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WELCOME TO INDEPENDENT CONSULTANT SALES

Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales


Submitted to George Beckwith A, Ed.D.
By
Lakin Jones
In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the
Master of Science in Educational and Instructional Technology
National University
La Jolla
8/2014

WELCOME TO SALES

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The Capstone Project entitled Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales is approved by:

Signature_______________________________________________ Date___________
George BeckwithA, Ed.D.
Capstone Faculty Advisor, School of Education

We certify that this Capstone Project by Lakin Jones entitled Welcome to Independent
Consultant Sales, in our opinion, is satisfactory in the scope and quality as Masters of Science
project for the degree of Master of Science in Educational and Instructional Technology in the
School of Media and Communication, at National University.
Signature_______________________________________________ Date___________
George Beckwith, Ed. D., MSEIT Program Lead Faculty

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Copyright 2014 by Lakin Jones


All Rights Reserved

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Table of Contents
ABSTRACT .................................................................................................................................... 7
CHAPTER 1 ................................................................................................................................... 8
Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 8
Background of the Study ............................................................................................................ 8
Statement of the Instructional/Training Problem ........................................................................ 9
Purpose...................................................................................................................................... 10
Delimitations ............................................................................................................................. 10
Definitions................................................................................................................................. 10
Summary ................................................................................................................................... 11
CHAPTER 2: Review of the Literature ........................................................................................ 12
Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 12
Summary ................................................................................................................................... 17
CHAPTER 3: Project Design........................................................................................................ 18
Learning Theory........................................................................................................................ 18
Project Design ........................................................................................................................... 19
Procedure .................................................................................................................................. 21
Ethical Considerations .............................................................................................................. 30
Schedule ........................................................................................................................................ 31
Summary ................................................................................................................................... 32
CHAPTER 4: Project Evaluation and Discussion ........................................................................ 34
Project Evaluation ..................................................................................................................... 34
Instructional Goal.................................................................................................................. 34
Evaluators of instructional material ...................................................................................... 35
The Evaluations .................................................................................................................... 36
Study Limitations / Constraints ............................................................................................ 37
Usability Evaluation Plan ..................................................................................................... 38
Target User Profile ................................................................................................................ 38
The Usability Tests ............................................................................................................... 39
Study Limitations/Constraints .............................................................................................. 40
Data Presentation ...................................................................................................................... 41
Discussion ................................................................................................................................. 44
Limitations ................................................................................................................................ 44
CHAPTER 5: Summary and Conclusion ...................................................................................... 46
Conclusion(s) ............................................................................................................................ 46
Implications for Teaching/Training .......................................................................................... 47
Implications for Further Research ............................................................................................ 47
REFERENCES ............................................................................................................................. 49
APPENDICES .............................................................................................................................. 54
Appendix A: Usability Test Session Script .............................................................................. 54
Appendix B: Independent Consultant Sales: Reactionary Survey............................................ 56
Appendix C: Independent Consultant Sales Pre-test ................................................................ 57
Appendix D: Evaluators Questionnaire ................................................................................... 58
Appendix E: Post-Session Questionnaire ................................................................................. 60
Appendix F: Exit Interview ...................................................................................................... 61
Appendix G: Visual Storyboard................................................................................................ 62

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ABSTRACT
Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales (WICS) is an instructional online training course
that explores how to be a successful independent sales consultant through individual lessons that
allow a person to gain knowledge in the field and to exercise their newly learned skills. This
course is delivered through the learning management system, Moodle, and is useful for anyone
going into a career of independent consultant sales. The course is specifically designed for
people who are new to sales consulting or that would like to sharpen their sales consultant skills.
The target audience for the development of this course are those who sign up for a direct sales
company under someone. Participants in the course must be at least eighteen years of age.
Historically, most of the learners in this specific career path are female, but there are a
percentage of male participants. While most traditional sales consultant courses focus on the
integration of sales as a more introductory component, the focus of WICS is using an online
environment and technological tools that engage the learner more than previous coursework.
Participants will learn ways to approach prospective customers in order to achieve a sale. They
will discover what characteristics make a good sales consultant, as well as the different types of
sales models that are most commonly used in the consulting world. WICS emphasizes
collaborative learning and engagement in real world situations. Analyzes of the usability of the
Moodle course are discussed, and it can be seen that the course is most effective in achieving the
course objectives.

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CHAPTER 1
Introduction
Independent sales consulting has become a very large industry in todays society. People
see the opportunity of personal growth and take the challenge of being their own boss and
embracing the flexibility it offers. With so many new opportunities to be self-employed as an
independent consultant available, proper training has become a necessity for those embracing
sales consulting as a career. While many people are furthering their education in other subjects,
independent sales consultancy is becoming a popular career path for about 30% of MBA students
(Webb, n.d.). Because this industry is having such an impact on the sales market, providing those
who take the entrepreneurial route of independent consulting the proper training to succeed.
The purpose of this instructional training course is to prepare the learner to be a successful
independent sales consultant. The need is seen with the people that sign up under another
consultant in a direct sales company. Although there are training videos available, a course is
needed to break down the process of making a sell and characteristics of being a successful sales
consultant. By providing this type of course, learners will be able to achieve specific goals in the
business. By offering interactive activities, learners will understand the process much better than
just watching a video or listening to a call. Learners will be able to get real world situations and
know how to handle different situations after completing this course. With providing this course,
learners can gain insight as what it takes to be a successful sales consultant.
Background of the Study
In 2013 there was a 5.7% increase in the direct sales force that took the number to 16.8
million people involved in independent consultancy (2013 Direct Selling Statistics, 2014). With
this number on the rise, it is very important for those who pursue consultancy as a career receive

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proper training. Many times direct sales training courses are chunked together so that all topics
of being an independent consultant are covered in one course. Topics are squeezed into a small
time frame and are not thoroughly discussed. Some courses focus on as many as ten modules and
expect one week for each topic (Direct Selling Entrepreneur Program, 2011). Other courses are
somewhat more content focused but do not have the engaging activities. Typically courses
involve filling out worksheets or listening to lectures (Field and Direct Sales Training Class,
2014). What is more commonly seen is video training. Many companies offer training that are
just simply watching a video. Some have become a little more engaging by offering interactive
scenarios of multiple choice answering (Silver Wings Scholar Program, 2014). For the purposes
of this project, Direct Sales Consultant Training shall refer to a form of experiential education,
providing students with opportunities to engage and interact in real world situations, address
selling skills, and explore career interests.
Statement of the Instructional/Training Problem
The problem is the lack of focus on the specific topic of selling and a lack of interactive
multimedia instruction in previous courses. The process of a sales situation is somewhat lost in
other content in some training courses. With this process being so important, the process should
be the main and only focus of a training course. There is also a lack of interaction between
learners and real world experience. With most training courses being offered in video or call
form, this limits learners from being fully engaged. There is a gap in how training is being
presented to learners. Prior courses do not fully taking advantage of technological tools that can
help learners be completely engaged in every activity and participate in real world situations.

