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Student: Kathleen Turnowski

Course: EDU 521


Grade: 7
Topic: The Declaration of Independence

Professor: Professor Moroney


Date: January 14, 2015
Content Area: Social Studies

Instructional Objective: After viewing a brief video and participating in a brief discussion on why the
Declaration of Independence was written, students will read and interpret the Declaration of
Independence, correctly labeling the different parts and writing the meaning of each part in their own
words with their group with 80% accuracy.
Standards and Indicators:
Social Studies Standard #1: History of the United States and New York:
Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their knowledge
and understanding of the Declaration of Independence and the immense purpose
it had to the American 13 Colonies in their fight for independence form England.
Indicator: This will be evident when students discuss, analyze, and think critically
about the meaning and purpose of the Declaration of Independence, label and
rewrite the different parts of the Declaration of Independence, and the reasons
why the American Colonists created it.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary
source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
Indicator: This will be evident when the students correctly interpret and analyze the Declaration of
Independence, label and rewrite each part in their own words with their group, and individually
complete the homework critical thinking questions about the Declaration of Independence.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
Indicator: This will be evident when the students correctly interpret and analyze the Declaration of
Independence, label and rewrite each part in their own words with their group, and individually
complete the homework critical thinking questions about the Declaration of Independence.
NETS-S #1: Creativity and Innovation
Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop
innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression
c. Use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues
d. Identify trends and forecast possibilities
Indicator: This will be evident when the students correctly complete the
Declaration of Independence Break-Up Letter Project. Students will use technology
to write their letter and find sources to use for the historical content.

Motivation: Students will be engaged in the lesson by showing a brief History Channel video entitled
Declaration of Independence and asked the question, Why was the Declaration of Independence
written? from which the class will openly discuss the answers while being prompted by the teachers
various questions to critically think.
Materials:
SMART Board
SMART Notebook
History Channel video clip
Brief Question about the video clip
PBS website of the Declaration of Independence
homework questions on instructors Weebly website
student iPads
Strategies:
Collaborative Learning: Students will be given the opportunity to work in groups of three
together reading, interpreting, labeling, and rewriting the Declaration of Independence.
Open Discussion: Teacher will initiate an open discussion after viewing the Declaration of
Independence video from the History Channel to answer the proposed question.
Direct Instruction: Teacher will briefly lecture at certain points during the discussion and
reading of the Declaration of Independence, instructing students to take notes and highlight
certain parts of the Declaration of Independence.
Guided Practice: Teacher will model and guide students to highlight and underline key phrases,
vocabulary, and important/main ideas in the Declaration of Independence.
Adaptions:
Teacher will use a voice recorder for the student who is hearing impaired.
Student who is visually impaired will sit in the front of the class.
Differentiation of Instruction:
Visual: History Channel video clip, SmartBoard, photos, visuals, and graphics incorporated in
the lesson.
Audio: Open discussion, Guided Practice, Lecture
Intrapersonal: Note taking, brief question about the video clip
Interpersonal: Reading, Group Work, Open Discussion
Developmental Procedures:
1. Teacher will instruct students to take their seats and type the following question on the SMART
Notebook into their student iPad on their note-taking app (Notability): Why do you think the

Declaration of Independence was written?


2. Teacher will direct the students to pay attention to the brief History Channel video clip entitled
The Declaration of Independence in order to gather the information to answer the question.
3. Teacher will show the History Channel video clip entitled The Declaration of Independence.
4. Teacher will give the students a couple minutes to type their answer to the question. Teacher
will then teacher will ask for volunteers to discuss their answer with the class. Teacher will
prompt the students by asking them further questions, such as What does this phrase mean:
the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness? What is a declaration? Who can
define what that words means? Who wrote the Declaration of Independence? Why
was it written? What was its purpose? What was the goal? Why do you think John
Hancock signed his name so large? Why do you think that was a dangerous thing to do?
5. Teacher will instruct students to go to the following website on their iPads:
http://www.pbs.org/ktca/liberty/popup_declaration.html in which the Declaration of
Independence can be viewed. Teacher will read the document through with the students,
modeling for the students what to highlight. Teacher will ask questions and explain the different
parts of the Declaration of Independence (Preamble, List of Grievances, and Declaration of
War) describing each in detail. Teacher will instruct students to take notes on their iPad, typing
any vocabulary definitions important to the topic.
6. Teacher will break up the students into groups of three to begin the group work. With their
group, students will each label the different parts of the Declaration of Independence and
rewrite each part in their own words. Teacher will remind the students that this group work will
be timed and they will review it at the end of class.
7. Teacher will hand out the homework critical thinking questions while students are completing
the group work.
8. Teacher will then review the groups work by asking for volunteers from the groups to come up
to the SMART Board to label each part of the Declaration of Independence and briefly write in
their own words what each part means. Teacher will review with the class the correct responses.
(Teacher had previously walked around the room to manage and interact with the groups.)
9. Teacher will then explain the homework to the students, stating that the homework will be
collected and corrected the following day. Teacher will ask if there are any questions.
10. Teacher will explain the Break-Up Letter Project due in one weeks time to the students. The
directions and rubric will be handed out the following class, but teacher will explain (as closure)
that the Declaration of Independence is similar to a break-up letter.
Assessments: Students will successfully participate in group work to read, interpret, label, and rewrite
the Declaration of Independence in their own words with 80% accuracy.
Independent Practice: Students will define important vocabulary in their notebooks. Students will
also complete critical thinking short answer questions for homework to be collected and corrected in
class the following day.
Follow Up:
Academic Intervention: Students will complete a simplified outline of the Declaration of
Independence and flashcards of the vocabulary words discussed in class. Students can come for extra
help after school to review what was discussed and learned in class that day.

