P. 1
OFSCP-ES

OFSCP-ES

Views: 46|Likes:
Publicado porAntonio Hernandez

More info:

Published by: Antonio Hernandez on Dec 12, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/28/2013

pdf

text

original

LOCAL DISTRICT 4 OFFICE OF SCHOOL, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS UPDATES December 2009 Office of School, Family, and

Community Partnerships contact information. Please contact the main office number or telephone the direct lines for assistance. Main Office, (213) 241-0105 Fax Number, (213) 241-3392 Parent/Community Facilitators Belmont Family 1, Maria Gonzalez, (213) 241-0118 Belmont Family 2, Martha Sandoval, (213) 241-0144 Hollywood/Fairfax Family, Frida Samayoa, (213) 241-0143 Marshall/Franklin Family, Angie Cardenas, (213) 241-0110 Parent Ombudsman William Masis, (213) 241-0131 Eagle Rock Family, William Masis

maria.gonzalez@lausd.net martha.sandoval@lausd.net frida.samayoa@lausd.net angelina.cardenas@lausd.net william.masis@lausd.net

REMINDER: Please remember to schedule interpretation services, if necessary, through the Translations Unit at 213-241-5840. The services can be also scheduled online at http://www.translationsunit.com/

The second School Report Card for LAUSD schools is on its way! 2008-09 School Report Cards are scheduled to be released on January 19th, 2010. Parents will receive a School Report Card in the mail for their children’s individual school. This is a progress report about schools designed and built by parents and community members for parents and community members. Included with this packet is an informational flyer for parents and guardians. Parents and guardians will be able to access Report Cards online at www.lausd.net/reportcard. Parents should feel free to speak with their children’s teachers and principals if they have questions.

Thank you for your support with the Winter Parent Training held at Helen Bernstein High School, Saturday, December 5, 2009! The conference put on by parents in collaboration with the Office of School, Family, and Community Partnerships and with the support of the Instructional Services Office and District staff, attracted nearly two hundred participants. The presenters were outstanding and parent officers participated in many hands-on opportunities across all subject areas. If you have suggestions or comments regarding the training, please contact Maria Gonzalez, Parent/Community Facilitator at (213) 241-0118 or Frida Samayoa, Parent/Community Facilitator at (213) 241-0143. Included with this packet are the December and January issues of “Parents Make the Difference” newsletter and the Winter “Parent and Child Activity Calendar” which provides practical ideas for parents to help their children. For the “Parents Make the Difference” and “Parent and Child Activity Calendar” there is an Elementary, Middle and High School version. You may reproduce the pages separately or as a unit. Please do not remove the copyright message from any page. You may use articles from each newsletter issue in your own newsletters and/or publications. When using individual articles, please give credit with a statement such as “Reprinted with permission of the Parent Institute.” Accompanying photographs may be reproduced only when reproducing the newsletter in its entirety. If you need additional support please contact the Office of School, Family and Community Partnerships at (213) 241-0105. The next scheduled School/Community Liaisons’ Meeting will be held Tuesday, January 12, 2010 at the Harbor Building [4201 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90010] from 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. If you have questions or need assistance please contact Maria Gonzalez, Parent/Community Facilitator at (213) 241-0118.

Calendar of Events January 12 January 19 January 27 School/Community Liaisons’ Mtg 8:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m. LDCEAC/LDELAC Monthly Mtg 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon PCAC Meeting 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Harbor Building, Rm 202 Holy Hill Church TBD

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------February 9 February 16 February 24 School/Community Liaisons’ Mtg 8:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m. LDCEAC/LDELAC Monthly Mtg 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon PCAC Meeting 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Harbor Building, Rm 203 Holy Hill Church TBD

Attendance Matters
Why is it so important for your middle schooler to be in school? Every day of school is important. But after winter break, missing days of school can be especially tough on your child. She should be in school every day unless she is ill. Here's why: • • • Once the year is half over, many teachers turn a serious eye to the end-of-year exams that are so important to school accreditation. The pace of instruction picks up. It becomes more difficult to catch up after missed days. In just a few weeks, if not before, teachers will also begin to review for the end-of-year exams. This review will go on at the same time as regular teaching. Your child may have more homework as a result of faster instruction and review. The more time she is out of school, the more it piles up. And she will be required to turn it all in.

Please continue to: • • • Emphasize to your child the importance of daily attendance. Being on time is important, too! Accept no excuses except true illness for having your child miss school. Refrain from making plans for your child that would require her to miss school.
Reprinted with permission from the January 2010 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2010 The Parent Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc.

December 2009 Vol. 21, No. 4

®

Local District 4, LAUSD Byron J. Maltez, Interim Superintendent

make the di erence!
Use science to encourage good hygiene!
Here’s a fun science project that will show your child how the flouride in SCIENCE toothpaste protects his teeth. You will need two jars, two raw eggs and two cups of white vinegar. Label one jar plain egg and the other toothpaste egg. Weigh and measure both eggs, then smear one with a layer of toothpaste. Fill the jars with vinegar and drop one egg into each jar. Cover the jars with plastic wrap. Have your child observe the eggs for four days. Bubbles will form around the plain egg for the first 15 minutes. (That’s the acid of the vinegar working.) By the next day, the eggshell will be gritty, and the egg will be bigger. After three days, the shell will be completely gone, and the egg will be soft and rubbery. Meanwhile, the toothpaste egg will show little change, due to the protection provided by the toothpaste. Because teeth and eggshells are both made of calcium, this experiment is a great way to help your child see why he needs to brush his teeth!

Ensure your child continues to learn over the school holiday

Y

our child looks at the calendar and imagines the joy of having no schedule for the whole winter school holiday. You look at the same blank squares on your calendar and have a mild moment of panic. However, the winter break can give you a chance to spend a little extra time with your child. Here are some activities that will keep her learning—and that will keep you from hearing, “I’m bored” during the holiday: • Assemble a list from your local newspaper of places to go and things to do. Every community has places that will interest kids. Check out a local museum (see if they have a day when admission is free). Look for free concerts you can attend. See if the local public library has any special story hours or performances.
X02583434

• Get outside. Be sure you schedule time every day to be outdoors. Walk, bike, skate, ski—but get outside! • Look for a video based on a children’s book. Read the book first, then watch the video. Discuss how the two were alike, and what differences you saw. • Prepare food together. Nearly every culture has some special foods associated with the holiday season. With your child, prepare foods you remember from your childhood. Share your memories. Or do some research and prepare a dish you’ve never tried. • Volunteer. Set aside time for a family volunteer activity. Feed animals at the animal shelter. Make sandwiches for people living on the street. Your child will learn the best gift is the gift of service. www.parent-institute.com

Copyright © 2009, The Parent Institute®

Practical ideas for parents to help their children

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz1234567890!@#$%^&*()-=+~`'",.<>/?[]{}\|ÁÉÍÓÚáéíñú¿

Copyright © 2009, The Parent Institute®

www.parent-institute.com

Follow five research-based tips for more successful discipline
Helping children learn appropriate behavior is a parenting task that DISCIPLINE sometimes seems overwhelming. But research shows there are five ways parents can be most successful in shaping children’s positive behavior: 1. Give your child positive attention. Set aside time every day when you can give your child some individual attention. Read a book, play a board game or work together on a household project. The important thing is that the two of you are together, talking and listening to each other. 2. Listen to your child. Give him words to express his feelings. Kids who can say, “I’m angry” are less likely to hit. 3. Give choices whenever you can. Kids learn how to make good choices by making lots of choices. Let your child make choices—and then live with the results. 4. Notice when your child does something right. This doesn’t mean praising your child every time he takes a breath! But when he does something positive, let him know you noticed. He’ll be more likely to do it again tomorrow. 5. Be a good role model. You can’t expect your child to control his temper if you scream at every car on the road. Your example is the single most powerful way that you teach your child about appropriate behavior.
Source: American Academy of Pediatrics, “Guidance for Effective Discipline,” Pediatrics (American Academy of Pediatrics, www.aap.org).

Are you helping your dawdling child speed it up?
It’s time to leave, but your child is not ready. This is the fourth morning this PARENT week you’ve been late. QUIZ Some kids just seem to have only one speed—slow. But there are ways parents can help these kids learn to “get a move on.” Are you doing all you can to move your dawdler out the door? Answer yes or no to the questions below to find out: ____1. Does your child go to bed on time, so it’s easier to get up in the morning? ____2. Do you take time at night to lay out clothes and pack book bags? ____3. Does your child know, step by step, what she has to do to get ready in the morning? ____4. Do you give your child “twominute warnings” to ease transitions? ____5. Do you build extra time into your schedule? How well are you doing? Each yes means you are helping your dawdling child get up to speed. For each no answer, try that idea from the quiz.

“Where parents do too much for their children, the children will not do much for themselves.”
—Elbert Hubbard

Expose your elementary schooler to other countries & cultures
Children often know very little about other countries. Here are REINFORCING some ways you can LEARNING expose your child to other cultures: • Learn about holiday customs of people around the world. Use the library to discover how other people celebrate their own special days. • Look for plays, movies or puppet shows about people from other countries. Many libraries and museums present these programs for free.
X02583434

• Compare coins and stamps from other countries. They often include information about the country. You may find stamps from other countries where you work. You can also look on the Internet. • Learn simple words in different languages. Teach your child to count to 10 in another language. Learn simple phrases such as, “Hello,” and “Thank you.” • Look for television programs about other countries. When you watch the news, keep a globe or an atlas nearby to learn more about the countries in the news.

®

make the di erence!
Practical Ideas for Parents to Help Their Children. ISSN: 1523-1275 1046-0446 For subscription information call or write: The Parent Institute®, 1-800-756-5525, P.O. Box 7474, Fairfax Station, VA 22039-7474. Fax: 1-800-216-3667. Or visit our website: www.parent-institute.com. Published monthly September through May by The Parent Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc., an independent, private agency. Equal opportunity employer. Copyright © 2009 NIS, Inc. Publisher: John H. Wherry, Ed.D. Editor: Rebecca Miyares. Writers: Kristen Amundson & Susan O’Brien. Illustrator: Joe Mignella.