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Purpose
The purpose of the Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales (WICS) course is to prepare
the learner to be a successful independent sales consultant by focusing specifically on the sales
skills needed. Constructed as web-based training to be delivered through Moodle, WICS
provides real-world experiences and collaboration that exercise the skills and knowledge related
to course of study and career goals of each learner. Learners will have the ability to choose
business related situations that pertain to personal interests, providing motivation and resulting in
a higher level of learning.
Delimitations
Many delimitations were taken into account as part of the project design. The WICS course
was designed with the following impositions:

Focus on adult learners pursuing the same career path with different backgrounds and
experience

Course designed as online format

Subject matter experts chosen exclusively from direct sales consultant companies and
experiences

Course content limited to four modules and seven lessons

Open source Moodle chosen for open source availability

Resources within time period of 2007-2014

Definitions
For purposes of this project, the following words are defined:

Direct Selling: is the marketing and selling of products directly to consumers away
from a fixed retail location.

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Experiential Learning: The process of making meaning from direct experience or


learning through doing.

Moodle (modular object oriented dynamic learning environment): An open source


computer system for creating online courses.

Online Learning: Education where content and instruction is given primarily over the
internet.

Sales Consultant: A person who provides expert advice professionally and sells a
product or service in return for money or other compensation.

Subject Matter Expert (SME): A person who is an expert in a particular area or topic.

Web-based training (WBT): Anywhere, any-time instruction delivered over the


Internet

Summary
WICS is a training course that is meant to close the gap of insufficient delivery of content
pertaining directly at the selling skills needed to be a successful independent sales consultant.
The course is designed to provide learners a direct sales situation where they can apply their
academic knowledge in a real world experience. WICS is developed as a web-based training
course using Moodle to provide flexibility for learners. Throughout the course, learners will gain
a deeper understanding of how to approach and carry out a sales situation to help build their
business. Learners will gain individual experiences through virtual, cognitive, and physical
learning opportunities.

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CHAPTER 2: Review of the Literature


Introduction
The Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales (WICS) training course seeks to develop
and improve the sales skills of people pursuing a career of independent consultancy. This course
focuses on the use of technology as the primary way of providing engaging activities and real
world experiences dealing with being an Independent Sales Consultant. To effectively
accomplish this, it is important to understand the importance of training in the sales consultant
industry, how and why technology is an essential part of WICS, and what specific technological
tools, components, and activities were vital to the design of WICS and why. To ensure the
learning content and environment were effective, the following data was researched for review:
1) Background on the Importance of Training, 2) Online Learning, 3) Web 2.0 Tools, 4) Digital
Storytelling, 5) Asynchronous Discussions, and 6) Vodcasts.
Background on the Importance of Training
Training, especially in the direct sales industry, is very important for those who have
learned the techniques to pass them on to others who join the company. Paula C. Kringle (1989)
interviewed the vice president of marketing for Carew Positional Selling, Sean Carew, who
states, Training is essential if you have any expectation of productivity from your salespeople.
He goes on to say, Very few people are born as good salespeople. They need to be trained. The
article goes on to talk about the importance of building selling skills, price and value of the
products, and coaching (Kringle, 1989). Wilson, Strutton, and Farris (2002) examined different
models of training offered and the effect the training had on salespeople. One of the findings
states, Salespeople who are confident in their selling skills are likely to employ product
knowledge. Hence new salespeople might be taught fundamentals of selling before learning

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details regarding products (Wilson et al. 2002). By providing learners with confidence in their
selling skills, they will be more apt to learn product knowledge and employ it in the sell. The
course is designed with this concept in mind. It solely focuses on the selling aspect of being an
independent sales consultant. Many more people are going into direct sales as a career now days.
In respect to training, If requiring performance of effortful or difficult tasks enhances
appreciation of group membership, then salesperson socialization procedures that ask high levels
of effort from new employees can enhance their esteem for the role they are to play in the
organization (Brown & Peterson, 1994). This study suggests that a higher job satisfaction rate
will be seen when effort is put into a sales job. This study supports the sales course being
developed because people are apt to put more effort forth if they have the knowledge of what
skills to use and how to use them. The course will give learners the foundation of the skills they
need to be a successful salesperson and lead to job satisfaction. A key point made by Mr.
Hibbard, assistant vice president and product manager at New England Mutual Life, for agents
selling the insurance is that Training is important, too. Show agents how to sell VUL
(Variable Universal Life) (Koco, 1994). From this article, it can be seen that training is
important in all types of direct sales companies. Training is key for people to be successful direct
sales consultants.
Online Learning
A new kind of learning has come about with all the new technological advances. The way
people communicate, share, and facilitate information has changed significantly with these
technological advances (McIntyre, n.d.). Perry and Pilatim (2011) state, Online learning had
become a major element in the higher education matrix. Online learning is becoming a part of
the educational scene with many institutions offering online courses and programs. McIntyre

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(n.d.) states, The issue is no longer one how to use technology to teach, but one where teachers
acknowledge the way the world is already developing, and understand the significance of online
literacy and the role that collaboration and online engagement plays in student learning and their
future workplace environment. There are several advantages to using online learning mentioned
in the article Benefits of Online Learning (1998) including the following:

Enhancing student-to-student and faculty-to-student communication.

Enabling student-centered teaching approaches.

Providing 24/7 accessibility to course materials.

Providing just-in-time methods to assess and evaluate student progress.

Reducing "administrivia" around course management.

