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r5rtfo55o#

By

%.

Senart P. P. 1,254
(Vide Kshatriya Clans in Bud 1 hist India.
P. 2
Bhimala Charan Law, M. A- B. L. Ed 193

By

3).

(^

(Lecchavi)
W^bSfo.

(Licchavi - Dauhitra).
I.

5f)^7V^

a e)

ur*\t}c$5:oo

^Sofi^<^o&:>

35

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(Kshatriya Clans in Biidd, India P. 7)&


(Vide Inscriptions of the Early Gupta Kings,
Edited
by T. F. Fleet
Corpus Inscriptionum
Indicarum Vol. Ill P 8S
a

II.

Tfc^s

^^TT-8^j(5KS^ (Vide
ffl

Fleet Op. Git. P.

27)

III.

98

IV. aoo^JSoSSar'S'XbS

r5oii

(Do

Page

43)

(Do

Page

50)

aSs&-8&ifc iSj-oS

..-jg

35

ft"d&>
e^> "eF So^^rf
Vic tf^(&X:>^)
considered to be spurious e?
/

(Vide Fleet, Inscriptions of

the

(which

fe>

Early

Is

Gupta

Kings, Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Vol. Ill


8)
256.,
(&) Kshatriya Clans in Budd, India

'

(Licchivi)

(Licchavi
\

LJ

Inac Vola
_

ln

(Kshatriya Clans in Buddhist times P=8);


Antiquary Vol. IX P. 168.f.f.)

"

17

& Indian

(Licchavi)

(Vide Legge, FaHien P. P. 71, 76

(Licehavi)

S.

(Vide Buddhist records of the Western World


Beal Vol. II P. 73)

"

By

The Licchavis were neither Tibetan nor Iranian

in their origin,

but there

is

very clear evidence in th

show that they belonged


caste -the Kshatriya \

Buddhist literature

to

to the

Aryan

ruling

g^.jm^^.y^^^.^ m ,^ ^.^,mi^
i

A-Mij\l!!^^J?i;iJV:mMa!g^

llmr-nnr-im

-reytpHiiir^qMrm^^^^

(Kshatrlya Clans In Buddhist India P.

9)

eo

&

Q
cc

(5

C?

no

^)

(Vide Mahaparinibhana Suttana. Translated by


C. A. F. Rhys Davids in Dialogues of
Buddha. VoL III P. 187).
"The Exalted one was a Kshatriya and so are
we- We are worthy to receive a portion of the relics
of the Exalted one ".
T.

W.

&

(Kshatriya Clans in Buddhist India P.

9)

fi

The Lord

fore I deserve

is

a Kshatriya and so

a share

of the relics

am
59

(Kshatriya Clans in Budd. India

"

Nikaya. P. T. S. VoL III P. P. 164, 1660


Clans in Budd. India P. 10)

Licchavi

named Mahali

&

Kshatriya

says,

If his
is the Buddha.
all
he
becomes
and
-Knowing,
knowledge increases,
to
me
not
it
should
happen
why
(Vide Suraangala Vilasim Pt I P. T, S. P. 312) &
Kshatriya Clans in Budd. India, P
46

am

Kshatriya, so

'

8c55bo

*X

A3

B/

..._..

O
I

2^

no
ss

The eighteen confederate Kings of Kasi and


Hosala the nlae Mallakis and Nine LIcchavis, on the
BEZjL-^g^^MRLiJail'.ti.'UBlL

i.JLil^^^fflyTO7H"Sa>at-!ll^' VJ^ttBfmPfmf^!^
_

day of new moon, instituted in illumination on


Poshadha, which was a fasting day; for they said,
"

the

Since the light of intelligence is gone, Jet us


of material matter ".

make an illumination

(Kalpa Sutra. 128 Translated by Prof. H. Jacobi


Vol. XXII P. 268) & Kshatriya Clans iii
Buddhist times P. 12)
,

(Vide Jacobi Op. Git. 108-110. P. P. 255-6.


