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Kate Freeman and Jessica Mannion Professor Hendricks, Cooperating Teacher: Mrs.

Hopke 11 AM-11:45 AM, September 26, 2013 Mott Elementary School ELE 301-02 1. Title or Topic of the Lesson and Grade Level Learning to Read and Write the Numbers 4 and 5, Kindergarten 2. Lesson Essential Question(s): Can students read and write the numbers four and five?

3. Standards: K.CC.3 Write Numbers from 0-20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).
4. A. Learning Objectives and Assessments: B. Assessments: Learning Objectives Students will be able to associate a physical amount of objects (or a picture with x amount of objects) with the numeral and word that is associated with this quantity. Assessments Student completion of the Read and Write Worksheet for numbers 4 and 5 (p. 30-31) and student responses to teacher questions (for example: when students are asked “how many shapes are on the felt board?” and are given the opportunity to replicate the numerals ‘4’ and ‘5’ they will be able to do this with success) Student completion of the Read and Write Worksheet for numbers 4 and 5 (p. 30-31)

Students will be able to read and write the numeral ‘4’ and the numeral ‘5’ and will be able to read and write ‘four’ and ‘five.’ 5.

Materials: Sentence Strips with the Lesson Standards and Objectives on them Demi’s Count The Animals 1-2-3 Felt Board with Sets of 4 and 5 Felt Houses Thirty Copies of McGraw Hill, My Math Volume 1 Thirty Pencils Teacher’s Edition of McGraw Hill, My Math Volume 1 Plastic Cubes (Sets of 4 and 5; 9 cubes will be given per student) 30 blank sheets of construction paper Large post-it paper, and markers

6 . Pre-lesson assignments and/or prior knowledge: Prior to our lesson, students have been working on being able to count up to 100. We got the opportunity to help Mrs. Hopke perform a Pre-Year Assessment; students were asked to

”  “How many bear cubs are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. today we will be learning how to read and write the numbers four and five. How many bees are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. How many flowers are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers.” After each question we will count out loud as a class together. 2. How many worms are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. or number of objects physically shown to them if the number of shapes does not surpass a one digit number.”  “How many large elephants are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers.”  “How many ducklings are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers.”  “How many small elephants are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. Lesson Beginning: The instructors will begin the lesson by reading Demi’s Count the Animals 1-2-3. How many tiger tails are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. How many tiger tails are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. “How many houses are on the felt board?” for various examples of 4 and 5 houses. Instructional Plan:  We will begin our lesson by asking students to come to the carpet.  “How many rhinos are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. The teachers will ask students the following questions while reading the book.”  “How many bear cubs are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. Students will be instructed to hold up fingers that represent the amount of animals depicted on a given page. 7.”  We will put our felt board on the easel at the front of the room.”  “How many large elephants are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. When four houses are on the board students will be asked. We will stop on page 10 when we have reviewed how to count up to the number 5.”  “How many ducklings are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers.  We will Read Demi’s Count the Animals 1-2-3 aloud to our class to review how to count to 4 and 5. How many bees are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. How many worms are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers.identify numbers in print that went as high as ’28.”  “How many small elephants are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. They all have the ability to count the number of shapes represented in print. We will review counting to four and five with the students. How many flowers are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers.”  “How many tigers are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. Students also have been taught lessons similar to ours on the numbers 1. “How many houses will there be if we add one more house to the felt board?” . This will serve to engage and motivate our students for the activity we will be performing (reading and writing the numbers 4 and five). and struggled with two-digit numerals. and 3 in the week prior to our lesson.’ Almost all students were able to identify single-digit numerals automatically. and sit in their rows ‘criss-cross applesauce’ with their hands in their laps.  The following questions will be asked while this book is read to the class:  “How many rhinos are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers.”  “How many tigers are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. students will be asked.  We will state the objectives for the lesson to students. 8.