McIntyre (n.d.) also discusses benefits that include the flexibility of time and location, the
context presented, information sharing, online resources, and a diverse and enriching experience.
Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales training course is designed as an online course with
many of these benefits in mind. It allows learners to work on their own time and have more
engaging activities and collaboration with peers and the teacher. Online learning has become one
of the main ways people take courses and understand how to use the technology. This allows this
project to work perfectly by working with a familiar language of people within the course.
Web 2.0 Tools
Web 2.0 tools can be defined as engaging applications that give learners and teachers the
ability to create, collaborate, edit, and share content (Web 2.0 Tools, 2014). According to Elmas
and Geban (2012), Web 2.0 tools have many advantages for the teacher, learner, and classroom
environment. Those advantages include providing an active and meaningful learning
environment, diversified assessments, using updated content, and having the ability to find

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more resources to offer the learners (Elmas & Geban, 2012). Teachers have the many more
technological tools to available for use to engage learners and create meaningful content. Billings
(2012) states, Integrating these tools into learning activities shifts the focus from solitary,
passive learning to an environment that is dynamic and collaborative and promotes engaged
learning. The Web 2.0 tools utilized in WICS are meant to make more engaging presentations
of content, while having learners present research in an active manner as well.
Digital Storytelling
Digital Storytelling is the practice of telling stories using a combination of graphics, audio,
and video (What is Digital Storytelling?, 2014). Digital stories can be used with a variety of
topics including personal events, tutorials, or historical events. A goal with the use of a digital
story for the teacher is to facilitate various learning styles and connect to students interest in
technology (7 Things you Should Know, 2007). Teachers can use digital stories as tools to
present new content or have students create one to demonstrate their understanding. For the
purpose of this course, the teacher will be creating a digital story to present and engage students
in the content and instruction (Robin, n.d.). Digital storytelling is a great way to gain the students
attention while engaging them in the content by having imagery that goes with the auditory
content being presented.
Asynchronous Discussions
Online courses use asynchronous discussions to support a variety of educational activities
(Gao, Zhang, & Franklin, 2013). As Gerosa, Filippo, Pimentel, Fuks & Lucena (2010); Kayler &
Weller (2007) states, It is considered an extension of instructional practices that promotes
dialogue, reflection, knowledge construction and self-assessment (as cited in Gao, Zhang, &
Franklin, 2013). With the aim to be at developing 21st Century skills such as critical thinking,

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asynchronous discussions have become a major part of an online environment (Ghodrati &
Gruba, 2011). Learners are able to be free of time constraints and can share thoughts and provide
feedback to peers through these discussions. WICS will use asynchronous discussions as a means
of communicating with peers and providing feedback for one another on course work. They will
use it to gain different perspectives on topics and gain a deeper understanding of the content.
Vodcasts
A vodcast is a podcast that contains video. There are many advantages to using vodcasts in
the classroom. These advantages include:

The students get repetition by having the opportunity to listen and watch the video
content multiple times (McKee, Harrison, & Allan, 2008).

If students miss a class, they can download the vodcast and not have missed any content
that was covered (McKee, Harrison, & Allan, 2008).

Vodcasts replace passive learning with active participation of the students in the
classroom (Wahab, & Ghafoor, 2013).

Vodcast provides content creators (teachers) the opportunity to create and use relevant
and engaging teaching materials (Wahab, & Ghafoor, 2013).

Students can themselves create their class presentation using audio and visual tools and
share it with other classmates using a video sharing site (Wahab, & Ghafoor, 2013).

Vodcast are great for online courses to present lectures to students and offer the feeling of
having a personal experience.

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WICS will be utilizing a vodcast to present content of a lesson to provide a more engaging
and non-passive lecture. Vodcasts are a very good way to gain the attention and interest of
students so that a deeper level of learning can be achieved.

Summary
Training is very important in the independent sales consulting field. If engaging and
effective training is not provided, success can be very difficult. A new way of learning is
occurring now days with all the new technological advances. Online learning has become a norm
for most, so why not provide training courses within a language that most people are fluent in:
technology. By using Web 2.0 tools, digital storytelling, asynchronous discussions, and vodcasts,
learners can be much more engaged in the content of the course. Training courses offered before
do not take advantage of all of these technological tools to enhance the learning of the students.
It is proven that these tools offer students a more engaging and technology rich learning
environment.

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CHAPTER 3: Project Design


Learning Theory
The constructivist theory is basically the idea that learners construct knowledge through
their own experiences. The theory suggests that to construct this knowledge, learners must be
actively participating during the instruction. Constructivism learning theory is a philosophy
which enhances students' logical and conceptual growth (Constructivism Learning Theory,
2014).
Jean Piaget is usually credited with having formed the foundation of the constructivist
theory. Piagets theory is that people cannot simply be given information and understand it, but
they build knowledge through experience (Constructivism, 1995). With this theory, students
learn from experiences while the teacher is a facilitator with the instruction. The elements of the
constructivism learning theory include learners constructing meaning from experiences and prior
knowledge, activities that engage the mind as well as the hands, and collaboration. In essence,
they are learning by doing, storing this new knowledge, and comparing it to knowledge already
acquired. There are two key principles with Piagets constructivist theory: 1) Learning is an
active process and 2) Learning should be whole, authentic, and real (Cognitive Constructivist
Theories, n.d.). The Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales training course is constructed
with a variety of online activities for learners to gain knowledge through real world experiences.
Lev Vygotsky focused more on the social aspect rather than the cognitive aspect of the
constructivist theory. Like Piaget, Vygotsky believed that learning is constructed by experience,
but he also believed that Piaget overlooked the importance of the social nature of language on
learning. Vygotsky (1934) emphasized the role of language and culture in cognitive
development and in how we perceive the world, and claimed that they provide frameworks

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through which we experience, communicate, and understand reality (Constructivism and Social
Constructivism, n.d.). This theory suggests that learning is a social process. Students feel more
connected if they can see, hear and interact with others. The training course has this social aspect
integrated through digital stories, discussion boards, vodcasts, and chats.
Project Design
Numerous instructional design models have surfaced through the years. Having a model
for instructional design is very important when developing the instruction. As Martin Ryder
(n.d.) states,
An instructional design model gives structure and meaning to an I.D. problem, enabling
the would-be designer to negotiate her design task with a semblance of conscious
understanding. Models help us to visualize the problem, to break it down into discrete,
manageable units. A model should be judged by how it mediates the designers intention,
how well it can share a work load, and how effectively it shifts focus away from itself
toward the object of the design activity (as cited from Instructional Design Models, n.d.,
para. 1).
The purpose of instructional design is to create training that achieves what it is supposed to
achieve. By using the right instructional design model, the proper tools and goals are provided to
have successful instructional courses.
ADDIE Model
The acronym ADDIE stands for analysis, design, development, implementation, and
evaluation. The ADDIE model is one of the most commonly used instructional design
model. Many of the other models are derived from the ADDIE model. Each outcome of the

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steps of ADDIE serves as input to the next step of the process. Januszewski (2007) breaks
the steps down of ADDIE as follows:

Analysis: During this step, the designer identifies the audience, learning problem,
knowledge that already exists, learner needs, instructional objectives, and a
timeline for the training.

Design: Designing is the step where the learning objectives are specified.
Storyboards and prototypes are often made, along with what the content will be to
achieve the objectives in lessons and activities.

