Está en la página 1de 28

Name: ____________________

Date: ____________
Period: _____

Money, Banking, and the Federal Reserve Pre-Test


What is money?

What do you know about electronic money?

How does a bank work?

What do you know about the current financial crisis?

What does the Federal Reserve do?

What is Monetary Policy?

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Transcript (for podcast)


Today Im talking about money.
Money is something that people use every day. We earn it and spend it but dont often think
much about it. Economists define money as any good that is widely accepted as final payment
for goods and services. Money has taken different forms through the ages; examples include
cowry shells in Africa, large stone wheels on the Pacific island of Yap, and strings of beads
called wampum used by Native Americans and early American settlers. What do these forms of
money have in common? They share the three functions of money:
First: Money is a store of value. If I work today and earn 25 dollars, I can hold on to the
money before I spend it because it will hold its value until tomorrow, next week, or even
next year. In fact, holding money is a more effective way of storing value than holding
other items of value such as corn, which might rot. Although it is an efficient store of
value, money is not a perfect store of value. Inflation slowly erodes the purchasing power
of money over time.
Second: Money is a unit of account. You can think of money as a yardstick-the device we
use to measure value in economic transactions. If you are shopping for a new computer,
the price could be quoted in terms of t-shirts, bicycles, or corn. So, for instance, your new
computer might cost you 100 to 150 bushels of corn at todays prices, but you would find
it most helpful if the price were set in terms of money because it is a common measure of
value across the economy.
Third: Money is a medium of exchange. This means that money is widely accepted as a
method of payment. When I go to the grocery store, I am confident that the cashier will
accept my payment of money. In fact, U.S. paper money carries this statement: This
note is legal tender for all debts, public and private. This means that the U.S.
government protects my right to pay with U.S. dollars.
In order to appreciate the conveniences that money brings to an economy, think about life
without it. Imagine I am a musician-a bassoonist in an orchestra-who has a car that needs to be
repaired. In a world without money, I would need to barter for car repair. In fact, I would need to
find a coincidence of wants-the unlikely case that two people each have something that the other
wants at the right time and place to make an exchange. In other words, I would need to find a
mechanic who would be willing to exchange car repairs for a private bassoon concert by 9 AM
tomorrow so I can drive to my next orchestra rehearsal. In an economy where people have very
specialized skills, this kind of exchange would take an incredible amount of time and effort; in
fact, it might be nearly impossible. Money reduces the cost of this transaction because, while it
might be very difficult to find a mechanic who would exchange car repairs for bassoon concerts,
it is not hard to find one who would exchange car repairs for money. In fact, without money,
every transaction would require me to find producers who would exchange their goods and
services for bassoon performances. In a money-based economy, I can sell my services as a
bassoon player in an orchestra to those who are willing to pay for orchestra concerts with money.
Then, I can take the money I earn and pay for a variety of goods and services.
Economists say that the invention of money belongs in the same category as the great inventions
of ancient times, such as the wheel and the inclined plane, but how did money develop? Early
forms of money were often commodity money-money that had value because it was made of a
substance that had value. Examples of commodity money are gold and silver coins. Gold coins
were valuable because they could be used in exchange for other goods or services, but also

