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Slugger Magazine

Slugger Magazine

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l u g g e r

V O L . 1 , N O . 1

H OW A 17-Y EAR -O LD C HANGED B ASEBALL FOREVER
The History of Louisville Slugger

THEY’RE THE BEST OF THE BEST
and They’re Swinging Louisville Slugger

BEHIND THE SCENES

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VERY SPECIAL about this issue of
Slugger The Magazine. It is the first issue
ever published, making it a magazine you’ll definitely want to

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THERE’S SOMETHING

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l u g g e

V O L .

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H OW A 17-Y EAR -O LD K ID C HANGED B ASEBALL FOREVER

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120 YEARS OF PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGY

hold on to.

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THEY’RE THE BEST OF THE BEST

In this one-of-a-kind issue, you’ll learn about
the RICH

HISTORY of the world’s oldest,

LOUISVILLE SLUGGER BATS .1000 AT LAST THREE COLLEGE WORLD SERIES

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THE LOUISVILLE SLUGGER M USEUM — WHERE BASEBALL H ISTORY COMES TO LIFE

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most legendary batmaker –

Louisville Slugger.

You’ll learn how wood and

aluminum bats are made.
You’ll take a PEEK at our bat pick up a few

BEHIND THE SCENES

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factory and museum. And you’ll

tips from today’s top pros –

tips that can help you become a BETTER PLAYER.

So read and

ENJOY. And if you want to find out
more about LOUISVILLE

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ALSO I N THIS ISSUE:
BEHIND THE SCENES 5 THE SILVER SLUGGER AWARD 10 HOW WOOD BATS ARE MADE 16 HOW ALUMINUM BATS ARE MADE 17 HOW TO CHOOSE A BAT 18 HOW TO BREAK IN A GLOVE 20

s l ugge r
just log on to

www.slugger.com.

T H E

V O L. 1, N O. 1

M A G A Z I N E

T HE

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF

LOUISVILLE S LUGGER.

WWW.SLUGGER.COM

©2005 BY LOUISVILLE SLUGGER. ALL RIGHTS R ESERVED. N O
PORTION OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT PRIOR WRITTEN PERMISSION FROM

LOUISVILLE SLUGGER.

PRINTED

IN THE

USA.

THE OFFICIAL BAT OF MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL®

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SLUGGER,

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I N MANY WAYS, the rich, 120-year history of the Louisville Slugger baseball bat


The History of Louisville Slugger Hillerich & Bradsby

began in the talented hands of 17-year-old John A. “Bud” Hillerich. Bud’s father, J. F. Hillerich, owned a growing woodworking shop in Louisville, Kentucky, in the 1880s, when Bud began working for him as a 14-year-old apprentice.
Legend has it that Bud, who played baseball himself, slipped away from work one afternoon in 1884 to watch Louisville’s Major League team, the Louisville Eclipse. The team’s star, Pete Browning, mired in a hitting slump, broke his bat. Bud invited Browning over to his father’s shop to make him a new one. With Browning at his side giving advice, Bud handcrafted a new bat from a long slab of wood. Browning got three hits with it the next day. Browning told his teammates, which began a surge of professional ball players to the Hillerich shop. Yet J. F. Hillerich had little interest in making bats; he saw the company’s future in stair railings, porch columns and swinging butter churns. For a brief time in the 1880s, he even turned away ball players.


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Baseball was the nation’s most popular sport, and legends like Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb and Lou Gehrig swung Louisville Sluggers.

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Bud persisted; he saw the future in bats. His father, pleased with his son’s enthusiasm, relented. Some 120 years — and more than 100 million bats later — the Louisville Slugger is the most popular bat in Major League Baseball. The secret was that the company would make bats to a player’s very specific needs, wishes — or superstitions. The finished bats could range in length from 30 to 42 inches and in weight from 30 to even 50 ounces. The company kept a card file on each of thousands of players, a practice it continued almost 100 years. The legendary Joe DiMaggio would weigh his Louisville Slugger on a

wholesale company, adding his marketing expertise to Bud Hillerich’s manufacturing and engineering abilities. In 1916, the company became The Hillerich & Bradsby Company. By 1923, Louisville Slugger was selling more bats than any other bat maker in the country. Baseball was the nation’s most popular sport, and legends like Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb and Lou Gehrig swung Louisville Sluggers. By 1940, Hillerich & Bradsby had sold 2,000,000 bats to professional baseball (including the Negro Leagues), amateur leagues and youth teams. The small-scale Louisville souvenir bats also contributed to overall sales. During World War II, it switched to producing gun stocks,

Some 120 years — and more than 100 million bats later — the Louisville Slugger is the most popular bat in Major League Baseball.
delicatessen scale to be sure the weight was right. Ted Williams could tell if a bat handle was a quarter-inch too thick by holding it in his hands. In 1894, with Bud Hillerich taking over for his father, the name “Louisville Slugger” was registered with the U.S. Patent Office. In the early 1900s, the growing company pioneered a sports-marketing concept by paying Hall of Famer Honus Wagner to use his name on a bat – a practice continued by Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, teenage sensation LeBron James and so many other professional athletes in virtually all sports today. In 1911, Frank Bradsby joined the company from a St. Louis hardware potato mashers and police clubs. With the post-World War II boom, sales climbed to almost 7,000,000 wooden bats a year by the early 1970s. That soon changed dramatically when Little League, high school and college teams changed to aluminum bats. As demand for wooden bats dropped, the company expanded its aluminum bat capacity. Today, Louisville Slugger dominates in both wood and aluminum bat categories, with 65% of all Major League players using Louisville Slugger, as well as six of the past seven national college championship teams. So what would baseball be like if young Bud Hillerich had followed his father’s urging and devoted his efforts to making swinging butter churns? We don’t even want to think about it.

