Archstone, to David Augarten, Tishman Speyer, et. al. (Jan. 19, 2008)
[LBHI_SEC07940_111678].  The “principle mistake in the article is the assumption that public market
share prices are in any [way] predictive of real estate values, or represent an ‘efficient’ market.”  Sellers
goes on to argue “how wrong the public market gets valuations and even directionality from time to
time” and cites examples where Archstone bought back its own stock at large discounts to the “value” of
the assets when there was a period of illiquidity.  He also cited Archstone’s “solid” operating
fundamentals.  Id.
1460 Id.  “Using a comparison of public market pricing to value our portfolio may seem intuitive to
someone who doesn’t understand public markets well, but it is flawed for several reasons.  First, you
simply could not purchase these companies today at anywhere close to current share prices.”  As
support, Sellers cites an example where Archstone was rebuffed in its attempt to acquire another REIT
during the last cycle with a cash offer at a “material premium” to the existing stock price.  He further
states that publicly traded REITs such as AvalonBay and Equity Residential were trading at 35% to 50%
below replacement cost and that replacement costs were “unlikely to come down much, if at all, due to
the tremendous demand for raw materials from large construction initiatives around the world” and that
land prices within Archstone’s markets were “unlikely to change much either.”  Id.
1461 Id.  “Replacement costs are an especially important benchmark in supply‐constrained markets,
because of the difficulty of adding new supply.  By definition, as demand increases in these markets, it
can only be met by developing new units at replacement costs, which in turn requires rents that produce
a market rate of return on these costs.”  Id.  Replacement cost refers to the cost to replace an asset, such as
a building, at the cost that one would incur today, which may be different from the fair market value of
the asset.  Id.
1462 Id.  Sellers states that fundamentals for apartments were expected to become stronger due to the
deteriorating fundamentals for new single family homes (i.e., people will be more likely to rent than buy).
Id.
1463 Id.  Investors “place a very high value on the ability to acquire these types of [Archstone’s] assets, at
any point in the real estate cycle.”  “We are in a period of more limited transactional volume today, but
there is still significant demand to purchase the assets we own at very attractive prices, and we will
continue to consummate transactions with qualified buyers and partners as we move forward.”  Id.

394

Sellers closed the e‐mail by stating that this was a time to “acquire great assets at

attractive prices,” because he did not “anticipate seeing a lot of distress in the markets,

due to the strong operating fundamentals in our business” and he expected that interest

rates would come down.1465

You're Reading a Free Preview

Descarga
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->