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Book of the Black Bass

Book of the Black Bass

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MORE ABOUT
BLACK BASS
SUIPPLEMENT
BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS
JAMES A. HENSHALL, M.D
www.kirtas.com
MORE ABOUT
BLACK BASS
SUIPPLEMENT
BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS
JAMES A. HENSHALL, M.D
www.kirtas.com

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Sections

  • CHAPTER I
  • CHAPTER II
  • CHAPTER III
  • CHAPTER IV
  • CHAPTER V
  • CHAPTER VI
  • CHAPTER VIII
  • CHAPTER IX
  • CHAPTER X
  • CHAPTER XI
  • CHAPTER XII
  • CHAPTER XIII
  • CHAPTER XIV
  • CHAPTER XVI
  • CHAPTER XVII
  • CHAPTER XVIII
  • CHAPTER XIX
  • CHAPTER XX
  • CHAPTER XXI
  • CHAPTER XXII
  • CHAPTER XXIII
  • CHAPTER XXV
  • CHAPTER XXVI

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HENSHALL.D gnUS Sllwstrated SJiCOND PRINTING CINCINNATI THE ROBERT CLARKE COMPANY 1889 . M.MORE ABOUT BLACK BASS STIPPLEM ENT BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS JAMES A.

. Alabama Copyright 1989 B. JAMES A.A. All rights reserved..S. 1889.S. HENSHALL Reproduction of MORE ABOUT THE BLACK of BASS" By Bass Anglers Sportsman Society - America* Headquarters Montgomery. Inc.Copyright.

FROM THE UBCHIN WITH FISHER WITH PIN HOOK AXD WILLOW WAND "cORk" THE TO BTlLL- SAPLIXg" "PEELED FI.TO THE ANGLING OF GUILD AMERICA.Y-PISHEB WITH AND ROD AND THE ARTISTIC CREEL. THIS BOOK IS FRATERNALLY INSCRIBED THE AUTHOR .

.

of For the new portrait myself. to illustrate their in that line. that it has been adhered to in the supplement. has induced and bring its subject-matter down to date. (V) . HENSHALL. my publishers are alone of an responsible. by cuts that have been especially pre pared for manufacturers. of illustrating specialities the and tackle. its success literary enterprise (for all of which I profoundly grateful). proved so desirable feature. and the press. I have thought it best. beyond the the correction of a few clerical and remain typographical errors. The very flattering THE Black Bass. photograph. The tools plan pursued in the using book. Decehbbb. 1888. to let and the original edition intact. as a anglers. and has been has so much commended a by anglers gener ally. and it has and received reception accorded to the Book op the favorable and notices and encomiums from naturalists. am encouraged me to For obvious reasons.PREFACE. CINCINNATI. to issue addi tional ment matter or in a separate volume in the form chapters of a supple sequel the supplemental agreeing in number and caption with those in the original original edition. It is an exact reproduction excellent JAMES A.

.

Optics CHAPTER of Angling Hearing. . Black Bass CHAPTEE VII. . CHAPTER shall Fishing Eeels Improvements in Eeels of Click Eeels Multiplying Line New Reels XI. CHAPTEE X. Fishing and Implements. . ent Geographical Habits of Distribution Original Habitat Pres Eange Transplantation in New Waters.. CHAPTEE Eod Rod Henshall IX. Cause of Coloration of Black Bass .. PART PIRST.. Black Bass Nomen I.. of 15 CHAPTER III. Reels . Terminology. Morphology. Nomenclatdre and Morphology of additional Generic acterizations and specific descriptions authors.. . by the and Cuvier of and author type specimens. 101 (vii) . Scientific settled History op Linnaean specimens specimens Valenciennes' Identification Lacep^dn's.. Intelligence and Special Senses . Tackle. op CHAPTER IV. Comparative .. On Inland Bass Waters with Black 62 Bass In Transportation Black Black Bass in England GermanyIn Scotland In Holland. in Rods Henshall of Rods Improvements Dowel-Mortise Joint Rod Non-Dowel Joint Power Sta'idmd Rods of . CH APTB R V..TABLE OF CONTENTS. Tools. PART SECOND. CHAPTEE clature amd the Physiology.Fishing Lines New Various Makers. 11 char CHAPTEE II. Stocking of 56 VIII.. 88 Lines for Bait-FishingHen Lines for Fly-Fishing Metal Center Lines. Spawning and HatchingExperiences in Bass-culture Nest Building Pood and Growth Food of Young and Adult 48 Hibernation. Coloration of .. Young 39 41 Coloration. Various Makers Fly Rods Henshall Fly 09 Steel Rods. CHAPTEE VI.. . . Qualities Opinions Changes Anglers. . General and Special Features and the Black Game 29 Bass Black Bass of of Texas Arkansas . Smell Sight .

PART THIRD. Anglers' Miscellaneous Pliers Rod Implements and Fly Books Minnow Leader Bc.xes Buckets Landing Nets Disgorgers Extractors Holder Wading Shoes Pishing 131 Boats.. Chubs. Artificial Flies Killing Flies Table . Angling CHAPTEE Art xvm... Popularity Extraordinary Minnow-Casting.. Nomenclature 125 CHAPTER XVI. . and of . CHAPTEE XIII. CHAPTEE Conditions Governing Best Time fcir Black the Biting . Artificial Baits Evolution of Trolling . Trolling Fishing CHAPTER A for Count Retrospection. Trolling at Murderous Sportsmen. CHAPTER worm Silkworm GutExperiments with or American Silk Gut Native Silkworms Leaders Snells. SceneJuslification . of . Still-Fishinq Angling of Fisher A igj Boyhood The our . Casting the Minnow Capabilities of the Min of now-Casting Henshall Rod CHAPTER Rod Mascalonge Red-FishTarpon . .. a Fishing. Bobbing and . Pot-Fishing jqa XXV. as a Bass Game of Brook Trout is Black Bass Black Bass not Disappearing The Survival of Why the the Fittest The and Fish Piscivorous Comparison Salmon. Happy CHAPTER Still XXIV. . Philosophy of Angling ... for Black Bass Mod ern Art General Instructions . jgg Gogebic . Minnows. Concluding Remarks.A Labor of Labor The Last Love The .171 Reminiscence.. Spoons- Triple Hook Hammered Spoons Artifioinl Artiflcial Minnows Adjustable .. XIV. ... XXIII.. Fish 162 When Fishes Feed XX. On Lakes . J59 CHAPTER XIX. . CHAPTER XV. Flies . Skittering Bobbing- Tropical . Fly and Spoon Mouse.. . Natural Baits . CHAPTER XXII. 129 Shiners. 165 CHAPTER A XXLFly-Fishing Fly-Fishing Advice On ..vill Xll... Trout. of Flies 119 Henshall's Fluttering Fly. Cast. XXVI. CHAPTER Reward of Bobbing in Florida Trolling.114 Spelling CHAPTEE Tying Hooks. The and and Fly-Fishing. . . Streams . CHAPTER XVII. ... of Angling . as an Beauties Love Angling. Hooks Numbering . .. . Fish and Hooks Eyed Huoks 105 Snoods. Skittering. The Angling. TABLE OF CONTENTS. ..

AND PHYSIOLOGY. TERMINOLOGY.PART I. MORPHOLOGY. .

.

These the Indiana L^niversity Zoology Bloomington. viz. can " of other are.: as proposed mouthed mouthed by Mieropterus dolomieu for the small- Bass. I MAY be pardoned restoration of for referring to the fact that the Lacepede's names for the Black Bass species. has been fully concurred in and adopted by with the ichthyologists connected the Smithsonian of Institu tion at at Washington. C. SCIENTIFIC HISTORY OF THE BLACK BASS. CHAPTER I. In this connection. it is interesting to note that Linnaeus had two specimens of the large-mouthed Black Bass sent to him years by Dr.SUPPLEMENT BOOK OF THE BLAOK BASS. S. which does not seem probable. older names should be discovered. some thirty drawing and description of the (11) . Garden. names the Museum Comparative at Cambridge. as Professor Goode of and grounded now upon a firm foundation unless priority. and says. me. sent of before Bosc his Charleston. institutions. and Mieropterus salmoides for the largeBass." not be changed.