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

because the gold itself was valued and had other uses. Commodity money gave way to the next
stage-representative money.
Representative money is a certificate or token that can be exchanged for the underlying
commodity. For example, instead of carrying the gold commodity money with you, the gold
might have been kept in a bank vault and you might carry a paper certificate that represents-or
was backed-by the gold in the vault. It was understood that the certificate could be redeemed
for gold at any time. Also, the certificate was easier and safer to carry than the actual gold. Over
time people grew to trust the paper certificates as much as the gold. Representative money led to
the use of fiat money-the type used in modern economies today.
Fiat money is money that does not have intrinsic value and does not represent an asset in a vault
somewhere. Its value comes from being declared legal tender-an acceptable form of paymentby the government of the issuing country. In this case, we accept the value of the money because
the government says it has value and other people value it enough to accept it as payment. For
example, I accept U.S. dollars as income because Im confident I will be able to exchange the
dollars for goods and services at local stores. Because I know others will accept it, I am
comfortable accepting it. U.S. currency is fiat money. It is not a commodity with its own great
value and it does not represent gold-or any other valuable commodity-held in a vault somewhere.
It is valued because it is legal tender and people have faith in its use as money.
There have been many forms of money in history, but some forms have worked better than
others because they have characteristics that make them more useful. The characteristics of
money are durability, portability, divisibility, uniformity, limited supply, and acceptability. Lets
compare two examples of possible forms of money:
1. A cow. Cattle have been used as money at different points in history.
2. A stack of U.S. 20-dollar bills equal to the value of one cow.
Lets run down our list of characteristics to see how they stack up.
1. Durability. A cow is fairly durable, but a long trip to market runs the risk of sickness or
death for the cow and can severely reduce its value. Twenty-dollar bills are fairly durable
and can be easily replaced if they become worn. Even better, a long trip to market does
not threaten the health or value of the bill.
2. Portability. While the cow is difficult to transport to the store, the currency can be easily
put in my pocket.
3. Divisibility. A 20-dollar bill can be exchanged for other denominations, say a 10, a 5,
four 1s, and 4 quarters. A cow, on the other hand, is not very divisible.
4. Uniformity. Cows come in many sizes and shapes and each has a different value; cows
are not a very uniform form of money. Twenty-dollar bills are all the same size and shape
and value; they are very uniform.
5. Limited supply. In order to maintain its value, money must have a limited supply. While
the supply of cows is fairly limited, if they were used as money, you can bet ranchers
would do their best to increase the supply of cows, which would decrease their value. The
supply, and therefore the value, of 20-dollar billsand money in generalare regulated
by the Federal Reserve so that the money retains its value over time.
6. Acceptability. Even though cows have intrinsic value, some people may not accept cattle
as money. In contrast, people are more than willing to accept 20-dollar bills. In fact, the
U.S. government protects your right to use U.S. currency to pay your bills.

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Well, it seems udderly clear at this point thatbased on the characteristics of moneyU.S.
20-dollar bills are a much better form of money than cattle.
To summarize, money has taken many forms through the ages, but money consistently has three
functions: store of value, unit of account, and medium of exchange. Modern economies use fiat
money-money that is neither a commodity nor represented or backed by a commodity. Even
forms of money that share these function may be more or less useful based on the characteristics
of money.
Podcast about money Questions
Listen to the podcast about money and answer the questions.
What are the three functions of money?
1. __________________________________
2. __________________________________
3. __________________________________
What is representative money?

What is fiat money?

What are the six characteristics of money?


1. __________________________
2. __________________________
3. __________________________
4. __________________________
5. __________________________
6. __________________________

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

After the podcast take your textbook and read through Chapter 10 Section 1 and answer
the following questions by analyzing the cartoon on money in the textbook on page 254 by
answering the following questions.

Describe what is happening in the cartoon.

Why does the frog fail to fit into any of the three acceptable sources of value?

Under what circumstances might a frog be an acceptable form of money?

Is there anything in the chapter that you do not understand?

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Money Simulation
1. First 10 students will be randomly picked to be the specialty shop owners.
a. Specialty shops will be cheese, vegetables, fruit, milk, bread, clothing, shoes,
meats, furniture, and advice. (print at least two pages of each shapes item list for
the activity)
i. 1 dollar, a cow, and determined item: is the price of cheese, vegetables,
fruit, milk, and bread.
ii. 2 dollars, a cow, and determined item: is the price for clothing, shoes,
and meats.
iii. 3 dollars, a cow, and determined item: is the price of furniture.
iv. 4 dollars, 1 cow, and determined item: is the price of advice.
2. The first 10 will be given a stack of paper that will represent the products in their shop.
3. The rest of the class will be given one of three types of currency or products that the
students will need to trade or barter with.
a. Cow: students will need to barter with each shop owner to determine what they
can trade for one cow. Cows can also be traded for 4 dollars or a designated item.
b. One Dollar: Students will be able to trade one dollar for any of the products in the
shops or could trade with other types of currency. One cow equals 4 dollars.
Dollars cannot be traded for the other items.
c. Items for trade: This can be any item in the picture and students will need to
barter with shop owners for items and hope that they would want that item in
return. The item owners can barter with cows but they have to come to an
agreement. Items cannot be traded for dollars.
4. The 10 shop owners will be set up around the room. With booths and price signs.
5. Students will go ahead and start trading items when the time starts.
6. The instructor will walk around watching the students to see if they understand the
assignment.