Development: This is the step where decisions on what type of learning activities
will be used. Drafts and trial runs are done with the target audience, along with
revision if needed. Instructor training also occurs during this stage.

Implement: During implementation, the materials are put into action for
instructors and learners. Support is provided when needed.

Evaluation: Formative evaluation is done through each step of the model.


Summative evaluation is done at the end. Evaluation is done to insure the learning
objectives are met (p. 108-109).

Honebein, Duffy, & Fishman (1993); Savery & Duffy (1996) state, Most educators
believe that authentic means that learners should engage in activities which present the
same type of cognitive challenges as those in the real world (as cited by Reigeluth, 1999).
Instructional design models are only worth using if they can be used in real world
situations. By taking a look at the models from Gustafson & Branchs (1997) taxonomy,
the instructional models can be categorized into either classroom orientation, product
orientation, or system orientation (as citied by Plotnick, 1997).

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The ADDIE model is categorized as a system oriented approach. It can be used for
developing full courses and complete instructional programs. ADDIE looks at the whole
as more than a collection of its parts (Hoffman, B., Ritchie, D., & Marshall, J., 2006).
Hoffman, B., Ritchie, D., & Marshall, J. (2006) go on to say that without a systematic
model, there may be too much information or not enough in the training courses which
will cost time and effort to fix it. By using the ADDIE model, courses can be developed
much faster and with better design.
Procedure
A great amount of research was conducted to create an effective training course by
determining which strategies and tools would support a learner focused environment and prove
relevant to be engaging. After the audience and objectives were established, the evaluation
analysis of the courses visual appeal, functionality, and usability began during the design
process. By using this process, test administrators were provided with an usability test session
script, a reactionary survey to analyze the overall feel of the course, an evaluators questionnaire
to help assure the usability and design of the course, a post-session questionnaire to evaluation
how user-friendly the Moodle course is designed, and an exit interview to allow participants to
express the strengths and weaknesses of the course. A visual storyboard was the next object to be
created to provide organization of the course content and activities as a visual interpretation of
how each component interrelates. When the storyboard was completed, the project content was
organized into an introductory unit and four individual units. Each of the four units contain at
least two lessons with activities and is scheduled as a five week course. Upon completion of the
visual storyboard, project content was organized into four individual units, each containing two

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lessons and scheduled at one unit per week, for a total of four weeks. The details were outlined
for this storyboard as follows:
Unit Assessment:
Upon completion of training the trainees will be able to:

demonstrate the characteristics of a good sales consultant by discussing each


characteristic.

analyze the value of their product and their competition by researching and gaining
knowledge.

demonstrate their understanding of various sales models by accurately identifying


each model.

utilize new knowledge to be a more motivated, professional sales consultant by


performing at a higher degree.

During a sales situation, learners will:

demonstrate a pre-sale approach

construct a guided conversation

identify customer needs

describe the value of their company

illustrate information with a product price presentation

organize and achieve a sale with a price presentation and the close

apply knowledge to overcome customer objectives

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Target Audience: The target audience is people who are new to sales consulting or that
would like to sharpen their sales consultant skills. The main focus for the development of
this course are those who sign up for a direct sales company under someone. They can be
either male or females, but must be at least eighteen years of age.
Course Structure: The Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales Training Course is
intended be delivered entirely online using Moodle. Learners will access online lessons,
course materials, and resources. Throughout the course, students will participate in a blend
of self-paced activities using Moodle. Activities will consist of discussion forums,
vodcasts, animations, video, Prezi presentations, Powerpoints, written assignments and
online assessments.
Course Outline
Course Home
1. Overview/Introduction of course
2. Syllabus
3. Course outline of each week
4. Document sharing folder

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Introduction
1. Introductions Discussion Board to introduce themselves
2. Pre-test
3. Welcome chat course overview of objectives and topics
Module 1: The Career
1. Introduction reading and video
2. Lesson 1: The Professional Sales Consultant
a. Objectives: Students will demonstrate the understanding of the characteristics of a
good sales consultant by discussing each characteristic.
b. Content/Activities
i. Topics
1. Lecture Students will watch a digital story to gain insight on the
characteristics of a sales consultant
2.

I am a Salesperson will be introduced to this reading using


Voki

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ii. Assignment Students will respond to the DB topic: What characteristics


make a good salesperson or consultant? Explain why? Include any
personal experiences you have had with a good salesperson or consultant.

3. Lesson 2: Sales Models


a. Objectives: Students will demonstrate their understanding of various sales models
by accurately identifying each model.
b. Topics
i. Reading on different sales models:
1. The 3 Ps
2. The Close
3. Consultant
4. Problem-solving
ii. Assignment - For this assignment, you will be researching three sales
models. Using the Web 2.0 tool, Prezi, you will make a presentation of
your findings. You will describe each models and the advantages for using

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each. Make sure to categorize your topics and include at least 3 scholarly
articles to back your findings.
Module 2: The Pre-Sale
1. Lesson 1: The Approach
a. Objectives:
i. During a sales situation, the learner will be able to demonstrate a pre-sale
approach.
ii. The learner will be able to identify and analyze the value of their product
and their competition.
b. Topics
i. Lecture on:
1. What your company offers
2. The Competition
3. Prospective customers
4. Buying signs
c. Assignment - Research the product you are selling and the value of the product.
Also, it is important to know what your competition offers so you can explain
why your product will meet the need of the customer better. Research similar
companies and their products.

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2. Lesson 2: The Warm Up/ Qualification


a. Objectives:
i. During a sales situation, the learner will be able to construct a guided
conversation
b. Topics
i. Gathering Information
ii. Approach the customer
iii. Powerpoint on guided conversation
c. Assignment Students will write a general script to be used as a guided
conversation
i. Students will post finished script in DB to get peer reviews
Module 3: The Sale
1. Lesson 1: Identification of Need
d. Objectives:
i. During a sales situation, the learner will be able to identify of customer
needs.
e. Topics
i. The gathering of information

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1. Open-ended questions
2. The checklist

ii. The Right Company Assurance


1. Your companys story
2. Items to give to the customer
f. Assignment Students will write out a checklist.

3. Lesson 2: The Solution


a. Objectives:
i. During a sales situation, the learner will describe the value of their
company

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ii. During a sales situation, the learner will illustrate information with a
product price presentation
b. Topics
i. Presentation of the product
1. Four-Step FAB Explanation
ii. The proposal structure
1. Price presentation
2. Customer objections
c. Assignment Students will create a PPT of how they would present the prices of
their products

Module 4: The Close


1. Lesson 1: Overcoming Objections
a. Objectives:
i. During a sales situation, the learner will apply knowledge to overcome
customer objectives
b.Topics
i. Validity
ii. Knowing when to be flexible
1. Offering of incentives
iii. Warm Down
c. Assignment Students will write a close to use for a sales situation.