12
same

SUPPLEMENT

TO

THE

BOOK

OP

THE

BLACK

BASS.

species

to

Lacepede ;

but Linne failed

to

describe

them.
"Alexander Garden,*
of

one

the

earliest

American

natural

ists,
the
and

was a physician,
middle of

resident century.

in

the last

Charleston, South Carolina, in He was an enthusiastic collector,
the
great

in

constant correspondence with

Swedish

natural
upon
'

ist,

many

of

his

letters,

with

the accompanying notes
volumes of

his

collections,

being

preserved

in the two

Smith's

Cor

Linnseus.'

respondence of
"

He

was

to

science

more especially a in that department
applied

botanist,
are

and

his

contributions

fitly

commemorated

by

the

name

Gardenia,

by Linnseus,
a

in his

honor,
that

to the

beauti
aud
of

ful Cape Jessamine.
was so careful and

He collected, also,
are

reptiles and

fishes,

conscientious

preparator
still

almost

all

the fishes
the
other

sent

by
of

him to Sweden
which

fishes
state

upon

Linne

worked are
most
of

in existence, though in a much less sat

isfactory
gone
"

preservation,

and

them, indeed, have

to destruction.
method

Garden's

was

to

skin

half

of

the

fish, leaving
varnish

the

vertical

and glue

fins attached, to press it in a botanical press, it to a sheet of herbarium paper.
specimens are

it,

"These

preserved

in the

rooms of

the Linnaean

Society
"

of

London,
summer
of

in Burlingtou
and of

House,

in

connection with

the

Linnaean herbarium

library.

In the

1883, by
the

the courtesy

of

Dr. William
permitted

Murie,

librarian

the Linnsean
of

make a careful

study

Society, Linnaean fishes,
as

we were and

to

especially

of

the
all

American
collected

forms, by Garden,
American
and

which

were,

and

which

has been remarked, almost were named and described

by
G.

*0n 193.

the

Fishes in

the Linnaean Collection.

Brown Goode

Tarleton H. Bean.

By

<Proc. U. 8. Nat. Mus

isSS

SCIENTIFIC

HISTORY

OF THE

BLACK

BASS.

13

Linnfe, in
tures.
.

the
.
.

tenth

and

twelfth

editions

of

his Sydema Na

"Linne had two

examples of

the large-mouth Black Bass from
not

Garden (Nos. 8
described the
"

and

40, Garden), but he does
with

seem

to have

species.

For No. 8, page 306.
"

see

Correspondence

Linne,

311 ; for 40,

see

No. 40 is labeled thus

by Garden :
No. 40. Labrus.
Nostralib.

Fresh-watkr Trout.

Since the

publication of pleasure of

the

"

Book

of

the Black

Bass,"

personally examining the orig inal type species in the Mu seum D'Histoire Naturelle, in the Jardin des Plantes, at
specimens of

I have had the

the Black Bass

Paris. Lacepede's
mouthed

type

specimen

of

M.
12

dolomieu,
and

the

small-

Bass (referred to
about
of

on

pp.

41),*
a

is

a

fine

example,
good

a

foot in

length,
It

and

is in

remarkably
a
small-

state

preservation.

is

undoubtedly

mouthed

Bass.
specimens sent and

The two
14
and

to the

museum

by

43),
are

from
"

one of

which

the figure in

Milbert (pp. Cuvier and
"

Valenciennes'

Histoire

Naturelle

des
one

Poissons

was

taken,
and

both large-mouthed

Bass,

being fully
sent

eight,
to the

the

other about six specimens

inches in length.

The four
*Book
of

from the Wabash river,

the Black

Bass, 1881.

14

SUPPLEMENT

TO

THE

BOOK

OF

THE

BLACK

BASS.

museum

by Le

Sueur (pp. 14

and

43),

are all small-mouthed

Bass,
the

the largest

being

at

least fifteen inches in length,
long.
with

and

others about one-third as

I
N.
of

am

very

glad of

to have had the opportunity,

Hon.

Longworth,

Cincinnati (an

old

Black Bass angler),
of

verifying Dr. Jordan's identification referred to in his paper on page 41.

these specimens,

CHAPTER II.
NOMENCLATURE AND MORPHOLOGY.

Genus MICROPTERUS Lacepede.
ADDITIONAL SYNONOMY AND

REFERENCES.

Gunther, Cat. Fishes Brit. Mus., i, 252, 1859. GiJNTBER, Cat. Fishes Brit. Mus. i, 255, 1859. Grystes GUnther, Intro. Study of Fishes, 392, 1880. Huro GiJNTHEE, Intro. Study of Fishes, 393, 1880. Mcropterus Cope, Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus., xvii, 32, 1880. Mieropterus Cope, Rept. Pa. Fish Com., 130, 1881. Mcropterus Jordan and Gilbert, Syn. Fishes N. A., 484, Mierc^terus Jordan, Geol. Surv. Ohio, iv, 942, 1882. MA&ropterus Gill, Standard Nat. Hist., iii, 230, 1885. Mieropterus Jordan, Manual Vertebrates, 120, 1888.
Euro
,

Grystes

1882.

Generic Characterizations.
Grystes
the

Giinther,

1880.-

"Body

oblong, covered

with

scales

of moderate size. on
vomer and

All the teeth villiform, without canines ; teeth palatine bones. One dorsal fin with ten spines ;
caudal

anal

with

three ;

fin

rounded.

Prseoperculum

with

a

One species, from the fresh waters of the United States (G. sahnonoides), attains to a length of more than Growler,' two feet. It is known by the name of ' and
single smooth margin.

eaten."

(Gunther, Introduction to Study of Fishes, 393, 1880.) Huro Giinther, 1880. "Body oblong, compressed,
with scales of moderate size,

covered
of

AU the teeth

villiform

; bones

(15)

and as As. " This genus embraces species.. relegated name should The characters thus de Under ordinary circumstances. acterized as Mieropterus. Nat. They ap the Labraces in forra. the fin much smaUer 10 in number. 1882. the low and rather anal spines 3 . of their fins parts. 1880. than the dorsal .) MiCROPTERUS well-marked Cope. Preopercle weakly a ctenoid. Mouth very large. in the struct <^Bept. the Com. Dorsal fin divided by deep notch. be adopted. 1881. S. specimen. The next name in order is CaUiurus Raf." and other (Cope. name Mieropterus has rus ionally. com elevated. the broad maxillary reaching nearly to or beyond the posterior margin of the eye. caudal feeble. Fishes of Pa. Lateral line spines anal continuous.) Jordan. oblique. however. vomer and entire ous . Mouth rather oblique. its supplemental bone weU developed. Head oblong-conic. and was almost as badly char This name should. The ' Black Bass ' of Two dorsal fins. none prominent. as its characters were drawn from normal objects. Intro. I retain the former (Cope. without cartilagin Branchiostegals normally 6. however. BuU. 393. 1880. 130. Fish MiCROPTERUS pressed. . nigrica (Gun ther. operculum flap. on Teeth on jaws. Mus.16 supplement to the book of tiie black bass. 32. U. 1880. that the name and characters of here that it were seems the genus Mieropterus based on a monstrous or mutilated rived were false be and absurd. xvii. " I may MiCROPTERUS Cope. the CaUi'uprovis is peculiarly false in significance. with with the lower jaw " projecting. usually ending in two flat points. the first Lake Huron (Huro add six spines. but are most like the extinct genus from the eocene of Miophsus. which are found every-where only two in eastern proach North America south and west of the Potomac river. 1881. palatines Lower jaw ." obtained some curreucy. Study of Fishes. Scales rather small. back not much "Body elongate-ovate. this to the limbo of undeterminable myths. the head without serrature. ure the Rocky Mountains.. which is only applica ble to young fishes of this genus. Pa. the tongue.