2 • Elementary • Parents make the difference! • December 2009

www.parent-institute.com

Copyright © 2009, The Parent Institute®

Make online safety a priority for every member of your family
Kids use computers for homework, fun and socializing, but the COMPUTERS convenience has a cost. & INTERNET Families must promote computer and Internet safety. Thankfully, NetSmartz, an online safety resource, shares lots of tips with parents and kids: • Keep the computer in a central spot, such as in the family room, where you can keep an eye on Internet activities. • Consider installing programs that make computer use safer for kids. Also check your Internet service provider’s safety features. • Learn about Internet safety. Then talk with your child about basic rules and post them near the computer. (Find examples at www.netsmartz.org/resources/ pledge.htm.) • Protect personal information, such as name and age. Discuss why it shouldn’t be shared online. • Never agree to meet online-only “friends” or acquaintances in person. Don’t respond to inappropriate messages. Instead, turn off the monitor and tell a trusted adult. Also notify law enforcement. (Visiting CyberTipline.com can help.) Go online together. Let your child show you her computer skills and favorite sites. Guide her to childfriendly resources. Keep track of your child’s online activities. With whom does she email or chat? What games does she play? What sites does she use? Supervise closely and keep online accounts in your name. Remember that your child may go online in other locations, such as at a friend’s home. Take steps to ensure safety no matter where she uses the Internet.

Q: My son has real problems
writing down his thoughts. It seems to take him much longer than other students to write words on a page. He also has trouble spelling. Now that he’s in fifth grade, he is assigned a lot more writing. How can I help him?

Questions & Answers
A: Writing is not something that
comes naturally to all children. And some, like your son, seem to face special challenges. Still, as you correctly point out, writing is essential to success in school. You do need to meet with your child’s teacher to discuss your concerns. Ask her how you both can work on this issue. There are some things you can do to help your son when he has a writing assignment to do at home. To get started: • Emphasize the importance of planning. Before your son ever picks up a pencil, he should think carefully about what he wants to write. He can brainstorm and jot down a few ideas—or make a recording of what he wants to say. • Let your child use a computer. Teach him to type (there are plenty of programs that will help). He will be able to write more quickly, so he’ll be less frustrated. He’ll need to use a computer in middle and high school anyway—you can help him get a head start. • Help your child practice his handwriting at home. He’ll always need to write some things by hand. Writing is a skill, and just like other skills, it gets better with practice. —Kristen Amundson, The Parent Institute

Source:“Safety Tips,” NetSmartz, www.netsmartz.org/ safety/safetytips.htm.

Reinforce writing skills with a fun game of ‘collect a sentence’
Do you plan to travel over the school holiday? Here’s a fun car game that will ENCOURAGING sharpen your kids’ writing WRITING skills. It will also help them become better observers. Here’s how to play: 1. Set a time limit—say, one or two minutes. 2. Let your kids “collect” all the words they see in the time you have allotted. They can include the names of things they see, like “burger” or “telephone.” They can write down descriptions of things they see (“blue” for the sky or
X02583434

“hot” for the fries). They can also look for actual words on signs. 3. Begin the challenge. When the time limit is up, your kids must use the words they have collected to create as many sentences as they can. The sentences can be funny or serious. You might work with younger kids, or divide into teams. 4. See how many sentences you can write. Then next time, see if you can beat your own record.
Source:“Collect a Sentence,” FamilyEducation.com, http://fun.familyeducation.com/word-games/travel-games/ 57461.html.

December 2009 • Elementary • Parents make the difference! • 3

Copyright © 2009, The Parent Institute®

www.parent-institute.com

It Matters: Building Character
Help your child persevere by setting goals
Facing life’s challenges —from learning to ride a bike to finishing a big project—requires BUILDING CHARACTER perseverance, and kids need plenty of help developing this trait. To boost your child’s persistence: • Build on the past. Remind your child of times she’s succeeded through hard work. Discuss how great she felt and how she can do it again. • Set a small goal. Choose something your child can accomplish and enjoy, such as walking a mile with you. This builds confidence. • Ask for input. What else would your child like to achieve? Wanting to reach the goal will give her motivation. • Be honest. Make sure your child picks a realistic goal, but explain that reaching it won’t be easy. Good planning will help a lot. • Make a plan. Write down specific steps and deadlines. Help your child divide her goal into small, manageable parts. • Be a cheerleader. Compliment progress, both along the way and at the finish line. Do not use prizes or punishments. • Learn from the experience. Even if your child doesn’t meet her objective, stay positive! Take pride in her hard work. Talk about what she might do differently next time, and envision success.
Source: Marie Faust Evitt, “How to Teach Kids Perseverance and Goal-Setting,” Parents.com, www.parents.com/ family-life/better-parenting/parenting-style/how-toteach-kids-perseverance-goal-setting/?page=1.
X02583434

Encourage your child to be honest in difficult situations

R

esearch shows that by the time kids reach elementary school, most know the difference between honesty and lying. But that doesn’t make truth-telling easy! To encourage honesty in your child: • Be a role model. Children are good “lie detectors.” They notice when parents tell the truth—and when they don’t. • Reward trustworthiness. If your child is truthful in a difficult situation, compliment him! • React calmly. When your child lies, don’t label him a “liar.” Express confidence that he will make better choices in the future. • Discuss honesty. Why is it important to be honest? Note examples of honesty and dishonesty—and their effects.

• Create opportunities for telling the truth. Say, “You broke my vase,” instead of, “Did you do this?” It’s better to say what happened rather than to ask unnecessary questions.
Source: Karen Stephens, “Lying, Fibs, and Tall-Tales: Teaching Children To Be Truthful,” mysmallwonders, www.mysmallwonders.com/resources/pdf/LYING01 PELibrary.pdf.

Teach your elementary schooler to express anger with respect
It’s hard to be angry and respectful at the same time. But expressing anger with respect BUILDING RESPECT is essential. You and your child can control your reactions if you: • List triggers. Think about what makes you most angry. Being disobeyed? Being told what to do? Commit to reacting calmly to these situations. • Identify “red flags.” Start by noticing what anger is like for you. Does it make you hot? Make you want to scream? These are important warning signs. • Think. When you feel angry, ask yourself, “What made me angry?” “What else did I feel?” Anger can sometimes really be disappointment or embarrassment. • Leave the source. If possible, walk away from what is frustrating you and try to calm down. • Make good choices. There are many respectful ways to release anger. Write in a journal, paint a picture or exercise. When you’re angry with a person, wait until your’re calm to talk.
Source: Elizabeth Verdick and Marjorie Lisovskis, How to Take the Grrrr Out of Anger, ISBN: 1-57542-117-8 (Free Spirit Publishing, www.freespirit.com).

4 • Elementary • Parents make the difference! • December 2009

Escuela Primaria

Diciembre 2009 Vol. 21, No. 4

TM

Local District 4, LAUSD Byron J. Maltez, Interim Superintendent

¡hacen la diferencia!
¡Use la ciencia para fomentar la buena higiene!
Aquí tiene un proyecto de ciencia divertido que le enseñará a su niño la forma como el flúor que CIENCIA contiene la pasta dental protege su dentadura. Usted necesitará dos tarros, dos huevos crudos y dos tazas de vinagre blanco. Rotule un tarro que contenga un huevo simple y otro que contenga un huevo con pasta dental. Pese y mida los dos huevos, después embarre uno con una capa de pasta dental. Llene los tarros con vinagre y meta un huevo dentro de cada tarro. Cubra los tarros con envoltura de plástico. Observen los huevos durante cuatro días. Se formarán burbujas alrededor del huevo simple durante los primeros 15 minutos. (Eso es el ácido del vinagre que está funcionando.) Al día siguiente, la cáscara del huevo estará llena de arena, y el huevo estará más grande. Después de tres días, la cáscara habrá desaparecido totalmente, y el huevo estará suave y con una consistencia gomosa. Entretanto, el huevo con pasta dental mostrará poco cambio, debido a la protección proporcionada por la pasta dental. Debido a que tanto la pasta dental como las cáscaras de huevo contienen calcio, ¡este experimento es una manera fabulosa de ayudar a su niño a entender porqué necesita cepillarse los dientes!

Asegúrese de que su niño continúe aprendiendo durante el invierno
u niño ve el calendario y se imagina la dicha de no tener que ajustarse a un horario durante todas las vacaciones escolares de invierno. Usted ve los mismos cuadros blancos en su calendario y siente un leve momento de pánico. Sin embargo, las vacaciones de invierno pueden brindarle una oportunidad de pasar un poco de tiempo adicional con su niño. Aquí tiene algunas actividades que lo mantendrán leyendo—y evitará que usted lo oiga decir, “Estoy aburrido” durante las vacaciones: • Reúna una lista de su periódico local de lugares a visitar a dónde ir y cosas qué hacer. Cada comunidad tiene lugares que les interesarán a los niños. Trate un museo local (vea si existe un día en el que la entrada es gratuita). Busque conciertos gratuitos a los que puedan asistir. Vea si la biblioteca local ofrece horas del cuento o espectáculos especiales. • Salgan al aire libre. Asegúrese de
X02583434

S

programar tiempo todos los días para estar al aire libre. Caminen, monten bici, patinen, esquíen— ¡pero salgan al aire libre! • Busque un vídeo basado en un libro para niños. Lean el libro primero, después vean el vídeo. Hablen de cómo ambos eran semejantes, y de qué diferencias vieron. • Preparen la comida juntos. Casi toda cultura tiene algunas comidas especiales relacionadas con la temporada de vacaciones. Con su niño, prepare comidas que usted recuerda de su niñez. Comparta sus recuerdos. O hagan un poco de investigación y preparen un plato que nunca hayan intentado. • Ofrezcan sus servicios como voluntarios. Aparte tiempo para realizar una actividad familiar de servicios voluntarios. Den de comer a los animales en el refugio para animales. Hagan emparedados para la gente que vive en la calle. Su niño aprenderá que el mejor don es el don de servicio.
www.parent-institute.com

Copyright © 2009, The Parent Institute®

Ideas prácticas para que los padres ayuden a sus hijos

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz1234567890!@#$%^&*()-=+~`'",.<>/?[]{}\|ÁÉÍÓÚáéíñú¿

Copyright © 2009, The Parent Institute®

www.parent-institute.com

Siga estos cinco consejos para ejercer una disciplina más eficaz
Ayudar a su niño a aprender un comportamiento apropiado es una tarea DISCIPLINA de crianza de niños que algunas veces parece abrumadora. Pero las investigaciones muestran que existen cinco maneras de cómo los padres pueden ser más exitosos en formar el comportamiento positivo de los niños: 1. Bríndele atención positiva a su niño. Aparte tiempo todos los días cuando pueda brindar un poco de atención positiva individual a su niño. Lean un libro, jueguen un juego de mesa o trabajen juntos en un proyecto del hogar. Lo importante es que ambos estén juntos, hablándose y escuchándose uno al otro. 2. Escuche a su niño. Enséñele palabras para expresar sus sentimientos. Los niños que pueden decir, “Estoy enojado” son menos propensos a golpear a los demás. 3. Brinde opciones siempre que pueda. Los niños aprenden cómo tomar buenas decisiones tomando muchas decisiones. Deje que su niño tome decisiones—y después que viva con los resultados. 4. Note cuando su niño haga algo bien. ¡Esto no significa que tenga que elogiar a su niño cada vez que respire! Pero cuando haga algo positivo, hágale saber que lo notó. Será más probable que lo vuelva a hacer mañana. 5. Sea un buen modelo de conducta. Usted no puede esperar que su niño controle su temperamento si usted le grita a cada coche que circula en la carretera. Su ejemplo es la única y más poderosa manera de enseñarle a su niño lo concerniente al comportamiento apropiado.
Fuente: American Academy of Pediatrics, “Guidance for Effective Discipline,” Pediatrics (American Academy of Pediatrics, www.aap.org).