BEHIND THE SCENES
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LOUISVILLE SLUGGER
WHEN YOU BUY a bat, you probably go to the sporting goods store, swing a few bats and take home the one that feels best to you. Or you may simply order your favorite bat over the Internet or from a catalog. But when you’re an MLB player, things are different. Major League players know exactly what they need in a bat when it’s time to face down a 90-mph fastball. For over a hundred years, Louisville Slugger has worked closely with pro players to craft bats precisely to their meticulous specifications. And when we say meticulous, we do mean meticulous. For example, Ted Williams could notice a variance of just half an ounce in bat weight. He once complained about his handle taper being off in a batch of new bats. When the handles were measured, they found that the tapers were off by just five-hundredths of an inch. A DIFFERENT KIND OF CARD CATALOG. All those years of crafting wood bats for the game’s most legendary players has resulted in some truly interesting pieces of baseball history. Among these is the Louisville Slugger “Card Catalog.” This A PEEK INSIDE THE LOUISVILLE SLUGGER BAT VAULT. Many of the bats made for baseball’s legends are still around. You just have to know where to find them. Deep within the halls of the Louisville Slugger Museum, there is a place that not just everybody gets to see. In the bat world, it is the “holiest of holies”: the Louisville Slugger bat vault. Since the early days, Louisville Slugger has kept bat models turned for the top pros. If you are ever lucky enough to find yourself in the Louisville Slugger vault, you could hold a bat that was actually turned for Mickey Mantle or Joe DiMaggio in your very own hands. Who knows? Practice hard enough, and your bat may someday be in the vault right beside The Babe’s or A-Rod’s. Hey, you never know.
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isn’t like the card catalog you’ll find in your local library. On these cards are the order specs and bat dimensions of baseball’s all-time greatest hitters. Today, decades later, Louisville Slugger can use these cards to precisely recreate the bats that wrote baseball history.

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LOUISVILLE SLUGGER.

maximum protection with minimum restriction of movement. Designed by a hand surgeon, James M. Kleinert, M.D., ours is the first line of gloves that truly works in concert with the human hand. In addition to its on-field performance products, Louisville Slugger offers personalized, miniature, commemorative and collectible bats. These are becoming more and more popular with collectors who want to hold and own a piece of baseball history, as well as you’ll find in every Louisville Slugger bat. From the earliest days until the present day, Louisville Slugger has always employed the most powerful technology available in the bat business. Back in the days of Ty Cobb, that meant having the most skilled craftsmen at the lathes, handcrafting bats with fans who simply want to recapture fond childhood moments. And considering how long Louisville Slugger has been around, there are more than just a few of to the collegiate level. composite bats that give new meaning to the word “performance.” TPS, or the aluminum “TournIt also means computer-aided crafting of custom wood bats for ament Players Series,” is designed specifunheard-of consistency in meeting top players’ specs. ically for fast-pitch and slow-pitch softball. These A NEW GENERATION OF BATS FOR A NEW GENERATION OF PLAYERS. aluminum bats have proven every bit as successful as Louisville Slugger’s wood bats, making them the choice of a new generation of ballplayers. MORE THAN JUST BATS. Over the past 30 years, Louisville Slugger has gone far beyond bats, providing performance technology in the forms of fielding and batting gloves, helmets, catchers’ gear, equipment bags, training aids and accessories. In particular, the “Bionic” series of batting and fielding gloves incorporates an innovative design that gives
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YEARS OF PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGY

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BE FOR E TH E WOR LD SE R I ES,
Little League and the rule that said “three strikes mean you’re out,” a small company in Louisville, Kentucky, was already perfecting the bats that would write the history of the game. That bat, of course, was Louisville Slugger: a name as old as the game itself, a name forever linked to the game’s greatest players and greatest moments.
No other bat in the history of baseball has won more games,

to the most demanding specifications of the world’s most demanding players. Today, it means applying the latest aerospace technology to bat making, delivering high-tech aluminum and

those moments to recapture.

Although wood bats are at the heart of Louisville Slugger, set more records and captured more titles at more levels of play they currently represent less than 20% of Louisville Slugger’s than Louisville Slugger. From Babe Ruth to Hammerin’ Hank Aaron overall sales revenues. Aluminum is the name of the game at to A-Rod and Derek Jeter, Louisville Slugger bats have been the most levels these days, so the familiar Louisville Slugger oval is choice of champions since 1884, at all levels of play. most often found on the barrels of its performance-oriented TPX® TECHNOLOGY THAT’S GROWN WITH THE GAME. What makes a Louisville Slugger a Louisville Slugger? It’s something we call “performance technology,” and it’s something
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and TPS® aluminum bats. TPX, which stands for “Tournament Players Xtra-Lite,” is geared toward baseball markets ranging from youth ball all the way

THE LINEUP IS A MANAGER’S DREAM COME TRUE and
an opposing manager’s worst nightmare. It is a team composed of batting champs, Cy Young winners, All-Stars and future Hall of Famers. Consider this team’s infield: Alex Rodriguez, New York Yankees; Nomar Garciaparra, Chicago Cubs; Jeff Bagwell, Houston Astros; Mike Lowell, Florida Marlins; Derek Jeter, New York Yankees and Edgar Renteria, Boston Red Sox. And behind the plate is Ivan Rodriguez of the Detroit Tigers. Roaming the outfield and bringing homerun power to the plate are: Craig Biggio, Houston Astros; Jim Edmonds, St. Louis Cardinals; Ken Griffey Jr., Cincinnati Reds and Lance Berkman, Houston Astros. Need a left-handed designated hitter? Pencil in Rafael Palmeiro from the Baltimore Orioles. For a right-handed designated hitter, there’s Gary Sheffield of the New York Yankees.

Player, has averaged 50 home runs a year over the last three seasons. Garciaparra has wielded his bat like a magician, while building a lofty career batting average of roughly .320. These are only a sampling of the Major League players who choose Louisville Slugger when taking to the plate or field. And the list goes on: Boston’s Manny Ramirez, Toronto’s Vernon Wells, Atlanta’s Andruw Jones and Seattle’s Bret Boone. In fact, 17 position players selected to the 2003 Major League AllStar Game make Louisville Slugger their bat of choice, more than any other bat. But that should come as no surprise because Louisville Slugger is the Official Bat of Major League Baseball, and 65% of all Major Leaguers today are “Sluggers.” And on the mound, more than 25% of all Major League pitchers choose a Louisville Slugger TPX series glove.