Geol. 942.NOMENCLATURE AND MORPHOLOGY. 1882. Mus. A. . MiCROPTERUS ceding one. Nat. the leaving . Bean. 948 Jordan.. Mieropterus dolomieu 1882. Nat. U. S. portant American 'game-fishes. i. 485. iii. Syn. salmoides Mieropterus 1880. slight development the the of the spines. Rept. Gilbert. Pro. Mieropterus 37. S. 230. large. among the most im (Jordan and Gilbert..) is MICROPTERUS DOLOMIEU Lacepede THE SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS. salmoides Goode.) Jordan. xiv. 49. Com. dorsal. xviii. Fish U. 1880. BuU. of Size large. Pro. a considerable emargination the bulk of spinous and soft portions. 1882. A. S. 484. Gill. additional SYNONOMY AND REFERENCES. and Mus.) 1885. Mus. iii. 1882.. Surv. Nat. The operculum has a spiniform projection mouth emarginated.) (Same description as the pre "This of (Jordan. 1879.'" Two species. Fishes iv. Ohio. Hist. 96 salrmides Cope. 93. 1882. salmoides Mieropterus GooDE. BuU. 28.. Mieropterus dolomieu Joedajt N. 1885. Syn." (Gill. Bull. Pa. Mieropterus 1881. Nat. Nat. S. Standard Noi. U. Geol. 17 fin emarginate. Fishes N. U. genus MiCROPTERUS especially the to the soft is distinguished the low by and the comparatively elongate form the body. and the caudal Hist. 1876 Mieropterus salmoides Nelson. Mus. S. Ohio. 130 1881 Mieropterus dolomieu McKay. <iBull. xvi. State Lab.. iv. .. iv. Ills. V.. Nat. Mus. Surv. which decrease between portion.

Forbes. viii. Fishes N.. Nat. Fish. vi. 1884. i. 401. S.. 1885. Sci. 231. Pro. S. 67. Bollman. His. Industries U. Rept. S. S.. Cat. Pro. 8. 7. A. Gill. and Mus. Nat. Ac. 1883. Fishes. 5. Mieropterus dolomiei Eigenmann Nat. 1886. Nat. vi. 365. 1888.. Schwar/barsch. 13. 1883. 464. U. U. Colvin Mieropterus dolomieu Mather. Mieropterus dolomiei 1884. American Fishes. . 1886. Lye. 1886. Mieropterus dolo7niei Jordan and Meek. U. aud xxvii. Ind. N. Jordan. Mieropterus dolomiei Mieropterus dolomiei Bean. Mieropterus dolomiei Von Borne. 1886.. Brook. Mieropterus dohmiei Bean. Hist. Ann.. Goode. 7. Bull. Adirond.. Pro. Surv. 5. Fish Com. and Mieropterus dolomiei Jordan Gilbert. Die Fischzucht. BuU. 1885. 1883. Fhil. ii.. etc. Mieropterus dulvmiei 1888. Rept. Agric... 17. Manual Vertebrates.. Mus. 411. and Mieropterus dohmieit Jordan Evermann. Nat. Standard Nat. Pro. 54. and Mieropterus dolomiei Evermann Y. iii. Mieropterus dolomieu Goode. U. . 120. 502. Nat. 148. 3. 1885. 339. Soc. dem Mieropterus dolomieu VoN Borne.. 249. Hist. Pro. Hist. Mus. S. Fordice. Mus. Mieropterus dolomiei Jordan. U. Mieropterus dolomiei Evermann. seo. Mieropterus dolomieu 1885. 1886. Mieropterus dolomiei Jordan Swain.18 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS.. 12. dem 1885. Nat. 1886. ix. Mus. Nat.

1882. i. Dorsal fin ninth spine salmoides. 1881." parts of the state. scales on thc trunk so as compar atively small. lat. Nat. all 1876. but never . MiCROPTERUS SALMOIDES Nelsou. which tend to form bronze luster . <iRept. quite variable.. g. Small-mouthed . anal. and not much shorter than the tenth.. ninth I. in nearly (Nelson. Scales on dorsal developed sheath Scales as a of deep (involving the last spine) of small those on back. 4. 1876. the but smaller than in M. pectoral.nomenclature and morphology. each and with series differentiated from advancing high up the mem scales or brane behind ray (except last two each ray. scales of trunk small (e. <^Bull. covering only about half the width of the bone. Partial Cat. the orbit. Scales margin on anal ascending high behind Mouth moderate. the maxillary ending margin of siderably in front cheek the hinder about Scales on minute. Body " becoming of deeper with age. gr. but less being about half as long Coloration than in M. nigiicans']. Supramaxof orbit Ulary ending considerably in front of hinder (about under hinder border of pupil). depressed. 37. " Like tbe and proced- ing IM. darker spots short vertical bars. the longest. with along the sides. sahmides. a about 17 rows in of an line and about 9 in horizontal one). 17. DOLOMIEU Jordan Com. Fishes of Pa. between lateral line Scales on nape and breast much smaller and back. the deeply notched. Fish and Doi'sal fin little half shorter than the tenth. Scales interoperculum uuise- rial. Fishes IUs. 11 rows). preopeicular limb none. Hist. line.) Gilbert. spine and being a the longest Qi. Ills. 19 Specific Descriptions. Scales of cheeks minute (e. equal " than those of sides." (Cope. rays articulated. State Lab.. three). MiCROPTERUS ovate-fusiform. 130. 1881. Dorsal 13 . 72-75. 5). 16-1. the young dull golden-green. only about a fourth shorter than Pa. the 10-11 . between oblique or bit and preoperculum. III. Mouth con large. in 17 rows .) MiCROPTERUS SALMOIDES Cope. found in numbers. Head large.

20

SUPPLEMENT

TO

THE

BOOK

OF

THE

BLACK

BASS.

a

dark lateral band ; 3 bronze bands radiating from
;
a

eye

across

cheeks and opercles white

dusky

spot on point of operculum

;

belly
tips ;

;

caudal

fin

yellowish at

base,

then

black,
In
are

with white

dorsal
the

with

markings

brouze spots, its edge dusky. are obsolete, but usually they

some waters the fin-

very

conspicuous

in

youug.

Southern
the

specimens

lower

part of all

sides with

usually have the scales of the faint dark streaks ; adult specimens

have

these

marks more or
uniform

ultimately of a 3^; depth 3J.

less wholly obliterated, and become dead-green, without silvery luster. Head

Rivers

of

the

X, 13; A. Ill, 10 or 11 ; Scales 11-74-17. United States, from the Great Lake region to South
D.

Carolina
and

and

Arkansas ; abundant,
clear and cool waters

frequenting

running streams,

; its southern limit is bounded preferring by the presence of such waters. As a game-fish this species is (Jordan and usually more highly valued than its
congener."

Gilbert, 1882.)
as

Syn. Fishes N. A.
DOLOMiF.u
one.)

<^BuU.

U. S. Nat.

Mus.,

xvi,

485,

MiCROPTERUS
the preceding

Jordan, 1882. (Same description (Jordan, Geol. Surv. Ohio, iv, 948, Bean,
1883.
"This is
a

1882.)
MiCROPTERUS
and

DOLOMIEI

beautiful
as well
as

hardy

game

natural

U. S. Nat.
found
ward

baits, Mus.,

fish, extensively taken and largely sold in the
xxvii,

by

artificial

markets."

(Bean, B^uU.
is

464, 1883.)

MiCROPTERUS
north

DOLOMIEI
47

Goodc,

1884.
to

"The

small-mouth
whUe

to latitude
to

and west

Wisconsin,
and

south

it

ranges

latitude
of

33,

where

Professor Jordan found it

in the headwaters

the Chattahoochee

Ocmulgee rivers, the

latter

ing
sec.

being the only instance of its presence in a stream empty east of the Alleghanies into which it is not known to have
by i, 401, 1884.)
man."

been introduced

(Goode, Fishery Industries of U. S., Forbes, 1884.
more

MiCROPTERUS
and

DOLOMIEI

"Abundant in rivers

larger creeks, but occurring

rarely in

lakes, preferring

NOMENCLATURE

AND

MORPHOLOGY.

21 It
of
occurs

swifter

water

than

the

preceding

[other]

species.

throughout

Illinois,

been taken

by

us

but is relatively rare to the in the Wabash aad some other

southward.

Has

its larger
river."

tributaries, but not elsewhere south of the Illinois <^Rept. IUs. Stole Fish (Forbes, Cat. Native Fishes Ills.

Com,

67, 1884.)
MiCROPTERUS
DOLOMIEU
mouth

GiU,

1885.