P. X-XII). fKshtriya Clans in,
Buddhist India P

&
P

13,36)

dtsss-8os5warfa. (Do P.

13)

oo

no
-

a
--

3Ttfs

"

(Kshatriya Clans in Buddhist India P.

14.

The Liochavis were looked upon as persons

of

very high Pedigree

5?

(Kshatriya CJans in Buddhist India P.


5 \-x-ctfcoOO

TJ

"The

(& e^^SbsSoS'

41

75oi520o

(vJospS^SDwo.T*

Licchavis were Kshatriyas of

Gotra"

13).

Vasistha
(do P. 13)

The Sakyas and the Licchavis are branches of

the same people

".

(Kshatriya Clans in Buddhist India P, 17/

"

The Sakya, race

(to

which the Buddha belonged

was divided into three parts, whose most celebrated

were Sakya the Great (the Buddha),


3akya the Licchavi, and Sakya the rr ountaineer ".
'epresentatives

(Vide His. of the Eastern Mongols,


3anang Setsen
Kshatriya Clans 17),

&

oex.

Page

21.

By

Tibetan King, belonged to the family


of Sakya the Licchavi ".
(The life of the Buddha. By Rockhill Popular
.Edition Page 203 Note )

''The

first

" The Licchavis were of pure Kshatriya parentage


"
on both sides
(Page 27 of Kshatriya Clans in Buddhist India),

The Licchavis were pure Kshatiiyas

by_origin^

(Kshatriya Clans in Btrld. India P.

25)

Just as Ajatasatru had gbried in the -title of


Videhiputto \ the son of a daughter of Videha
who occupied the
people, that is, of the Licchavis
.Videha country, so also it was considered a glory to
an orthodox Gupta Emperor to have been a "Lecchavi
dauhitra or the son of a daughter of the Licchavis.
(Kshatiiya Clans in Budihist India P. 27.. 28.)
4

%'

'

11

The power and glory of the Licchavis during


the period of Brahmanic revival under the Guptas
were as great as under the Sisunakas and the

43

Mauryas and that their position as one of the leading


and most honoured Kshatriya fannies in Eastern
India was fully recognise 1."
(Kshatriya Clans In Buddhist Inlia P. 29)

P.

(Vide SigaUjataka Edited by V. Fausboll Vol, III


& Kshatriya Clans in Buddhist India P. 10
5)

Foot-Note

3.)

^(^ O

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S'O 3001

101)

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3001-3059

son-in-law of

thg_Ljj^

Ghatotkacha Gupta, Chandra Gupta

itm^LiU|-^''r'Miinii'jiy--!'^j^^Tfcyrrp^'^ri-ffl^^

sou of

Established a
B^^tt^iy^p^^g-jqaj^Mp^-^g.-a^afflif "ii^p} r^****Mjp|3my7^f<i -y^^jm^

New

By
(Prachina Mudra, P. 121
(Kshatriya Clans in Bu Id. In ha P.

13").

00

iJ

co-v
Sjc^bj^) '^iT

&

D. Bauer ji)

^9cCb^aorfb.

^j^

SosSbn'&.rSo

/o

^^D/e5^,^)

"The Nepal
two

inscriptions point oufc that there were


distinct houses, one of which known as the

Thakuri family,

mentioned

the Vamsavali but is


not recorded in the inscriptions; and the other one was
the Licchavi or the Surya Vamai family which issued
its charters from the house or palaca called
Managriha
and used an era uniformly with the Gupta epoch.
Thus we find that the Licchavis were not inferior
to the imperial Guptas so far as rank and power were
is

in

concerned. Their friendly relations with the Guptas


were established by the marriage af Chandra Gupta
^ with Kumara Devi a daughter of the I icchavis."

(Vide Fleet, Corpus


Vol. Ill P. P. 133, 135)
India P. 138).

&

Inscriptionum Indicarum,
Kshatriya Clans in Budd.

fl

457

\o
o

TP=rf

^3^^^/eSb

tf

^sSbr^

(Kshatriya Clans in Budd. India P-

I Si 5).

