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WTS 1 and 2

Instructional Writing Strategies for Elementary Students with Autism


Erika Galewski
Saint Marys University of Minnesota
Schools of Graduate and Professional Programs
Portfolio Entry for Wisconsin Teacher Standard #1 and #2
EDUW 691 Professional Skills Development
Caroline Hickethier, Instructor
February 27, 2015

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Selected Wisconsin Teacher Standard Descriptors


Wisconsin Teacher Standard (WTS)
Standard # l: Teachers know the subjects they are teaching. The teacher understands the central
concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and can create
learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for students.
Knowledge
The teacher understands how students conceptual frameworks and their
misconceptions for an area of knowledge can influence their learning.
Dispositions
The teacher is committed to continuous learning and engages in professional discourse
about subject matter knowledge and children's learning of the discipline.
Performances
The teacher can evaluate teaching resources and curriculum materials for their
comprehensiveness, accuracy, and usefulness in representing particular ideas and
concepts.
Wisconsin Teacher Standard (WTS)
Standard #2: Teachers know how children grow. The teacher understands how children with
broad ranges of ability learn and develop, and can provide instruction that supports their
intellectual, social, and personal development.
Knowledge
The teacher is aware of expected developmental progressions and ranges of individual
variation within each domain (physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive), can
identify levels of readiness in learning, and understands how development in any one
domain may affect performance in others.
Dispositions

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The teacher appreciates individual variation within each area of development, shows
respect for the diverse talents of all learners, and is committed to help them develop selfconfidence and competence.
Performances
The teacher stimulates student reflection on prior knowledge and links new ideas to
already familiar ideas, making connections to students experiences, providing
opportunities for active engagement, manipulation, and testing of ideas and materials,
and encouraging students to assume responsibility for shaping their learning tasks.

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National Board for Professional Teaching Standards


Proposition 1: Teachers are Committed to Students and Their Learning
Proposition 2: Teachers Know the Subjects They Teach and How to Teach Those
Subjects to Students.
Proposition 3: Teachers are Responsible for Managing and Monitoring Student
Learning
Proposition 4: Teachers Think Systematically about Their Practice and Learn from
Experience.

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Danielson Domains
Domain 2: The Classroom Environment
b. Establishing a Culture for Learning
Importance of the content
Expectations for Learning and Achievement
Domain 3: Instruction
b. Engaging Students in Learning
Activities and Assignments
Grouping of Students
d. Using Assessment in Instruction
Monitoring of Student Learning
Feedback to Students

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Pre-assessments
Self-assessment of Instruction Related to WTS and Targeted Student Learning Objective(s)
For Wisconsin Teacher Standards (WTS) 1 and 2, I want to focus on how I can assess
writing and implement teaching strategies that would assist autistic and struggling third grade
writers in becoming more skilled in writing. I teach at a parochial school, in a third grade
classroom of twenty-two students. There are three students that I have identified through
AIMSweb assessments that require long-term interventions with writing skills. One of the
identified students is autistic and receives occupational therapy and visual therapy two times a
week. I recognize the need to implement strategies in the classroom to help these students with
their writing skills for Wisconsin Teaching Standards 1 and 2.
With regard to Wisconsin Teacher Standard 1, I highlighted three descriptors that are key
elements within my classroom. For the knowledge descriptor goal, I chose The teacher
understands how students conceptual frameworks and their misconceptions for an area of
knowledge can influence their learning. I have been working with an autistic student who
struggles with handwriting, reading and writing. Two other students, although not on the autism
spectrum, also show similar difficulties in these same curricular areas. I have been collaborating
with occupational and visual therapists from the local public school in order to assist these
students with their writing skills, which demonstrates my commitment to better understanding
the cognitive processes that influence their writing skills.
Within our school system, we are provided professional development opportunities and
resources that help guide instruction. Most recently, our system has provided training on
IPAD/Chrome book technology, AIMSweb online assessment tools, Fountas and Pinnell guided
reading assessments, Response to Intervention, and Common Core curriculum planning sessions.
These professional development opportunities highlight the disposition descriptor The teacher is
committed to continuous learning and engages in professional discourse about subject matter

