P. 1
Lehman Brothers Chapter 11 Examiner’s Report 2 of 9

Lehman Brothers Chapter 11 Examiner’s Report 2 of 9

|Views: 9|Likes:
Publicado porCervino Institute
Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. Chapter 11 Proceedings Examiner’s Report, Volume 2 - Section III.A.2: Valuation; Section III.A.3: Survival. The Examiner in this matter was Anton R. Valukas, Chairman of Jenner & Block.
Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. Chapter 11 Proceedings Examiner’s Report, Volume 2 - Section III.A.2: Valuation; Section III.A.3: Survival. The Examiner in this matter was Anton R. Valukas, Chairman of Jenner & Block.

More info:

Published by: Cervino Institute on Mar 13, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/12/2014

pdf

text

original

While Hughson, who was responsible for distribution of bridge equity and debt

positions held in Lehman’s Commercial Book and was ultimately content with the level

of write‐downs taken in the third quarter of 2008, those responsible for marking and

price testing Lehman’s PTG book were not.

910 Id.

911 Examiner’s Interview of David O’Reilly, Oct. 26, 2009, at p. 2 (expletive deleted).  Hughson confirmed
that this exchange occurred.  Examiner’s Interview of Paul A. Hughson, Oct. 28, 2009, at p. 8.
912 Examiner’s Interview of Paul A. Hughson, Oct. 28, 2009, at p. 8.

255

Historically, Lehman had used a method it referred to as “Cap * 105” to value the

collateral underlying PTG debt and equity positions.913  This method simply multiplied

the capitalization of the development by 105% to determine the collateral value.914

While this method was deemed a conservative approach when real estate values were

increasing, Lehman recognized that in the down‐market of late 2007 and 2008 it could

produce overstated collateral values.915  Accordingly, Lehman had worked with its

primary asset manager, TriMont, to implement a new valuation model, known as an

internal rate of return (“IRR”) model, to value PTG collateral.916  The process was

managed by Anthony Barsanti and Aristides Koutouvides, Asset Managers in

Lehman’s PTG group.917  The IRR model was introduced on a rolling basis and by the

third quarter of 2008 a substantial part of Lehman’s PTG book was valued using an IRR

model.918  The switch to the IRR model resulted in lower estimates of collateral values

than the old Cap * 105 method, and, as a consequence, indicated that material write‐

downs were appropriate for a significant number of PTG assets.

913 Examiner’s Interview of Anthony J. Barsanti, Oct. 15, 2009, at pp. 12‐13; Examiner’s Interview of
Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 4.
914 Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 4.

915 Id.; Lehman, Valuation & Control Report ‐ Fixed Income Division (Feb. 2008), at p. 27 [LBEX‐BARFID
0000058] (“Current valuation methodology for land and development projects is based on cap * 105%,
which was a conservative or prudent approach is an up‐market.  Given current market conditions, this
approach may not be appropriate.”).
916 Examiner’s Interview of Anthony J. Barsanti, Oct. 15, 2009, at p. 13.

917 Id.

918 Id.

256

According to Barsanti, during the third quarter of 2008, he wanted to take $700

million in write‐downs on PTG positions.919  However, Barsanti stated that Kenneth

Cohen directed that no more than $500 million of write‐downs could be taken on the

PTG portfolio during that quarter.920  Kenneth Cohen, during his interview with the

Examiner, did not recall any such exchange.921

The same $500 million limit on PTG write‐downs was also recalled by Jonathan

Cohen, who remembered it as one part of a $1.585 billion limit on GREG write‐downs

generally.  Jonathan Cohen stated that during a meeting with Kenneth Cohen in

Kenneth Cohenʹs office a few days before the end of the third quarter, Kenneth Cohen

told him that there was a limit of $1.585 billion for GREG’s third quarter

loss.922  Jonathan Cohen stated that Kenneth Cohen explained that this would result in a

limit of $500 million in write‐downs on PTG assets.923  During the meeting, Jonathan

Cohen pointed out to Kenneth Cohen that certain write‐downs had not been considered

in Kenneth Cohenʹs analysis.  These additional write‐downs included $28 million in

Asia, ʺrun rateʺ GREG P&L of $20 million, and Coeur Defense and IMD Archstone

919 Id.

920 Id.

921 Examiner’s Interview of Kenneth Cohen, Oct. 20, 2009, at p. 11.  The incident described by Barsanti is
somewhat corroborated by Walsh.  Barsanti’s proposed write‐down was one part of the “late breaking
news” during the third quarter that Walsh described.  Walsh stated that when Barsanti informed him that
GREG’s initial estimate of $1 billion in write‐downs should have been increased by $700 million, this
caused McDade and Lowitt to become upset about getting information so late in the quarter.  Examiner’s
Interview of Mark A. Walsh, Oct. 21, 2009, at p. 14.
922 Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 7.