T H E Y’R E

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BEST BEST.
O F T H E
THEY’RE SWINGING

LOUISVILLE SLUGGER HAS BEEN PRESENT FOR NEARLY EVERY

LEGENDARY MOMENT IN THE GAME’S RICH HISTORY.
On the mound, the right-handed starter would be Houston’s Roger Clemens, who has fanned more than 4,000 batters and is arguably one of the greatest pitchers ever to wear a Major League uniform. From the left side, fireballer Andy Pettitte, also of Houston. Out of the bullpen there’s ace Billy Wagner of the Philadelphia Phillies. So what Dream Team have we been building? Is this Major League Baseball’s all-star team the best of the best? A possible all-opponent team, as voted on by big-league players? Actually, this is the All-Louisville Slugger Team, composed of Major Leaguers who use Louisville Slugger products in pursuit of on-field achievement, whether that is a towering homerun to the upper deck or a sharp line drive to the outfield gap. Or in the case of pitchers Clemens and Pettitte, the equipment they view as the best available in their pursuit to perfect their craft. The names are familiar to even the casual baseball fan. Griffey and Palmeiro are among an elite group of players who have smacked 500plus home runs. Rodriguez, the 2003 American League’s Most Valuable But then Louisville Slugger has been present for nearly every legendary moment in the game’s rich history. Ever since Honus “The Flying Dutchman” Wagner of Pittsburgh Pirates fame selected Louisville Slugger as his bat of choice in 1905 – followed by the infamous Ty Cobb three years later – Louisville Slugger has been at the plate when history was made. Babe Ruth hit all 60 of his home runs in 1927 with a Model R43 Louisville Slugger. That record stood until Roger Maris shattered it in 1961 using a Slugger bat. Hank Aaron hit his record 715th career home run into the left-field stands in Atlanta with a Louisville Slugger, and Tony Gwynn captured a record eight Silver Bats, awarded to the league’s batting champ, swinging a Louisville Slugger. Ken Griffey Jr., in June 2004, joined the 500-homer club with his drive to the right-field seats, becoming the sixth youngest player to reach that milestone. A Louisville Slugger was in his hands for the historic moment. From The Babe to A-Rod to the College World Series champions, the best players and the best teams use Louisville Slugger.

LOUISVILLE SLUGGER.

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SILVER SLUGGER AWARD WINNERS
2004 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Mark Teixeira, Texas Rangers 2B Alfonso Soriano, Texas Rangers SS Miguel Tejada, Baltimore Orioles 3B Melvin Mora, Baltimore Orioles OF Manny Ramirez, Boston Red Sox OF Gary Sheffield, New York Yankees OF Vladimir Guerrero, Anaheim Angels C(tie) Ivan Rodriguez, Detroit Tigers Victor Martinez, Cleveland Indians DH David Ortiz, Boston Red Sox NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Albert Pujols, St. Louis Cardinals 2B Mark Loretta, San Diego Padres SS Jack Wilson, Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Adrian Beltre, Los Angeles Dodgers OF Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants OF Jim Edmonds, St. Louis Cardinals OF Bobby Abreu, Philadelphia Phillies C Johnny Estrada, Atlanta Braves P Livan Hernandez, Montreal Expos 2003 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Carlos Delgado, Toronto Blue Jays 2B Brett Boone, Seattle Mariners SS Alex Rodriguez, Texas Rangers 3B Bill Mueller, Boston Red Sox OF Vernon Wells, Toronto Blue Jays OF Garret Anderson, Anaheim Angels OF Manny Ramirez, Boston Red Sox C Jorge Posada, New York Yankees DH Edgar Martinez, Seattle Mariners NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Todd Helton, Colorado Rockies 2B Jose Vidro, Montreal Expos SS Edgar Renteria, St. Louis Cardinals 3B Mike Lowell, Florida Marlins OF Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants OF Albert Pujols, St. Louis Cardinals OF Gary Sheffield, Atlanta Braves C Javy Lopez, Atlanta Braves P Mike Hampton, Atlanta Braves 2002 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Jason Giambi, New York Yankees 2B Alfonso Soriano, New York Yankees SS Alex Rodriguez, Texas Rangers 3B Eric Chavez, Oakland A’s OF Magglio Ordonez, Chicago White Sox OF Bernie Williams, New York Yankees OF Garret Anderson, Anaheim Angels C Jorge Posada, New York Yankees DH Manny Ramirez, Boston Red Sox NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Todd Helton, Colorado Rockies 2B Jeff Kent, San Francisco Giants SS Edgar Renteria, St. Louis Cardinals 3B Scott Rolen, St. Louis Cardinals OF Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants OF Sammy Sosa, Chicago Cubs OF Vladimir Guerrero, Montreal Expos C Mike Piazza, New York Mets P Mike Hampton, Colorado Rockies

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2001 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Jason Giambi, Oakland A’s 2B Bret Boone, Seattle Mariners 3B Troy Glaus, Anaheim Angels SS Alex Rodriguez, Texas Rangers OF Juan Gonzalez, Cleveland Indians OF Manny Ramirez, Boston Red Sox OF Ichiro Suzuki, Seattle Mariners C Jorge Posada, New York Yankees DH Edgar Martinez, Seattle Mariners NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Todd Helton, Colorado Rockies 2B Jeff Kent, San Francisco Giants 3B Albert Pujols, St. Louis Cardinals SS Rich Aurilia, San Francisco Giants OF Sammy Sosa, Chicago Cubs OF Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants OF Luis Gonzalez, Arizona Diamondbacks C Mike Piazza, New York Mets P Mike Hampton, Colorado Rockies 2000 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Carlos Delgado, Toronto Blue Jays 2B Roberto Alomar, Cleveland Indians 3B Troy Glaus, Anaheim Angels SS Alex Rodriguez, Seattle Mariners OF Darin Erstad, Anaheim Angels OF Manny Ramirez, Cleveland Indians OF Magglio Ordonez, Chicago White Sox C Jorge Posada, New York Yankees DH Frank Thomas, Chicago White Sox NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Todd Helton, Colorado Rockies 2B Jeff Kent, San Francisco Giants 3B Chipper Jones, Atlanta Braves SS Edgar Renteria, St. Louis Cardinals OF Sammy Sosa, Chicago Cubs OF Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants OF Vladimir Guerrero, Montreal Expos C Mike Piazza, New York Mets P Mike Hampton, New York Mets 1999 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Carlos Delgado, Toronto Blue Jays 2B Roberto Alomar, Cleveland Indians 3B Dean Palmer, Detroit Tigers SS Alex Rodriguez, Seattle Mariners OF Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle Mariners OF Manny Ramirez, Cleveland Indians OF Shawn Green, Toronto Blue Jays C Ivan Rodriguez, Texas Rangers DH Rafael Palmeiro, Texas Rangers NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Jeff Bagwell, Houston Astros 2B Edgardo Alfonzo, New York Mets 3B Chipper Jones, Atlanta Braves SS Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds OF Sammy Sosa, Chicago Cubs OF Larry Walker, Colorado Rockies OF Vladimir Guerrero, Montreal Expos C Mike Piazza, New York Mets P Mike Hampton, Houston Astros 1998 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Rafael Palmeiro, Baltimore Orioles 2B Damion Easley, Detroit Tigers