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knowledge and children's learning of the discipline and the performance descriptor The teacher
can evaluate teaching resources and curriculum materials for their comprehensiveness, accuracy,
and usefulness in representing particular ideas and concepts. By attending these professional
development opportunities I demonstrate the willingness to keep current on best practices in
education, the ability to analyze various resources, and implement instruction and assessments
that will benefit students.
With regard to Wisconsin Teacher Standard 2, I highlighted an additional three
descriptors that are also vital components within my classroom. For the knowledge descriptor
goal, I chose The teacher is aware of expected developmental progressions and ranges of
individual variation within each domain (physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive), can
identify levels of readiness in learning, and understands how development in any one domain
may affect performance in others. After initial assessments at the beginning of the school year I
concluded that additional support systems would need to be in place for the student diagnosed
with autism. His reading level was far below the third grade level, as were his fine motor,
speaking and writing skills. Communication is an area where many autistic students need
additional support. I realized that his struggles with processing information and fine motor skills
would impact his performance across curricular areas. Through my connection with special
education teachers and therapists from the public schools, I was able to gather support materials
at the beginning of the year to support instruction for this particular student.
For the disposition goal, I chose The teacher appreciates individual variation within each
area of development, shows respect for the diverse talents of all learners, and is committed to
help them develop self-confidence and competence. After initial meetings with the special
education teachers and therapists, I implemented more frequent use of graphic organizers, visual
prompts, and assistive technology to help him communicate more effectively. Over the course of

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the school year, these modifications to the learning environment helped him feel more confident
and eager to take part in writing opportunities across the curriculum.
For the performance goal, I chose The teacher stimulates student reflection on prior
knowledge and links new ideas to already familiar ideas, making connections to students
experiences, providing opportunities for active engagement, manipulation, and testing of ideas
and materials, and encouraging students to assume responsibility for shaping their learning
tasks. I am eager to learn about additional instructional strategies, tools and techniques that will
aid in providing instruction to students who need intervention in writing and what methods
would best motivate these learners to eventually self-regulate.
Assessment of Student Performance Related to Targeted Student Learning Objective(s)
My third grade class is comprised up of 22 students, 9 girls and 13 boys. One student has
been diagnosed on the autism spectrum and has an IEP that provides two hours of therapy during
the school day. He has limited communication skills both orally and in writing. Three students,
including the student with autism were identified as requiring interventions after initial beginning
of the year assessments in writing, reading and language, as they did not meet grade level
standards. During the first quarter, I collected weekly writing samples in journals from all
students. Each weekly writing sample began with a prompt or picture. I looked for
capitalization, grammar, punctuation, complete sentences, and quality handwriting within each
writing sample. I noticed that these three students needed assistance in writing more than one
complete sentence. Letter formation, spelling, and sentence structure was noticeably lower in the
three students as compared to the rest of their classmates. I began by providing visual aids and
graphic organizers that could be taped to their desks or inside their journals. During daily oral
language, struggling students were paired with students that could support. In the beginning of
the second quarter of the 2014-15 school year I administered AIMSweb writing assessments to
my class of third graders. The same three students were identified as needing intervention in

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terms of total words written, correct writing sequences, and words spelled correctly. At the fall
benchmark level for third grade writing, students should fall between the ranges of 20-35 for
total words written, 11-27 for correct writing sequences, and 14-29 for words spelled correctly.
Following this assessment, I recognized the need for additional strategies that I could use in
order to help these students progress in their writing skills.
Assessment of Learning Environment While Learning Targeted Objective(s)
Since the beginning of the 2014-15 school year I have collected weekly writing samples
from all third grade students. All of the writing samples were based on a writing or picture
prompt. These writing samples provide me with evidence of growth and what language and
writing skills students need to work on. Writing is a part of a Daily 5 literacy program in third
grade where students have daily opportunities to write for different purposes narrative,
informative and persuasive. Two to three lessons each week focus on modeling the writing
process and providing teacher and peer conferencing. At the end of the second quarter I gave a
writing interest survey (Artifact A) to gauge what attitudes students had about their writing.
After reading the responses, I noted that each of the three struggling writers did not enjoy the
writing process. I need to deeper understand what elements of the writing process are the most
frustrating for them, support skill development and integrate more motivating methods to engage
them in the writing process more fully in order to develop skills through methodical practice.
Several students, including each of the three struggling writers, noted that they felt most engaged
when writing on a word processor or IPAD. In order to motivate these students I need to provide
additional writing opportunities with technology, or use technology as a reinforcement tool to
engage them during their writing process.
Assessment Conclusion and Essential Question to Guide Research
The self-assessment, assessment of student performance, and learning environment
assessment show that I need to address the issues that my struggling writers have in order for