"The

small-mouthed

Black Bass has the
of

the

adult

does

not

the maxillary comparatively small, the scales are con extend beyond the orbit ;
and
seventy-two

siderably smaller, there being the lateral line, and as many as ten

to

seventy-five rows

or

twelve

along between the
region of

lateral line
the
great

and

back.
and

It does
not

not extend north of
reach

the

lakes,

is

known to In

farther

south

than

South Carolina
with the

and

Arkansas.
species.

most

places

it is

associated

large-mouthed

large

a size as

its

relative."

It does not, as a rule, reach as (Gill, Standard Nat. Hist. , vol. iii,
"

231, 1885.)
The small-mouth Mather, 1886. was introduced into Brown's tract inlet, flowing into Racquette lake, some years ago, by the New York Fish Commission, and now they are plentiful in the lake and are working down into
MiCROPTERUS
DOLOMIEU

Forked lake lent theory
mouth or
'

and

toward

Long
is
'

lake.

.

.

.

There is

a

preva

that this
Oswego'

gamier'

species

than its cousin, the bigam

Bass,

an opinion

that I

not

prepared

to

indorse,
both
rond.

as

were

I have found but little difference between them when under two pounds (Mather, Colvin's Adi
weight."

Surv., Fishes, 5, 1886.)
DOLOMIEU

MiCROPTERUS
"This
the
species state.

Jordan

and

Evermann,
game

1886.

is usuaUy It frequents

placed clear

first among the

fishes

of

waters, especially those

with

some

current,

and

is

averse to mud.

It is

much

less

frequently
and

found
Ever

in

ponds

than the large-mouthed

Bass."

(Jordan
"

mann, Ind. Agric. Report, 13, 1886.) MiCROPTERUS dolomiei Goode, 1888.

The

oldest name

for

22
the

SUPPLEMENT

TO

THE

BOOK

OF

THE

BLACK

BaSS.

large-mouth
as

mouth,

is Mieropterus salmoides; and for the smallHenshaU has proved, Mieropterus dohmiei. It is hoped
which

that this

decision,

is

grounded

upon a

firm foundation

of

priority, may be permitted to ican Fishes, 54, 1888.)

unchange

stand

(Goode, Amer

MiCROPTERUS
growing deep ; dorsal less
ninth

DOLOMIEU

Jordan,

1888.

"

with

age;

scales on
notched as

the

cheek

Body ovate-oblong, small, in about 17

rows

deeply
about

than

in the

the

spine

half

long

as

\_M. salmoide.^'] ; the longest. Coloration
next

; the young dull golden -green, with darker spots on sides, which tend to cluster in short vertical bars ; three bronze
variable

bauds

across cheeks with

;

caudal

yellowish,

next

black,

with

a white

tip Head, 3J; depth 3J.
11-72 to 75-17.
dan, Manual of

; dorsal

bronze

spots.

Adult nearly uniform olive-green. D. X, 13. A. IH, 10. Scales, 10 or
pounds."

L. 1 to 2 feet ; weight, 2 to 7

(Jor

Vertebrates, 120, 1888.)

MICROPTERUS SALMOIDES

(Lac) Henshau..

THE LARGE-MOUTHED BLACK BASS.
ADDITIONAL SYNONOMY AND

REFERENCES.

1849

Holbrook, Cat. Fauna and Flora. <Statistics of Ga., 16. Mieropterus salmoides McKay, Pro. U. S. Nat. Mus., iv,
sahmides

Grystes

93, 1881.
Mieropterus
salmoides

Goode

and

Bean,

Pro. U. S. Nat.

Mus., V, 238, 1882. Mieropterus salmoides Jordan
N.

and

Gilbert, Syn.

Fishes

A., 484,

1882.

Mkropterus 1882.

salmoides

Jordan, Geol. Surv. Ohio, iv, 952, Hay,
Bull. U. S. Fish

Mieropterus 1882.

salmoides

Com., ii, 64,

nomenclature

and

morphology.

23

Mieropterus

salmoides

Bean,

Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus. , xxvii, Fish. Industries U.

446, 502, 1883.
Mieropterus
salmoides

Goode,

S.,

sec.

i, 401,

1884.
salmoides

Mieropterus

Gilbert, Pro. U. S. Nat. Mus.
Jordan, Pro. U. S. Nat. Mus.,

vii,

204, 209,
Mieropterus

1884.
salmoides

vii,

320, 1884. Mieropterus salmoides
1884.
Mieropterus
saimoides

FoiiBES, Rept. Ills. Fish Com., 67,

Gill, Standard

Nat.

Hist., iii, 231,

1885. Mieropterus
1885.
salmoides

Jordan, Cat. Fishes N. A., 17,
and

Mieropterus

salmoides

Jordan

Meek, Pro. U. S. Nat. Bean, Pro. U. S. Nat.

Mus.,

viii,

14, 16, 17, 1885.
Goode
and

Mieropterus

salmoides

Mus.,
Nat.

viii,

208,

1885.

Mieropterus Mieropterus Mieropterus Mieropterus Mieropterus 1886. Mieropterus
etc.,

salmoides

Jordan 1886.

and

Gilbert,

Pro. U. S,

Mus., ix, 21,
salmoides

Bollman,

Pro. U. S. Nat. Mus. ,

ix,

464, 1886.
salmoides

Evermann,
Jordan
and

Bull. Brook. Soc. Nat.

Hist., il, 7,

1886.

salmoides

Evermann,

Ind. Agric.

Rept., 13, 1886.
salmoides

Jenkins, Hoosier Naturalist, 95,
Von
dem

salmoides

Borne, Schwarzbarsch,

3,

1886.
salmoides
salmoides

Mieropterus
Mieropterus

Goode, American Fishe.s, 54, 1888. Jordan, Manual Vertebrates, 120,

1888.

36. MiCROPTERUS abundance NiGRrcANS throughout the are Nelson. Mus. 36. and is esteemed as one of the "Trout. also in the MiCROPTERUS that the FLORIDANUS Cope. Rept." best food fishes. Mieropterus nigricans Nelson. S. Mus. S. S. 49.. U. Nat. S. i. Von dem pallidus 1880 Mieropterus floridanus xvii. 497.24 1876 1879 supplement to the book of the black bass. U. the The young marshes found in the myriads in the ditches draining <iBull. State Lab.sissippi]. Pro. iii.- It is called are instead of "Bass.) (Hay.. S. .) Hay. Bull. I do not know how constant this character wiU prove. Specffic Descriptions. Nat. iii. iii. Nat. Nat. Nat Mus. 1880. Bull.. U. This is marked by a dark. 1880. xviii. pallidus Mieropterus 1880. along IUs. 1880. Mus. Cat. North. Pro. Nat. Nat. Bull." "Found in great far as I can learn. "This species is abun [in Mis. Mieropterus 1881. 96. Fishes Ills. 1876.. State Lab. "It appears then. Bean. Cope. as river. U. Ills. Mus. 497. Nat. Mieropterus 1885 sahnonoides Borne. 1876. pallidus Hay. . 1880. MiCROPTERUS dant the every-where Hist. only important character which distinguishes the Texan form from the Floridian is the much smaUer size of the cheek scales. Hist . 148. Pro.. Goode. salmoides [Jf. Bull. Mus." as at The young sometimes interrupted. U. 131. S. pallidus Calumet (Nelson. found sometiraes There is often a small patch of feeble teeth dolomieu^." on the tongue of both this species and M. Mieropterus 1880. 28. Fish Com. state [Illinois]. conspicuously lateral band. Cope. paUidiis Mieropterus xiv. Pa. U. Fischzucht. Mieropterus pallidus Goode. adults.. i. 31.