923 Id.

257

write‐downs of $19 million.924  Jonathan Cohen also stated that during this meeting, Jim

Blakemore, a Managing Director in the London office, called and wanted to take an

additional $10 to $15 million of write‐downs on certain assets and was told by Kenneth

Cohen that he could not do so.925

Additionally, Jonathan Cohen told the Examiner that at one point during this

meeting OʹMeara joined by phone.  According to Jonathan Cohen, the three discussed

additional write‐downs and Jonathan Cohen was told that ʺthe number is the

number.ʺ926

Jonathan Cohen stated that during this meeting he and Kenneth Cohen

performed calculations and he took notes on the Q3 Writedown Summary.927  In the top

right‐hand corner of the Q3 Writedown Summary (as sent by Kenneth Cohen), the

document shows a column of figures summed to 1,585, the same number Jonathan

Cohen stated was the limit imposed on GREG’s third quarter write‐downs.928  The net

924 Id.

925 Id.

926 Id. at p. 8.

927 See Lehman, Q3 Writedown Summary [LBHI_SEC07940_2258765].  During their meeting, Jonathan
Cohen added additional handwritten notations to this document.  Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan
Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 7.
928 Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 7.  The document also shows that the
addition of two write‐ups to the 1,585 figure, one of “15” related to Europe and another of “9” attributed
to “Santa Monica,” brought the total net write‐down on the document to $1.561 billion.  Lehman, Q3
Writedown Summary, at p. 23 [LBHI_SEC07940_2258765].

258

loss actually determined by GREG for the quarter was $1.585 billion.929  In addition, the

bottom of the first page of the document also shows “500” as the number assigned to

PTG for third quarter write‐downs, consistent with the $500 million limit on write‐

downs that both Jonathan Cohen and Barsanti described on PTG assets.  The net write‐

down taken on PTG assets for the third quarter was $504 million.930

The Examiner has found no evidence suggesting that the Q3 Writedown

Summary, which was circulated on August 25, 2008, was drafted in bad faith.  Kenneth

Cohen, who drafted this document, was likely unaware at the time of the significantly

larger than expected write‐down of PTG assets suggested by the recent switch to IRR

models.931  Jonathan Cohen told the Examiner that he did not discuss the additional $200

million PTG write‐down he thought was appropriate with anyone more senior than

929 Lehman, Global Real Estate 2008 Net Mark Downs, at p. 1 [LBEX‐AM 346991].  However, as noted
above, Lehman did not finalize its financial statements for the third quarter of 2008 and did not file a
Form 10‐Q prior to the bankruptcy.
930 The calculation of this net write‐down includes net write‐downs of $8 million on a category Lehman
labeled “CA Land & Condos ‐ Troxler,” $145 million on “CA Land & Condos ‐ Other,” and $350 million
on “Land and Condos (US excluding CA).” Lehman, Global Real Estate 2008 Mark Downs, at p. 1 [LBEX‐
AM 346991].  The PTG gross write‐down for the quarter was $555 million, with a write‐up of $51 million,
for a net write‐down of $504 million.  Id. at pp. 2‐4.  The Examiner’s financial advisor has observed that a
summary of write‐downs in E&Y’s workpapers suggests $503 million for PTG positions, but attributes
this difference to rounding.  See Lehman, 3Q Real Estate Gross and Net MTM Cash Bonds Spreadsheet
(Aug. 29, 2008) [EY‐SEC‐LBHI‐MC‐GAMX‐08‐045830].
931 It should be noted that Kenneth Cohen stated that he heard sometime early in August that some
within GREG thought that $700 million in PTG write‐downs were appropriate, but that by the end of the
quarter, when the conversation with Jonathan Cohen and O’Meara occurred, he thought that only $500
million in write‐downs were being suggested.  Examiner’s Interview of Kenneth Cohen, January 21, 2010,
at p. 4.

259

himself other than Reilly.932  Accordingly, it is the Examiner’s view that this document

represented a good faith effort to estimate write‐downs as of August 25, 2008.