"In the Nepal Vamsavali, the Liccha^is have


been alloted to the Suryavamsa or solar race of ttfe
Kshatriyas.'*

(Indian Antiquary. Vol. XXXVII P. P. 78-90)


Kshatriya Clans in Budd. India P, 14)

Kshatriya Clans

in

BuiH. India

(Kshtriya Clans in Budd, India.

P. 17.

P
?^
Co

So^S,

(Kshatriya Clans in Budd. India


(if!

23)

^rII 327 to 82

11

was considered a glory to an _o^thodox_Giipfca


Emperor to have been a Licchavi - Puhitiaor the son
It

of a daughter of the Licohavis."

(Kshatriya Clans in Budd, India (P. P. 27

"V

Dr. Fleet

"

The Llcchavis were then

at least

of equal

rank
and power with the early Guptas is shown by the pride
manifested by the latter in this alliance as exhibited
in the record of

names

of

Kumara Devi

9 '

etc.

(Kshatriya Glaus in Buddhist India P. 28) & J.


Gupta Insertions-' Co rpous Ins. Ind. VoL III

Fleet

Introduction, P. 155

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(Vide History of India

lyyangar.

Part

Page

By

K. V.

Rangaswamy

93).

"

The Vajjians, a confederation of eight clans of


vhich the chief were the Licchavis of Vaisah."
3d.

(Ancient India.
1911 Page

By

S.

Krishnaswamy Ayyangar

(Vide Cunnigham, Ancient Geography

of India

P. 447).

66

name

Some
"

of the coins of

Licchavl

9 '

on

Chandra Gupta

have the

them"

(Kshatriya Clans in Buddhist India.

"v

eo

P.

8)

tfnfc

B-'oSxSb \rib7VS)

ij

o
5
C4-)

was introduced under the name of


Chandra Gupta 1 On one side of it were insiscd the
figures of Chandra Gupta and his queen Kumara
"
" "
Sree Kumara
Devi and the words Chandra Gupta
"
and
the other
on
Devi in the Brahmi Character,
side were engraved the fignre of Laxml, the goddess
"
Licchaof Fortune seated on a Lion and the word

"A

gold coin

5!

vayah

("Kshafcriya

Clans In Buddhist India P. 137)

Prachina Mudra

By

R.

rn

^)^7T

-v

2-

Banerjee. P. 122).

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90

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25

s6

The second record

of

the

Gupta

likewise perpetuated on stone, is to be

heritage^
seen in the

Mathura inscription from the Katra Mound, wherein


Samudra's parentage is apparently repeated in accordance with the tenor of the earlier monument
The
genealogy of the family

is

further extended in the

District of

Ghazipur

and an unnamed heir/

and

counterpart at Bihar,

Its

lb (X'oSJ
Q
s

~i .'"V

OL

.
>v-

S.

w,

"

born in Vaisah, to that city alone


was to ba contracted outside Valsali.
girls

No marriage

(Kshatriya Cldiis In Buddfa, India


v

-7.)

o
g'tfowtfb

"B-Sb\S^(6S6oi&>e6ioooSSb
^*J

2j

XJ

tf

"V

b'

eo

EI

(Kumara Devi)

She ^belonged

to a royal family

of the Licchavis."

(Kshatriya Clans

212

in Bnddhisfc India P. 137).

no

oo

V
vXJ

cWixXJ

\J

Cj&J

fO

&J &J

oJ

cxXJ

C>c(\XJj

.y_

9 ^r'exr-'QO,

'

212

-tfo/tf^^ SS-O\
"3

"

Ghaadragupta was crowned as King of Kings, a


date thereafter reckoned as the beginning of the great
Gupta Era, To celebrate the event lie struck coins

own name,

inscribed With his

Kumara Davi, and


was the chief."

that of

his

of the Licchavi Clans of

queen,

which he

<IESN

the

\
CD

"i*J
* Bf

;6555od$joex>
XJ

~s

11

It is

wholly misleading to describe the Gupta


Era as a Hindu or Brahraanical reaction, Ttwas rather
an Aryan revival, for it was the effort of the
Aryan
K^trivas, aided by the Aryan Brahmins, to restore
the

political

Aryan

and spiritual supremacy of the Indo-

race in Aryavarta. 95

His, of the

P.P. 151-52.