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Bike

Cookies

Bucket of Beads

Laptop Computer

Cell Phone

Blanket

Hammer

Diamond

iPad

Puppy

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Bitcoin breaks new ground on Capitol Hill


By Julian Hattem - 11/23/13 08:45 AM EST
Bitcoin survived its big debut in Washington last week, but positive early reviews from Congress
doesn't mean the virtual currency is ready for prime time.
The money is still largely alien to many lawmakers and regulators, who have only started to
wrap their heads around the concept. But high profile Senate hearings have helped to boost its
perception and proponents hope that positive signs from Washington will make it easier for
people trying to trade and buy bitcoins.
If there was a moment in history where you could say that bitcoin has arrived in Washington, it
was this week, said Jinyoung Englund, a spokeswoman with the Bitcoin Foundation.
Bitcoins only exist online, but can be traded for cash or used to buy goods and services at a
growing number of businesses.
Users say they have more freedom with bitcoins than with traditional forms of money, since
payments can be conducted with a smart phone or over the Internet, and that there are lower fees
for transferring money than banks and payment processing companies charge.
However, the anonymous nature of bitcoins and other virtual currencies can make them
appealing to criminals and money launderers. Last month, the FBI shut down Silk Road, an
online marketplace that relied on bitcoins and sold illegal drugs and other illicit goods.
But last week, regulators and lawmakers indicated that the currency provided as much
opportunity for good as for harm.
They understand that bitcoin is not inherently something that is illicit, said Jerry Brito, a senior
research fellow at George Mason Universitys Mercatus Center. There can be illicit uses, but
that in fact there are probably many more beneficial, innovative potential than there is illicit
use.
Two Senate committees held largely positive hearings on the currency, and senators noted that
bitcoins offer new potential.
With every new Internet-based technology, I believe that members of Congress should
recognize that we often don't know what these new advancements will develop into, Sen. Dean
Heller (R-Nev.) told a joint panel of two Senate Banking subcommittee. While we must ensure
proper safeguards, it is my hope that we can help maintain an environment that continues to
promote new financial technologies and innovative growth.
Banks have been skeptical of dealing with bitcoin businesses, but Brito said that that positive
message from Washington should help convince them to change their tune.
Thats something that hopefully banks will hear a message coming out of D.C. this week,
saying No, no, this is a legitimate thing. This is perfectly legal and has great uses, he said.

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

The currency is still new, though, and is far from mainstream acceptance.
I'm only starting to wrap my head around the potential upside, downside, regulatory issues,
monetary policy issues, taxation issues, consumer protection issues that this innovation
represents, Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) said at the Tuesday hearing.
An aide with the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee, which also
held a hearing on bitcoins, said that staff are following up on the subject and plan to issue a
comprehensive report.
Regulators have also shown that theyre not entirely ready to give the currency a pass.
On Thursday, the Federal Election Commission (FEC) deadlocked on a vote to allow bitcoins to
be donated to political campaigns. The agencys advisory opinions require support from a
majority of its members for passage, but the commission hit a stalemate with a 3-3 vote.
The FEC vote is sort of good analogy for how the government is looking at bitcoin, Brito said.
Theyre not saying no; theyre not saying yes either."
The Internal Revenue Service is working on guidance on how to treat bitcoin for tax purposes.
Financial regulators like the Commodity Futures Trading Commission have also expressed an
interest in the money.
One problem for bitcoin oversight is that it can be used to purchase goods like a currency, but it
can also be used to send money around the world, like a security, or as an investment vehicle,
like a stock.
That can pose a problem for financial regulators, Englund with the Bitcoin Foundation said.
I think what Washington still has yet to wrap their head around is that bitcoin does not fit in one
bucket. Depending on the context of the use, it fits in different buckets and therefore will have
different regulatory guidelines apply, she said.
For the most part, bitcoin watchers dont expect there will be many new laws or regulations to
increase the governments oversight and crack down on fraud.
I dont think theyre going to be issuing regs, said Timothy McTaggart, a partner at the Pepper
Hamilton law office. I think they have the power already.
According to bitcoin backers, the biggest problems facing bitcoins in the U.S. is banks aversion
to get involved with bitcoin firms and the difficulty for exchanges to register in each state in the
country, which is necessary to get off the ground.
The largest bitcoin exchange is currently in China, and Englund said that time is running out for
the U.S. to get ahead of the curve.
Were in a very limited window for the U.S. to lead in this innovation and that windows not
going to stay open for very long, she said.