the ninth spine being only the about a fourth as Ipng as the longest. Fishes of Pa. Body com becoming deiper moderately Mouth very wide. Nat. pressed. large. Coloration of the young dark-green a above . g. Scales on reaching the cheek in about 10 rows ." (Cope. 10. sides and below greenish-sUvery . moderately small (e. III. ascending comparatively little (none behind last five or six). covering or not much (on nape). jr. S. in imperfect as a (e. 1882. anal. 32.. 11). 25 Perhaps some of the names recently given to the Mexican forms may be applicable to a variety so defined. 14). (on breast). age. Scales of interoperculum uniserial. xvii. and half as long as tenth. 12 (I. 14 (1.. " 1881. g. 65-70 .) MiCROPTERUS ovate-fusiform. Fish Com. in the young shorter. 131. adult notched. between lateral Scales on nape and breast scarcely lot. I.. very few).^-" Large mouthed. fish is rather light colored . extending Dorsal rays consid ticulated. Dorsal fin much compressed [depressed?]. 7^ 8 rows).. smaUer than those of sides. 1881. and there is a middle of each row of The Llano [Texas] scales. SALMOIDES Pa. between orbit and pre operculum. row Scales of preopercular number).) MiCROPTERUS PALLIDUS Cope. 3-5 in limb de Scales on and with dorsal developed series rays low (obsolete) shallow on sheath. Scales of cheeks the entire veloped width of an the bone. . uM. which are line along the especially distinct below dusky tiiB lateral line. the maxillary in the beyond the eye . membrane on behind the none Scales of anal (or ar Mouth large. Head large." (Cope. Mus. and back. Scales line of trunk moderate or (e. blackish stripe along the sides from . pectoral. <C_Iiept. U. erably behind the posterior Supramaxillary margin orbit. scales on the trunk comparatively Dorsal fin very deeply Lingual teeth sometimes present. Une. about ten rows in an oblique line and about 5-6 in a horizontal one). Jordan and with Gilbert.NOMENCLATURE AND MORPHOLOGY. 1881.

. <CBull.26 opercle SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OP THE BLACK BASS. and the color becomes more and more of a uniform opercular pale. ii. A. 446. (Jordan and Gilbert. a L. (Description same MiCROPTERUS SALMOIDES Jordan." Mus. from the James to the St. Mieropte rus dohmieu (Hay. I have the never succeeded The young in Black are found in finding the South a specimen of Lac. caudal fin pale at base. TJ.) /%. Both species waters. fin ." (Bean.. blotch usually present. 1882. Ill. preceding. 1882. As the fish grows older the black lateral to the middle of the caudal band breaks up dark and grows fainter.. scales 8-68-16.) MiCROPTERUS ranges SALMOIDES west and Goode. the coloration and and sluggish waters. it is especiaUy erable sport grows to a larger size than the smaU-mouthed and common west of an the Alleghanies. xvi. 11 . 1883. iv. every-where lakes. from the Grreat Lakes and Red river of the North to Florida and Texas . U. Fishes of Ohio. Rivers of the United States. "This species is gen eraUy abundant and Bass . 484.. BuU. "An abundant fish every-where vary much with different Fishes N A. 1882. it is to important food-fish affords consid anglers. in all perhaps as far occurring in the Red River Manitoba. D. in every pond. Nat. three dark oblique stripes across the cheeks and opercles . below and above the lateral band some dark spots . and in the lower reaches of the streams and bay . It abounds the rivers of the Southern States. as the <CJj-eol. depth 3. TJ. Mus. [Lower Mississippi VaUey]. 64. 1-2 feet. It grows abundant. dull green. Head 3J . S. S. Nat. 952. whitish at tip . then blackish.) MiCROPTERUS SALMOIDES Hay.) (Jordan.. north. as 1884. preferring to a larger size than next species [M dolomieu^. bayous. John. X." small-mouthed Bass. belly white. 1882. Fish Com. 13 . and in the Southern States . in latitude 50.) MiCROPTERUS salmoides Bean. 1883. BuU. Surv. xxvii. 1882. "The large-mouth farther to the of the North. S. . the back being darker . Ohio. and is readily distinguished by its the larger mouth and larger scales.

of very distinct longitudinal streaks follow The caudal fin has narrow cross-streaks (Jordan and formed dark spots. TJ. iii. dard Nat. " Texas. (Forbes. below this there the ing rows of scales. 1888. which reach the dorsal are fin. 1885." Florida. direction into Jordan (Gill. a little smaller.^Ind.) and MiCROPTERUS specimens SALMOIDES Gilbert. Stan "These squama- Hist. and [Texas] mouth agree with northern ones in form and tion. Nat. to seventy in the lateral line. however.. State Fish Cmn. perhaps. so "The large-mouthed that the maxillary scales are quite Black Bass has the adult extends deeply the cleft. of back the large. and the between the lateral line and the back is only of The distribution in this form extends from the British and another vol. around to itude 27.) state.. 1886. S.) "Body rather ." Gilbert. It although and is the the common southern form Black Bass.. of Native Fishes Ills. orbit 1885. sec. 27 OUS connected with the Gulf of Mexico. the ground being here much paler than in the other \M. Jordan. 1886. Fishery Industries SALOMiDES TJ.. and Pro. throughout Illinois. ponds but on of MiCROPTERUS occurs also The large-mouthed sluggish in rivers and large of creeks waters. 1884. MiCROPTERUS the SALMOIDES mouth of Gill. MiCROPTERUS SALMOIDES <. Agric. Iol. i. num seven there being sixty-five ber or of rows eight. 231. The is. Mus. The lateral band is broken up into irregular dark cross-streaks. no more abundant there than iu the northern <CiRept." (Goode. provinces is very wide. the coloration nu is somewhat merous and different. 13. Black Bass favors especially lakes. 401. 1884. part the whole.NOMENCLATURE AND MORPHOLOGY. Rept. . ix. and there (Jordan and being a broad blackish band along the sides.) MiCROPTERUS " SALMOIDES Jordan Evermann. Food Fishes Ind. 1886. in lat S.) Forbes. 1886 The young may be known at once bythe color." Evermann. 1884. Cat. dohmieu"]. 21. and it southward in one direction to Mexico." Ills.

dolomieu']. Adult dull green. tip. growing deeper with age. with sides with a above and some dark spots broad blackish band in young. scales on cheek large. three dark stripes caudal pale at base and cheeks . silvery below . 13. weight 3 to 8 across pounds. 1888. 120.) . Head 3J ." (Jordan. mesiaUy dusky. Scales 8-68-16. Color dark green. below it . HI. D. 11. depth 3. L. 1 to 2^ feet. X. ninth dorsal spine not half length of longest. A. than in the preceding [Jf. in about 10 rows . nearly plain.28 deeper SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK and more compressed BASS. Manual Vertebrates.

while the small-mouth is probably more active in its movements. I still hold that. there is no difference in game qualities . Prof. while in of all other features differed same species of the agreeing North and of Florida. Cope. in several large-mouthed Bass taken in the St. of somewhat and in the smaller size of the gill- scales covers. Mus. of so also we occasionally find similar variation and in the large-mouthed the Bass sippi of the northern southern portions Missis Valley. Edward D. took several Cope. S.. xvii. the cheeks. Francis river. large-mouthed the Bass. As to a comparison of game qualities. other things being equal. D. longitudinal streaks. as between the small-mouthed Bass and the large-mouthed Bass. though not quite so pronounced. 31. As there is mouthed a geographical variation of between the small- Bass the a extreme North and South. and where the two spe cies inhabit the same waters. also in the squamation the markings They by showing differed several slightly in coloration and especially noticeable I observed these several variations. which.* a few years ago. the large-mouthed Bass is *0n the Zoological Position U. 1880.CHAPTER III. below the lateral line. in the autumn of 1885. for. <Bull. dusky. GENERAL AND SPECIAL FEATURES. By B. (^9j . Kat. Arkansas. of more power- Texas. with when in Texas.