Aryan Rule

in India.

By HavelL

v-

(p

oi

01

efo-Cfc-Sb

eo

"They (The Gupta Emperors) were fall-blooded


Aryans of the historic Licchavi Clan who rallied the
*

nmu.niiaimini

.....

ni llll

m__^ rT _

TIII ,

B|| ...........

---

n-J

-_____^____^,, ^_^__

Kshatriya Clans to the defence of the Tryavarta


against the Turks, and HLIDS of those days who were
threatening the existence of Aryan Empire in India"
(Bhandarkar's
Ed. 1917.
x.

Commemoration Vol.

P.

442

"

Mr. Allen presumes that Jfemudr^^


chajjjJa rn Iy an 1 to keep up the memory
bornjg.j., L ic
.

of the

father,

Chandragupta and mother, Kumara


9

Devi the coin was Issued


(Kshatnya Claris
.

in

Budd. India, P.

137).

Samudragupta by Ms conquests considerably


enlarged the Empire of the Guptas ..... .and reasserting
the principle of Kshatriya hegemony over the whole
6S

of India

9 '

(HavelFs History of the Aryan Rule in India P. 154).

15

was the
the Gupta Imperial Court"

Sanskrit, therefore, naturally

language oi

official

(Do Book P,

41

155).

The

village kathaks found ready listeners to


praises of the mighty kshafcriya (Samudragupta) thenB^afTgmmmLaaagaTOn- nmnxrTmrvKfn. Mamifk**iatfm*mttmm*aiH'..f Uf mia fi
.

seated on

Rama's throne

(Havell's His. of the

at

Ayodhya."

Aryan Rule

in India P. 155)

Qtf

S^Sooo

"The Guptas were undoubte

f-Ttm-KXiJi

tives

_|f^rt^ ?^ri--nnyjy.'i

HJ , fBja^jJtt.u-i^^ JJd

*^ ..MUBBwBM.TtTJHaMiiifc.^jtriii u
)

>

^aiafcj.g^U

_J-fflmi-.-^Tr''Trft pKt1

Aryan Kshattiya

of

a .^ ^

Tr^av.^-^'

j^ffT[r^

[rf

L,

t .-.^T

ily

the representa-

>^I^^T^ ip*eu^ ..idtif^j^Jne^. ^-r^^^

tradition,

5 '

(Do

P. 178).

!T"II

"In fact the instinct of caste lias become so


Ingrained in and natural to the Indian mind, that the
Ka]aputs of pure Aryan descent decline even now, as
thousands of years ago, to take girls from, or give
girls in marriage to the Aryans of mixed descent
whether they be the Kshatriyas of the united provinces, or the Kathis of Katiawar and the Maharatta of
Maharastra."
(Epic India. By Q. V Vaidya P. 45)
IT

!!

"

o-rf\"^o^

e^,9c55boe>D

,5

1940
ds

800

tf

eo

No one " he wrote is allowed to marry out of


own class or exercise any calling except his own?
(Epic India P. 49. By a V. Vaidya, M. A
ss

"

his

S'

ooo$tfrf\
o).

G ,9
45
11

There

system as

is

no

we know

doubt whatever
it to-day
with

that
all

its

the caste
elaborate

with regard to marrige. food, ceremonial


pollution, etc. existed in its iully developed form in
the days of Harsha. (i. e 606-640 A. D.)
restrictions

'

606^640

E^Q
S&T*
?!
1

12

<?

TJ

(?

tfoll

S'olj

L
00

SO

SP8

3.

Mr,

3.0.0

tffitt

fc-

z.
<r.

esoixno

oo,
DO.

j_g Q

tf

V,

1J

W3

"i

SjJ

o
e

eo'

284s "4>tiej

e9fc>"3o5fc^

^V

'

23

o r

The Genesis

of the

Human Race

GjoSb

oO

LJ

<^

114

1-8-0

5050

00

5050

86

3188

(li

^.