Jonathan Cohen stated that he had never before heard of a predetermined limit

on write‐downs.933  However, even though he knew that such a limit would mean that

there were appropriate write‐downs that would not be taken, Jonathan Cohen stated

that he did not question it with Kenneth Cohen or O’Meara.934  He thought that he likely

just said ʺOKʺ in return.935  When asked why he did not raise the issue during this

discussion with Kenneth Cohen and O’Meara, Jonathan Cohen explained that “when

someone like Chris is telling me ‘that is the number,’ I’m not going to bring up

something else.”936

When asked whether he was surprised at the limit he understood to be set,

Jonathan Cohen stated that he was not because of an analysis he had done for Reilly in

late July.937  He explained that Reilly told him that he was trying to get a sense of what

positions they had to take a write‐down on and where they still had options.  Jonathan

Cohen stated that Reilly asked him to determine how GREG write‐downs would be

allocated under different scenarios for global GREG write‐downs.938  Cohen said that at

932 Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 22, 2010, at p. 3.

933 Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 7.

934 Id.

935 Id.

936 Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 22, 2010, at p. 3.

937 Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 8.

938 Id.

260

that time he understood that he was being asked ʺif we could only take $X amount in

writedowns, what would it be?ʺ939  Jonathan Cohen stated that this task prepared him

for the idea of predetermined levels of write‐downs.  Cohen also stated that during the

conversation in which Reilly asked him to do this, he voiced his opinion that they

should take more write‐downs, but did not ask why the limit was being set or where it

was coming from.940  Cohen explained that his impression was that the directive was

coming from above Reilly.941

The document that Cohen prepared is titled “GREG Potential Markdowns ‐

Q308” and sets forth four different scenarios for total GREG write‐downs in the third

quarter of 2008 and the applicable asset‐level write‐downs under each scenario.942  The

total GREG write‐downs under each scenario are $2.194 billion, $1.531 billion, $1.0

billion, and $750 million.  Jonathan Cohen told the Examiner that that the target write‐

down numbers for the last two scenarios were provided by Reilly.943

Jonathan Cohen also stated that the write‐down numbers for specific assets on

this document were ʺmade up numbers,ʺ as he did this analysis very quickly and had to

939 Id.

940 Id.

941 Id.

942 Lehman, GREG Potential Markdowns as of July 23, 2008 (July 2008) [LBEX‐JC 000001].  The additional
handwritten notes on the document were made by Jonathan Cohen.  Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan
Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 8.
943 Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 8.

261

meet the scenariosʹ targets.944  For instance, he stated that the write‐down number for

Archstone on this document was a ʺcompletely made up number.ʺ945  Jonathan Cohen

explained that there was a lot of juggling to get the numbers to fit the total write‐down

scenarios and that it was hard to get down to these numbers in the last two scenarios.946

Jonathan Cohen told the Examiner that it was his opinion at the time that the proper

write‐downs in the third quarter would have been somewhere between $1.5 billion and

$2.2 billion, which are the write‐downs reflected by the first two scenarios in this

document.947  He also noted that he personally delivered the document to Reilly and

that it was a ʺgood questionʺ whether Reilly asked him not to e‐mail it.948

After his discussion with Kenneth Cohen and O’Meara, Jonathan Cohen worked

to determine how to meet the $500 million write‐down target for PTG assets.  He and

Kebede divided the write‐downs into three tiers.949  The first tier was composed

of write‐downs that Lehman would be unable to justify not taking.950  The second and

third tiers were composed of potential write‐downs that Jonathan Cohen determined

were appropriate, but for which Lehman would be able to offer support for a decision

944 Id.

945 Id.

946 Id.  Jonathan Cohen stated that Kebede helped him put the document together and they had only an
hour or two in which to produce the document.  Id.
947 Id.; Lehman, GREG Potential Markdowns as of July 23, 2008 [LBEX‐JC 000001].

948 Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 8.

949 Id. at p. 9.

950 Id.

262

not to implement.951  The third tier was composed of potential write‐downs that

Jonathan Cohen determined they had the strongest case for not taking.952  However,

Jonathan Cohen stated that he felt that all of the write‐downs in each of the tiers

should have been taken.953  The total amount of the PTG write‐downs Cohen calculated

for all tiers was $714 million, or $214 million over the limit he understood was set for

PTG.954

Ultimately, Jonathan Cohen could not identify any person he believed to be

responsible for imposing a limit for GREG third quarter write‐downs.955  He stated that

he did not think that Kenneth Cohen had the authority to impose such a limit on his

own and that it also could not have been Walsh.956  He speculated that Lowitt, OʹMeara,

Michael Gelband, Global Head of Capital Markets, or Kirk may have had such

authority.957

Jonathan Cohen and Barsanti were the only witnesses who had direct contact

with Lehman senior management on the subject of possible write‐down caps.  But other

witnesses provided the Examiner with relevant evidence.  Kebede stated that he found

it difficult to explain why write‐downs were not taken on many assets during the third

951 Id.

952 Id.

953 Id.

954 See Lehman, untitled spreadsheet, at pp. 2‐5 [LBHI_SEC07940_2258765]; Examiner’s Interview of
Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 8.
955 Examiner’s Interview of Jonathan Cohen, Jan. 11, 2010, at p. 9.