¿Está ayudando a su niño lento a apresurarse?
Es hora de salir, pero su niño no está listo. Esta es la cuarta mañana de esta CUESTIONARIO semana que ha llegado PARA PADRES tarde. Algunos niños simplemente parecen tener una sola velocidad—despacio. Pero hay formas en que los padres pueden ayudar a estos niños a aprender a “moverse.” ¿Está haciendo todo lo que puede para hacer que su niño salga a tiempo a la puerta? Conteste sí o no a las siguientes preguntas para averiguarlo: __1. ¿Se acuesta temprano su niño, de modo que sea más fácil levantarse? __2. ¿Dedica tiempo en la noche para preparar la ropa y empacar las mochilas? __3. ¿Sabe su niño, paso a paso, lo que tiene que hacer para alistarse en la mañana? __4. ¿Le avisa a su niño con “dos minutos de anticipación” para facilitar las transiciones? __5. ¿Incluye tiempo extra en su horario? ¿Cuán bien le está yendo? Cada respuesta de sí significa que está ayudando a su niño lento a apurarse. Para cada respuesta de no, pruebe la idea correspondiente del cuestionario.
Escuela Primaria
TM

“Donde los padres hacen demasiado por sus niños, los niños no harán mucho por ellos mismos.”
—Elbert Hubbard

Exponga a su estudiante de primaria a otros países y culturas
Los niños a menudo saben muy poco acerca de otros países. Aquí tiene algunas REFORZANDO EL maneras de exponer a su APRENDIZAJE niño a otras culturas: • Aprendan lo concerniente a las costumbres festivas de la gente en todo el mundo. Use la biblioteca para descubrir cómo otras personas celebran su propios días especiales. • Busquen juegos, películas o funciones de títeres que se traten de gente de otros países. Muchas bibliotecas y museos presentan estos programas de manera gratuita. • Comparen las monedas y las estampillas de otros países. Con frecuencia éstas incluyen información sobre el país. Usted puede encontrar estampillas de otros países en el lugar donde trabaja. También puede buscarlas en la Internet. • Aprendan palabras sencillas en diferentes idiomas. Enseñe a su niño a contar hasta 10 en otro idioma. Aprenda frases sencillas tales como, “Hola,” y “Gracias.” • Localicen programas de televisión sobre otros países. Cuando estén viendo las noticias, procure tener un globo terráqueo cerca para aprender más sobre los países que mencionan las noticias.

¡hacen la diferencia!
Ideas prácticas para que los padres ayuden a sus hijos. ISSN: 1523-2379 1523-1313 Para obtener información llame o escribe a: The Parent Institute®, 1-800-756-5525, P.O. Box 7474, Fairfax Station, VA 22039-7474. Fax: 1-800-216-3667. O visite: www.parent-institute.com. Publicada mensualmente de septiembre a mayo por The Parent Institute®, una división de NIS, Inc., una agencia independiente y privada. Empleador con igualdad de oportunidad. Copyright © 2009 NIS, Inc. Editor: John H. Wherry, Ed.D. Redactora: Rebecca Miyares. Escritores: Susan O’Brien y Kris Amundson. Directora de Traducciones: Michelle Beal-García. Ilustraciones: Joe Mignella. Traductoras: Kelly Maldonado y Dolores Quintela.

2 • Escuela Primaria • Los Padres ¡hacen la diferencia! • Diciembre 2009

X02583434

www.parent-institute.com

Copyright © 2009, The Parent Institute®

Haga que la seguridad en línea sea una prioridad para su familia
Los niños usan las computadoras para hacer la tarea, para divertirse y COMPUTADORA para socializar, pero la conE INTERNET veniencia tiene un costo. Las familias deben fomentar la seguridad de la computadora y de la Internet. Menos mal, que NetSmartz, un recurso de seguridad en línea, comparte consejos con los padres y los niños: • Mantenga la computadora en un lugar central, como en la sala de la familia, donde puede vigilar las actividades de su niño. • Considere instalar programas que hagan que el uso de la computadora sea más seguro. Supervise también las características de seguridad de su proveedor de servicio de la Internet. • Aprenda lo concerniente a seguridad de la Internet. Después hable con su niño sobre las reglas básicas y péguelas cerca de la computadora. (Vea ejemplos en www.netsmartz. org/resources/pledge.htm). • Proteja la información personal, como el nombre y la edad. Hable de porqué no debe compartirse en • línea. Nunca acepte conocer en persona a “amigos” o a personas que sólo conoce en línea. No responda a mensajes inapropiados. En lugar de eso, apague el monitor y coménteselo a un adulto. También notifíqueselo a las autoridades encargadas de imponer el cumplimiento de la ley (Visitar CyberTipline.com puede ayudar.) Vayan en línea juntos. Deje que su niño le muestre sus habilidades en la computadora y sus sitios favoritos. Guíelo hacia recursos apropiados. Siga la pista a las actividades de en línea de su niño. ¿Con quién intercambia correos electrónicos o chatea? ¿Qué clase de juegos juega? ¿Qué sitios usa? Supervise cuidadosamente y lleve la cuenta del uso de en línea a su nombre. Recuerde que su niño puede ir en línea en otros lugares, como en casa de un amigo. Tome medidas para garantizar que haya seguridad no importe dónde use la Intenet.

P: Mi hijo tiene verdaderos problemas para escribir sus pensamientos. Parece que necesita mucho más tiempo que otros estudiantes para escribir las palabras de una página. También tiene problemas para deletrear. Ahora que está en quinto grado, le asignan muchas más tareas de escritura. ¿Cómo puedo ayudarlo?

Preguntas y respuestas
R: Escribir no es algo que se les da de manera natural a todos los niños. Y algunos, como su hijo, parece que enfrentan desafíos especiales. Aún más, como usted lo señala correctamente, escribir es esencial para tener éxito en la escuela. Usted necesita reunirse con la maestra de su niño para hablar de sus preocupaciones. Pregúntele cómo pueden trabajar ambas en este problema. Hay algunas cosas que puede hacer para ayudar a su hijo cuando tenga que hacer una tarea de escritura en casa. Para comenzar: • Enfatice la importancia de planear. Antes que su hijo tome un lápiz, debe pensar con cuidado sobre qué quiere escribir. Puede plantear y anotar ideas—o hacer una grabación de lo que quiere decir. • Deje que su niño use una computadora. Enséñele como mecanografiar (hay bastantes programas que lo ayudarán). Podrá escribir más rápido, de modo que estará menos frustrado. Necesitará usar una computadora en la escuela intermedia y en la preparatoria de todos modos—usted puede ayudarlo a adelantarse. • Ayude a su niño a practicar su letra en casa. Siempre va a necesitar escribir algunas cosas a mano. Escribir es una habilidad, e igualmente como otras habilidades, mejora con la práctica.
—Kristen Amundson The Parent Institute

Fuente: “Safety Tips, “NetSmartz, www.netsmartz.org/ safety/safetytips.htm.

Refuerce las destrezas de escritura con el juego ‘junte oraciones’
¿Planean viajar durante las vacaciones escolares? Aquí tiene un juego diverFOMENTANDO tido que puede realizar en LA ESCRITURA el auto que agudizará las destrezas de escritura de sus niños. También los ayudará a llegar a ser mejores observadores. Aquí tiene cómo jugar: 1. Establezca un tiempo límite— digamos, uno o dos minutos. 2. Deje que sus niños “junten” todas las palabras que vean en el tiempo que usted les concedió. Pueden incluir los nombres de cosas que ven, como “hamburguesa” o “teléfono.” Pueden escribir descripciones de cosas que ven (“azul” para el cielo
X02583434

o “caliente” para las papas fritas). También pueden buscar palabras reales en las señales. 3. Comience el reto. Cuando termine el tiempo límite, sus niños deben usar las palabras que hayan juntado para crear tantas oraciones como puedan. Las oraciones pueden ser chistosas o serias. Usted podría trabajar con los niños más pequeños, o dividirlos en equipos. 4. Vean cuántas oraciones pueden escribir. La próxima vez, vean si pueden romper su propio récord.
Fuente: “Collect a Sentence,” FamilyEducation.com, http://fun.familyeducation.com/word-games/ travel-games/57461.html.

Diciembre 2009 • Escuela Primaria • Los Padres ¡hacen la diferencia! • 3

Copyright © 2009, The Parent Institute®

www.parent-institute.com

Enfoque: Inculcando valores positivos
Ayude a su niño a perseverar fijando metas
Encarar los retos de la vida—desde aprender hasta montar una bicicleta hasta terminar un VALORES POSITIVOS proyecto grande— requiere perseverancia, y los niños necesitan bastante ayuda para desarrollar este rasgo. Para fomentar la perseverancia de su niño: • Básese en el pasado. Recuérdele a su niño las veces en las que tuvo éxito a través del trabajo duro. Hable de cuán bien se sintió y cómo puede hacerlo de nuevo. • Establezca una meta pequeña. Escoja algo que su niño pueda realizar y disfrutar, como caminar una milla con usted. Esto fomenta la confianza. • Pídale su aportación. ¿Qué más le gustaría lograr a su niño? El hecho de querer alcanzar la meta lo motivará. • Sea honesto. Asegúrese de que su niño escoja una meta realista, pero explíquele que lograrla no será fácil. Un buen plan ayudará. • Haga un plan. Escriba pasos específicos y fechas límites. Ayude a su niño a dividir su meta en partes pequeñas, razonables. • Sea un animador. Halague el progreso, tanto a lo largo del camino como al final. No se valga de premios ni castigos. • Aprenda de la experiencia. Aun cuando su niño no cumpla su objetivo, ¡manténgase positivo! Enorgullézcase de su esfuerzo. Hablen de lo que él podría hacer diferente la próxima vez y prevean el éxito.
Fuente: Marie Faust Evitt, “How to Teach Kids Perseverance and Goal-Setting,” Parents.com, www.parents.com/ family-life/better-parenting/parenting-style/how-toteach-kids-perseverance-goal-setting/?page=1.