Academic Enrichment: Students will write their own Declaration of Independence in the form of a
break up letter. Students may be creative but must have a Preamble, a List of Grievances, and a
Declaration of exactly what they want. Students must include accurate historical facts and content
learned in class that is relevant to why the American Colonists wanted to be free from British rule and
break away from England, gaining independence. The Declaration of Independence Break Up Letter
must be typed, Times New Roman, Font Size 12, Single Spaced, and no longer then one page. Students
must use two online sources besides their textbook and notes, citing the sources on the back of their
letter. It is due in one weeks time from the date of this lesson. Students must complete it with 90%
accuracy. The students will be graded on the following rubric:
LetterWriting:DearEnglandIWantToBreakUpRubric
TeacherName:Ms.Turnowski
StudentName:________________________________________
CATEGORY
Salutation and
Closing

4
Salutation and
closing have no
errors in
capitalization and
punctuation.

Sentences &
Paragraphs

Sentences and
paragraphs are
complete, wellconstructed and
of varied
structure.

Grammar &
spelling
(conventions)

3
Salutation and
closing have 1-2
errors in
capitalization and
punctuation.

All sentences are


complete and
well-constructed
(no fragments, no
run-ons).
Paragraphing is
generally done
well.
Writer makes no Writer makes 1-2
errors in
errors in
grammar or
grammar and/or
spelling.
spelling.

2
Salutation and
closing have 3 or
more errors in
capitalization and
punctuation.

1
Salutation and/or
closing are
missing.

Most sentences Many sentence


are complete and fragments or runwell-constructed. on sentences OR
Paragraphing
paragraphing
needs some work. needs lots of
work.

Writer makes 3-4


errors in
grammar and/or
spelling

Writer makes
more than 4 errors
in grammar and/or
spelling.

Capitalization and Writer makes no


Punctuation
errors in
capitalization and
punctuation.

Writer makes 1-2


errors in
capitalization and
punctuation.

Writer makes 3-4


errors in
capitalization and
punctuation.

Writer makes
more than 4 errors
in capitalization
and punctuation.

Ideas

Ideas were
expressed in a
pretty clear
manner, but the
organization

Ideas were
somewhat
organized, but
were not very
clear. It took

The letter seemed


to be a collection
of unrelated
sentences. It was
very difficult to

Ideas were
expressed in a
clear and
organized
fashion. It was

easy to figure out could have been more than one


figure out what
what the letter
better.
reading to figure the letter was
was about.
out what the
about.
letter was about.
Content Accuracy The letter
contains at least 5
accurate facts
about the topic.

The letter
contains 3-4
accurate facts
about the topic.

The letter
contains 1-2
accurate facts
about the topic.

The letter contains


no accurate facts
about the topic.

Format

Complies with all


the requirements
for a friendly
letter.

Complies with
almost all the
requirements for
a friendly letter.

Complies with
several of the
requirements for
a friendly letter.

Complies with
less than 75% of
the requirements
for a friendly
letter.

Neatness

Letter is typed,
clean, not
wrinkled, and is
easy to read with
no distracting
error corrections.
It was done with
pride.

Letter is neatly
hand-written,
clean, not
wrinkled, and is
easy to read with
no distracting
error corrections.
It was done with
care.

Letter is typed
and is crumpled
or slightly
stained. It may
have 1-2
distracting error
corrections. It
was done with
some care.

Letter is typed
and looks like it
had been shoved
in a pocket or
locker. It may
have several
distracting error
corrections. It
looks like it was
done in a hurry or
stored improperly.

References:
Chronicle of the Revolution. (n.d.). Retrieved January 17, 2015, from
http://www.pbs.org/ktca/liberty/popup_declaration.html
Declaration of Independence Exclusive Videos & Features. (n.d.). Retrieved January 17, 2015, from
http://www.history.com/topics/american-revolution/declaration-of-independence/videos
English Language Arts Standards History/Social Studies Grade 6-8. (n.d.). Retrieved January 17,
2015, from http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RH/6-8/
ISTE Standards for Students. (2014). Retrieved January 17, 2015, from
http://www.iste.org/docs/pdfs/20-14_ISTE_Standards-S_PDF.pdf
Turnowski, K. (2015). Causes of the American Revolution. Retrieved January 17, 2015, from
http://edu521americanrevolutioncauses.weebly.com/