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them to communicate clearly as the year progresses and as they continue through their education.
How do I best meet the needs of my struggling writers? How does autism affect my students
written communication? What tools and instructional strategies can I implement that would
benefit my autistic student and the other struggling writers? The essential question to guide
research focuses on What types of instructional strategies and tools assist struggling writers in
becoming more fluent?
Research Summary
Writing is an essential skill that young learners must use to communicate effectively in a
number of educational and real world settings. In order for students to fully demonstrate their
understanding and knowledge across all content areas, written expression is a fundamental skill.
Over the course of several research studies, it has been widely accepted that students on the
autism spectrum may encounter significant difficulties in processing and communicating in
writing (Pennington, 2010). It is necessary for educators to implement instructional strategies
and tools that would assist these learners in developing writing and communication skills. Three
forms of instructional strategies and intervention have been used with students on the autism
spectrum to a varying degree of success. These strategies - Self-Regulated Strategy
Development (SRSD), Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI), and Simultaneous Prompting (SP) have fostered the development of writing skills in students with autism and other learning
disabilities.
It is important for educators to plan writing instruction in order to help students develop
writing skills that will allow them to communicate effectively. Graham, Harris and Larsen
(2001) asserted that in order to effectively plan instruction educators should implement the
eleven features of writing instruction that include: the posting of literacy materials in the
classroom environment; daily writing across content areas; the use of motivational strategies;
teacher-student conferencing; predictable writing routines; overt teacher modeling; cooperative

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arrangements; instruction across a wide-range of skills; the use of reading to support writing
development; opportunities for students to self-regulate their behavior during writing; frequent
assessment; and conferencing with parents. (para.6). With these elements of writing instruction
in place within the classroom environment, students will become more confident and skilled
writers across the curriculum. Students on the autism spectrum often have difficulty in written
performance. Myles concluded that students on the spectrum write more simplistic and shorter
writing samples as compared to their peers (2003).
Within an inclusive classroom environment, it is essential to provide accommodations,
modifications, and interventions that would further develop autistic students communication and
writing skills. Academic interventions that provide explicit strategies for success, while also
addressing the students motivation and perception of his or her ability to meet task demands, are
likely to be effective with this population. (Delano, 2007, p. 253). SRSD is a tool that provides
structured and direct modeling to students when proceeding through the stages of the writing
process. Writing experiences are scaffolded by the teacher until students have had enough
support that they can become more independent writers. Studies of students exposed to the
SRSD model have shown a significant improvement in the number of sentences and the quality
of sentences written by these students over the course of an intervention timeline. (Delano,
2007).
The major goals of SRSD as related to writing include helping writers (a) master higher
level cognitive processes involved in writing, (b) develop the ability to monitor their use
of effective writing strategies, and (c) form positive attitudes about writing and about
themselves as writers. (Assaro-Saddler & Saddler, 2010, p.108)
In order to effectively carry out SRSD effectively in the classroom environment, teachers
should follow through six stages of instruction as outlined by Harris and Graham (1993). These
six stages include (a) development of background knowledge, (b) discussion of the strategy, (c)

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modeling of the strategy and self-instructions, (d) memorization of the strategy, (e) support and
collaborative practice, and (f) independent practice. (Harris & Graham, 1993, para. 6). This
type of intervention for struggling writers also can involve four steps in carrying out
assessments, instructional intervention lessons and feedback. These four stages are (a) baseline
written data collection, (b) intervention lessons and treatment, (c) post-treatment independent
assessments, and (d) maintenance where writing is collected after intervention lessons and
student writing has been completed. (Assaro-Saddler & Saddler, 2009).
To assess the effectiveness of the SRSD approach to writing intervention, teachers should
use four measures to document changes in writing from baseline to post-treatment: number of
story elements, overall holistic quality, number of words, and planning time. (Aasaro-Saddler &
Saddler, 2010, pg. 113).
Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) is a method of providing instruction and
interventions through the use of a computer or similar form of technology to teach concepts and
allow students to respond through the technology. With the integration of various forms of
instructional technology, struggling writers and students on the autism spectrum can benefit from
visual prompts, instant feedback and modeling of writing strategies. Using assistive technology,
computer programs, and IPAD applications to provide visual story prompts, spoken story
starters, graphic organizers, speech recognition and positive feedback would allow students to
gain confidence and develop writing skills.
Simultaneous prompting provides the struggling writer with a writing environment that
builds upon writing strategies and skills in a way where the student is supported during every
stage of writing. Simultaneous prompting involves the consistent delivery of a controlling
prompt immediately following the presentation of the discriminative stimulus. During all
instructional trials, a prompt is provided that ensures the student will produce a correct