Anime a su niño de primaria a ser honesto en situaciones difíciles
as investigaciones muestran que para cuando los niños llegan a la escuela primaria, la mayoría de ellos ya sabe la diferencia que existe entre honestidad y mentir. ¡Pero eso no hace que decir la verdad sea fácil! Para fomentar la honestidad: • Sea un modelo de conducta. Los niños son buenos “detectores de mentiras.” Se dan cuenta cuando los padres dicen la verdad—y cuando no la dicen. • Recompense la honestidad. Si su niño es sincero ante una situación difícil, ¡felicítelo! • Reaccione con calma. Cuando su niño mienta, no lo catalogue como un “mentiroso.” Exprésele su confianza en que tomará mejores decisiones en el futuro. • Hable de la honestidad. ¿Por qué es importante ser honesto? Note los ejemplos de honestidad y

L

deshonestidad—y sus efectos. • Cree oportunidades para decir la verdad. Dígale, “Rompiste mi florero,” en lugar de, “¿Hiciste esto?” Es mejor decir lo que sucedió en lugar de hacer preguntas innecesarias.
Fuente: Karen Stephens, “Lying, Fibs, and Tall-Tales: Teaching Children to Be Truthful,” mysmallwonders, www.mysmallwonders.com/resources/pdf/LYING01 PELibrary.pdf.

Enseñe a su escolar de primaria a expresar el enojo con respeto
Es difícil estar enojado y ser respetuoso al mismo tiempo. Pero expresar el enojo con respeto es RESPETO esencial. Usted y su niño pueden controlar sus reacciones si: • Enlistan las cosas que provocan el enojo. Piensen en lo que más hace que se enojen. ¿Qué no lo obedezcan? ¿Qué le digan lo que tienen que hacer? Comprométanse a reaccionar con tranquilidad ante estas situaciones. • Identifican “las señales rojas.” Comiencen por notar cómo es el enojo para ustedes. ¿Hace que sientan calor? ¿Hace que quieran gritar? Estas son señales importantes de advertencia. • Piensan. Cuando sientan enojo, pregúntense a sí mismos, “¿Qué me hizo enojar?” “¿Qué más sentí?” El enojo puede ser en realidad una desilusión o vergüenza. • Deje a un lado la fuente. De ser posible, aléjense de lo que les está frustrando y traten de t ranquilizarse. • Tomen buenas decisiones. Hay muchas maneras respetuosas de liberar el enojo. Escriban en un diario, pinten un cuadro o ejercítense. Cuando estén enojados con una persona, esperen hasta que estén tranquilos para hablar.
Fuente: Elizabeth Verdick y Marjorie Lisovskis, How to take the Grrrr Out of Anger, ISBN: 1-57542-117-8 (Free Spirit Publishing, www.freespirit.com).
X02583434

4 • Escuela Primaria • Los Padres ¡hacen la diferencia! • Diciembre 2009

January 2010 Vol. 21, No. 5

®

Local District 4, LAUSD Byron J. Maltez, Interim Superintendent

make the di erence!
Teach your child the important skill of pacing
Your child can’t be successful on a test A. if she only finishes B. a few questions. TESTING TIPS Teaching your child how to pace herself can help. Tests require a good sense of timing. If your child goes too quickly, she’s likely to make careless mistakes. If she goes too slowly, she won’t finish in time. To help your child: • Talk about activities in which pacing is important. A 30-minute TV show can’t last 27 minutes (or 33 minutes). If a child gets to the bus a minute late, she has still missed it! • Have your child try to guess how long her homework will take her. At first, you might need to help. “Do you really think you could do 15 math problems in five minutes?” See how close her estimate is to the time it really takes. • Help your child work more quickly. If making her bed takes five minutes, could she try to do it in four?
C. D.
Source: Guinevere Durham, Teaching Test-Taking Skills: Proven Techniques to Boost Your Student’s Scores, ISBN: 9781-5788-6572-7 (Rowman & Littlefield Education, www.rowmaneducation.com).

Y

Kids can’t grow up responsibly if parents don’t show them how
ou probably know some people who’ve never quite grown up. They may have jobs, but never seem to be able to live on their own. One reason may be that they didn’t learn how to take on the responsibilities of adult life. Their parents may not have taught them the skills they need—to balance a budget or to take care of basic life skills like cooking or doing laundry. If you want your child to grow up and live as an independent adult, you need to start teaching him those skills today. Here are some ways you can help your child develop the habits that will get him ready for adult life: • Expect him to get himself up in the morning. Even a first grader can learn to wake up to an alarm. • Teach him to care for his own clothes. Young children can put
X02583434

clothes in the laundry basket. They can fold their own clothes and put them away. Older kids can learn how to do laundry. • Help him manage money. Whether it’s an allowance or payment for extra chores, teach your child the value of saving. • Enlist his help. Every family member should do something that helps out the family. Young children can set the table. Older kids can learn how to prepare a simple meal. When they do these things, thank them for making your home run more smoothly. • Volunteer. Make time for your family to volunteer together. Doing something for others builds responsibility.
Source: William Damon, The Path to Purpose: Helping Our Children Find Their Calling in Life, ISBN: 9781-4165-3723-6 (Free Press, www.simonandschuster.net).

Copyright © 2010, The Parent Institute®

www.parent-institute.com

Practical ideas for parents to help their children

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz1234567890!@#$%^&*()-=+~`'",.<>/?[]{}\|ÁÉÍÓÚáéíñú¿

Copyright © 2010, The Parent Institute®

www.parent-institute.com

Too much screen time can equal too little play time for your child
Kids spend too much time in front of a TV or a computer and too little time in active play. SCREEN TIME According to a recent scientific study, this is leading to an increase in childhood obesity. More than 70 percent of 10-year-olds spend over two hours a day watching TV or playing on a computer. That means they don’t have much time for active play. You can probably figure out the result. Far too many children today are struggling with obesity. By age 11, one in five children is considered obese. Over their lives, these kids will face many more health problems. They are more likely to contract diseases like diabetes. What can you do? Here are some suggestions: • Limit time watching TV and on the computer. If your child has a cell phone, time spent texting is also considered screen time. • Build in time for active play. Doctors recommend 60 minutes a day. Go to a park and play together! • Add exercise time to screen time. Keep weights or an exercise mat nearby. During commercials, challenge your child to do sit-ups or a few jumping jacks.
Source: Sarah E. Anderson, Christina D. Economos and Aviva Must, “Active Play and Screen Time in US Children Aged 4 to 11 years in Relation to Sociodemographic and Weight Status Characteristics: A Nationally Representative Cross-sectional Analysis,” Biomed Central, www.biomedcentral.com/ 1471-2458/8/366.

Do you know how well your child is doing in school?
The school year is about at the midway point. Do you have a good idea PARENT of how well your child is QUIZ doing? Do you know where problems could occur (or perhaps already exist)? Answer yes or no to each question below to find out: ___1. Do you talk to your child about the graded tests and projects he brings home? ___2. Do you ask your child why he thinks he received certain grades (good and bad ones) and what he has learned? ___3. Have you contacted your child’s teacher to learn more about subjects he has problems with? ___4. Do you check your child’s report card when it comes home, paying close attention to conduct and behavior grades? ___5. Do you review the results of state tests with your child’s teacher? How well are you doing? Each yes means you are keeping up with your child’s progress in school. For each no answer, try that idea in the quiz.

“Live so that when your children think of fairness and integrity, they think of you.”
—H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

What can you do to make sure your child is listening to you?
You’ve talked and talked. But you feel like a television set with the volume TALKING AND turned down—your child LISTENING just isn’t listening. Nothing is so frustrating to parents. But there are things you can do to make sure your child listens when you have something important to say. To get your child to listen, try these two strategies: 1. Make eye contact. If your child’s eyes are on the TV set, her brain is there, too. So calmly say, “Peyton, I need to say something to you.
X02583434

Could you look at me, please?” Remember: If you shout, “Look at me when I’m talking to you,” your child is likely to just tune you out! 2. Remember that less is sometimes more. Keep your instructions short and simple. It’s best to give no more than two steps at a time. “Please pick up the books and put them on the shelf.” Any more than that and your child is likely to forget what you’ve asked.
Source: Stanley Turecki and Leslie Tonner, The Difficult Child, ISBN: 0-553-38036-2 (Bantam Books, a Division of Random House, www.randomhouse.com/bantamdell).

®

make the di erence!
Practical Ideas for Parents to Help Their 1523-1275 Children. ISSN: 1046-0446 For subscription information call or write: The Parent Institute®, 1-800-756-5525, P.O. Box 7474, Fairfax Station, VA 22039-7474. Fax: 1-800-216-3667. Or visit our website: www.parent-institute.com. Published monthly September through May by The Parent Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc., an independent, private agency. Equal opportunity employer. Copyright © 2010 NIS, Inc. Publisher: John H. Wherry, Ed.D. Editor: Rebecca Miyares. Writers: Kristen Amundson & Susan O’Brien. Illustrator: Joe Mignella.

2 • Elementary • Parents make the difference! • January 2010

www.parent-institute.com

Copyright © 2010, The Parent Institute®

Make thinking irresistible to your child with a few fun games
Ask your child if he wants to improve his thinking skills, and the answer will DEVELOPING probably be “No way!” THINKING But ask if he wants to SKILLS play games, and the answer will probably be “Yes!” By planning creative games, you can have fun and build thinking skills too. For example: • Discuss the day—with a twist. At dinnertime, suggest that your child describe three things about his day. The twist is that one of them must be pretend, and other players have to guess which it is. Encourage your child to include plenty of details. A parent or older sibling can help your child prepare if needed. • Gather your family or a group of friends in a circle. Tell a story, letting each person add one word at a time. If someone isn’t sure what to say, he can say, “Pass.” To make the game more challenging, ring a bell after nouns and adjectives. See if the group can name synonyms for them (words with similar meanings). Happy might become cheerful, chipper or joyful. Vote for your favorites and use them in the story. • Take a few moments to write down the plot after watching a TV show or movie. Then read your summary aloud, leaving blanks for your child to fill in. “The plane landed in _______, where the passengers saw _______.” Accept any answers that make sense. In fact, compliment your child for being able to provide several answers for one space! If the game is too hard, ask “multiple choice” questions your child is likely to get right.
Source: Paula Iley, Using Literacy to Develop Thinking Skills with Children Aged 5-7, ISBN-13: 978-1843122821 (David Fulton, www.routledgeteachers.com).

Q: Lately, my son has been telling
me he hates school. It doesn’t happen every day, but it has happened more than once. I’m not sure how to respond—he has to go to school, after all. How can I sort out what’s truth and what’s exaggeration? And how can I help him without taking over his life?