3B SS OF OF OF C DH

Dean Palmer, Detroit Tigers Alex Rodriguez, Seattle Mariners Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle Mariners Albert Belle, Chicago White Sox Juan Gonzalez, Texas Rangers Ivan Rodriguez, Texas Rangers Jose Canseco, Toronto Blue Jays

OF Manny Ramierez, Cleveland Indians C Ivan Rodriguez, Texas Rangers DH Edgar Martinez, Seattle Mariners NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Eric Karros, Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Craig Biggio, Houston Astros 3B Vinny Castilla, Colorado Rockies SS Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds OF Dante Bichette, Colorado Rockies OF Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres OF Sammy Sosa, Chicago Cubs C Mike Piazza, Los Angeles Dodgers P Tom Glavine, Atlanta Braves 1994 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Frank Thomas, Chicago White Sox 2B Carlos Baerga, Cleveland Indians 3B Wade Boggs, New York Yankees SS Cal Ripken, Jr., Baltimore Orioles OF Albert Belle, Cleveland Indians OF Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle Mariners OF Kirby Puckett, Minnesota Twins C Ivan Rodriguez, Texas Rangers DH Julio Franco, Chicago White Sox NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Jeff Bagwell, Houston Astros 2B Craig Biggio, Houston Astros 3B Matt Williams, San Francisco Giants SS Wil Cordero, Montreal Expos OF Moises Alou, Montreal Expos OF Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants OF Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres C Mike Piazza, Los Angeles Dodgers P Mark Portugal, San Francisco Giants 1993 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Frank Thomas, Chicago White Sox 2B Carlos Baerga, Cleveland Indians 3B Wade Boggs, New York Yankees SS Cal Ripkin, Jr., Baltimore Orioles OF Albert Belle, Cleveland Indians OF Juan Gonzalez, Texas Rangers OF Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle Mariners C Mike Stanley, New York Yankees P Dwight Gooden, New York Yankees NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Fred McGriff, San Diego Padres, Atlanta Braves 2B Robby Thompson, San Francisco Giants 3B Matt Williams, San Francisco Giants SS Jay Bell, Pittsburgh Pirates OF Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants OF Lenny Dykstra, Philadelphia Phillies OF David Justice, Atlanta Braves C Mike Piazza, Los Angeles Dodgers P Orel Hershiser, Los Angeles Dodgers 1992 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Mark McGwire, Oakland A’s 2B Roberto Alomar, Baltimore Orioles 3B Edgar Martinez, Seattle Mariners SS Travis Fryman, Detroit Tigers OF Joe Carter, Toronto Blue Jays OF Juan Gonzalez, Texas Rangers OF Kirby Puckett, Minnesota Twins C Mickey Tettleton, Detroit Tigers DH Dave Winfield, Toronto Blue Jays

NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Mark McGwire, St. Louis Cardinals 2B Craig Biggio, Houston Astros 3B Vinny Castilla, Colorado Rockies SS Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds OF Sammy Sosa, Chicago Cubs OF Moises Alou, Houston Astros OF Greg Vaughn, San Diego Padres C Mike Piazza, New York Mets P Tom Glavine, Atlanta Braves 1997 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Tino Martinez, New York Yankees 2B Chuck Knoblauch, Minnesota Twins 3B Matt Williams, Cleveland Indians SS Nomar Garciaparra, Boston Red Sox OF Dave Justice, Cleveland Indians OF Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle Mariners OF Juan Gonzalez, Texas Rangers C Ivan Rodriguez, Texas Rangers DH Edgar Martinez, Seattle Mariners NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Jeff Bagwell, Houston Astros 2B Craig Biggio, Houston Astros 3B Vinney Castilla, Colorado Rockies SS Jeff Blauser, Atlanta Braves OF Larry Walker, Colorado Rockies OF Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants OF Tony Gwynn, Sand Diego Padres C Mike Piazza, Los Angeles Dodgers P John Smoltz, Atlanta Braves 1996 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Mark McGwire, Oakland A’s 2B Roberto Alomar, Baltimore Orioles 3B Jim Thome, Cleveland Indians SS Alex Rodriguez, Seattle Mariners OF Albert Belle, Cleveland Indians OF Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle Mariners OF Juan Gonzalez, Texas Rangers C Ivan Rodriguez, Texas Rangers DH Paul Molitor, Minnesota Twins NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Andres Galarraga, Colorado Rockies 2B Eric Young, Colorado Rockies 3B Ken Caminiti, San Diego Padres SS Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds OF Ellis Burks, Colorado Rockies OF Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants OF Gary Sheffield, Florida Marlins C Mike Piazza, Los Angeles Dodgers P Tom Glavine, Atlanta Braves 1995 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Mo Vaughn, Boston Red Sox 2B Chuck Knoblauch, Minnesota Twins 3B Gary Gaetti, Kansas City Royals SS John Valentin, Boston Red Sox OF Albert Belle, Cleveland Indians OF Tim Salmon, California Angels

S L U G G E R

A ward

IF YOU COULD PICK THE BEST OFFENSIVE PLAYERS AT EVERY POSITION, WHO WOULD YOU CHOOSE? THAT’S BASICALLY WHAT MAJOR LEAGUE MANAGERS AND COACHES ARE ASKED TO DO EACH YEAR WHEN THEY CHOOSE THE RECIPIENTS OF THE SILVER SLUGGER AWARDS.
Founded and sponsored by Louisville Slugger, the Silver Slugger Award is becoming one of the most prestigious honors in Major League Baseball. The Silver Slugger Award recipients are chosen by managers and coaches from each league. They are asked to vote on nine players, one from each offensive position, based on a combination of offensive statistics for the season. Batting average, slugging percentage and on-base percentage are all taken into account, as are a player’s overall performance and value to his team. Of course, the coaches and managers are not allowed to vote for players from their own teams. Each three-foot tall trophy is presented by a Louisville Slugger representative at one of the recipient’s home games, usually in April or May. The trophy is engraved with the names of all 18 winners from both leagues. Louisville Slugger also sponsors the Silver Bat Award, presented to the batting champions of both the American League and the National League.