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response. (Pennington, 2010, pg. 26). Simultaneous prompting would be an effective tool to
use in order to ensure success during early writing experiences.
Research Implications
What types of instructional strategies and tools assist struggling writers in becoming
more fluent? How can I effectively meet the needs of struggling writers, including a student with
autism, in my classroom? Will Self-Regulated Strategy Development, Computer Assisted
Instruction and simultaneous prompting provide effective experiences with writing that will
enhance the skills of struggling and autistic writers? Throughout my research, it was clear that
these instructional tools should be considered when planning writing lessons and interventions
for struggling writers. According to my research, in order for these students to progress in the
development of writing skills, instructional interventions should be carried out in a small group
or one to one setting with direct instruction, modeling, prompting, assistive technology, visual
supports and frequent exposures to writing each day.
Poor writing skill development impacts a students ability to communicate their ideas
effectively in many educational and real-life experiences. It is imperative that I address the
needs of the struggling writers within my classroom. In order to effectively meet the needs of
struggling third grade writers, which includes a writer with autism, I need to provide additional
intervention blocks of time that I can work individually or in a small group to model strategies,
provide opportunities to write using assistive technology, give visual/verbal prompts and positive
feedback, and assess student growth through writing samples.
Research-based Action Plan
Action Plan Summary Outline
1. Develop and provide direct instruction in small group or individual sessions using the
SRSD method.
a) Gather baseline data on each student writing responses before instruction
b) Provide direct instruction lessons on various writing strategies
c) Implement the use of graphic organizers/mnemonic devices POW and
TIDE

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d) Assess student writing using AIMSweb and writing response collection


after instruction
e) Compare baseline data with assessments given after instruction
2. Implement the use of Computer Assisted Technology to students when writing.
a) Incorporate word processing programs for students to use when writing
b) Incorporate IPAD apps that have voice recognition and word prediction
features for students to use when writing
3. Incorporate the use of simultaneous prompting during individual and small group
writing instruction.
Targeted Student Learning Objective(s)
1. Standardized goals:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information
clearly.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.2.a
Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations
when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.2.b
Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.2.c
Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect
ideas within categories of information.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.4
With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and
organization are appropriate to task and purpose.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.5
With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as
needed by planning, revising, and editing.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.6
With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing
(using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
2. Targeted learning objective: Same
Task(s) and Essential Proficiency Criteria for Targeted Learning Objective(s)

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1. Task: Students will increase proficiency in writing complex sentences


independently through direct instruction using SRSD, CAI and SP.
2. Criteria that Prove Proficiency in Meeting Targeted Learning Objective(s)
a. Increased number of total words written, correct writing sequences and
words spelled correctly in student writing responses.
b. Increased ability to write independently on paper or through assistive
technology.
Method(s) to Assess Progress of Proficiency for Targeted Learning Objective(s)
1. AIMSweb writing prompt writing samples and assessments.
2. Baseline writing sample data compared to post-treatment writing assessment
data.
Post-assessments
Instructional Insights Related to WTS and Targeted Student Learning Objectives
I hypothesize that my instructional effectiveness in teaching writing will improve through
the implementation of Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD), Computer Assisted
Instruction (CAI) and Simultaneous Prompting (SP). By consistently providing direct
instruction, teacher modeling of writing concepts and strategies, and positive feedback, students
that typically struggle with writing will feel more confident and able to write.
As I began my research I immediately noticed that there were three main techniques that
had proven useful with struggling writers and students with autism. SRSD, CAI and SP were the
three instructional methods that proved most successful when teaching students how to write.
Further into my research I discovered that these types of instructional methods were most
effective when utilized in small group or individual instruction. I determined that in order to
successfully implement these strategies I would have to devote a block of time to work with
these writers individually on a consistent basis.