Before these questions are asked students will be reminded not to call out so that their peers have time to think of their answers to the question. Before these questions are asked students will be reminded not to call out so that their peers have time to think of their answers to the question. Instruct students to put their pointer finger on number four. We will explain. Instruct students to put their pointer finger on number two. and show students slowly how to write these numbers on the chart paper. (Instructors will walk around and check student work) Students will be asked to hold up their pointer fingers and place it on the group of five objects (five bricks). Students will be instructed to put their pointer on number one. (The workbook. Instruct students to turn to page 33 in their workbooks. Students will be asked to hold up their pointer fingers and place it on the group of four objects (four cones). and a pencil) Ask students to turn to page 30 in their books. (Instructors will walk around and check student work) Students will be asked to trace the number 5 once. and will be individually asked how many stop signs there are. Ask students “How many trucks are there in this picture?” Students will be instructed to place a counter on each truck in number two. Before these questions are asked students will be reminded not to call out so that their peers have time to . Ask students “How many trucks are there in this picture?” Students will be instructed to place a counter on each truck in number four. Students will be instructed to place four counters on this group. (Instructors will walk around and check student work) Students will be asked to trace the number 4 twice. Ask students “Count the stop signs in number one. 9 plastic cubes. (Instructors will walk around and check student work) Instruct students to look at page 32 (on the right side of their workbooks). Students will be instructed to trace the number five in their workbooks. and to write the number 4 by themselves once next to the four hats. and to write the number 4 by themselves once next to the four trucks. Instruct students to trace the number 5 three times next to the five stop signs with their pencils. and will also trace the numbers 4 and 5 in the air. The materials for the next activity will already be at student’s seats. (Instructors will walk around and check student work) Students will be asked to trace the number 4 twice. The instructor will explain that ‘4’ and ‘5’ and ‘four’ and ‘five’ represent four or five physical objects. The words ‘four’ and ‘five’ will be written underneath these numerals. Before these questions are asked students will be reminded not to call out so that their peers have time to think of their answers to the question.                The instructor will then write the numerals ‘4’ and ‘5’ on the chart paper. Instruct students to put their pointer finger on number three. Students will be instructed to trace the number four in their workbooks. Ask students “How many hats are there in this picture?” Students will be instructed to place a counter on each hat in number three. How many stop signs are in this picture?” Students will be instructed to put a counter on each stop sign. Students will be instructed to place five counters on this group. Instruct students to put their pointer finger on number five. Before these questions are asked students will be reminded not to call out so that their peers have time to think of their answers to the question. and to write the number 5 by themselves twice next to the five trucks. Ask students to return to their tables.

    think of their answers to the question. The following elements also need to be considered. Ask students “How many cones are there in this picture?” Students will be instructed to place a counter on each cone in number five. How many stop signs are in this picture?” “How many trucks are there in this picture?” “How many hats are there in this picture?” “How many trucks are there in this picture?”k “How many cones are there in this picture?” “How many hammers are there in this picture?” . How many tiger tails are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. o Differentiation: Students at ‘approaching level’ will be given extra teacher instruction.” “How many ducklings are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. How many flowers are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers.” “How many large elephants are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. Before these questions are asked students will be reminded not to call out so that their peers have time to think of their answers to the question. and to write the number 5 by themselves twice next to the five hammers.” “How many small elephants are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. the instructor will answer any questions that arise. How many bees are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. (Instructors will walk around and check student work) Students will be asked to trace the number 4 once.’ Students who are ‘on level’ will be instructed to complete the activity independently. (Instructors will walk around and check student work) Students will be asked to trace the number 5 once.” “How many houses are on the felt board?” “How many houses will there be if we add one more house to the felt board?” “Count the stop signs in number one.” “How many bear cubs are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. Ask students “How many hammers are there in this picture?” Students will be instructed to place a counter on each hammer in number six. For extra practice they will be given blank paper. The instructors will ask students to point to the number four and to the number 5 individually in their workbooks. How many worms are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers.” “How many tigers are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. Questions: o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o “How many rhinos are there on this page? Hold up that many fingers. and will be asked to practice writing the numerals ‘4’ and ‘5’ without arrows to guide them. Instruct students to turn back to page 31. Instruct students to put their pointer finger on number six. Advanced students will be instructed to complete the exercise independently. Upon successful completion of this activity student workbooks will be collected and students will be permitted to get a puzzle from the front of the room to work on until lunchtime. The teacher will help students to represent a numeric quantity using manipulatives (plastic cubes) and will help students practice how to write the numerals ‘4’ and ‘5. and to write the number 4 by themselves twice next to the four cones.

When the teacher sees the student with their hands folded she will know they are finished working. . Students will be reminded to not call out before questions are asked. (*clap-clap-clapclapclap*) The workbooks and cubes will be distributed at the students tables while they are sitting at the carpet so class time isn’t wasted when the students are ready to work. Transitions: First transition: Students will be asked to come and sit on the carpet criss-cross apple sauce for the start of the lesson. the teacher will clap out a rhythm that the students know to repeat and quiet down when they hear. A teacher will come to look over their work and then dismiss the student to go get a puzzle to work on until it is time for lunch. Upon successful completion of this activity student workbooks will be collected and students will be permitted to get a puzzle from the front of the room to work on until lunchtime. the teachers will dismiss students who are sitting and waiting quietly to go back to their seat. Closure: Students will be instructed to turn back to page 31. The students will sit quietly with their hands folded when they are finished as opposed to raising their hand or shouting out “I’m done!”. 9. Third transition: Students will sit with their hands folded to show they are finished their work. The instructors will ask students to point to the number four and to the number 5 individually in their workbooks. Pencils will be in the baskets at the students’ tables. or quiet them down.o o o o o o o o Classroom Management: To regroup students. get the class’ attention. Second transition: After given directions for what they will be doing at the tables.