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NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Fred McGriff, San Diego Padres 2B Ryne Sandberg, Chicago Cubs 3B Gary Sheffield, Sand Diego Padres SS Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds OF Barry Bonds, Pittsburgh Pirates OF Andy Van Slyke, Pittsburgh Pirates OF Larry Walker, Montreal Expos C Darren Daulton, Philadelphia Phillies P Dwight Gooden, New York Mets 1991 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Cecil Fielder, Detroit Tigers 2B Julio Franco, Texas Rangers 3B Wade Boggs, Boston Red Sox SS Cal Ripkin, Jr., Baltimore Orioles OF Jose Canseco, Oakland A’s OF Joe Carter, Toronto Blue Jays OF Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle Mariners C Mickey Tettleton, Detroit Tigers DH Frank Thomas, Chicago White Sox NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Will Clark, Sand Francisco Giants 2B Ryne Sandberg, Chicago Cubs 3B Howard Johnson, New York Mets SS Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds OF Barry Bonds, Pittsburgh Pirates OF Bobby Bonilla, Pittsburgh Pirates OF Ron Gant, Atlanta Braves C Benito Santiago, San Diego Padres P Tom Glavine, Atlanta Braves 1990 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Cecil Fielder, Detroit Tigers 2B Julio Franco, Texas Rangers 3B Kelly Gruber, Toronto Blue Jays SS Alan Trammell, Detroit Tigers OF Rickey Henderson, Oakland A’s OF Jose Canseco, Oakland A’s OF Ellis Burks, Boston Red Sox C Lance Parrish, California Angels P Dave Parker, Milwaukee Brewers NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Eddie Murray, Los Angeles Angels 2B Ryne Sandberg, Chicago Cubs 3B Matt Williams, San Francisco Giants SS Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds OF Barry Bonds, Pittsburgh Pirates OF Bobby Bonilla, Pittsburgh Pirates OF Darryl Strawberry, New York Mets C Benito Santiago, San Diego Padres P Don Robinson, San Francisco Giants 1989 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Fred McGriff, Toronto Blue Jays 2B Julio Franco, Texas Rangers 3B Wade Boggs, Boston Red Sox SS Cal Ripkin, Jr., Baltimore Orioles OF Kirby Puckett, Minnesota Twins OF Ruben Sierra, Texas Rangers OF Robin Yount, Milwaukee Brewers C Mickey Tettelton, Baltimore Orioles DH Harold Baines, Chicago White Sox, Texas Rangers NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Will Clark, San Francisco Giants 2B Ryne Sandberg, Chicago Cubs

3B SS OF OF OF C P

Howard Johnson, New York Mets Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds Kevin Mitchell, San Francisco Giants Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres Eric Davis, Cincinnati Reds Craig Biggio, Houston Astros Don Robinson, San Francisco Giants

OF Dave Parker, Cincinnati Reds C Gary Carter, New York Mets P Rick Rhoden, Pittsburgh Pirates 1985 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Don Mattingly, New York Yankees 2B Lou Whitaker, Detroit Tigers 3B George Brett, Kansas Royals SS Cal Ripkin, Jr., Baltimore Orioles OF Rickey Henderson, New York Yankees OF Dave Winfield, New York Yankees OF George Bell, Toronto Blue Jays C Carlton Fisk, Chicago White Sox DH Don Baylor, New York Yankees NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Jack Clark, St. Louis Cardinals 2B Ryne Sandberg, Chicago Cubs 3B Tim Wallach, Montreal Expos SS Hubie Brooks, Montreal Expos OF Willie McGee, St. Louis Cardinals OF Dale Murphy, Atlanta Braves OF Dave Parker, Cincinnati Reds C Gary Carter, New York Mets P Rick Rhoden, Pittsburgh Pirates 1984 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Eddie Murray, Baltimore Orioles 2B Lou Whitaker, Detroit Tigers 3B Buddy Bell, Texas Rangers SS Cal Ripken, Jr., Baltimore Orioles OF Tony Armas, Boston Red Sox OF Jim Rice, Boston Red Sox OF Dave Winfield, New York Yankees C Lance Parrish, Detroit Tigers DH Andre Thornton, Cleveland Indians NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Keith Hernandez, New York Mets 2B Ryne Sandberg, Chicago Cubs 3B Mike Schmidt, Philadelphia Phillies SS Garry Templeton, San Diego Padres OF Dale Murphy, Atlanta Braves OF Jose Cruz, Houston Astros OF Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres C Gary Carter, Montreal Expos P Rick Rhoden, Pittsburgh Pirates 1983 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Eddie Murray, Baltimore Orioles 2B Lou Whitaker, Detroit Tigers 3B Wade Boggs, Boston Red Sox SS Cal Ripken, Jr., Baltimore Orioles OF Jim Rice, Boston Red Sox OF Dave Winfield, New York Yankees OF Lloyd Moseby, Toronto Blue Jays C Lance Parrish, Detroit Tigers DH Don Baylor, New York Yankees NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B George Hendrick, St. Louis Cardinals 2B Johnny Ray, Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Mike Schmidt, Philadelphia Phillies SS Dickie Thon, Houston Astros OF Andre Dawson, Montreal Expos OF Dale Murphy, Atlanta Braves OF Jose Cruz, Houston Astros C Terry Kennedy, San Diego Padres P Fernando Valenzuela, Los Angeles Dodgers

1988 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B George Brett, Kansas City Royals 2B Julio Franco, Cleveland Indians 3B Wade Boggs, Boston Red Sox SS Alan Trammell, Detroit Tigers OF Kirby Puckett, Minnesota Twins OF Jose Canseco, Oakland A’s OF Mike Greenwell, Boston Red Sox C Carlton Fisk, Chicago White Sox DH Paul Molitor, Milwaukee Brewers NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Andre Galarraga, Montreal Expos 2B Ryan Sandberg, Chicago Cubs 3B Bobby Bonilla, Pittsburgh Pirates SS Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds OF Darryl Strawberry, New York Mets OF Andy Van Slyke, Pittsburgh Pirates OF Kirk Gibson, Los Angeles Dodgers C Benito Santiago, San Diego Padres P Tim Leary, Los Angeles Dodgers 1987 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Don Mattingly, New York Yankees 2B Lou Whitaker, Detroit Tigers 3B Wade Boggs, Boston Red Sox SS Alan Trammell, Detroit Tigers OF George Bell, Toronto Blue Jays OF Dwight Evans, Boston Red Sox OF Kirby Puckett, Minnesota Twins C Matt Nokes, Detroit Tigers DH Paul Molitor, Milwaukee Brewers NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Jack Clark, St. Louis Cardinals 2B Juan Samuel, Philadelphia Phillies 3B Tim Wallach, Montreal Expos SS Ozzie Smith, St. Louis Cardinals OF Andre Dawson, Chicago Cubs OF Eric Davis, Cincinnati Reds OF Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres C Benito Santiago, San Diego Padres P Bob Forsch, St. Louis Cardinals 1986 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Don Mattingly, New York Yankees 2B Frank White, Kansas City Royals 3B Wade Boggs, Boston Red Sox SS Cal Ripkin, Jr., Baltimore Orioles OF George Bell, Toronto Blue Jays OF Kirby Puckett, Minnesota Twins OF Jesse Barfield, Toronto Blue Jays C Lance Parrish, Detroit Tigers DH Don Baylor, Boston Red Sox NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Glenn Davis, Houston Astros 2B Steve Sax, Los Angeles Dodgers 3B Mike Schmidt, Philadelphia Phillies SS Hubie Brooks, Montreal Expos OF Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres OF Tim Raines, Montreal Expos