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Bitcoin Is A Joke by Joe Weisenthal Nov. 6, 2013, 5:42 PM


Bitcoin is back in the news, as the digital currency has surged to new all-time highs in recent
weeks.
A few weeks ago, it was just above $100. Today it's over $260.
This surge has prompted Timothy B Lee at The Washington Post to ask whether those who have
called it a bubble in the past should retract and admit that they were wrong.
Well I'm not totally sure if I've called it a bubble, but I have spoken negatively of it, and I'll say
that I still think it's a joke, and probably in a bubble.
Now first of all, I find the premise of Lee's post to be hilarious. The currency has been surging
several percent every day lately, and that's evidence that it's not in a bubble?
Before going on, I want to be clear that saying something is a bubble is not saying it will go
down. It could go to $500 or $1000 or $10,000. That's the nature of manias.
But make no mistake, Bitcoin is not the currency of the future. It has no intrinsic value.
Now this idea of "intrinsic value" when it comes to currency bothers people, and Bitcoin Bugs
will immediately ask why the U.S. dollar has intrinsic value. There's an answer to that. The U.S.
Dollar has intrinsic value because the U.S. government which sets the laws of doing business in
the United States says it has intrinsic value. If you want to conduct commerce in the United
States you have to pay taxes, and there's only one currency you're allowed to pay taxes in: U.S.
dollars. There's no getting around this fact. Furthermore, if you want to use the banking system at
all, there's no choice but to use U.S. dollars, because that's the currency of the Fed which is
behind the whole thing.
On top of all these laws requiring the U.S. dollar to be used, the United States has a gigantic
military that can force people around the world to use dollars (if it came to that) so yes, there's a
lot of real-world value behind greenbacks.
Bitcoin? Nada. There's nothing keeping it being a thing. If people lose faith in it, it's over.
Bitcoin is fiat currency in the most literal sense of the word.
But it gets worse. Bitcoin is mostly just a speculative vehicle. Yes, there are PR stunts about bars
and other shops accepting bitcoins. And there is a Bitcoin ATM for some reason. But mostly
Bitcoin is a speculative vehicle. And really, you'd be insane to actually conduct a sizable amount
of commerce in bitcoins. That's because the price swings so wildly, that the next day, there's a
good chance that one of the parties will have gotten royally screwed. Either the purchaser of the
good will have ended up totally blowing a huge opportunity (by not holding longer) or the seller
will be totally screwed (if Bitcoin instantly plunges). The very volatility that excited people to
want to play the Bitcoin game is death when it comes to real transactions in the real world.
Again, Bitcoin might go up a lot more before it ultimately ends. That's the nature of bubbles. The
dotcom bubble crashed a bunch of times on its way up. Then one day it ended. The same will
happen with this.
In the meantime, have fun speculating!
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/bitcoin-is-a-currency-for-clowns-201311#ixzz3JqFr9Uyw

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Money, Banking, and the Federal Reserve Exam