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1. Cumulative Assignment
a. Objectives:
i. Students will be able to utilize new knowledge to be a more motivated,
professional sales consultant by performing at a higher degree.
ii. During a sales situation, learners will organize and achieve a sale with a
price presentation and the close
b. Assignment Students will be combining everything they have been working on
during this course and use them in a real world sales situation. They will record
the appointment and attempt of the sale.
i. Students will use Eyejot to do a reflection on their sales attempt.

Ethical Considerations
The following ethical concerns were identified and addressed:
1. Ensuring testers / evaluators understand the project and the data collection process.

Use of usability test session script prior to testing/evaluation (Appendix A)

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31

2. A clear description of the purpose of the research, who is conducting the data collection,
the specific activities that the tester/evaluator will be asked to do, and how much time
will be involved is explained, either with a written or verbal statement.
3. Potential testers/evaluators informed that their participation is truly voluntary, and during
the alpha testing, they are not being tested but are helping to complete the course
development
4. Testers/evaluators informed and assured that confidentiality be safeguarded.
Schedule

Milestone

Target Completion

Status/Comments

Date
Prospectus

7/13/2014

Completed

Visual / Text Storyboards

7/20/2014

Completed

Instructional Evaluation Plan

7/27/2014

Completed

Usability Evaluation

7/30/2014

Completed

Planning Capstone Report

7/30/2014

Completed

Project Initiation

8/2/2014

Completed

Capstone Introduction Ch. 1

8/5/2014

Completed

Completed Review of Literature Ch. 2

8/12/2014

Completed

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Milestone

32

Target Completion

Status/Comments

Date
Project Design Ch.3

8/15/2014

Completed

Working Prototype of Project

8/20/2014

Completed

Usability and Content Testing

8/21/2014

Completed

Project Evaluation Ch. 4

8/23/2014

Completed

Summary and Conclusion Ch. 5

8/25/2014

Completed

Final draft and review of written report

8/27/2014

Completed

Completed project and report

8/30/2014

Completed

Summary
The constructivist theory focuses on learners constructing knowledge from their own
experiences. In education, students become active participants within their learning when
applying the constructivist theory. Students are engaged in the content by working with hands-on
activities.
By using the ADDIE model to design the Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales
course, the instruction of the course is created to be more effective and engaging and in a timely
manner. Students have the chance to experience real-world situations to enhance their learning
and gain a deeper understanding of the content. Through the modules of this course, students will
be learning how to deal with a sales situation as an independent sales consultant. Each step is

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33

broken down and explained so that students can gain knowledge about each step of a successful
sales situation. They will be working on tasks to be used within the real-world experience of
being in a situation for the final project. At the conclusion of this course, students will have new
knowledge of characteristics and techniques to be a successful independent sales consultant.

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34

CHAPTER 4: Project Evaluation and Discussion


Instructional evaluation is defined by Donald Clark (1995) as the systematic determination of
merit, worth, and significance of a learning or training process by comparing criteria against a set
of standards. Although evaluation is the last stage of the ADDIE process, it needs to be an ongoing step. The main purpose of evaluation is to make sure that the learning goals of the course
will meet the required needs of the business. If teachers are to improve their practice they, like
their students, need both formative and summative assessment to support continuous progress
(Nets Project, 2003, p. 8). Kirkpatrick & Kirkpatrick (2009) state three specific reasons
evaluating training is important:
1. To justify the existence and budget of the training department by showing how it
contributes to the organizations objectives and goals.
2. To decide whether to continue or discontinue training programs
3. To gain information on how to improve future training programs
Evaluation is a must or nothing else is even worth doing. Knowing what to evaluate is the key to
good evaluation (Piskurich, 2006, p. 267-268). By evaluating the course early and throughout the
process, it can ensure the effectiveness and usability of the course.
Project Evaluation
Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales is the product title being presented for
evaluation. The target learner is those who have entered into independent consultant sales and
those who feel they need to sharpen their skills as a sales consultant.
Instructional Goal
Upon completion of training the trainees will be able to:

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35

demonstrate the characteristics of a good salesperson by discussing each


characteristic.

analyze the value of their product and their competition by researching and gaining
knowledge.

demonstrate their understanding of various sales models by accurately identifying


each model.

utilize new knowledge to be a more motivated, professional salesperson by


performing at a higher degree.

During a sales situation, learners will:

demonstrate a pre-sale approach

construct a guided conversation

identify customer needs

describe the value of their company

illustrate information with a product presentation

organize and achieve a sale with a price presentation and the close

apply knowledge to overcome customer objectives

Evaluators of instructional material

B. Gill - Sales Director Mary Kay Beauty Products SME will be able to evaluate
the content of being an independent consultant and effectiveness for new consultants

Dowell - Sales Director Cookie Lee Jewelry SME - will be able to evaluate the
content of being an independent consultant and effectiveness for new consultants

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36

Media/Technology Specialist National University will be able to evaluate the


media and technology is effective

T. McReynolds Mary Kay Beauty Products Team Member will be able to


evaluate the effectiveness of the course

M. Nash Cookie Lee Jewelry Team Member - will be able to evaluate the
effectiveness of the course

The Evaluations

The first level of Kirkpatricks four levels of evaluation focuses on the reaction of
participants to the course, while level two focuses on what knowledge and skills the
participants have gained from the course (D. Kirkpatrick, J. Kirkpatrick, & W.
Kirkpatrick, 2009). The instructional evaluations that will be conducted to see the
effectiveness of the course will consist of a pre-test, pro-test, survey, and
questionnaire. These evaluation instruments will help to see the effectiveness of the
course and exact information to see if the course meets the expectations at the first
two levels of Kirkpatricks model.

Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales course will be evaluated in two ways. The
first will be through a survey that will be a reactionary evaluation to the course
(Appendix B). The pre-test evaluation will take place during the introductions of the
first week of class (Appendix C). Learners will have a discussion board to introduce
themselves and provide the knowledge of independent consultant sales they have.
From the DB and pre-test, responses will indicate where the learners stand and the
need for the course. The evaluation will take place through responses in discussion
boards within the Moodle (online) classroom. Learning evaluations will include

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37

interactive activities with a cumulative assignment during the final week. The
reaction instrument will be in the form of an evaluators questionnaire on the course
(Appendix D).

Evaluation of the course design will be on-going from the beginning. SME will help
decide what content should be included in the course. Evaluators will review and
complete the course. Once completed, they will be offering ways to improve the
course. Through the course, resources will include audio and visual presentations,
articles and videos, and other interactive technology tools such as discussion boards
and chats.