Mather. rise equally well to the arti ficial fly. this un fair and unmerited comparison is fast dying out. Two or three years ago. the fishery editor of Forest ind Mr. current notice by anglers in various the The Bass but erroneous opinion that the small-mouthed game qualities. after persistence and activity. anglers. and no angler can tell from its manner of " fighting. and do not pretend to be. in its efforts to break away being hooked. it has like been brought to my country. if there be any difference in this respect. saying that Germany he has observed that the large-mouthed Black Bass rises better to the artificial fly than the small-mouthed and Bass. But but who imbibed this to opinion second-hand from prejudiced anglers who ought as have known better. qualities of a what are game fish ? to the As I under it. they are : its a aptitude to rise artificial exhibition fly. solicited the opinions of for the species the Black Bass is is " Stream. Re species of Both Black Bass cently I received a letter from Count Von dem Borne." anglers on this subject. from which I select a few from . ful . however. I think the large-mouthed Bass has the advantage. of (who has been very successful in introducing and propagating the Black Bass in that country). and has been much enhanced by the indorsement of several of our best ichthyologists. whether he is fast to he has the the a large-mouthed or a small-mouthed Bass. and its strength and cunning. becoming better known. has been very widespread. and fly-fishing being more commonly practiced. But stand until ocular evidence. though. of its readiness to take natural bait. Fred. who un exceeds the large-mouthed Bass in fortunately.30 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. are not. parts My wise of own experience rather favors this view.

undeservedly. qualities could Dr. where. some the fighting qualities of small-mouth. fighting. and denounced the vulgarian. when Dr. Gill first that there or were only two one Black ' Bass.. New York City. F. I . and was no bighe gave in. T. F. opinion as a that the big- game fish. as we think. Mather inaugurated the discussion " as follows We have for many years been of the mouthed Black Bass has been underrated found in Northern showed waters. instead the no with of a dozen so. 31 various parts of the country. T.. Dr. and that he one any other angler could " " the distinction. of firm believer in the superior game the small-mouthed declared that he in variably tell what species of Black Bass he had hooked. given and never recovered that it is generally from the bad name month we to it. and New York. T is well known as a participant in the fly contests bait-casting and was a in the tournaments at of the Na tional Rod Reel Association. Dr. was confident he from its manner of " could not do so." credit In the summer of 1885. Wisconwere consin. on taking a two-pounder. Last were Bass fishing with a gentleman who was strongly prejudiced against which ' the big-mouth . and acknowledged that there was more fight mouth." Dr.GENERAL AND SPECIAL FEATURES. fish was as gamy as the other.' in the fish than he had ever given it for. F. for forced to nor acknowledge himself make quished. had F. when About the time species of praised when Dr.' other as a dash in him. has very extensive country. he declared before seeing it must weigh twice that figure. Bass. but. and and angling experience in all parts of the Dr. The was matter was finally put to a practical van test. among a number of prominent anglers. I both of was at Gogebic lake. a and Dr. : Mr. This has been the fish has repeated so often believed.

when two to six pounds. gentleman Opinicon ") of Utica. superior gameness good as large-mouth in brook trout A or weedy pond. fuU main weighing from three to five and game. says of the large- Bass we : " Since began fishing the North Michigan waters I have be- . as all other comparisons are of no weight. of and from the side. the only ." on "Kingfisher. angled for the large-mouth in reason preference that the former were of good size. whUe fishing on a lake the forming the St. rocky to a is. in the pounds. the large-mouth less ing. frequently broke water. These fish " were life The difference between the two kinds of Black Bass be from weight." of mouthed Cincinnati. that when struck. though they would sulk and fight for aside every inch of line with as much determination as ever shown on by the small-mouth. a I the opinions of few anglers who have fished for both species in the same waters. Lawrence same river. Y. water. taken in running from deep could water. and the angler having one his hook had business hand.32 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK Of THE BLACK BASS.. might add that this result wiU be obtained wherever the two species exist give in the same waters. (" and this holds to the any : other game-fish. expresses himself as follows "Pound for pound the small-mouth excels large-mouth. large-mouths. Ohio. as a matter of a course. to the other. but in to the this respect its brother. N. principally for thc During the past sum a part of mer. The writer using fine tackle as good has. from one side of skiff could be taken the other small-mouth of one and a half pounds. cold or as a game fish. from choice. sport as be desired. the large-mouth offers angler Bass. stream A small-mouthed Bass in in a swift.

be said of that these small-mouth. not As a rule. There is evidently of something wrong tioned with the large-mouthed Bass says of the men Kin- locality. could I have taken the not big-mouth the I thought its it came gameness a stick. and the fish are aU . but they seem to lose heart in the strug whUe. when fishing in the Mississippi by the species. them. and it would be hard to convince me that they up are any thing like action. I think that to their your opinion fishes do above fight in proportion weight when are they are two pounds in weight. 33 come arm better acquainted with out. with ing ing them to net note of their gameness in advance of I think that the in favor this of general opinion in Central New York is as a game section the small-mouthed Bass fish. is correct. and while Mississippi viduals of river with rod and I have found indi game both species which were lacking in qualities. the and equal of the small-mouth in dash. has years this to say : ' ' For the past twenty I have taken these fishes in the reel. Iowa. which fish has been hooked termine. few rushes. make tireless vigor of every thing that counts in the of a thoroughly of fish. muddy warm. Last week I took took and species. but there several of each individual exceptions even " to this." its fighting qualities. or that opinion with is more pronounced in that than in any other which I am acquainted. in derhook " lake. near Albany : and The lake is shallow. and have handled them tUl my has been tired a hard fighters for gle after a I am not going to say they are not good. for Ira Wood this species.GENERAL AND SPECIAL FEATURES." game " Dubuque." Dubuque. any river. and again when in like The same can be exceUed. I have also found those when which excelled in them. aud before bring know to de in my opinion it is impossible for one degree of accuracy.

" Salmon Newport. in the bave alluded. than in a three-pound deceive when first hooked. if a you find any meat left. for instance. I prefer the small-mouth every angler of Mr. The big-mouth. the in the ' in the slack water or holes of that an shoaly places. and came out with . "I more Clarke. S. up to six and a Roe. takes the of stream the two which to I fly much more freely than his neighbor. and I have taken them in a with fly. the being more ." many half pounds of as as fifty day (in early times). as the Syracuse. whUe both time. bait. . . a veteran fifty great years' experi and whose opinion is entitled to weight. there is a difference in the ' fishes. or a game fish to eat. and.34 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. says : say that. head. from Minnesota to Florida. the without prejudice. and. tail and skin . any fish to catch.'' thing but gamy " Syracuse. I started in stream. time and offers the follow ing testimony : "Last year I spent some investigating where swift the comparative gaminess of the small-mouth the big-mouth Black Bass in species exist and the Little Red River about equal other of Arkansas. from an acquaintance with both species for than forty years. New York. weight. and " spoon. by being less are weight. the first other large-mouth. ence. it is muddy in taste . one ' both in numbers. " Of course." good enough. I have found wUl or no Uttle difference between them. Arkansas. C. more cussedness and endurance. following shows : of shares this general "There is more more fight and more game. impression favorable to manner' the big-mouth." opinion. after being stripped of these. in a one and a half pound small-mouth Black Bass and having both wiU and barred sides.

. to it. in lakes.. tangle it among weeds. I in have caught the large-mouth Black Bass in running waters. statement Swift running that not water is the best for fly-fish mud and ing. river any trout stream . would If the writers had tried the their large- they and probably have changed opinions. weeds. other hand. and go nowhere "I have caught else. is a very close out and reliable observer. am the small-mouth of take the fly freely troUing all. but nearly all these from Pennsylvania. New York and Ohio. however. as a way. it about do very many no highly reprehensible snags. ponds.GENERAL AND SPECIAL FEATURES. There is nothing will indirect about him wind he is hooked. New Mexico. and re a reliable ferred to the mouth. the pursuit without an attempt This I have goes straight never known the big-mouth to do. in East Baton as Rouge Parish. and legitimate fly-fishiug. smaU-mouth. I have frequently ob foUow the lure for a while. Then he cut the line on rocks. of the abundance of his heart his mouth speaketh : "I have part of caught the large-mouth Black Bass from the through most of southern north Louisiana." of Stanton. etc." " Cyrtonyx. but that I have big does ones not by splendidly bait-fishing. In this regard he is worse. takes He starts for it. only as and ward. and things. and a good angler and fly-fisher . and fights with at least equal determination after In using the trolling spoon in served that the small-mouth abandon clear will water. (remember I flies). and fights it untU out on that line. and to capture. The they invariably Uke true. it. La. to the and always found that they caught as rise fly. speaking it is but the small ones that take it small-mouths are seldom not at The big-sized years ago not caught about that Four I saw a number of complaints the Black Bass being articles were fish for the fly. On the with rule. 35 taking. I have the Gulf not States. if he be Fort so bad. as his sly neighbor the small- mouth. is simply the large-mouth in the as clear and pure a Amite.