956 Id.

957 Id.

263

quarter of 2008.958  He also noted that, contrary to what had previously been customary,

he was not involved in the final decision on write‐downs in the second and third

quarters of 2008.959

Rebecca Platt, a product controller responsible for PTG debt positions, also told

the Examiner that she heard of a cap on total write‐downs for the quarter, although she

did not hear of this directly from senior managers and could not recall a specific

number.960  She also stated that, in her view, product controllers Jonathan Cohen and

Kebede did not have sufficient authority to control valuations and that in many

instances they were overruled by the business desk or senior management.961  Platt also

explained that part of her job was explaining the outcome of the price testing process —

that is, why write‐downs suggested by Product Control’s models were not, in some

cases, taken.  She stated that as 2008 progressed, she had increasing difficulty coming

up with justifications for not taking write‐downs and that requests for write‐downs

were met with increasing resistance from the business desk and/or senior

management.962  When Platt could not create a rationale for why the write‐down was

not taken, she would consult with Kebede.963  For the August 2008 pricing report, which

set forth the results of the price verification process for the last month in the third

958 Examiner’s Interview of Abebual A. Kebede, Oct. 6, 2009, at p. 5.

959 Id.

960 Examiner’s Interview of Rebecca Platt, Nov. 2, 2009, at p. 10.

961 Id.

962 Id.

963 Id..

264

quarter, neither Kebede nor Platt could create cogent rationales to explain why certain

positions were not written down.964  Kebede suggested that Platt write “PCG [Product

Control Group] is in discussion with desk regarding this variance” with respect to these

positions.965   Platt stated that, although she thought the PTG debt positions were not

reasonably marked, there was “only so much [we] could do.”966  Referring to the

Product Control Group, she stated that they were, “kind of sadly, the little people.”967

Eli Rabin, the product controller responsible for PTG equity positions, also told

the Examiner that he heard rumors that there was a limit on the amount of write‐downs

that could be taken on PTG positions in the third quarter of 2008.968  He did not know

whether the limit was imposed on just GREG or all of Lehman and did not specify who

set the limit.969

Aristides Koutouvides, who worked on the PTG business desk, stated that the

role played by senior management changed in the third quarter of 2008.970  Specifically,

he remembered that there was more pushback from senior management as to write‐

downs.971  Koutouvides stated that the limit he understood to be in place was allocated

964 Id. at p. 11; Examiner’s Interview of Abebual A. Kebede, Oct. 6, 2009, at p. 6.

965 Lehman, Pricing Report (Aug. 2008), at pp. 19‐24 [LBEX‐BARFID 0000248]; Examiner’s Interview of
Rebecca Platt, Nov. 2, 2009, at pp. 10‐11; Examiner’s Interview of Abebual A. Kebede, Oct. 6, 2009, at pp.
5‐6.
966 Examiner’s Interview of Rebecca Platt, Nov. 2, 2009, at p. 11.

967 Id.

968 Examiner’s Interview of Eli Rabin, Oct. 21, 2009, at p. 12.

969 Id.

970 Examiner’s Interview of Aristedes Koutouvides, Nov. 20, 2009, at p. 16.

971 Id.

265

across all positions, such that every position that he felt should be written down was,

just not to the extent he deemed appropriate.  He recalled one example in which he and

Barsanti wanted $500 million in write‐downs, but were only allowed $450 million.972  He

was also unable to specify where the supposed limit on write‐downs originated.

Koutouvides characterized the dialogue between the heads of the business units and

senior managers as “expectations management” when it came to valuations.973

(4) Examiner’s Findings and Conclusions With Respect to Senior
Management’s Involvement in CRE Valuation

The evidence is in great conflict as to whether senior management actually

attempted to impose artificial limits on write‐downs or whether more junior managers

misperceived management pushback as management interference.  The evidence is

murky and based upon speculation as to exactly who among the senior managers

would have engaged in such interference if in fact it occurred.  The amount of the write‐

downs not taken because of the possible interference – approximately $200 million in a

quarter in which Lehman would report $3.9 billion of losses – is of questionable

materiality.  Furthermore, the actual write‐downs – right or wrong – were never

formally reported.  For all of these reasons, the Examiner concludes that the evidence

does not support the existence of colorable claims arising out of write‐downs in the

third quarter of 2008.

972 Id.

973 Id.

266

d) Examiner’s Analysis of the Valuation of Lehman’s Commercial

You're Reading a Free Preview

Descarga
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->