Study Limitations / Constraints

Technological Learners will need to have access to a computer with Internet


connection and have at least some experience with using and setting up accounts to
use different tools. They will be using different technology tools and need to have
some knowledge of how to use these tools by following tutorials.

Human Learners must have a positive attitude towards the course to be successful.
They must be prepared for each lesson and willing to participate. An important skill
the learners need to possess is time management and self-discipline as a lot of
material is covered in a short amount of time.

Financial There is no budget for this course. Learners will be able to participate
without having to worry about paying for it or any of the objects used in the course.

Time The time constraint is both on the development and implementation of the
course. The course has to be development in a certain time frame. Learners are also
expected to finish the course within a four to five week time frame.

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38

Usability Evaluation Plan


Usability can be defined as being the extent to which a product can be used by specified users to
achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction in a specified context of
use (Quesenbery, 2001). Usability contains five characteristics the product must meet for user
satisfaction: effective, efficient, engaging, error tolerant, and easy to learn. Usability testing is
the process that the designer uses to gain feedback from users by testing on the product they have
developed. Once the users have completed navigating through the product, they can critique and
provide constructive criticism as to how the product can improve. Usability is a major way to
assess how easy the interface is to use. It refers to methods for improving ease-of-use during the
design process (Nielson, 2012).
Usability testing is important because it helps the designer see how easy the product is to
maneuver initially. Once users have learned the design of the product, testing can then determine
the satisfaction of the product for the user and how quickly tasks can be completed within the
design. Usability testing lets the design and development teams identify problems before they
are coded (Usability Testing, 2014).
Target User Profile
The following is an example of a Target User Profile table.
Following are the characteristics of the target user for Welcome to Independent
Consultant Sales
User Characteristic
Comment
Mostly Female
Average age: 18-50
Education level: 70% College Graduates,
30% High School Graduates

The column to the left represents the


minimal characteristics needed to
participate in this course. The age and
gender of the user are not as important, as

WELCOME TO SALES
Profession: Varies from Teacher,
Bookkeeper, Sales Associate, Banker... all
looking to make Independent consulting a
profession
Moodle Learning Style: Novice,
Experienced, or Advanced
Computer Experience: MS Windows,
Research skills, Internet/Tech Savvy
Preferred Learning Style: Online, handson

39
is the user possessing advanced computer
skills in order to comfortably navigate
within the Moodle System.
The user will need to be able to view
videos, as well as participate in surveys,
Web 2.0 tools, live chats, discussions,
and researching on the Internet.
A user friendly course is what will drive
the success of the final design.

The Usability Tests


The three types of usability testing I will be using are Explorative, Un-moderated, and
Assessment. Exploratory testing will be used in the initial design phases. The purpose of
the test is to identify points of confusion encountered by the user and then to "walk
through" what would help them out (Rubin & Chisnell, 2008). I will be giving the user
some tasks to complete to identify any malfunctions. The user will work one-on-one with
me and have access to the Moodle course. A Post-Session Questionnaire will be given to
users with specific questions about details of the course and a comments section for
feedback (Appendix E).
Un-moderated testing can be very useful because users can do the testing in a familiar
environment with the software provided thus the answers will be of much value (YouEye,
2013). I will use this testing with one of my team members, and they will test in a remote
location on their down time. I will be able to evaluate the understanding of the content by
tracking completed assignments and how well the navigation of the course is designed. If
they have trouble with navigation, this will need improvement.
Assessment testing will allow me to provide a real-time version of the Moodle course and
receive immediate feedback. I will be able to gain an idea how the technology, effectiveness,

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40

and overall usability of the Moodle course are from the feedback and ways that it can
improve. I will be present and available for any questions user may have and will be
observing their actions. Upon completion, users will be asked to complete an Exit Interview
(Appendix F) that will be a reflection on specific details of the course.
Testing will occur throughout the entire design phase up until just prior to the launching
of the product. Testing is the design phase will occur early to add or delete content. Mid-way
through the process, testing will be done to revisit the additions or deletions based upon the
user feedback. Testing just prior to launching will be to give the course one more overall
look to make sure everything is working properly.
Resources to be used include tutorials, videos, and engaging technological tools.
Study Limitations/Constraints

Technological: Everyone may not have the same type of laptop or computer so this
may or may not pose a problem with the download of the course and other tools used
throughout the course. No other technology constraints are present at this time.

Human: The only problem may be getting an appointment with everyone who will be
testing. Getting in touch with everyone may be slightly difficult but possible.

Financial: There is no budget for this product, as Moodle is free to download. The
only problem that may arise is if upgrades to software have to been done or having to
provide a place to test.

Time: The Instructional Designer will be responsible for the time management of
testing and developing the course. At this time there is not a strict time constraint on
the development of the course. The class will have a time constraint of four to five
weeks.

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41

Data Presentation
After the needs analysis has been determined and the majority of the course content has
been created, SMEs will be met with to conduct an alpha test and evaluations. The evaluation
process with begin with the SMEs reviewing the visual storyboard (Appendix G). SMEs will be
asked specific questions regarding the content of the lessons and the overall feel of the course
from a student perspective through completing a Reactionary Evaluation Survey (Appendix B),
Evaluators Questionnaire (Appendix D), Post-Session Questionnaire (Appendix E), and Exit
Interview (Appendix F).
The results of the Reactionary Survey are as follows:
Independent Consultant Sales: Reactionary
Survey
SME
#1

SME
#2

SME
#3

SME
#4

SME
#5

OverAll

1. The overall quality of the course is good.

100%

2. The course content meets the needs for the


topic of the course.
3. The course objectives are clear.

100%

100%

4. The course navigation is easy to use and


understand.
5. The course design flows together well.

100%

100%

6. Assignments are appropriate.

100%

7. Tutorials are effective

100%

8. The media is of good and appropriate quality

100%

9. The time commitment is reasonable.

100%

10. The course met your needs.

100%

Please circle the answer that describes your


opinion best.
Agree, Undecided, Do Not Agree

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42

The results of the Evaluators Questionnaire are as follows:


Independent Consultant Sales: Evaluators
Questionnaire
SME
#1

SME
#2

SME
#3

SME
#4

SME
#5

OverAll

1. The course provided a good balance of


instruction and practice.

100%

2. The course is well organized.

100%

3. Learning resources and tools are effective in


enhancing subject matter.

100%

4. Teacher provided adequate support for


students.