1. Is money the most efficient way to trade for goods and services?

2. How is Money, Banking, and the Federal Reserve connected?

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

3. What is currency?
a. way to pay for goods and services
b. Paper money and coins
c. A unit of account
d. All of the above
4. What are the three functions of money?
a. Payment, Form of Currency, Medium of Exchange
b. Medium of Exchange, Durability, Unit of Account
c. Medium of Exchange, Unit of Account, Store Value
d. Unit of Account, Commodity, Portability
5. BitCoin is
a. A new form of currency
b. Unregulated currency
c. A way to pay for things on the Internet
d. All of the above
6. Who first proposed a National Bank for the United States?
a. James Madison
b. Alexander Hamilton
c. Thomas Jefferson
d. Sam Adams
7. What happened in 2008?
a. A massive economic boom
b. The Housing market plateaued
c. A massive Recession started
d. Nothing
8. What are some of the functions of Financial Institutions?
a. Storing Money, Saving Money, Losing Money
b. Loans, Credit Cards, Interest
c. Storing Money, Loans, Mortgages
d. Credit Cards, Saving Money, Profit
9. Which President helped create the Federal Reserve?
a. Theodore Roosevelt
b. Franklin Roosevelt
c. Herbert Hoover
d. Woodrow Wilson
10. What is the Federal Reserve?
a. A Centralized Bank that helps regulate the economy
b. A Centralized Bank that only produces money
c. Just a Bank
d. A Credit Union
11. What are some of the functions of the Federal Reserve?
a. Issuing Currency, Stabilizing the Economy, Create Laws
b. Check Clearing, Bank Examinations, Lender of Last Resort
c. Stabilizing the Economy, Creating Coins, Supervising Lending Practices
d. Bank Examinations, Issuing Currency, Economic Reforms

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

12. What is Monetary Policy?


a. How money is circulated in the Economy
b. How GDP is influenced
c. How Inflation is regulated
d. How the Federal Reserve makes decisions about real GDP and Inflation
13.______Money
14.______Unit of Account
15.______Medium of Exchange
16.______Money Supply
17.______Liquidity
18.______Default
19.______Treasury
20.______Inflation
21.______Moneterism
22.______Interest Rates
23.______Reserves
24.______Financial Crisis
25.______Currency

A. Coins and paper bills used as money


B. The funds or revenue of a government
C. A general increase in prices in an economy
D. Belief that the money supply is most important
factor in economic performance
E. Anything the serves as a medium of exchange,
unit of account, and store of value
F. All the money available in the economy
G. Deposits that a bank keeps readily available
H.A means for comparing the values of goods
and services
I. Failure to pay back a loan
J. Time when the Economy is at an all time low
or a massive Recession
K. The rate set for the price of money borrowed
L. Anything used to determine value during the
exchange of goods and services
M. The ability to be used as, or directly converted
into cash

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Answer Key for Exam


1. Is money the most efficient way to trade for goods and services?
a. Free Response. Must have substantial evidence to support clam. No right or wrong
answer.
2. How is Money, Banking, and the Federal Reserve connected?
a. Free Response. Must have substantial evidence to support clam. No right or wrong
answer.
3. What is currency?-A
a. A way to pay for goods and services
b. Paper money and coins
c. A unit of account
d. All of the above
4. What are the three functions of money?-C
a. Payment, Form of Currency, Medium of Exchange
b. Medium of Exchange, Durability, Unit of Account
c. Medium of Exchange, Unit of Account, Store Value
d. Unit of Account, Commodity, Portability
5. BitCoin is-D
a. A new form of currency
b. Unregulated currency
c. A way to pay for things on the Internet
d. All of the above
6. Who proposed a National Bank for the United States?-B
a. James Madison
b. Alexander Hamilton
c. Thomas Jefferson
d. Sam Adams
7. What happened in 2008?-C
a. A massive economic boom
b. The Housing market plateaued
c. A massive Recession started
d. Nothing
8. What are some of the functions of Financial Institutions?-C
a. Storing Money, Saving Money, Losing Money
b. Loans, Credit Cards, Interest
c. Storing Money, Loans, Mortgages
d. Credit Cards, Saving Money, Profit
9. Which President helped create the Federal Reserve?-D
a. Theodore Roosevelt
b. Franklin Roosevelt
c. Herbert Hoover
d. Woodrow Wilson
10. What is the Federal Reserve?-A
a. A Centralized Bank that helps regulate the economy
b. A Centralized Bank that only produces money

