P. 1
Lehman Brothers Examiners Report VOL 2

Lehman Brothers Examiners Report VOL 2

|Views: 58|Likes:
Publicado porTroy Uhlman

More info:

Published by: Troy Uhlman on Mar 11, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/24/2011

pdf

text

original

An e‐mail exchange between Webster Neighbor and Alex Kirk details the model

Lehman used to value Archstone in the third quarter.1798 The base case in this model

assumed a flexed case of 5.57% for the exit capitalization rate and 4.90% for the rent

CAGR.  The Examiner’s financial advisor created four different cases in the model

stressing each of these two assumptions. In the first case the Examiner’s financial

advisor assumed that the rental growth assumption was that of the base case that

Lehman used (4.90%) and that the exit capitalization rate was 1.0% higher than at

closing.  Applying the same rental growth rate assumption Lehman used in the third

quarter, the Examiner’s financial advisor’s stress of the exit cap rate raised it to the rate

Lowitt cited in the second quarter earnings call (albeit at a lower rental growth rate).

The second case maintained the same exit cap rate but further stressed the rental

growth rate by 75 basis points, bringing the rental revenue CAGR to 4.15%.  The third

case also maintained the same exit cap rate but further stressed the rental growth rate

by an additional 75 basis points, bringing the rental revenue CAGR to 3.90%.  In the last

case, the Examiner’s financial advisor ran the model at a CAGR of 3.40%.

1798 Lehman, Easy Living Corporate Q3 Model (Aug. 22, 2008), at Full Rollup tab [LBEX‐DOCID 3119444].

492

DCF Method Sensitivity Analyses (Q3 2008)

Numbers in Millions unless stated otherwise

Assumptions

Case 1

Case 2

Case 3

Case 4

Rental Growth Rate Decrease (from 72 bps)

0 bps

75 bps

100 bps

125 bps

Exit Cap Rate increase (from 75 bps)

25 bps

25 bps

25 bps

50 bps

IRR

15.0%

15.0%

15.0%

15.0%

Total Funded Amount of the Equity

$2,388

$2,388

$2,388

$2,388

Lehman Reported Valuation for the Equity

$1,647

$1,647

$1,647

$1,647

Weighted Average Mark of the Equity

69.0

69.0

69.0

69.0

Write Down taken by Lehman within the Equity

$741

$741

$741

$741

Implied Valuation

$1,507

$1,265

$1,187

$992

Implied Mark

63.1

53.0

49.7

41.6

Implied Incremental Write‐Down

$140

$382

$460

$655

Inputs

Outputs

(vi) Examiner’s Findings and Conclusions as to the
Reasonableness of Lehman’s Archstone Valuation as
of the End of the Third Quarter of 2008

As noted earlier, Archstone equity was a SFAS 157 Level 3 asset whose valuation

is entitled to a significant amount of judgment.  For the reasons set forth above, the

Examiner’s financial advisor concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support a

finding, for purposes of a solvency analysis, that Lehman’s valuation for its Archstone

bridge equity investment as of the end of the third quarter of 2008 was unreasonable.

Recognizing that the valuation of such an illiquid investment requires the application of

judgment to numerous factors and criteria, the Examiner concludes that the evidence

supports a finding that Lehmanʹs valuation of $1.647 billion for its Archstone bridge

and permanent equity investment was overvalued by $140 million to $400 million.

The low end of the range implies a decline in enterprise value of between 7.5%

and 10.0% since the acquisition.  This decline is less than the decline in value of

493

Archstone assets under contract or in negotiation at this time; therefore the low end of

the range assumes there is some merit to Lehman’s argument that asset sales were not

indicative of the value for the remainder of the portfolio.  The Examiner’s financial

advisor’s analysis shows a $140 million overvaluation based on a DCF analysis using

the following assumptions: a 25 basis points increase in exit capitalization rate and a

zero basis point decrease in rent growth (which results in rent growth that is

significantly higher than third‐party projections for Archstone’s markets and a NOI

growth rate of 7.0%, which is significantly higher than Archstone’s historical average).

The Examiner’s financial advisor used Lehman’s base case figure for the rent growth

but stressed the exit capitalization rate an extra 25 basis points from Lehman’s base

case.  The resulting exit capitalization rate is the same as the exit capitalization rate used

in the second quarter analysis.

The high end of the range implies a decline in enterprise value since the

acquisition of 12.5%.  A 12.5% decline is still below the decline in value for Archstone

assets under contract or in negotiation at this time.   The Examiner’s financial advisor’s

analysis shows a $382 million overvaluation based on a DCF analysis making the

following assumptions: a 75 basis point decrease in rent growth and a 25 basis points

increase in exit capitalization rate. The Examiner’s financial advisor stressed the exit

capitalization rate to 6.07% based on the implied going‐in capitalization rate of 5.37%.

This capitalization rate is below the 5.5% that was cited as the appropriate capitalization

494

rate for AvalonBay in the research report published by Lehman on May 14, 2008.1799  The

rental growth CAGR assumed by a 75 basis point decline is 4.15% while the implied

NOI CAGR is 6.1%.  The NOI CAGR is significantly higher than what Archstone was

able to achieve historically while the rent CAGR is slightly higher than Archstone’s 10

year historical average.

g) Examiner’s Analysis of the Valuation of Lehman’s Residential
Whole Loans Portfolio

This Section of the Report addresses Lehman’s valuation of Residential Whole

Loans (“RWLs”) and Residential Mortgage‐Backed Securities (“RMBS”) during the

second and third quarters of 2008.  RWLs, the valuation of which presents the greater

challenge of the two, are addressed first and in greater detail.  The comparatively

straight‐forward valuation of RMBS follows.  While this Report notes several issues

with Lehman’s price testing of its RWL portfolio, insufficient evidence exists to support

a colorable claim that Lehman’s valuation of these assets was unreasonable.  Likewise,

there is insufficient evidence to support a colorable claim that Lehman’s valuation of its

RMBS portfolio was unreasonable.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Descarga
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->