Questions & Answers
A: Your questions are wise. Not
all kids who say they hate school actually do. Sometimes, they’re just looking for attention (or for a chance to put off homework). And not all parents who get involved with their child’s school issues end up making things better. Still, if he’s said this more than once, there’s probably something going on. Here’s what to do: 1. Talk to your child. Wait for a time when he’s relatively calm and when you have time to talk. Then ask him what’s going on. “You’ve said you hate school a couple times. What’s making you feel this way?” 2. Identify the problem. Listen closely to what your child says. Does he hate math class? Are kids mean to him on the bus? Is he feeling overwhelmed because he’s in too many activities? 3. Help your child find solutions. For example, if he’s struggling in a class, ask the teacher for advice. Does he need to spend more time on the subject? Is he turning in homework? 4. Be positive. Help your child see that nearly every situation has positives and negatives. Then help him build on the positives and minimize the negatives. —Holly Smith, The Parent Institute

Help your elementary schooler build strong observation skills
One thing that sets scientists apart is their skill as observers. Scientists REINFORCING notice and remember LEARNING details. Here’s a fun way to help your child develop this trait. Ask your child to describe the front of a building she knows well. It could be your house, your apartment building or the school. Just choose a building that she sees regularly. Have her be as accurate as she can. How many stories high is the building? What color is the front door? How many windows are there? Are the window frames painted a different color? Write down what she thinks she remembers. Then take a trip. Walk outside to look at the front of your house. Walk down the street to see the school. Check the reality against the details your child remembered. What observations were correct? Which details did she miss? You can turn this into a game when you’re out for a walk. Say, “How many windows were in the front of Mr. Johnson’s house?” See if your child can remember without looking.
Source: Sally Berman, Thinking Strategies for Science: Grades 5-12, ISBN: 9781-4129-6288-9 (Corwin Press, a SAGE Publications Company, www.corwinpress.com).

X02583434

January 2010 • Elementary • Parents make the difference! • 3

Copyright © 2010, The Parent Institute®

www.parent-institute.com

It Matters: Attendance
Does my child’s attendance really matter?
“Does it really matter if my child misses school?” parents ATTENDANCE wonder. “Yes!” say MATTERS experts. Research shows that regular attendance is linked to current and future school success. When kids miss too much school, they miss more than daily lessons. They miss the chance to build social and academic foundations that help with future learning. To minimize attendance issues: • Remember that excused and unexcused absences take a toll on learning. Keep track of how often your child is absent or tardy. In general, if a child is out of school 10% or more of the year, absences are considered particularly serious. • Keep the school calendar handy when making plans. Schedule appointments and trips when school isn’t in session. If your child needs to miss school, talk with the teacher. • Tell school officials about problems that lead to absences. Many families face challenges with health, transportation, child care and other issues. Community programs may be able to help. • Avoid unnecessary absences by establishing family routines that make life easier. Small changes, such as organizing school supplies at night and getting enough sleep, can make a big difference.
Source: Hedy N. Chang and Mariajosé Romero, “Present, Engaged, and Accounted For: The Critical Importance of Addressing Chronic Absence in the Early Grades,” National Center for Children in Poverty, www.nccp.org/publications/ pub_837.html.
X02583434

Your family’s good habits lead to your child’s good attendance

K

ids are tardy for all kinds of reasons, such as missing the bus, oversleeping and being unable to find something important. Some tardies are unavoidable, of course. But others are easily prevented with daily habits, such as: • Study routines. Do homework at the same time, and in the same place, each day. Have your child double-check her schoolbag for anything you need to read or sign. When study time is over, pack the bag and put it by the front door. • Nighttime routines. Stick to a regular bedtime each night. Kids might brush teeth, find the next day’s outfit and put on pajamas, while parents pack lunches, set alarm clocks and tuck in kids. Any late-evening activities should be relaxing, such as listening to music or reading.

• Morning routines. Post a checklist of responsibilities, such as getting dressed, having breakfast and brushing teeth. Parents must stay on schedule, too, so their work (making breakfast, driving to school, etc.) supports their child’s success.

Help your child stay healthy this winter to avoid missing school
Scientists estimate that up to 80% of infections are spread by hands. That means a simple WELLNESS step—hand washing— is the top way to stay well and avoid staying home sick. Share these tips with your child: • Wash properly. Wet hands, lather with soap and wash for 20 seconds. It takes about this long to sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice. • Include all parts of the hands— front, back, fingernails, between fingers, etc. To stay clean, use a fresh paper towel to turn off the faucet and open the bathroom door. • Wash hands often, especially before eating. Soap and water work best. If they aren’t available, use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. • Sneeze or cough into your elbow instead of your hand to reduce the spread of germs to others.
Source: “Put Your Hands Together,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov/CDCTV/Hands Together/Transcripts/HandsTogether.pdf.

4 • Elementary • Parents make the difference! • January 2010

Escuela Primaria

Enero 2010 Vol. 21, No. 5

TM

Local District 4, LAUSD Byron J. Maltez, Interim Superintendent

¡hacen la diferencia!
Enseñe a su niño la habilidad de organizar el tiempo
Su niño no puede salir bien en un examen si solamente contesta CONSEJOS PARA unas cuantas preguntas. LAS PRUEBAS Enseñar a su niño a controlar el tiempo puede ayudar. Los exámenes requieren un buen sentido de controlar el tiempo. Si su niño va muy rápido, es probable que cometa errores por descuido. Si va muy despacio, seguramente no terminará a tiempo. Para ayudar a su niño: • Hable de las actividades en las que controlar el tiempo es importante. Un programa de televisión de 30 minutos no puede durar 27 minutos (o 33 minutos). Si un niño llega a tomar el autobús un minuto tarde, ¡seguro que lo habrá perdido! • Haga que su niño piense en cuánto tiempo le tomará hacer su tarea. Al principio, usted podría necesitar ayudar. “¿Piensas realmente que podrías resolver 15 problemas de matemáticas en cinco minutos?” Vea cuán cerca está su cálculo respecto al tiempo que realmente le toma hacerlo. • Ayude a su niño a trabajar con mayor rapidez. Si tender su cama le lleva cinco minutos, ¿podría tratar de hacerlo en cuatro?

A. B.

C. D.

Los padres deben de fomentar la responsabilidad en el hogar
sted probablemente conoce a algunas personas que nunca se han desarrollado totalmente. Tal vez tengan empleos, pero parece que nunca son capaces de valerse por sí mismas. Una razón puede ser que no aprendieron a asumir las responsabilidades de la vida de adultos. Tal vez sus padres no les enseñaron las habilidades que necesitan—para ajustarse a un presupuesto o para encargarse de las habilidades básicas de la vida como cocinar o lavar la ropa. Si quiere que su niño se desarrolle y viva como un adulto independiente, comience por enseñarle esas habilidades hoy mismo. Aquí tiene algunas maneras como puede ayudar a su niño a desarrollar hábitos que lo prepararán para la vida de adulto: • Espere que se levante sólo en la mañana. Incluso un escolar de primer grado puede aprender a despertar con un despertador. • Enséñele a hacerse cargo de su ropa. Los niños pequeños pueden
X02583434

U

poner la ropa sucia en un cesto. Pueden doblar su ropa y guardarla. Los niños de mayor edad pueden aprender lavar la ropa sucia. • Ayúdelo a administrar el dinero. Ya sea que se trate de una mesada o un pago por tareas domésticas adicionales, enséñele a su niño el valor de ahorrar. • Pida su ayuda. Cada miembro de la familia debe hacer algo que ayude a toda la familia. Los niños pequeños pueden poner la mesa. Los niños mayores pueden aprender cómo preparar una comida sencilla. Cuando hagan estas cosas, déles las gracias por hacer que su casa funcione mejor. • Ofrezca sus servicios. Haga tiempo para su familia para que todos ofrezcan sus servicios juntos. Hacer algo para otros fomenta la responsabilidad.
Fuente: William Damon, The Path to Purpose: Helping Our Children Find Their Calling in Life, ISBN: 9781-4165-3723-6 (Free Press, www.simonandschuster.net).

Fuente: Guinevere Durham, Teaching Test-Taking Skills: Proven Techniques to Boost Your Student´s Scores, ISBN: 9781-5788-6572-7 (Rowman & Littlefield Education, www.rowmaneducation.com).

Copyright © 2010, The Parent Institute®

www.parent-institute.com

Ideas prácticas para que los padres ayuden a sus hijos

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz1234567890!@#$%^&*()-=+~`'",.<>/?[]{}\|ÁÉÍÓÚáéíñú¿

Copyright © 2010, The Parent Institute®

www.parent-institute.com

El tiempo frente a la pantalla puede reducir el tiempo de juego
Los niños pasan mucho tiempo frente a una televisión o una computaTIEMPO DE dora y muy poco tiempo PANTALLA en un juego activo. Según un estudio científico reciente, esto está contribuyendo a un aumento en la obesidad infantil. Más del 70 por ciento de los niños de 10 años pasan más de dos horas al día viendo tele o jugando en una computadora. Eso significa que no disponen de mucho tiempo para jugar. Usted probablemente se imaginará el resultado. Muchísimos niños están pasando apuros con la obesidad hoy en día. A los 11 años, uno de cada cinco niños está considerado como obeso. Durante el transcurso de sus vidas, estos niños se enfrentarán a muchos más problemas de salud. Es más probable que contraigan enfermedades como la diabetes. ¿Qué puede hacer usted? Aquí tiene algunas sugerencias: • Limite el tiempo de ver televisión y de estar en la computadora. Si su niño tiene un teléfono celular, el tiempo que pasa enviando mensajes de texto también se considera como tiempo de pantalla. • Incorpore tiempo para el juego activo. Los doctores recomiendan 60 minutos al día. ¡Vayan a un parque y jueguen juntos! • Agregue tiempo para ejercitarse al tiempo de pantalla. Procure tener pesas o un tapete para ejercitarse a la mano. Durante los comerciales, rete a su niño a hacer abdominales o a dar unos cuantos saltos.
Fuente: Sarah E. Anderson, Christina D. Economos y Aviva Must, “Active Play and Screen Time in US Children Aged 4 to 11 years in Relation to Sociodemographic and Weight Status Characteristics: A Nationally Representative Cross-sectional Analysis,” Biomed Central, www.biomedcentral.com/ 1471-2458/8/366.