is another clear stream. Henshall Mr. when The upper Oua a boy. Previous to this." and " Lambert. and. Pennsylvania. and says : "Dr. I had never before heard it of questioned smaU- that the common opinion regarding the superiority rjouth might be exaggerated. the in deep. ever saw in New England or Canada." of Erie. I have been taking notice of the Basses. he sulks near the bottom until he finds that won't caught. him to that the big- I will ter fighter than I had given credit for. Within the of past three I have taken prepared yet about one hundred fish a both kinds. but after some weeks careful observation Black I must admit weeks that I am in doubt admit about it. eould No one who has ever cast an a fly in Central New York such an are opinion for in stant. mon notion that the small-mouth was the best fighter. when he . seems whose experience with the large-mouthed Bass unfortunately to be confined to Central New York." " Rob Roy. The habits sluggish of the two fish here mud utterly other unlike. and is full of them." of Syracuse. but when generally takes it under water as it is trailing . but am not mouth is the equal of his fully brother.36 I SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. do. or on rapids with surface The large-mouth rarely rises to the rocky bottom. say that he is This is one the bet effect of popular prejudice. One clear lives in water. in many of the waters of that section. as are all the clear rivers and creeks through the piny woods in Alabama Mississippi. on sand or gravel bottom. water on bottom. chita. is as gamy aud both as firm in the hold conviction that the large- the small-mouth. and I have fished. in Arkansas. I accepted the com way in which they fought. the is almost persuaded : " Since reading your article on game qualities of the two ago. to meet the fly. Mather have had seem wide experience on mouth many waters.

" How does In of contrast : to the above note Roy the following of Rob enjoy his know this ? to " from " E. as though suddenly realizing his danger. but when clear of an the water. He never ugly shake like a bulldog makes bold leaps for freedom an desperate runs. 37 comes with a cat nor just to the surface. he is . and five feet morsel in peace. The instant he strikes he goes for deep water to enjoy his he feels the sharp sting of the hook. Shenandoah. the largo-mouth " shut it is hooked in. also in Florida to the and other Southern States. to me. of As I have fish. the Delaware. will small-mouthed. water clear of five six times before ? the Did any large-mouth ever do submitting to be netted. he makes a grand leap for life and freedom. and some some smaller I have fished for Bass in the Northern streams. is all game. and gives in his mouth. The small-mouth. I never caught a large-mouth Bass in running water. frequently rising three. is." Rob Roy " shows himself in the above to be quite im aginative and feet.. four. large-mouth a as much while comes to the net with jaws gaping like a pickerel on trolling " line." near hut the morsel small-mouth goes to the " same place " in peace. or No Bass ever leaped'" " five sulked. he and rushes for deep water with energy gives and power that thrills delights the fly-caster. on the contrary. I have known or And small- he mouth up only Bass to leap after a desperate the struggle." A Bass." No or very Bass. If that fails. fight with its mouth sulks ever mouth open or according to the part of the When caught. Alleghany. large other prejudiced.GENERAL AND SPECIAL FEATURES. any fish. Susquehanna. Potomac. fights with his mouth shut. again. I relative of gameness can not give an opinion as will the two say one thing a in - favor of the and large-mouth that fish a which. P. the bottom. covers multitude sins. The small-mouth." Chicago " lakes.

"In ten years very few large fish. The those large-mouth Bass caught with caught with the fly have been large as live bait. If he finds that the big-mouth is just as they would good a game-fish as the smaU-mouth. and without bias. them as but I have looked lucky accidents. months each fly-fishing for small-mouth During these years season by the river side. the and always rises himself completely out of of he takes the showing the a good part his body." I could give fuUy fifty more opinions on this subject. and upon Bass I have I have caught spent three have fished at least two days each week.38 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. I advise every angler to investigate this matter for himself. but be merely repetitions of the above. splendid water as riser. sucks The in the small-mouth in a sluggish manner. frequently throwing fly. and often fly after manner of plebeian as sunfish. . A large fish has occasionaUy been caught. he is just that much better off.

dark golden.CHAPTER IV. change of coloration Another instance vironment. The coloration of with the young golden of the small-mouthed and with Bass is light green. Canadian sea-trout. is seen in the This is merely the brook-trout that When it re has become anadromous and runs to the sea. COLORATION OF THE BLACK BASS. to the a bright. Iris. golden. middle. tip whitish. and olivaceous or of blackish in the In the young the large-mouthed Bass the color is also greenish but darker. in the mouths of the . will observe. stringing the fish. spring or early summer. approaching the appearance of vertical bars. of fresh water a short time it appearance . that however different in coloration fishes of the same species may appear when first caught. or keep their fish alive fish-cars. character. silvery streams. like most marine fishes.. live-boxes. Base caudal fin yellowish. depth and the water. which numerous dots or punctulations. that by the more reprehensible practice of after being subjected to the same conditions for a few hours they will all exhibit the of same coloration. Iris. Base and tip of caudal fin in somewhat paler than the middle. small reflections. it is. who Those etc. temperature the due to en or change of in the condition. or in the food. but after being in (39) turns. and clusters of dark spots above and below. with a blackish band along the lateral line. somewhat of aggregate in small clus ters.

temperature. other surroundings. or voluntarily. the change involuntary.40 takes trout. . some tion is fishes. of a light. changing their colors however. especially to light. owing influences etc. they are thought by some at power of will. and is. without much doubt. to be when exposed endowed with to the the light. on the characteristic colors and spots of the brook- The external coloration of fishes depends on the pres ence of ers of variously-colored pigment-cells in are one or under both the lay the skin. SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. and are able to changes of color which or may be rapid or temporary. in or more less In permanent. is not very likely. as the Black Bass. and seems depend on contraction pansion of the pigment-cells already developed. depth is water. and which are very sensitive to surrounding conditions. These the pigment-cells influ cause ence or control of nervous sj'stem. Owing to this rapid change in the colors of certain fishes. or colora occasioned by an increase decrease in the to the number of of the different of pigment-cells. In more some fishes the to change coloration much or ex rapid. This.

occur territory mentioned By Dr. shall <Proceedings American Fishcultural Association. of or to offer any of theory concerning the Black same.CHAPTER V. except the waters into the Atlantic in New Eng flowing land and the Middle States. however. In this brief the paper. (41) . through the of Of the two species. the of the Black re markable of for its extent original habitat of one or other the two species and from Canada and ranging from Virginia to Florida. A study no the habitat the Bass. as they exist. it might be stated that the original geographical range of this representative Amer America. words. doubt. problem of the distribution Bass is The geographical distribution . south ol possessions and east of the Rocky Mountains. clusions without therefrom. thus far excelling any other embraced whole of ican fish North the British fish of America in its distribution. or relative to the distribution of the Black Bass species.* the writer intends merely to give facts. attempting to draw any from the laws which govern the of con geo graphical distribution the fresh-water fishes. and the Red river of the North to Louisiana In the other East Mexico. aid biologist very materially in solving the of animals. GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION. the large-mouthed Bass had the widest ring * all vast scope distribution. Hen On the Distribution ot the Black Bass. James A. 1883. will.

The small-mouthed not Bass had a somewhat limited beyond in comparison. said also and and by means of artificial canals. Thus. extending east or south the Alleghany else with mountains. at Professor Jordan states. only one-fourth a in New are England. Thus. though occurring large-mouthed species. Scotland Germany. seventy species. It has been successfully introduced into thus Eng land. fishes. now of more than occur a hundred genera fresh-water fishes known to about in the waters east of occur the Mississippi river.42 above. are. account of New England peculiarities a zoological compared with on its faunal as the rest the of United States. range SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. rare tionsThis fact was who called of in the waters of these sec noticed " by Professor Louis island. the habitat of the Black Bass has the extended so by transportation." many as inhabit all the rivers of New The distribution of the Black Bass does not seem to be . repre known to occur twice as England. that it may be to inhabit every state of Union.eight Indianapolis. and of these a all except half-dozen each genera not represented by but single occur species . senting forty. are In the little White river." Agassiz. the present every-where At the been day. genera in the waters the Pacific Almost any stream of any extent of the Ohio or Mississippi basins will furnish double the number of genera and species as the entire as waters of either of the " above- named sections. occupying a wider range than any fresh-water fish in the world. and of more than thirty-five slope. as characteristically American forms of has been observed by Professor Jordan. gen for or absent erally speaking. The fact that the original habitat of the Black Bass does not embrace New England the and the Pacific slope is not re markable. genera.