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____
c. Just a Bank
d. A Credit Union
11. What are some of the functions of the Federal Reserve?-B
a. Issuing Currency, Stabilizing the Economy, Create Laws
b. Check Clearing, Bank Examinations, Lender of Last Resort
c. Stabilizing the Economy, Creating Coins, Supervising Lending Practices
d. Bank Examinations, Issuing Currency, Economic Reforms
12. What is Monetary Policy?-D
a. How money is circulated in the Economy
b. How the Federal Reserve influences GDP
c. How the Federal Reserve regulates Inflation
d. How the Federal Reserve makes decisions about real GDP and Inflation
13.___E___Money

A. Coins and paper bills used as money

14.___H___Unit of Account

B. The funds or revenue of a government

15.___L___Medium of Exchange

C.A general increase in prices in an economy

16.___F___Money Supply

D. Belief that the money supply is most important

17.___M___Liquidity

factor in economic performance

18.___I___Default

E. Anything the serves as a medium of exchange,

19.___B___Treasury

unit of account, and store of value

20.___C___Inflation

F. All the money available in the economy

21.___D___Moneterism

G. Deposits that a bank keeps readily available

22.___K___Interest Rates

H.A means for comparing the values of goods

23.___G___Reserves

I. Failure to pay back a loan

24.___J___Financial Crisis

J. Time when the Economy is at an all time low

25.___A___Currency

or a massive Recession
K. The rate set for the price of money borrowed
L. Anything used to determine value during the
exchange of goods and services
M. The ability to be used as, or directly converted
into cash

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Review Questions for Review Day


1. What is the Federal Reserve?
a. A centralized bank formed by the US government that regulates the economy
2. Name three cities that have a Federal Reserve.
a. Atlanta, St. Louis, San Francisco, Boston, Dallas, Kansas City, Minneapolis,
Chicago, Cleveland, Richmond, New York, Philadelphia
3. What are the functions of the Federal Reserve? Name three!
a. Check Clearing, Stabilize the Economy, Bank Examinations, Supervising Lending
Practices, Last Resort Lender, Issuing Currency
4. How does the Federal Reserve affect the economy?
a. Using currency to regulate inflation, puts currency into circulation,
5. What is Monetary Policy?
a. The actions that the Federal Reserve System takes to influence the level of real GDP
and the rate of inflation in the economy
6. How does Monetary Policy affect the economy?
a. Influences real GDP and the rate of inflation. This causes prices to either increase or
decrease.
7. What is money?
a. is a thing that serves as a medium of exchange, a unit of account, and a store of value.
8. What are the six functions of money?
a. Durability, portability, divisibility, uniformity, limited supply, acceptability
9. What is a bank run?
a. a widespread panic in which many people try to redeem their paper money at the
same time.
10. What are some different types of banks?
a. commercial banks, savings and loan associations, savings banks, credit unions,
financial companies.
11. what are the functions of a bank?
a. storing money, saving money, providing loans, providing mortgages, providing credit
cards, and making a profit.
12. what is liquidity?
a. the ability to be used as, or directly converted into, cash

Name: ____________________
Date: ____________
Period: _____

Historical Role Play : Functions of the Federal Reserve

Teacher Name: Rebecca Debski Kellyanne Brown

Student Names:

____________________________________________________________

CATEGORY

Role

Point-of-view,
arguments, and
solutions proposed were
consistently in
character.

Point-of-view,
arguments, and
solutions proposed
were often in
character.

Point-of-view,
arguments, and
solutions proposed
were sometimes in
character.

Point-of-view,
arguments, and
solutions proposed
were rarely in
character.

Knowledge
Gained

Can clearly explain


several ways in which
his character \\\"saw\\\"
things differently than
other characters and
can clearly explain why.

Can clearly explain


several ways in which
his character
\\\"saw\\\" things
differently than other
characters.

Can clearly explain


one way in which his
character \\\"saw\\\"
things differently than
other characters.

Cannot explain one


way in which his
character \\\"saw\\\"
things differently
than other
characters.

Required
Elements

Student included more


information than was
required.

Student included all


information that was
required.

Student included
most information that
was required.

Student included
less information than
was required.

Historical
Accuracy

All historical information


appeared to be accurate
and in chronological
order.

Almost all historical


information appeared
to be accurate and in
chronological order.

Most of the historical


information was
accurate and in
chronological order.

Very little of the


historical information
was accurate and/or
in chronological
order.