¿Sabe cuán bien le está yendo a su niño en la escuela?
El año escolar está casi a la mitad. ¿Tiene una buena idea de cuán bien CUESTIONARIO le está yendo a su niño? PARA PADRES ¿Sabe dónde podrían presentarse problemas (¿o dónde tal vez ya existen)? Conteste sí o no a cada pregunta de abajo para averiguarlo: ___1. ¿Habla con su niño respecto a los exámenes calificados y de los proyectos que trae a casa? ___2. ¿Le pregunta a su niño porqué piensa que obtuvo ciertas calificaciones (las buenas y las malas) y qué ha aprendido? ___3. ¿Ha contactado al maestro de su niño para saber más respecto a las materias que se le dificultan? ___4. ¿Revisa la boleta de calificaciones de su niño cuando llega a casa, poniendo especial atención en a las calificaciones de conducta y comportamiento? ___5. ¿Revisa los resultados de los exámenes estatales con el maestro de su niño? ¿Cuán bien le está yendo? Cada respuesta de sí significa que se mantiene al tanto del progreso de su niño en la escuela. Para cada respuesta de no, pruebe la idea correspondiente.
Escuela Primaria

“Viva para que cuando sus niños piensen en imparcialidad e integridad, piensen en usted.”
—H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

¿Qué puede hacer para asegurarse de que su estudiante lo escuche?
Usted ha hablado y hablado. Pero usted se siente como si fuera un HABLANDO Y televisor con el volumen ESCUCHANDO bajado—su niño simplemente no le está escuchando. Nada es tan frustrante para los padres. Pero hay cosas que puede hacer para asegurarse de que su niño escuche cuando usted tiene algo importante que decir. Para hacer que su niño escuche, pruebe estas dos estrategias: 1. Haga contacto visual. Si los ojos de su niño están solamente dirigidos hacia el televisor, su cerebro también está ahí. Así es con tranquilidad dígale, “Peyton, necesito decirte algo. ¿Podrías verme, por favor?” Recuerde que si usted grita, “Veme cuando te esté hablando,” ¡es probable que su niño simplemente le ignore! 2. Recuerde que menos es algunas veces más. Procure seguir dando sus instrucciones cortas y sencillas. Es mejor no dar más de dos pasos a la vez. “Por favor levanta los libros y ponlos en el anaquel.” Agregar más que eso y su niño probablemente olvide lo que usted le ha pedido.
Fuente: Stanley Turecki y Leslie Tonner, The Difficult Child, ISBN: 0-553-38036-2 (Bantam Books, a Division of Random House, www.randomhouse.com/bantamdell).

TM

¡hacen la diferencia!
Ideas prácticas para que los padres ayuden a sus hijos. ISSN: 1523-2379 1523-1313 Para obtener información llame o escribe a: The Parent Institute®, 1-800-756-5525, P.O. Box 7474, Fairfax Station, VA 22039-7474. Fax: 1-800-216-3667. O visite: www.parent-institute.com. Publicada mensualmente de septiembre a mayo por The Parent Institute®, una división de NIS, Inc., una agencia independiente y privada. Empleador con igualdad de oportunidad. Copyright © 2010 NIS, Inc. Editor: John H. Wherry, Ed.D. Redactora: Rebecca Miyares. Escritores: Susan O’Brien y Kris Amundson. Directora de Traducciones: Michelle Beal-García. Ilustraciones: Joe Mignella. Traductoras: Kelly Maldonado y Dolores Quintela.

2 • Escuela Primaria • Los Padres ¡hacen la diferencia! • Enero 2010

X02583434

www.parent-institute.com

Copyright © 2010, The Parent Institute®

Haga que pensar sea irresistible para su niño con estos juegos
Pregúntele a su niño si quiere mejorar sus destrezas analíticas y la DESTREZAS respuesta probablemente ANALÍTICAS será “¡De ninguna manera!” Pero pregúntele si quiere jugar juegos, y la respuesta probablemente será “¡Sí!” Planeando juegos creativos, ustedes pueden divertirse y desarrollar destrezas analíticas también. Por ejemplo: • Hable del día—con un giro. A la hora de la comida, sugiera que su niño describa tres cosas respecto a su día. El giro es que una de las cosas tiene que ser de fantasía y los otros jugadores tienen que adivinar cuál es. Anime a su niño a incluir bastantes detalles. Un padre o hermano mayor puede ayudar a su niño si es necesario. • Reúna a su familia o a un grupo de amigos en un círculo. Relate una historia, permitiendo que cada persona agregue una palabra a la vez. Si alguien no está seguro de qué va a decir, puede decir, “Paso.” Para hacer el juego más desafiante, toque un timbre después de los nombres y adjetivos. Vea si el grupo puede mencionar sinónimos de ellos (palabras con significados similares). Contento puede convertirse en jovial, alegre o feliz. Voten por sus favoritos y utilícenlos en la historia. • Tómese unos minutos para escribir el argumento después de ver un programa de televisión o una película. Después lea su resumen en voz alta, dejando espacios para que su niño los llene. “El avión aterrizó en __________, donde los pasajeros vieron__________.” Acepte cualquier respuesta que tenga sentido. De hecho, ¡felicite a su niño por poder aportar varias respuestas para un espacio! Si el juego resulta muy difícil, haga preguntas de opción múltiple que su niño tenga más posibilidad de contestar correctamente.
Fuente: Paula Iley, Using Literacy to Develop Thinking Skills with Children Aged 5-7, ISBN-13: 978-1843122821 (David Fulton, www.routledgeteachers.com).

P: Últimamente, mi hijo me ha
estado diciendo que detesta la escuela. Esto no sucede todos los días, pero ha sucedido más de una vez. No estoy segura cómo responder—después de todo, tiene que ir a la escuela. ¿Cómo puedo descubrir qué es verdad y qué es una exageración? ¿Y cómo puedo ayudarlo sin dominar su vida?

Preguntas y respuestas
R: Sus preguntas son sensatas. No todos los niños que dicen que detestan la escuela realmente lo hacen. Algunas veces sólo están buscando atención (o una oportunidad para postergar la tarea). Y no todos los padres que se involucran con los problemas de la escuela terminan haciendo que las cosas mejoren. No obstante, si ha dicho esto más de una vez, probablemente algo esté sucediendo. Aquí tiene lo que puede hacer: 1. Hable con su niño. Espere una ocasión cuando esté relativamente tranquilo y cuando tenga tiempo para hablar con él. Después pregúntele qué esta sucediendo. “Has dicho que detestas la escuela un par de veces. ¿Qué está haciendo que te sientas de esta manera?” 2. Identifique el problema. Escuche atentamente lo que dice su niño. ¿Detesta la clase de matemáticas? ¿Son malos los otros niños con él en el autobús? ¿Se está sintiendo abrumado porque está participando en muchas actividades? 3. Ayude a su niño a encontrar soluciones. Por ejemplo, si está pasando apuros en una clase, pídale consejos al maestro. ¿Necesita dedicarle más tiempo a la materia? ¿Está entregando la tarea? 4. Sea positiva. Ayude a su niño a entender que casi toda situación tiene aspectos positivos y negativos. Después ayúdelo a enfatizar más en los aspectos positivos y minimizar los negativos.
—Holly Smith The Parent Institute

Ayude a su escolar a desarrollar destrezas de observación sólidas
Una cosa que distingue a los científicos es su habilidad como observadores REFORZANDO EL Los científicos observan y APRENDIZAJE recuerdan los detalles. Aquí tiene una manera divertida de ayudar a su niño a desarrollar esta característica. Pídale a su niño que describa el frente de un edificio que conoce bien. Podría ser su casa, su edificio o la escuela. Simplemente que escoja un edificio que ve con regularidad. Haga que sea tan precisa como sea posible. ¿De cuántos pisos de alto es el edificio? ¿De qué color es la puerta principal? ¿Cuántas ventanas hay? ¿Están pintados de un color diferente
X02583434

los marcos de las ventanas? Escriba lo que él cree que recuerda. Después hagan un viaje. Caminen afuera para ver el frente de su casa. Bajen a pie a la calle para ver la escuela. Revise la realidad contra los detalles que su niño recordó. ¿Qué observaciones estuvieron correctas? ¿Cuáles detalles le faltaron? Usted puede convertir esto en un juego cuando salgan a dar un paseo. Dígale, “¿Cuántas ventanas habían en el frente de la casa del Sr. Johnson?” Vea si su niño puede recordar sin ver.
Fuente: Sally Berman, Thinking Strategies for Science: Grades 5-12, ISBN: 9781-4129-6288-9 (Corwin Press, a SAGE Publications Company, www.corwinpress.com).

Enero 2010 • Escuela Primaria • Los Padres ¡hacen la diferencia! • 3

Copyright © 2010, The Parent Institute®

www.parent-institute.com

Enfoque: La asistencia
¿Importa realmente la asistencia de su escolar de primaria?
“¿Importa realmente si mi niño falta a la escuela?” se preguntan ASISTENCIA los padres. “¡Sí!” dicen los A CLASES expertos. Los estudios muestran que la asistencia regular está relacionada con el éxito escolar. Cuando los niños faltan mucho, pierden más que las lecciones diarias. Pierden la oportunidad de desarrollar fundamentos sociales y académicos que coadyuvan con el aprendizaje. Para minimizar los problemas de ausencia: • Recuerde que las ausencias justificadas e injustificadas afectan el aprendizaje. Sígale la pista de las ausencias y los retrasos. En general, si un niño falta a la escuela 10% o más del año, las ausencias se consideran particularmente serias. • Mantenga el calendario escolar a la mano cuando esté haciendo planes. Programe las citas y los viajes cuando no haya clases en la escuela. Si su niño necesita faltar a la escuela, hable con el maestro. • Hable con las autoridades de la escuela respecto a los problemas que provocan las ausencias. Muchas familias enfrentan retos con la salud, el transporte, el cuidado de los niños y otros asuntos. Los programas comunitarios pueden servir de ayuda. • Evite las ausencias innecesarias estableciendo rutinas que hagan que la vida sea más fácil. Pequeños cambios, tales como organizar los materiales de la escuela de noche y dormir suficiente, pueden hace una gran diferencia.
Fuente: Hedy N. Chang y Mariajosé Romero, “Present, Engaged, and Accounted For: The Critical Importance of Addressing Chronic Absence in the Early Grades,” National Center for Children in Poverty, www.nccp.org/ publications/pub_387.html.

Los buenos hábitos de la familia conducen a la buena asistencia
os niños llegan tarde por muchas razones, tales como perder el autobús, quedarse dormidos o no poder encontrar algo importante. Algunos retrasos son inevitables, por supuesto. Pero otros se pueden evitar por medio de rutinas tales como: • Rutinas de estudio. Hacer la tarea a la misma hora, y en el mismo lugar, todos los días. Haga que su niño revise dos veces su mochila de la escuela para ver si hay algo que usted tenga que leer o firmar. Cuando termine la hora de estudio, empaque la mochila y póngalo cerca de la puerta principal. • Rutinas de noche. Aténgase a una hora de acostarse habitual. Los niños podrían cepillarse los dientes, preparar la ropa para el día siguiente y ponerse la pijama, mientras los padres empacan los almuerzos, ponen los despertadores y acuestan a los niños.