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One insight I gained while collecting lesson plans and graphic organizers to use during
SRSD was that student motivation, direct instruction and modeling were key elements I needed
to employ. In order for me to fully understand student writing ability, I first needed to gauge
his/her attitudes towards writing in general. Artifact A is a sample writing attitude survey that I
could administer to students early in the school year. The survey responses would assist me in
planning writing instruction that would engage students and also give me insight as to which
students may need support in developing their writing skills. After all, a student who may not
like to write will tend to have fewer writing experiences and could lack certain key writing skills
that frequent writers develop over repeated exposures to different types of writing. Another
important insight I gained while researching SRSD, CAI and SP is the importance of using
concrete models for students as they began to write more complex sentences. I needed to
support these students throughout the writing process at first, and then gradually decrease
support as they showed more independence and mastery of key writing skills through various
forms of assessments and assistive technology. Three different graphic organizers (Artifact B)
that would be useful tools in supporting students during writing are Positive Self-Talk, POW and
TIDE. Each one of these supports requires teacher modeling, student practice, positive feedback,
and additional teacher modeling in order to be effective. One final insight I gained centered on
the effectiveness of CAI in assisting students as they write. Computers and tablets are two forms
of technology that have the capability of motivating students and providing support during the
writing process. The IPAD app that seemed the most promising as a writing tool was the
ireadwrite app (Artifact C). This app has word prediction, voice recognition software, dyslexia
fonts, along with text and speech features which allow the student the opportunity to highlight
each word as they hear their writing read back to them at a selected pace.

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After gaining these insights into how autistic and struggling writers process language and
what instructional methods can be implemented within the classroom, I now have several
instructional strategies and tools that I can utilize when teaching writing skills to these students.
I must collect and organize SRSD lessons, graphic organizers, grade level appropriate writing
prompts, and access to assistive technology resources through our school instructional
technology coordinator. With these resources in place I can then move on to: collecting baseline
writing data, planning intervention sessions, monitoring student progress, and assessing growth
in writing skills. Students should grow in their planning, revising and editing skills when writing,
as well as organizing and connecting ideas together with topics and supporting details.
Comparison of Student Performance Related to Standardized Expectations
Based on the three individualized writing instruction sessions I have completed with my
autistic student, and the SRSD, CAI and SP strategies I have as a resource, I anticipate a
significant increase in student performance in regard to the Common Core State Standards in
English Language Arts Literacy:
W.3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the
development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose.
W.3.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing
as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
W.3.6 With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish
writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
According to third grade benchmark goals in AIMSweb, third graders should fall within certain
parameters at the fall, winter and spring (Artifact D). The fall benchmarks are as follows: total
words written (TWW) 25 or higher, correct writing sequences (CWS) 16 or higher, and words
spelled correctly (WSC) 19 or higher. The winter benchmarks are as follows: TWW 32 or
higher, CWS 22 or higher and WSC 25 or higher. The spring benchmarks are as follows: TWW

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37 or higher, CWS 28 or higher, and WSC 31 or higher. After a winter AIMSweb writing
assessment administered in January I tabulated the following results: six of my students did not
meet the TWW benchmark; four students did not meet the CWS benchmark; and five students
did not meet the WSC benchmark.
With the writing strategies and instructional methods I have researched in place, I predict
that each student that fell below the benchmark level in one or more of the three assessment
categories will make positive gains in one or more of the writing assessment criteria. By
providing one on one or small group instruction as much as possible, these students will be more
supported and likely to increase the number of sentences they can write with an increased
number of total words.
Comparison of Learning Environment While Learning Targeted Objective
With the use of supportive instructional strategies, direct modeling, prompting and the
use of computer assisted technology when writing students will be exposed to more supportive
writing opportunities which will build confidence and lead to a deeper development of writing
skill. (Artifact E) Students will have opportunities to be supported by me individually or in small
group with students of similar ability.
Reflection of Entire Learning Process
It was interesting to research instructional methods that would help support struggling
and autistic writers. Each of the three strategies I researched would be helpful tools for me to
continue to implement this school year and beyond. During my past writing instruction, I would
struggle as to how to help struggling writers that did not like to write. It was hard for me to
understand if they were refusing to write because they were unable to, or simply did not want to.
Now with these strategies in mind I can help these students strengthen their skills and be more
confident writers across the curriculum
What Worked and Why
1. During the three individual sessions I carried out SRSD, CAI and SP I found
the strategies to be helpful. These strategies help organize the writing process in