1950)

sSea&S

1836

^*Pdtfbw&c5

4988 o

2775

827

(II

1S2

S'O 2775

oir

e)

5050

((

1949)
PtfdSoo;

XIV

THE HINDU,

Sunday, July

17, 1949

Manavasrishti Vijnanam. (Tho Genesis


Human. Kace, )
By Kota Veukatachalara (Author)

-of

th

Gandhinagar, Vijayavada.

"This is an attempt to ascertain the cradle ol


mankind with the almost exclusive aid of Vedic tosti
money, The author believes that the first man was an
Aryan and that he was created in Aryavarta - the
Valley of the Saraawati,

etc,

XV
INDIAN REPUBLIC, Monday,
a
^

<3

d&

fe"

&

C) 86

oo

July, 18; 1949.

/&

Manava Srishti Vijnanam* By Kota VenkataHe points out that the first abode
chelam..v
He quotes profusely
of the Aryans was Aryavarta.
from the Rigveda, Manusmriti, the Puranas, and the
vedic commentaries. He supports Ms statements from
the findings of the Geological and Archaeological
researches etc
An attempt is made in the work
to stimulate in the minds of the students the spirit of
"
research into this
all important matter of the writ
of
on
the subject and rejecting what is
ings
foreigners
not supported by Vedic writings, by the author is a

The maps supplied by Jfe


wholsome feature.
Venkatachalam are useful (See Pages 27 81, 83).
9

The Appendix on
"

"

the
Ancient Geography of the
Puranas is very interesting study.
The section on
modern countries which correspond to ancient names
The problems raised
may be perused with interest
are of practical value and should be solved with the
aid of our own ancient literature and by a proper
interpretation. The conclusions are thought provoking and deserve to be widely read and thought over.

>*

oo

fl

O
S) Zj cSSb

X" tf

ttT

2e

2.

SXr

no

Q
-

?>)
^^

^g'o

36-.Y-1949

&

ii

c5o
ep-

Sa ST 60

>

18-10-49.
no

no

v
'

j3

"8-

dfoS-

o;5a

J7_

My

Dear Sir,
I thank you sincerely for
sending me a copy of
your excellent book "Manavasrishti
Vijnanam". You
nave given convincing reasons for
your views I feel
Ur
r6C6iV6 6Ver inCreasin
^ P ublic

aS.reclS

^^

S,

R, B. & 0. V. B. College,

f*

So

1)26

0-

9
'

6
<?

<C .

sOO

oo

iJ

"3

Genesis of the
(The
^

Human

Race)

&

itfo#5&>3b

00

VII

a; Q
40
^'x7o

.The process of the Evolution of the Universe


explained therein is covincing to all unprejudiced
minds I have my own doubts as to whether the
leaders of our secular state will give the book the
attention it deserves. I hope it will enable the present
and coming generations to know in an understanding
manner the eternal truths contained In our ancient
books.

VIII
CV

Dear

13

Sir,

I thank you once more heartily for sending me the


"
book
Manavasrishti Vijnanarn which I have read
with great Interest and benefit to myself, and admire
the profound knowledge and close reasoning which it
displays on the subject which greatly enhances the
5'

prestige of the

Aryan Race.

Genesis of the
(The
^

Human

Race)

&

itfo#5&>3b

00

VII

a; Q
40
^'x7o

.The process of the Evolution of the Universe


explained therein is covincing to all unprejudiced
minds I have my own doubts as to whether the
leaders of our secular state will give the book the
attention it deserves. I hope it will enable the present
and coming generations to know in an understanding
manner the eternal truths contained In our ancient
books.

VIII
CV

Dear

13

Sir,

I thank you once more heartily for sending me the


"
book
Manavasrishti Vijnanarn which I have read
with great Interest and benefit to myself, and admire
the profound knowledge and close reasoning which it
displays on the subject which greatly enhances the
5'

prestige of the

Aryan Race.

