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Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

LS2-2

Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.
[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on predicting consistent patterns of interactions in different ecosystems in terms of the
relationships among and between organisms and abiotic components of ecosystems. Examples of types of interactions could
include competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial.]

Science & Engineering Practices Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI) Crosscutting Concepts

Planning and Carrying Out
Investigations
Planning and carrying out investigations
to answer questions or test solutions to
problems in 68 builds on K5
experiences and progresses to include
investigations that use multiple variables
and provide evidence to support
explanations or design solutions.
Construct an explanation that
includes qualitative or quantitative
relationships between variables that
predict phenomena. (MS-LS2-2)



LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships
in Ecosystems

Similarly, predatory interactions may
reduce the number of organisms or
eliminate whole populations of
organisms. Mutually beneficial
interactions, in contrast, may become
so interdependent that each organism
requires the other for survival.
Although the species involved in these
competitive, predatory, and mutually
beneficial interactions vary across
ecosystems, the patterns of
interactions of organisms with their
environments, both living and
nonliving, are shared. (MS-LS2-2)


Patterns

Patterns can be used to identify and
effect relationships. (MS-LS2-2)
Critical Concept Interactions among organisms and the ecosystem and how the dynamics are affected.
Assessment
Students must create a presentation on how to control the mosquito population while
protecting the ecosystem.
Objectives

























Rubric: Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
Standard 3-4
GRC Documentation
4 3 2 1
S/E Practices
Construct an
explanation that
includes
qualitative or
quantitative
relationships
between
variables that
predict
phenomena.
(MS-LS2-2)


The solution incorporates
characteristics of the next
grade band descriptors.

Analysis includes reasons
as to why this solution is
more scientifically sound.
Independently and
collaboratively designs a
solution to explore the
relationships among the
ecosystem, the organisms,
the biotic and abiotic factors,
and the impact on an
ecosystem.

The qualitative and
quantitative data supports
explanations about these
relationships.

Analyze others solutions to
determine the validity of the
claims (MS-LS2-5)


Designs a solution to
explore the relationships
among the ecosystem, the
organisms, the biotic and
abiotic factors, and the
impact on an ecosystem.

The qualitative and
quantitative data supports
explanations about these
relationships.

Does not individually or
collaboratively design a
solution to explore the
relationships among the
ecosystem, the organisms,
the biotic and abiotic
factors, and the impact on
an ecosystem.

Disciplinary
Core Ideas
(DCI)

LS2.A:
Interdependent
Relationships in
Ecosystems
Meets the standard and
makes additional
connections to support a
new claim or shows a
deeper understanding.
Applies a wide range of
vocabulary fluently,
Uses qualitative and
quantitative data to explain
the relationships among the
ecosystem, the organisms,
the biotic and abiotic factors,
and the impact on an
ecosystem.

Uses claims to make
Explain the relationships
among the ecosystem, the
organisms, the biotic and
abiotic factors, and the
impact on an ecosystem.
Explanations and/or data
use mostly relevant facts
Does not meet the criteria
for approaching the
standard.

Similarly,
predatory
interactions may
reduce the
number of
organisms or
eliminate whole
populations of
organisms.
Mutually beneficial
interactions, in
contrast, may
become so
interdependent
that each
organism requires
the other for
survival. Although
the species
involved in these
competitive,
predatory, and
mutually beneficial
interactions vary
across
ecosystems, the
patterns of
interactions of
organisms with
their
environments,
both living and
nonliving, are
shared. (MS-LS2-
2)


accurately, and
appropriately.
reasonable predictions about
these relationships in a
future event.
Uses appropriate content
vocabulary including: biotic
factors, abiotic factors,
populations, community,
ecosystem, predator-prey,
food chain, food web,
carrying capacity, and limited
resources.
and may be basic or
superficial.

Uses some appropriate
content vocabulary
including: biotic factors,
abiotic factors,
populations, community,
ecosystem, predator-prey,
food chain, food web,
carrying capacity, and
limited resources.
Crosscutting
Clearly and accurately Analyze qualitative and Explanations and/or data Does not identify a cause
Concepts
Patterns
Patterns can be
used to identify
cause and effect
relationships.
(MS-LS2-2)

uses patterns from
qualitative and quantitative
data to identify cause and
effects relationships (MS-
LS2-1).
quantitative data to identify
cause and effects
relationships (MS-LS2-1)


use mostly relevant facts
and may be basic or
superficial to identify cause
and effects on relationships
(MS-LS-1).
and effect (MS-LS-1).
Communication in
the Discipline
Articulate and defend
claims using
observations and
experiences as
support.
Development, organization
and style are appropriate
to the task, purpose,
audience, and medium
used.

Precise writing presents a
focused, logical explanation
supported with sufficient
and relevant data from
experiments.

Shows insightful
connections to other
concepts or real-world
problems.
Development, organization
and style are appropriate to
the task, purpose, audience
and medium used.

Presents a focused
explanation supported with
sufficient and relevant data,
though experimental
references could be more
thorough.

Sources are cited and
explained where information
was found.

Writing is coherent, but
organization and/or may
not be appropriate to the
task, purpose, audience,
and medium used.

Explanation is logical and
focused, but needs more
supporting evidence.
Writing lacks clarity
and/or is inappropriate for
the task, purpose,
audience, or medium
used.

Claims are not supported
by evidence.

Communicates some
procedures, but lacks
important details.