90%

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

100%
100%

1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

100%
90%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
90%

Circle the answer that best represents your


opinion.
Thank you for your time and assistance. The
following information will help assure the
usability and design of the course.
Poor, Fair, Good, Excellent

Using the following scale to evaluate the following


items:
1 No problems
2 Minor problems, low priority to fix
3 Major problems, high priority to fix
4 Usability problem, must fix before product
release
Tutorials
Lesson 2
Cumulative Assignment
Assignments
Lesson 1
Lesson 2
Lesson 3
Lesson 4
Lesson 5
Lesson 6
Lesson 7
Cumulative Assignment

WELCOME TO SALES
Instructional Goals & Objectives Lesson 1
Lesson 2
Lesson 3
Lesson 4
Lesson 5
Lesson 6
Lesson 7
Cumulative Assignment

43

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%

The results of the Post-Session Questionnaire results are as follows:


Independent Consultant Sales: Post-Session
Questionnaire
SME
#1

SME
#2

SME
#3

SME
#4

SME
#5

OverAll

100%

Were you comfortable with using the internet


fro training? Y/N
Do you feel this Moodle course was use
friendly? Scale 1-5, 1 not comfortable, 5
comfortable
Would you recommend other training courses
to be implemented in a Moodle environment,
based on your experience with this course? Y/N
At any time, did you become bored with the
content? Y/N
Did you use a laptop or desktop to test this
course? L/D

100%

100%

100%

100%

80% L
20% D

What was your comfort level while completely


the tasks asked by the designer?
1-not stressed at all, 2-somewhat stressed, 3highly stressed
As regards links, pictures, and information
within the site, did you feel that the site was:
Too busy, not busy enough, had the right
amount

100%

Right

Right

Right

Right

Right

100%

The purpose of this test is to evaluate how userfriendly Moodle is. There are no
"right" or "wrong" answers.
Gender

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The results of the Exit Interview results are as follows:


Independent Consultant Sales: Exit Interview
The purpose of this exit interview is to see what
is working well and what is not working well as
I continue to design the site. Youre testing will
be responsible for my making additions,
deletions and corrections as I move forward
with the project. Please answer the following
questions
Agree, Undecided, Do not agree
The navigation of the Moodle course is easy to
use and understand
The appearance of the course is appropriate
and inviting.
The course is very user-friendly.
I would recommend this course to be used for
training.

SME
#1

SME
#2

SME
#3

SME
#4

SME
#5

OverAll

100%

100%

100%

100%

Discussion
The outcome of the alpha testing showed the course design and content met the objectives
and usability goals. The evaluation completed by the SMEs supports the content accuracy,
functionality and instructional effectiveness. Results support positively on the navigation of the
course, clarity of content, and being user-friendly with engaging activities. Participants submitted
minor comments on the weaknesses of the course, mostly being grammatical which can be easily
fixed. This evaluation testing allowed the course designer to remove obstacles, and identify flaws
or weakness so they can be fixed before launching the course.
Limitations
A significant limitation to the project was the time constraint of designing an effective
course within a month. It was challenging with not only the designing and developing, but also
scheduling evaluation sessions with busy SMEs. Each SME viewed a different version of the

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course due to the time constraint and having to continually progress with the project. Another
limitation might be the knowledge of the SMEs. With all five SMEs having working knowledge
of online instruction and course design, visualizing the course through the eyes of a learner new
to online learning might be an issue with evaluation of the course.

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CHAPTER 5: Summary and Conclusion


With new technologies emerging every day, educators must develop skills to embrace
these new tools to enhance learning because education is shifting with this digital era. The
Welcome to Independent Consultant Sales course is developed in a way that this shift can been
seen by being a solely online and engaging course. Piaget and Vygotsky focus on the learner
being an active participant in the learning process. By using the ADDIE model, the course is
designed to actively involve the participants through the online Moodle course. Online learning
is becoming the norm, and learners are looking for academic/training focused in rich, authentic
environments. WICS course strives to provide the learners with this kind of experience, while
being flexible at the same time.
Conclusion(s)
The WICS course is designed to sharpen the learners sales consulting skills by having
them explore techniques in a real world situation. Learners benefit through real world
experiential learning, and individual activities of discussions and reflection. Students are able to
explain the focus of their instruction and learning while deepening their understanding of the
content. The WICS courses digital format provides high levels of motivation and allows learners
to improve on their career choice resulting in more learning and knowledge retention. By
developing the WICS course in Moodle, the constructivist and social constructivist theories are
promoted through collaborations, engaging activities, and reflections. The analysis, design, and
evaluations are been proven successful. The Moodle platform allowed for the development of an
effective and efficient course.

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Implications for Teaching/Training


In the field of education, there are many challenges that instructors must overcome dealing
with learning styles of the 21st century learner. Addressing these challenges can be done by
incorporating technology and digital media into the content delivery. Instructors need to
continually study current and future technologies so they can provide students with the
opportunities to work with new digital tools that enhance learning. By providing more engaging
content and activities, active learning will be promoted and an increase of learning will occur.
The creation and delivery of content differs significantly now days through online and
distance learning. The activities and construction of ideas are student based and mostly done
through asynchronous communication. The framework for complex learning involve
technologies used within the design of the course. The WICS course offers many material for
organization, content presentation, student support, web resources, digital lessons, and activities.
Enhancing learner abilities to construct ideas, work collaboratively, and succeed in a sales
situation are the focus of virtual interaction. With the quality of instruction and learning
environments continuing to evolve, teaching and learning transformation will be required by
using available technology.
Implications for Further Research
The education world will continue to develop and change with new technologies becoming
available in the future. To cope with these changes, the educational field must change its way of
teaching. Performing assessments of student success will help to meet these goals of change.
From these assessments, gaps and issues will be found to focus on to continue improvement on
courses. Applying instructional best practices and design models to the development of a course
will lead to effective results in learning, remembering, and transferring new concepts and skills.

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For online teaching and learning, future research must focus on developing new scientific models
(Tallent-Runnels, Thomas, Lan, Cooper, & et al. 2006). Creating models focused solely for
online learning will lead to achievement of developing even more efficient and effective courses.