C?

<sy

C J

*sSb,

Stop's
^o

-tfB/tf
v.

XIII

ST

15-8-1949

^a,

XIV

THE HINDU,

Sunday, July

17, 1949

Manavasrishti Vijnanam. (Tho Genesis


Human. Kace, )
By Kota Veukatachalara (Author)

-of

th

Gandhinagar, Vijayavada.

"This is an attempt to ascertain the cradle ol


mankind with the almost exclusive aid of Vedic tosti
money, The author believes that the first man was an
Aryan and that he was created in Aryavarta - the
Valley of the Saraawati,

etc,

XV
INDIAN REPUBLIC, Monday,
a
^

<3

d&

fe"

&

C) 86

oo

July, 18; 1949.

/&

Manava Srishti Vijnanam* By Kota VenkataHe points out that the first abode
chelam..v
He quotes profusely
of the Aryans was Aryavarta.
from the Rigveda, Manusmriti, the Puranas, and the
vedic commentaries. He supports Ms statements from
the findings of the Geological and Archaeological
researches etc
An attempt is made in the work
to stimulate in the minds of the students the spirit of
"
research into this
all important matter of the writ
of
on
the subject and rejecting what is
ings
foreigners
not supported by Vedic writings, by the author is a

The maps supplied by Jfe


wholsome feature.
Venkatachalam are useful (See Pages 27 81, 83).
9

The Appendix on
"

"

the
Ancient Geography of the
Puranas is very interesting study.
The section on
modern countries which correspond to ancient names
The problems raised
may be perused with interest
are of practical value and should be solved with the
aid of our own ancient literature and by a proper
interpretation. The conclusions are thought provoking and deserve to be widely read and thought over.

The need for a reorientation of the study of Indian


History is well indicated by the facts brought
out
H^j*A V
t

in

tl

\J> 14. (y

11

this work.

"

&t

In this exceedingly well written


booklet,
author has collecte and set forth all the Vedic'
Puranic authorities bearing on the question of
origin of the Human race and original home of

the

and

His opening up of the mine of evidence


that question must appeal
to the heart
*
*
i
,,,,....,.
"*

T"

I a(J lan

qj>
>'

ete

o
o~ e

28

^)o/90"e3^5o

w^gd&o

5S6

the
the

relating to
of every
^ VJi V
"

XVII
&^a i^o^^o3^r^&

^'rf^ex>

&

11-12-^1949

- "lXAb?r"sS$iw 9-685

S!

XIV

THE HINDU,

Sunday, July

17, 1949

Manavasrishti Vijnanam. (Tho Genesis


Human. Kace, )
By Kota Veukatachalara (Author)

-of

th

Gandhinagar, Vijayavada.

"This is an attempt to ascertain the cradle ol


mankind with the almost exclusive aid of Vedic tosti
money, The author believes that the first man was an
Aryan and that he was created in Aryavarta - the
Valley of the Saraawati,

etc,

XV
INDIAN REPUBLIC, Monday,
a
^

<3

d&

fe"

&

C) 86

oo

July, 18; 1949.

/&

Manava Srishti Vijnanam* By Kota VenkataHe points out that the first abode
chelam..v
He quotes profusely
of the Aryans was Aryavarta.
from the Rigveda, Manusmriti, the Puranas, and the
vedic commentaries. He supports Ms statements from
the findings of the Geological and Archaeological
researches etc
An attempt is made in the work
to stimulate in the minds of the students the spirit of
"
research into this
all important matter of the writ
of
on
the subject and rejecting what is
ings
foreigners
not supported by Vedic writings, by the author is a

The maps supplied by Jfe


wholsome feature.
Venkatachalam are useful (See Pages 27 81, 83).
9

The Appendix on
"

"

the
Ancient Geography of the
Puranas is very interesting study.
The section on
modern countries which correspond to ancient names
The problems raised
may be perused with interest
are of practical value and should be solved with the
aid of our own ancient literature and by a proper
interpretation. The conclusions are thought provoking and deserve to be widely read and thought over.