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manageable steps with visual organizers, supportive prompting and successful


experiences with writing.
2. Small group and individual instruction would benefit all students involved.
3. Writing skills should be strengthened due to more experiences to write.
4. Computers/technology is motivating to many students which would encourage
more writing using apps and assistive technology.
What Did Not Work and Why
1. It would be difficult to block time each day to work with individual or small
groups of writers for an uninterrupted amount of time without a teachers assistant
or another teacher to assist the rest of the class. I wouldnt want to neglect
students that have reached the benchmark target or are above.
2. I will have to research each strategy more in depth and collect additional
resources and supplies in order to plan individual or small group sessions
effectively.
3. Assistive technology comes with an expensive price. For a smaller school
system like Regis, it would be hard to find money in the budget for a variety of
assistive technology resources for just my classroom.
My next steps
1. Collect lesson plans using SRSD, CAI and SP to add to my lesson plans.
2. Plan time to meet with struggling writers more often during class time.
3. Investigate CAI and assistive technology resources more extensively and speak
with administration and technology coordinators about cost.
4. Continue to monitor and assess writers using AIMSweb.
Throughout this research process, I compiled a list of useful instructional strategies that
would benefit students with autism and those students who struggle to write. These instructional
strategies and tools will be resources I can implement for the remainder of this school year and
beyond. I have gained a better understanding of what factors contribute to poor writing skills
and how I can plan instruction that will support students on multiple levels. Ultimately, I have
become a more well-rounded educator that can facilitate learning to those students who struggle.

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References
Garland, K. (n.d.). Writing attitude survey. Retrieved January 20, 2015, from Teachers Pay
Teachers: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Writing-Attitude-Survey835863
Graham, S., & Harris, K. (1993). Improving the writing of students with learning problems: selfregulated strategy development. School Psychology Review.
Graham, S., Harris, K. & Larsen, L. (2001). Prevention and intervention of writing difficulties
for students with learning disabilities: Review of a research program. Learning
Disability Quarterly, 89-114.
Myles, B.A. (2003). Written language profile of children and youth with Asperger Syndrome.
Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 362-369.
Pearson Education Incorporated. (2011). AIMSweb default cut scores.
Pennington, R. (2010). Using simultaneous prompting and computer-assisted instruction to teach
story writing to students with autism . Assistive Technology Outcomes and Benefits, 2438.
Saddler, K. A. (2009). Effects of planning instruction on a young writer with asperger syndrome.
Intervention in School and Clinic, 268-275.
Saddler, K. A.-S. (2010). Planning instruction and self-regulation training: effects on writers with
autism spectrum disorders. Exceptional Children, 107-124.
Snowden, M. (n.d.). Positive self talk organizer, POW and TIDE. Retrieved January 20, 2015,
from Common to the Core: http://www.commontothecore.com/p/conferences.html

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Artifact A
This writing survey could be administered to students at the beginning of the year or when
deemed appropriate when wanting to understand students attitudes about writing and how it can

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impact the development of their writing skills.

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Artifact B

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The self-talk organizer and the POW and TIDE graphic organizers help students remain positive
while writing and assist struggling writers organize their ideas.

Artifact C
This is a photo of a student using Computer Assisted Instruction on the IPAD to help him write a
series of complete sentences successfully.

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Artifact D
Below are the AIMSweb cut scores for third grade that I can use to monitor student progress and
plan instruction in writing.

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Artifact E
The following are examples of my autistic students writing samples before and after intervention
strategies were used to show development of writing skills.
9-4-14 Writing Journal Example Before Intervention 30 minutes of writing time.
TWW=18 CWS=8 WSC=14

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10-14-14 Writing Journal Example - Before Intervention 30 minutes of writing time.


TWW=10 CWS=8 WSC=9

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Writing Sample 12-17-14 Before Intervention 45 minutes of teacher support during writing
time.
TWW= 31 CWS=17 WSC=27

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Writing Sample 2-13-15 Intervention 15 minutes of teacher support during writing time.
TWW= 17 CWS=15 WSC=16* with the assistance of word predication CAI app.

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Writing Sample 2-20-15 Intervention 15 minutes of teacher support during writing time.
TWW= 25 CWS=23 WSC=23* with the assistance of word predication CAI app.

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