L

Cualquier actividad que haga en la noche debe ser relajante, como escuchar música o leer. • Rutinas de mañana. Fije una lista de comprobación de responsabilidades, tales como vestirse, desayunar y cepillarse los dientes. Los padres deben ajustarse al horario, para que su trabajo (preparar el desayuno, conducir a la escuela, etc.) apoye el éxito de su niño.

Ayude a su niño a mantenerse sano para evitar las ausencias
Los científicos calculan que más del 80% de las infecciones se propagan BIENESTAR por las manos. Eso indica que haya que tomar una medida sencilla—lavarse las manos— ésta es la manera más importante de mantenerse bien y evitar quedarse enfermo en la casa. Comparta estos consejos con su niño: • Lavarse adecuadamente. Mójese las manos, enjabónese y lávese por 20 segundos. Esto equivale al tiempo que tarda en cantar “Cumpleaños Feliz” dos veces. • Incluir todas las partes de las manos—el frente, atrás, las uñas de los dedos, entre los dedos, etc. Para mantenerlas limpias, use una toalla de papel limpia para cerrar la llave y abrir la puerta de baño. • Lavarse las manos con frecuencia, sobre todo antes de comer. Jabón y agua funcionan mejor. Si no están disponibles, use un desinfectante de manos que contenga por lo menos un 60% de alcohol. • Estornudar o toser en el codo en lugar de usar la mano para reducir la propagación de microbios.
Fuente: “Put Your Hands Together,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov/CDCTV/ HandsTogether/Transcripts/HandsTogether.pdf.
X02583434

4 • Escuela Primaria • Los Padres ¡hacen la diferencia! • Enero 2010

Parent & Child

Activity Calendar
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

®

make the di erence!

Saturday

December
6
Make a TV viewing schedule with your child this week. Use it to plan how you’ll both limit your viewing.

1

Look in the newspaper for a listing of free holiday events. Plan to attend one this month.

2 9

Plan to spend some one-on-one time with each child this month. Write the dates on your calendar. Teach your child how to make paper snowflakes. Fold paper or coffee filters and cut shapes. Decorate your windows with them. Keep track of everything you eat for a day. What changes would you like to make?

3

A rebus is a story that replaces some words with pictures. Make a rebus with your child.

4

Choose a number, then have your child list all the things she can think of that come in that number. This holiday season, do something nice for others as a family.

5

Do holidays have you stressed? Share the responsibility with your child. When he helps, he appreciates them even more. Take your child out for breakfast, or make it together this morning.

7

Plan a week of alphabet dinners— serve foods that start with the same letter. Choose a different letter each day.

8

Today, have your child teach you something she needs to learn for homework. It’s a great way to reinforce learning. When you’re in the car, have your child estimate how far it is to your destination. Check using the odometer. As school vacation approaches, have your child make a list of things to do when there’s nothing to do. Kids bored? Have them take turns as models, holding a pose while the other children draw or paint what they see.

10 17

Trace your child’s body on a big piece of paper. Then have her research and draw the inside! Play a game of “Concentration” with math flash cards. Problems with the same answer (9 x 2, 15 + 3) make a pair.

11

12 19

13

Bake cookies with your child. If you’re doubling a recipe, have your child do the math.

14

Visit the library. Check out a book about holiday traditions around the world. Today is the Winter Solstice. Check the paper to see how many hours of daylight there will be today.

15

16
23

18
25

Plan a late bedtime so everyone can read in bed. Everyone tells what they will be reading before they begin.

Think of something nice your child can do for a neighbor or older friend.

20 27

Set aside time today to work on craft projects with your child. Perhaps she can give these as gifts. Have a “backwards day.” Put on pajamas after you get up. Eat breakfast food for dinner.

21 28

22 29

Watch a TV Read a favorite program with holiday story, your child. Make a poem or religious story graph of the time spent with your child. on commercials vs. the program. Have your child draw a picture of what he thinks describes and defines “December.”

24

Talk with your child about the very best present she ever received. What made it special?

26

Enjoy some outdoor physical activity as a family today.

Visit the library. Check out a biography about someone interesting from another country.

30

31

Help your child create a time line of the last year.

2009
®

© 2009 The Parent Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. May be reproduced only as licensed by Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter. 1-800-756-5525

Parent & Child

Activity Calendar
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

make the di erence!

Saturday

January 2010
3
Encourage your child to start a diary or journal this year.

1 7
On this day in 1782, the first commercial bank was founded. Start a small savings account for your child.

Using an empty coffee can, have your child make a time capsule for the year just past. When you’re in the car, have your child estimate how far it is to your destination. Check using the odometer.

2 9

Make a list of the best times you had during the last year. Schedule time on the calendar to do them in 2010. Practice origami with your child.

4

Visit the library. Help your child check out a book about origami, the Japanese art of paper folding. It’s National Clean Off Your Desk Day. Make it Clean Off Your Homework Place Day, too!

5

Make a puzzle with your child. Glue a picture from a magazine onto cardboard. Cut it into puzzle shapes. Challenge your child to put away 1 + 3 + 2 + 4 + 1 things in his room.

6

Tonight at dinner, put a “price” on each item you serve. Have your child figure out the “cost” of the meal.

8

10 17

Have a family sing-along. Have each family member share a favorite song! Have a contest. Who can name the most parts of the body? (Organs count, too.)

11 18

12 19

13

The first radio broadcast was on this date in 1910. Instead of watching TV tonight, listen to the radio. Help your child make a fruit salad for dinner tonight. Include one unfamiliar fruit.

14

Resist the urge to overschedule your kids. They need “down time” to think, imagine and play. What’s the coldest place in the nation today? The warmest? What’s the difference between the two?

15

It’s National Soup Month. Make soup with your child—and enjoy the book Stone Soup together. Feed the birds. Use a notebook to record the kinds of birds you see.

16

Take a walk with your child. Note the seasonal changes.

Celebrate Martin Luther King’s life. Talk with your child about prejudice. Do a crossword puzzle with your child. It’s a great way to learn new words.

Watch the news with your child. Choose one story and compare it with the newspaper story. When you’re in the store, ask your child to figure how much change you should get from your purchase.

20 27

21
28

22 29

23

Check the newspaper to see if there’s a place you and your child can go roller skating or ice skating. Have your child help shop, prepare the dinner and clean up!

24 31

Help your child check out a book about a career. Have your child write and mail a letter to a friend.

25

26

It’s the birthday Write your of W. A. child’s name in Mozart. Listen to some a vertical column. classical music with Have him use each your child today. letter in his name to begin a poem.

Have a reading dinner. Ask family members to share something from the books they are reading.

30

© 2009 The Parent Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. May be reproduced only as licensed by Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter. 1-800-756-5525

Parent & Child

Activity Calendar
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

1 7
Help your child choose some flowering bulbs. Learn how to “force” them so they’ll bloom indoors. Tell your child five things you love best about him.

Visit the library. Check out a book about African American history. Talk about your own family history.

2 9

It’s Groundhog Day. How many words can your child make from the letters in GROUNDHOG?

8

Tuck a Valentine in It’s National your child’s lunch Cherry Month and every day this week. Great American Pie Write a special “I love Month. Celebrate by you” message on each. baking a cherry pie with your child!

14

15

Visit the library. Help your child check out a book about a hobby.

16

Look at car ads in the newspaper. Encourage your child to design and name a new car. Have your child draw a window picture. He can look out the window and draw what he sees!

21 28

Go on a “fraction search” through today’s newspaper. Which sections have the most fractions? Visit an interesting museum with your child today.

22

It’s the birthday of George Washington. How many facts can your child list about this famous president?

23

© 2009 The Parent Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. May be reproduced only as licensed by Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter. 1-800-756-5525

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz1234567890!@#$%^&*()-=+~`'",.<>/?[]{}\|ÁÉÍÓÚáéíñú¿

3

It’s the birthday of artist Norman Rockwell. Have your child draw a picture of an everyday activity.

10 17

Create an art gallery. Frame your child’s art work. Rotate the work on display frequently! Do “body arithmetic.” Ask your child, “How many do your fingers, knees, toes and nose add up to?” Start a family savings plan for a special goal. Plan the goal together and talk about how all will contribute.

24

February 2010

Local District 4, LAUSD Byron J. Maltez, Interim Superintendent

December 2009 • January • February 2010
®

make the di erence!

Saturday

4

Have your child write directions for making a sandwich. Then follow them exactly. It’s Inventor’s Day. Have your child draw a picture of something she’d like to invent. Go “ice skating” in the kitchen together. Wearing only socks, pretend you’re on the ice. Be careful!

5

Together, think of several words that start with the same letter. Try to put them together in a sentence that makes sense.

6

Look in the newspaper for free events your family can attend this month.

11 18

12 19

Can you name an animal that starts with each letter of the alphabet? (It’s okay to leave out X.) In 1473, Polish astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus was born. Have your child draw a picture of the solar system.

13

Take your child out to breakfast, or make it together this morning.

20 27

Set aside time today to work on a hobby with your child.

25

Play a family Ask family rhyming game. members, “If Take turns making up a you were an animal, short sentence. Answer which animal would with a sentence that you be and why?” rhymes.

26

Make play clay. Mix 1 c. flour, 1/3 c. salt, a few drops of oil, and water to make it easy to handle.

Calendario de Actividades
Domingo Lunes Martes Miércoles Jueves

Padres & Hijos

Escuela Primaria

TM

¡hacen la diferencia!

Viernes

Sábado

Diciembre
6
Esta semana organice un programa para ver TV. Utilícelo para planear cómo va a limitar el tiempo que pasan viendo tele. Hornee unas galletas con su hijo. Si usted está repitiendo una receta, permita que su hijo haga las cuentas. Saque tiempo hoy para trabajar en algunas manualidades. Quizás su hijo puede dar estas manualidades como regalo. Tenga un “día al revés.” Colóquese el pijama a la hora de levantarse y coman el desayuno de cena.

1

Miren el diario Planee pasar para informarse tiempo a solas con acerca de actividades cada uno de sus niños festivas gratuitas. en este mes. Escriba su Planeen asistir a una de “cita” en el calendario. ellas este mes. Hoy, haga que su hijo le enseñe algo que necesita aprender de tarea. Es una manera muy buena para enfatizar el aprendizaje. Cuando estén en el auto, haga que su hijo calcule la distancia al sitio a donde van. Revíselo con el odómetro. Ahora que se acercan las vacaciones, haga que su hijo haga una lista de lo que puede hacer cuando no tenga nada que hacer. ¿Están los niños aburridos? Haga que sean modelos y tomen turnos, mientras uno modela y posa, el otro dibuja lo que ve.