1982 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Cecil Cooper, Milwaukee Brewers 2B Demaso Garcia, Toronto Blue Jays 3B Doug DeCinces, California Angels SS Robin Yount, Milwaukee Brewers OF Dave Winfield, New York Yankees OF Willie Wilson, Kansas Royals OF Reggie Jackson, California Angels C Lance Parrish, Detroit Tigers DH Hal McRae, Kansas City Royals NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Al Oliver, Montreal Expos 2B Joe Morgan, San Francisco Giants 3B Mike Schmidt, Philadelphia Phillies SS Dave Concepcion, Cincinnati Reds OF Dale Murphy, Atlanta Braves OF Pedro Guerrero, Los Angeles Dodgers OF Leon Durham, Chicago Cubs C Gary Carter, Montreal Expos P Don Robinson, Pittsburgh Pirates 1981 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Cecil Cooper, Milwaukee Brewers 2B Bobby Grich, California Angels 3B Carney Lansford, Boston Red Sox SS Rick Burleson, California Angels OF Rickey Henderson, Oakland A’s OF Dave Winfield, New York Yankees OF Dwight Evans, Boston Red Sox C Carlton Fisk, Chicago White Sox DH Al Oliver, Texas Rangers NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Pete Rose, Philadelphia Phillies 2B Manny Trillo, Philadelphia Phillies 3B Mike Schmidt, Philadelphia Phillies SS Dave Concepcion, Cincinnati Reds OF Andre Dawson, Montreal Expos OF George Foster, Cincinnati Reds OF Dusty Baker, Los Angeles Dodgers C Gary Carter, Montreal Expos P Fernando Valenzuela, Los Angeles Dodgers 1980 AMERICAN LEAGUE 1B Cecil Cooper, Milwaukee Brewers 2B Willie Randolph, New York Yankees 3B George Brett, Kansas City Royals SS Robin Yount, Milwaukee Brewers OF Ben Oglivie, Milwaukee Brewers OF Al Oliver, Texas Rangers OF Willie Wilson, Kansas City Royals C Lance Parrish, Detroit Tigers DH Reggie Jackson, New York Yankees NATIONAL LEAGUE 1B Keith Hernandez, St. Louis Cardinals 2B Manny Trillo, Philadelphia Phillies 3B Mike Schmidt, Philadelphia Phillies SS Gary Templeton, St. Louis Cardinals OF Dusty Baker, Los Angeles Dodgers OF Andre Dawson, Montreal Expos OF George Hendrick, St. Louis Cardinals C Ted Simmons, St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Forsch, St. Louis Cardinals

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CAL STATE FULLERTON. RICE. TH E U N IVE RSITY OF TEXAS.

AWAR D

What do these three teams have in common? Each has won the College World Series during the last three years. And Check out these numbers: by no coincidence, all three chose Louis✮ Six of the past seven national colville Slugger products at the plate and in lege champions were Louisville the field at Omaha’s Rosenblatt Stadium. Slugger teams. When the country’s very best college teams ✮ Twelve of the past fourteen teams in gather each year in Omaha, Louisville the last seven College World Series Slugger’s line of TPX equipment takes a finals chose Louisville Slugger. prominent position on the mound and at ✮ Both teams in the 2004 national the plate. That’s how we have helped win championship game – Cal State

✮ LOUISVI LLE

000
AT LAST TH R E E COLLEG E WOR LD SE R I ES

SLUGG E R BATS

back-to-back-to-back College World Series Fullerton and Texas – used Louisville Slugger’s TPX line of equipment. titles and have been as much a fixture at the College World Series as hotdogs ✮ Louisville Slugger teams won nine of the fifteen games played at the and the singing of the national anthem. 2004 College World Series. Our winning stats don’t stop there. That’s why the list of Who’s Who in College Baseball – Stanford, University of Texas, Florida State, Cal State Fullerton, Rice and others – select Louisville Slugger as part of their winning teams. After all, they play to win. And Louisville Slugger TPX is the gear that can help them do it.

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The Louisville Slugger Museum

More than your standard tour, a visit to the Louisville Slugger Museum is the complete baseball experience, brought to you as only Louisville Slugger can. Interactive and full of excitement and history, the Louisville Slugger Museum is a must for any lover of the game. {WORLD’S LARGEST BAT} Start your day at the museum with a stop at the largest baseball bat in the world. A 68,000-pound steel monster, the bat is a to-scale replica of Babe Ruth’s 34-inch bat. The signature of Bud Hillerich is on the barrel, in honor of the man who turned the first Louisville Slugger in 1884. {THE THEATER} Settle down in our theater to watch “The Heart of the Game,” a thrilling insight into {THE FIELD} You leave the locker room and walk through the tunnel, the excitement building. Then you step into the dugout, and there before you is Louisville Slugger’s replica of Baltimore’s Camden

WHERE BASEBALL HISTORY

COMES TO LIFE

{THE OVAL ROOM} This is our main gallery, where you’ll see the genuine sticks swung by Ty Cobb, Ted Williams, Hank Aaron and more. Count the homerun notches Babe Ruth carved into his bat. Plus, you can learn about the history of the game and handle the oddball experimental bats of the past. And don’t forget to stand behind our umpire statue and get the feel of a pro pitcher’s heat coming at you full force. {THE FACTORY} This is where it all happens, where world-famous Louisville Sluggers are turned with the same pride that started in 1884. Witness the amazing precision that our craftsmen use when making the most famous bats in the world. You can get a personalized bat with your own

{
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FACE DOWN A 90 MPH ZINGER FROM ROGER CLEMENS.