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2014 from http://www.usability.gov/how-to-and-tools/methods/usability-testing.html

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Wahab, G. S. A., & Ghafoor, Z. A. (2013, December). Vodcast as instruction material in


teaching listening and speaking skills. Language In India, 13(12), 372+.
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http://web2014.discoveryeducation.com/web20tools.cfm
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2014 from http://www.topconsultant.com/articles/becoming%20a%20successful%20independent%20consultant.pdf
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12, 2014 from http://digitalstorytelling.coe.uh.edu/page.cfm?id=27&cid=27
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d=25320
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https://www.youeye.com/blog/usability-testing-types/

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APPENDICES

Appendix A: Usability Test Session Script


Hello, welcome to class. My name is Lakin Jones, and I am the instructional designer of
the course you are about to test. I am available for any questions you may have during this
process. My goal is to make this experience valuable or both of us by making it fun and
engaging.
With this assessment, Id like to let you know that it will help me improve on the design
during the development stages. Your test results will help me easily identify what is working,
and what is not working within the project. The primary goal of this test is to receive effective
feedback regarding the design, not to test you as a user, so I can complete a nearly flawless
Moodle course. There are not wrong answers here. The target audience for this test is those
interested in independent consulting who will be using the system to complete online training. In
this case, the background of each trainee will vary from all types of occupations.
Now, lets discuss your technical background, and whether or not you have the skills and
access to the appropriate technology to participate in the testing. How long, or, how much
experience do you have working on a computer? Do you have immediate access to the internet?
If so, have you ever used Moodle in the past or present? Do you find the internet and/or online to
be a good tool for training using todays technology.
Test Session Overview
As you begin to test, please keep in mind that this is just a prototype of the course, and is
not the final product. You will be using this time to note what works well, and was could use
more attention. The entire test should take anywhere from 45 minutes-1 hour. As you navigate
within the site, I will give you a series of specific tasks to initiate or follow, in order to assess its

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ease of use. Again, this is not a test of how well you perform these tasks, but in fact, how easy it
is for you to execute them.
If at any time, you find yourself stumped, hesitant, or confused on how to move forward
with the request, I am here to help. So, in other words, I am encouraging you to have these
thoughts out loud while youre working through the site. For example, I cant find where to
find?, or, How do I? These responses will actually contribute to the what needs work
portion of the design, so you are not being judged for being confused.
Well, I think I have reviewed all of the important issues, but, is there anything else I can answer
for you before we begin?
Home Page Impressions
If there are no more questions, Id like you to first take a few moments to look at the home
page of this Moodle course. Even more importantly, look at it without using your mouse to
navigate.

What is your first impression?

Do you think it easily identifies what the course is going to be about?

If you could pick out one thing that captures your attention the most, what would that be?

Now that you have had a chance to take a general look at the home page of this course, lets
get started with performing some tasks! As you can see, I have provided you with a printed copy
of the all tasks, and I will be going along with you as I announce each task verbally. Since this is
a self-paced test and there are no time restrictions, I am available at any time during this process
to answer any questions.
Okay. Are we all ready? Remember to think out loud and express all frustrations verbally,
so I can document these concerns for correcting design issues. Now, lets get started

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Appendix B: Independent Consultant Sales: Reactionary Survey


Please circle the answer that describes your opinion best.
1. The overall quality of the course is good.
Agree

Undecided

Do not agree

2. The course content meets the needs for the topic of the course.
Agree

Undecided

Do not agree

3. The course objectives are clear.


Agree

Undecided

Do not agree

4. The course navigation is easy to use and understand.


Agree

Undecided

Do not agree

5. The course design flows together well.


Agree

Undecided

Do not agree

6. Assignments are appropriate.


Agree

Undecided

Do not agree

7. Tutorials are effective.


Agree

Undecided

Do not agree

8. The media is of good and appropriate quality.


Agree

Undecided

Do not agree

9. The time commitment is reasonable.


Agree

Undecided

Do not agree

10. The course met your needs.


Agree

Undecided

Do not agree

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Appendix C: Independent Consultant Sales Pre-test

Please answer the following questions.


What are some characteristics of a good sales consultant?

What is the most common sales model used and why?

Why is it important to know the value of your product and have knowledge about the
competition?

What are the steps to a successful sales situation?

What is the importance of the pre-sale approach, guided conversation, and identifying customer
needs?

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Appendix D: Evaluators Questionnaire


Circle the answer that best represents your opinion.
Thank you for your time and assistance. The following information will help assure the usability
and design of the course.
1. The course provided a good balance of instruction and practice.
Poor

Fair

Good

Excellent

2. The course is well organized.


Poor

Fair

Good

Excellent

3. Learning resources and tools are effective in enhancing subject matter.


Poor

Fair

Good

Excellent

4. Teacher provided adequate support for students.


Poor

Fair

Good

Excellent

Using the following scale to evaluate the following items:


1 No problems
2 Minor problems, low priority to fix
3 Major problems, high priority to fix
4 Usability problem, must fix before product release
5. Tutorials:

Lesson 2 ______

Cumulative Assignment ______

6. Assignments: Lesson 1 ______


Lesson 2 ______
Lesson 3 ______
Lesson 4 ______

Lesson 5 ______
Lesson 6 ______
Lesson 7 ______
Cumulative Assignment ______

7. Instructional Goals and Objectives:


Lesson 1 ______
Lesson 5 ______
Lesson 2 ______
Lesson 6 ______
Lesson 3 ______
Lesson 7 ______
Lesson 4 ______
Cumulative Assignment ______

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8. Strengths of this course:

9. Weaknesses of this course:

10. Other comments:

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Appendix E: Post-Session Questionnaire


The purpose of this test is to evaluate how user-friendly Moodle is. There are no
"right" or "wrong" answers.
Test Facilitator: Lakin Jones
Test Date:
Test Location:
Name:
Gender:

Female / Male

Were you comfortable with using the internet for training?

Y/N

On a scale of 1-5, do you feel this Moodle course was user friendly?

12345

Would you recommend other training courses to be implemented in a Moodle environment,


based on your experience with this course?
Y/N
At any time, did you become bored with the content?

Y/N

Did you use a laptop or desktop to test this course?

L/D

What was your comfort level while completing the tasks asked by the designer?
(1=not stressed at all, 2=somewhat stressed, 3=highly stressed; circle one)
As regards links, pictures, and information within the site, did you feel that the
site was (circle one):
Too busy - Not busy enough- Had the right amount of links, pictures and
information

Comments/Suggestions:
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________

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Appendix F: Exit Interview


The purpose of this exit interview is to see what is working well and what is not working well as
I continue to design the site. Youre testing will be responsible for my making additions,
deletions and corrections as I move forward with the project. Please answer the following
questions.
The navigation of the Moodle course is easy to use and understand.
Agree
Undecided
Do not agree
The appearance of the course is appropriate and inviting.
Agree
Undecided
Do not agree
The course is very user-friendly.
Agree
Undecided

Do not agree

I would recommend this course to be used for training.


Agree
Undecided
Do not agree
What flaws/weaknesses did you experience with the course?

What are the strengths of the design?

Other Comments:

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Appendix G: Visual Storyboard

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