2

3

Un jeroglífico es una historia que reemplaza algunas palabras con fotos o cuadros. Elaboren un jeroglífico hoy.

4

Escojan un número ¿Las festividades la y después enutienen atareada? meren todas las cosas Comparta las responsque se les ocurran con abilidades con su niño. respecto a ese número. Apreciará las vacaciones si participa en ellas.

5

7

Para la hora de la cena esta semana planee una cena con letras del alfabeto. Escoja una letra diferente para cada día. Visiten la biblioteca y saquen un libro sobre festividades alrededor del mundo. Hoy es el solsticio del invierno. Revise el periódico para ver cuántas horas tendrá de luz el día. Visiten la biblioteca y saquen un libro con la bibliografía de alguien especial que sea de otro país.

8

9

Hagan copos de nieve con papel. Doble papel o filtros para café y recorte formas en ellos. Decore las ventanas con ellos.

10 17

Dibuje la silueta Durante estas de su hijo en festividades haga una hoja grande de algo especial en familia papel. ¡Haga que inves- para otra persona. tigue y dibuje la parte interna! Jueguen a “concéntrese” con tarjetas de matemáticas. Problemas con las mismas respuestas (9 x 2, 15 + 3) forman una pareja.

11 18

12 19

Lleve a su hijo a desayunar o preparen el desayuno juntos.

13

14

15

16

Mantenga un registro de todo lo que comen en un día. ¿Qué cambios le gustaría hacer? Mire un programa de TV con su hijo. Haga una gráficadel tiempo de comerciales y del tiempo del programa. Haga que su hijo elabore un dibujo describiendo lo que él piensa qué es el mes de diciembre.

Planee acostarse Piense acerca tarde esta noche de algo especial para que puedan leer. que su hijo pueda Cada uno debe decir hacer para un vecino o qué va a leer antes de un amigo. comenzar. Hable con su hijo acerca del mejor regalo que usted ha recibido. ¿Por qué fue tan especial?

20 27

21 28

22 29

23

24

Léale a su hijo una historia, un poema o un relato religioso de las festividades.

25

26

Disfrute en familia una actividad al aire libre.

30

31

Ayude a su hijo a trazar una línea de tiempo del año que acaba de pasar.

2009
Escuela Primaria
TM

© 2009 The Parent Institute®, una división de NIS, Inc. Puede ser reimpreso de acuerdo a los derechos listados en Los Padres ¡hacen la diferencia!® Escuela Primaria. 1-800-756-5525

Calendario de Actividades
Domingo Lunes Martes Miércoles Jueves

Padres & Hijos

¡hacen la diferencia!

Viernes

Sábado

Enero 2010
3
Anime a su hijo a iniciar un diario para este año.

1 7
En el día de hoy en 1782 se fundó el primer banco comercial. Abran una cuenta de ahorros para su niño. Evite el deseo de programar muchas actividades para su hijo. Su hijo necesita tiempo “libre” para jugar e imaginar. ¿Cuál es el lugar más frío en la nación hoy? ¿el más caluroso? ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre los dos lugares?

Utilizando una lata vacía de café, haga que su hijo elabore una cápsula de tiempo para el año que ha terminado. Cuando estén en el auto, haga que su hijo calcule la distancia al sitio a donde van. Revíselo con el odómetro.

2 9

Elabore una lista de los mejores momentos del año pasado. Marque en el calendario una fecha para volverlos a tener en 2010. Practique el origami con su hijo.

4

Visiten la biblioteca y saquen un libro sobre el arte japonés de doblar papel, el origami. Hoy es el Día Nacional para Limpiar el Escritorio. ¡Aproveche este día para limpiar el lugar de estudio también!

5

Hagan un rompecabezas. Peguen una foto de una revista sobre una cartulina. Después corten la cartulina en pedazos. Desafíe a su hijo a organizar 1 + 3 + 2 + 4 + 1 cosas de su cuarto.

6

A la hora de cenar, colóquele un “precio” a todo lo que sirve. Haga que su hijo saque cuentas de cuánto cuesta la cena. En este día en l910 se emitió la primera transmisión radial. En esta noche en vez de ver televisión, escuchen la radio. Ayude a su hijo a preparar una ensalada de frutas para la cena de esta noche. Incluyan una fruta poco familiar. Hoy es el natalicio de W. A. Mozart. Escuchen algo de música clásica con su niño.

8

10 17

Tengan un tiempo para cantar en familia. ¡Cada miembro de la familia comparte su canción favorita! T engan una competencia. ¿Quién puede nombrar el mayor número de partes del cuerpo? (¡Los órganos cuentan!)

11 18

12 19

13

14

15

Es el Mes Nacional de la Sopa. Haga una sopa con su niño y disfruten leyendo el libro Sopa de Piedras. Alimenten a los pajaritos. Utilicen un cuaderno para llevar un registro de las clases de pájaros que ven.

16

Salga a caminar con su niño y noten los cambios que trae la estación. Mire el diario e infórmese si hay un lugar para que usted y su hijo puedan ir a patinar sobre ruedas o sobre hielo.

Celebren la vida de Martin Luther King. Hable con su hijo sobre la discriminación. Complete un crucigrama con su niño. Esta es una manera muy buena para aprender nuevas palabras.

Miren el telenoticiero con su niño. Escoja una historia y compárela con la misma historia presentada en el periódico. Cuando estén en la tienda, pídale a su hijo que le diga cuánto es el cambio que le deben devolver al pagar por la compra.

20 27

21 28

22 29

23

24 31

Saque un libro sobre una carrera profesional.

25

26

Su hijo puede mandar una carta a un amigo por correo.

Escriba el nomTenga una cena ¡Haga que su bre de su hijo de lectura. Hahijo le ayude de manera vertical. ga que cada uno comhacer las compras, a Utilice cada letra para parta información acer- preparar la cena y a comenzar un poema. ca de lo que leen. limpiar en la casa!

30

© 2009 The Parent Institute®, una división de NIS, Inc. Puede ser reimpreso de acuerdo a los derechos listados en Los Padres ¡hacen la diferencia!® Escuela Primaria. 1-800-756-5525

Calendario de Actividades
Domingo Lunes Martes Miércoles Jueves Viernes

Padres & Hijos

1
7
Escoja algunas flores en capullo. Enséñele a su hijo cómo forzarlas para que florezcan más pronto. Comparta con su hijo cinco cosas que usted aprecia de él.

Visiten la biblioteca. Saquen un libro de la historia de la raza afroamericana. Hablen acerca de su propia historia familiar.

2 9

Es el Día de las Marmotas. ¿Cuántas palabras puede formar de la palabra MARMOTA? Es el Mes Nacional de la Cereza y el Mes del Gran Pastel Americano. Celebre esta festividad horneando un pastel de cereza.

8

Coloque un detallito de San Valentín en la lonchera de su hijo durante toda esta semana. Incluya una nota que diga “te quiero.”

14

15

Visiten la biblioteca. Saquen un libro acerca de un pasatiempo.

16

Miren los avisos clasificados en el periódico, anime a su hijo a que diseñe y le asigne un nombre al auto que diseñó. Haga que su hijo dibuje una ventana. ¡Puede mirar hacia afuera de esa ventana y dibujar lo que ve!

21 28

Es el día de investigar las fracciones. ¿Qué secciones del periódico tiene el mayor número de fracciones? Visite un museo interesante con su hijo en este día.

22

Es el natalicio de George Washington. ¿Cuántas facetas puede usted nombrar acerca de este presidente tan famoso?

23

© 2009 The Parent Institute®, una división de NIS, Inc. Puede ser reimpreso de acuerdo a los derechos listados en Los Padres ¡hacen la diferencia!® Escuela Primaria. 1-800-756-5525

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz1234567890!@#$%^&*()-=+~`'",.<>/?[]{}\|ÁÉÍÓÚáéíñú¿

3

Es el cumpleaños del artista Norman Rockwell. Haga que su hijo dibuje algo de una actividad cotidiana.

10 17

Forme una galería de arte, enmarque las obras de arte de su hijo. ¡Renueve la exhibición con frecuencia! Haga un ejercicio de matemáticas con su hijo. ¿Cuánto es el total de la suma de sus dedos, nariz y rodillas? Empiece un plan de ahorro familiar para una meta en particular. Planeen la meta y hablen de cómo contribuirán.

24

Febrero 2010

Local District 4, LAUSD Byron J. Maltez, Interim Superintendent

Diciembre 2009 • Enero • Febrero 2010
Escuela Primaria
TM

¡hacen la diferencia!

Sábado

4

Haga que su hijo Piense acerca de Revise el periódico escriba las instrucvarias palabras que para informarse de ciones para preparar un comienzan con la misma eventos a los que emparedado. Síganlas letra. Traten de colocar- pueden asistir gratis al pie de la letra. las todas juntas en una este mes. frase que tenga sentido. Es el Día del Inventor. Haga que su hija dibuje algo que le gustaría inventar. Vayan a “patinar sobre hielo” en el piso de la cocina usando calcetines. ¡Tengan cuidado! Jueguen con rimas. Tomen turnos formando frases cortas y contestando las frases con rimas también.

5

6

11 18

12 19

¿Puede nombrar un animal que comience con cada letra del alfabeto? (Es aceptable no incluir la X). En 1473 nació el astrónomo polaco Nicolaus Coppernico. Haga un dibujo del sistema solar. Pregunte a todos en la familia, “Si pudieras ser un animal, ¿que serías y por qué?”

13

Lleve a su hijo a desayunar fuera de casa, o mejor preparen juntos el desayuno en esta mañana. Saque algo de tiempo en este día para trabajar en un pasatiempo con su hijo.

20 27

25

26

Haga una masa para jugar. Mezcle una taza de harina de trigo, 1/3 de cucharadita de sal, unas gotas de aceite y agua.

www.lausd.net/reportcard

:
, , , : , , , : , : , 2010:

www.lausd.net/reportcard

¡¡¡PADRES!!!
Los Reportes de Progreso llegarán próximamente.
Les indicarán el desempeño de la escuela en diferentes aspectos, como cali caciones en las pruebas, tasas de graduación y participación de los maestros. Les darán una guía para trabajar con los maestros y demás personal de la escuela para cerciorarse de que su hijo esté aprendiendo dentro del tiempo esperado. También les mostrarán cómo trabajar con sus hijos en casa. Estén preparados y al pendiente de este Reporte de Progreso que se enviará a todos los padres en enero del 2010.

www.lausd.net/reportcard

.
, .

, .

. 2010 1

You're Reading a Free Preview

Descarga
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->