Share a dugout with Mickey Mantle. Watch authentic Louisville Slugger bats as they are created—from start to finish. It’s all part of the thrills and fun of the LOUISVILLE SLUGGER MUSEUM.
the history of baseball and the crucial part that Louisville Slugger has played in the game over the years. You’ll discover new tales and relive some of the sport’s legendary moments. {THE GLOVE} It’s certainly not regulation. But it’s the biggest ball glove you and your buddies will ever see. Sculpted from Kentucky limestone formed 450 million years ago, the 17-ton glove sculpture was crafted by Kimberly Hillerich, the great-great granddaughter of Bud Hillerich, and Albert Nelson. The sculpture is entitled “Play Ball.” Yard. You can step into the announcer’s booth and let our recordings bring to life some of the game’s most memorable achievements —Aaron’s 715th, Ripken’s legendary swat and more. Or listen to our batboy spin yarns about the game’s bygone era. It’s a great way to help the game come alive. name on it and learn every step in the bat-making process. And all visitors get a free, miniature Louisville Slugger. {THE GIFT SHOP}

Wrap up your visit by stopping in our gift shop. You can grab your favorite

}

souvenir from our hockey, golf or baseball sections. It’s the perfect way to end your trip and take a little bit of Louisville Slugger home with you. If you’ve yet to experience the Louisville Slugger Museum, start planning your visit soon. Because if you love baseball, this is one experience you don’t want to miss.

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O

M

N

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S

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LUMBER LEGEND
THE MAKING OF A MAJOR LEAGUE LOUISVILLE SLUGGER WOOD BAT
Swing a Louisville Slugger, and you’re swinging a piece of timber that’s been around for more than 60 years. That’s how long it takes for a tree to mature into suitable lumber. In fact, you’d be surprised at how much older your wood bat is than you are. The process of making a Louisville Slugger begins with selecting the timber itself. Although maple is rapidly gaining in popularity among today’s pros, the majority of bats are made from white ash. However, not just any white ash can become a Louisville Slugger. In fact, the only ash up to Louisville Slugger standards grows along a 200-mile stretch of land on the New York-Pennsylvania border. The soil, rain, sun – everything is just right there. That’s where the best bats in the world, Louisville Slugger bats, come from.
LET’S SAY WE WANT TO MAKE A WOOD BAT. Where do we start? It all starts with lumber from the first 10 feet of the tree trunk. Everything else is furniture and firewood. AT THE MILL, the trunk is cut into 40-inch “bolts,” then the bolts are split into triangular wedges. AFTER INSPECTION, the wedges are shaped into rounded pieces called “billets.” Newly-cut lumber is moist and soft, so the billets are dried in a huge kiln oven. The wood is inspected again, and the best billets get shipped to Louisville, Kentucky, and stored until they’re ready to be turned. That’s where the magic is — where these pieces of wood are made into the legendary bats of Louisville Slugger. A BAT IS “TURNED” using a tool called a “lathe,” which holds the billet at either end and spins it like an axle. Then it touches a sharp blade to the wood, which moves in a pre-set pattern from one end to the other. Chips of wood fly like sparks, and when it’s all over, you’ve got a bat. THE NEW BAT is removed from the lathe and sanded smooth as silk, then branded with a model number and the Louisville Slugger logo. If the bat is being made for a Major League player, it’s branded with the number 125, indicating that it was made from the highest quality wood — wood with a tight, straight grain and few knots or imperfections. THE BAT IS SANDED one more time to remove any residue left by the brand, then it’s dipped in lacquer or paint and hung to dry. The finish makes the wood stronger and adds a decorative touch, although some players prefer to have their bats unfinished — just pure, natural wood. DID YOU KNOW? The first Louisville Slugger was turned way back in 1884, and the process is the same today as it was back then. But back then, everything was done by hand. Machines do it all now, so what used to take 15 minutes now takes less than 15 seconds.

HOW LOUISVILLE SLUGGER MAKES ALUMINUM BATS
In World War II, the need for lighter, faster aircraft led to a renaissance in the manufacturing and processing of aluminum. Little did anybody know, it would later lead to a technological revolution in America’s favorite pastime – a revolution that came in the form of aluminum bats. The aluminum bat was actually patented way back in 1886, just two short years after the first Louisville Slugger was carved out of a log of white ash. But it wasn’t until the 1970s that aluminum began replacing wood as the material of choice for sending baseballs flying. Today, Louisville Slugger makes more than a million aluminum bats a year. Without getting overly technical, here’s a quick look at how these durable, high-performance bats are made.
LOUISVILLE SLUGGER’S ALUMINUM bats are manufactured in Ontario, California. They start as hollow aluminum tubes, 2 5/8 inches in diameter and about 30 inches long. A MACHINE RUNS THE TUBES through a process called “swaging,” in which they’re spun and molded into the appropriate shape. Because bats are tapered at one end, the swaging process also increases the length of the tubes, leaving the finished bats at the proper length. NEXT, THE BATS SOAK for 20 minutes in a bath of molten salt heated to over 800° F. This process cures the metal at a subatomic level, making the bat stronger and more durable. AFTER COOLING OFF in a supersaturated water-based solution, the bats move to an “aging furnace” where they will endure temperatures of close to 300° for 12 - 2 4 h o u r s . T h e p r o l o n g e d h e a t strengthens the metal even further, and prepares it for the final steps in the manufacturing process. THE HOLLOW BATS are closed at one end with polyurethane caps before a welding machine adds a knob to each one. NEXT, THE BATS ARE POLISHED and silkscreen printed with impact-resistant paint, then outfitted with synthetic grips. DECALS GO ON right before the bats are packaged and sent to eager batters all over the world. Baseballs beware. There is a steady supply of aluminum Louisville Slugger TPX bats on the way. DID YOU KNOW? Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth’s crust, but it’s rarely found in its pure form. It must be extracted from other compounds using an electrical process.

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BAT
FEW
have to do your homework to find it.

HOW TO CHOOSE A
DECISIONS IMPACT YOUR GAME as

AIR CHAMBER & OTHER SPECIAL FEATURES.
Many Louisville Slugger high-performance bats feature inflatable chambers filled with nitrogen inside their barrels. A Louisville Slugger exclusive, these chambers give players a solid feel, solid sound and outstanding performance. Another exclusive Louisville Slugger feature found in select Senior League and Youth bats is the Simms Sting Stop System, which reduces the sting you feel in your hands when your bat strikes the ball.

The best way to find the right bat is to start with the sizing chart. Then try different size bats in that general length range. The bat that feels comfortable and easy to swing should be selected.

BAT SELECTION CHART.

As a general rule, bigger, stronger players usually prefer a heavier bat for maximum power. Smaller players usually benefit from a lighter bat that allows greater bat speed. To determine the weight that’s right for you, swing a variety of bats and see how much weight you’re comfortable with.

WEIGHT.

ALLOY.
Several different aluminum alloys are used in today’s bats, each with different performance and durability characteristics. Ever wondered why some bats cost $30 while others cost $300? The alloy is often the biggest factor in the price difference. Here’s a look at some of the more popular alloys: 7046: A durable, affordable alloy that has been an industry standby for years. Cu31: This time-tested alloy provides a great combination of performance and durability. It was the first true high-performance bat alloy. C405: A popular alloy used by several manufacturers for their high-end bats. C555: An alloy that includes scandium, C555 is 10% stronger than C405. Scandium XS: Exclusively from Louisville Slugger, this alloy features twice the scandium found in bats made by other manufacturers, giving it even greater strength than C555. ST+20: Designed exclusively for Louisville Slugger by Alcoa, ST+20 is the strongest alloy on the bat market today. If you’re looking for the ultimate high-performance alloy, this is it.

Length and weight combine for peak performance. A longer bat gives you greater reach, allowing you to hit balls on the outside of the plate. But remember that a longer bat may be heavier, and the extra weight could slow you down. Like checking the weight, you need to swing bats of different lengths to decide what length best suits you.

LENGTH.

ALUMINUM BAT CARE TIPS
LIMIT THE BAT TO YOUR
INDIVIDUAL USE ONLY.

.

FEEL.

much as choosing the perfect bat. You want a bat that’s the right weight, right length and right barrel size for you — and within your budget. Improvements in technology have given today’s ball player more options than ever, so you’re sure to find a bat that feels like it was custom-made for you. You just

Most players 12 and under use a 2 1/4” barrel. This is the standard barrel size for Dixie Youth and Little League baseball, although some leagues and travel teams are using larger 2 3/4” barrels. Highschool and college players are restricted to a maximum barrel diameter of 2 5/8”.

BARREL DIAMETER .

This may be the most important factor. Make sure the bat feels right to you, like an extension of your arm and hand. After all, you’re going to be spending quite a bit of time together.

.

.

ROTATE THE BAT 1/4
TURN EACH SWING.

BELOW

DO NOT USE IN TEMPERATURES 60° (16° C).

.

DO NOT HIT WATERLOGGED BALLS.

Unless you’re in the pros or playing in a wood-bat league, we’ll assume that you’ll be swinging aluminum. Here are a few tips to keep in mind when making your selection:

Virtually all leagues have their own bat requirements and restrictions. For example, high school and college requirements call for BESR-certified bats. To avoid costly surprises, make sure you know all league requirements before you go bat shopping.

LEAGUE REQUIREMENTS.

You want to be comfortable and confident with your bat before you swing it in a win-or-lose situation, so take it to the practice field or batting cage and get in a few hits. Confidence can only come from one thing: batting practice. Whatever bat you choose, put in plenty of practice time, so you’ll be ready when the pressure’s on at the plate.

SO YOU’VE CHOSEN YOUR BAT. NOW WHAT?

.

DO NOT STORE THE BAT IN
EXTREME HOT OR COLD TEMPERATURES, SUCH AS IN A CAR TRUNK OR GARAGE.

.

.

DO NOT CLEAN METAL SPIKES OR
CLEATS WITH YOUR BAT.

I F USING A SOFTBALL BAT, DO NOT USE BALLS THAT EXCEED 400 LBS. COMPRESSION. USE WITH LEATHER- COVERED BALLS ONLY, NOT PLASTIC OR RUBBER CAGE BALLS.

.

.

ROUTINELY CHECK YOUR PLASTIC END CAP AND REPLACE IT IF IT CRACKS OR BECOMES LOOSE.

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{

There are as many myths and methods to breaking in a baseball glove as there are players in Major League Baseball. Some pretty bizarre substances and practices have been endorsed over the years — from rubbing in shaving cream to running over the glove with a car — to soften the mitt and suit it to your hand. But when it comes down to it, there are a few proven methods that can get your glove in game condition.

}

HOW TO BREAK IN A BASEBALL GLOVE
SOFTEN THE LEATHER.
To conform your glove to your hand and your game, the first step is to soften the leather. Any number of creams, oils and foams will do the job. Most pros prefer Neetsfoot Oil. But no matter what you choose to soften your mitt with, remember that less is more and that too much oil or foam will not get you closer to your goal. In fact, it will probably damage your glove. So remove the excess product after you have applied it, and don’t over-moisten the leather. You want a nice, round, roomy pocket for your glove when you’re fielding grounders or snatching those line-drive bullets out of the air. The tried-and-true method for achieving this is to place a ball firmly where you want your pocket to be and then close your glove securely around the ball by tying a shoestring around it or using a large rubber band. Because time is needed to get the pocket started, let the glove sit for a day or two while the shape starts to form.

MOLD THE POCKET.

SOMETIMES A NAME JUST SUMS IT ALL UP.
We know — the “D” word is not to be used lightly. But if anyone’s got a record in Omaha to back it up, it’s Louisville Slugger. That’s why the names DynastyTM and Omaha® felt right at home on the barrels of our newest bats. Tune in to the College World Series June 17-26/27 to see the newest Omaha and the aptly named Dynasty with ST+20 alloy in action.
THE OFFICIAL BAT OF AMERICA’S PASTIME.
www.slugger.com
TM

Of course the best way to create your pocket and match your glove to your hand is to use the glove. Before you take it out to the game, grab a buddy and catch some balls. This, more than anything else, will help you form the glove to your hand.

PLAY BALL!

should last many years, so patience and dedication should be used when breaking it in. If you follow these guidelines, you should be able to hand the glove down to your kids when they’re ready to get in the game.

A GOOD GLOVE

© 2005 Hillerich & Bradsby Co., Louisville, KY. All rights reserved.

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OTHERS MAKE BATS. WE MAKE HISTORY.

THE OFFICIAL BAT OF AMERICA’S PASTIME.TM
www.slugger.com

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