Climatic influences do of not seem the Pe to affect the distribution the large-mouthed Bass and of States. down to the recently formed ninsula of Florida. in the marine tertiary tic and mouthed formations Gulf Bass to the of cenozoic period. and the ten de of grees of extreme while western longitude this range. the large-mouthed Bass bids defiance alike to the icebound streams of Canada. they these sections adapt themselves and waters of transplanted. the the alone occurs. Bass is naturally restricted to cold and temperate waters. while small-mouthed Bass naturally to the older formations. both species were at home among the eozoic and period of primor rocks of Lake Champlain. in the United the small-mouthed Bass only to a small ex The the original habitat of of the species extended through twenty-five degrees latitude and thirty degrees not of longi tude. North Wisconsin.GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION. and the sunny streams of Southern . species or the character of waters . the tropical la the small-mouthed goons of Bast Mexico. small-mouthed Bass alone extreme ten degrees of southern occurring in the latitude. They flouri. dial ern rapidly increase. along Atlan large- slopes the Southern States. Thus. and Missouri of basins . 43 much affected by geological formations. and Carolinas the along the Appalachian chain in the Northern Georgia. the Originally. the large-mouthed Bass roams at his own sweet will through seems restricted be the regions of metamorphic and stratified coral rocks and glacial rocks of drift. the Illi nois.shed amid the paleozoic rocks of Great Lake coal region and the Mis sissippi valley. for to although one or certain both may have been readily when absent originally in the localities. Thus. climatic influences. and in the river measures of while the Ohio. in any degree. tent.

and some from it. the a in the lower portions of the on of streams. that burst out from the base sandy twelve or miles running parallel with the coast. the and erects his spiny oaks of in the palms and given live the southern peninsula." thick-ribbed The character of waters of has but little influence upon upon the distribution the species. while he is found in the head-waters tic certain rivers flowing into the Atlan (notably those of the Alleghany region of the Carolinas. in Hernando county. with a tide-water is reached would . fifty sixty feet deep. birches crest He flashes his bright of armor under the firs and the St. of Thus. less small-mouthed the large-mouthed If the water Bass than upon his congener. where he seems home in the brackish . streams at true cosmopolitan nature. and of half an acre in extent. the conditions seem favorable. descends the as much to their mouths. Lawrence grateful shade of basin. the small-mouthed Bass naturally seeks cooler and clearer waters. both species will thrive in it . smaU-mouthed Bass dis to his The large-mouthed to be Bass. " To him it is To hathe in In thrilling fiery floods. co-existing with the large-mouthed the latter only occurs Bass. Their current waters are until remarkably Bass of all clear and cool. and Alabama). is reasonably pure. whose sources are large springs. the appears. There ridge are several rivers Gulf coast of Florida. Georgia. but. Florida. the large-mouthed Bass is very abundant in them. and I have no strong doubt but the well small-mouthed upper portions thrive wonderfully in the as the streams if introduced and into them. As we approach tide-water. as has just been intimated.44 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. regions of or to reside ice. however.

which expected entirely from the character of their teeth.GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION. pike-perch. is great prob range to any extent by the supply of any one article of his food . A. they feed upon insects. frogs. the small- species showing some an especial fondness for the former. may throw mouthed light upon the preference of Bass for to say such waters. and of these the are more less In plentiful addition throughout the waters United States. insects. of adult Crawfish minnows are principal Black Bass. though it or would be affected. studies of of etc. The greater prevalence of crawfish in clear. when he it. might are almost in their habits. not and frogs. they feed constituted mouthed the insects . of course. of Pro fessor S. 45 waters of the estuaries as in the pure and crystal rapids of the highlands. and their sins have no doubt . when less than inch in length. for the cau get Black Bass varying it Eastern prefers a with diet crawfish. almost entirely of minute When from one to four inches upon Crustacea [En- long. " that the presence of the " voracious Bass the the would militate against increase or of shad on or salmon. by au abundance and scarcity the or of its food. piscivorous and gar-fish. in his food fishes. The Black Bass ably not restricted being in its in a manner omnivorous. and waters he would object to young be eels. in minnows. pickerel. of founded fact . wholly tomostraca). larvse. rocky small- streams. ascertained Forbes. The pike. larvae. The objections are not valid. I the wish a word in this connection in reference to objections heretofore of urged before this Association against introduction the upon theory Black Bass into Eastern waters. food as a whole. an that the food consisted young Bass. the to these. wliile crawfish and small fishes principal diet of adult Bass.

to the prevent the return of the shad a salmon during gauntlet breeding succeed season . longer than the memory of man runneth to the contrary. But in your just so indignation do not make a scape-goat of fellow as the Black Bass. righteous a deplorably true. isolated lakes in Wisconsin where the Black Bass on account with co-existed the cisco (one of the salmon family). The failure to exists. If then the Bass can not " with" get away out" the cisco in confined waters. bullheads and suckers take and care of it. waters where In Western varieties of the Bass exists with the usual fishes. and should few run the and iu depositing is their spawn in the upper reaches of good the rivers. spearing. either. while the Bass will in a hungry. into of which brook-trout introduced to the discomfiture the former fish. charged to the Black Bass. teethed fishes restock canine above named. like the young shad or salmon if it comes his way when he will not make them special objects of pursuit. with his miles of gill-nets at the mouths or of the streams. prominent among which unrelenting pursuit of the young fry by the predatory fishes mentioned. Bass and I know of a small stream that abounded in Black crawfish. there is no perceptible decrease in the it is always numbers of If any of species suffers the Black Bass know has of I over-fishing. the eels. must such streams.46 been take SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OP THE BLACK BASS. without a decrease of the latter fish. for the trout increased . if any other causes such failure intro is the be attributed to than the duction of the Black Bass. But. They are only exceeded in their destructiveness by the genus Homo. etc. how can he " clean the shad or salmon in large flowing were streams? Moreover. All of which truly and good deplorable.

man who alleges he depopulates the that he streams of valuable of food fishes. or asserts kills for the love the Bass with has never looked into the mouth of his eyes open. do not hesitate to aid in tho thc Black Bass by introducing that success desirable assured. then. the Delaware many other streams for evi dence of its rapid increase in excelled new waters. he will not water species His natural and his mate. furthermore. And. and You have only to look to the and is already the Sus- Potomac. there are waters in which the brook-trout the rainbow-trout wiU not further distribution of thrive. less. It is easily done. species. eat by no other fish that swims and among fresh the white-fish. for the table. ." will wax and grow fat. the spawn of by but one. nor that of his fellows' mates. he prefers easily procured. that they are On them he The it. quehannah. 47 while the numbers of the Bass grew smaller by degrees or and beautifully If. The Black Bass is for gameness.GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION. food is the crawfish and the minnow . increase and multiply. " them.

1882. (48) <Bulletin U. The or eggs are inclosed the or enveloped tinous bands sink at once ribbons of an of adhesive nest which to the bottom and become glued to the pebbles. Jr. S. I placed and records during the breed following interesting data : * forthe sole purpose of water the Bass in the pond noticing them during the breeding season. that my observations have not I think the female prepares the spawning the male males ground or male bed. The be the eggs are of the adhesive or glutinous same are class.. rocks. frora five thousand to age Black Bass yields twenty thousand eggs. U. Jr. according way as to and weight. prepared a small and stocked the pond in grounds it with small-mouthed several years Bass from he had the White river and Fall creek. . Spawning The female and Hatching. fight with Whilst the fe each other is preparing the bed the of for * Successful Propagation Black Bass. of Major Isaac at Arsenal. S. . ii. A. after which joins her. but the in the pond was so crowded with a growth of algae been satisfactory. etc. by in pisciculturist. trout. Indiana.. of or and can not manipulated in the those the salmon. HABITS OF THE BLACK BASS. the Arnold. Commission. Fish By Major Isaac Arnold.For opportunity of closely observing the fish the ing " season. glu or shad (which latter non-adhesive separate) character. sticks. while in command Indianapolis.CHAPTER VI.

It would has been confirmed by the Mr. Geo. in pairs. . and those Mr. allowing nothing the eggs have hatched and the young fry are old. that this proceeding is of to both species.HABITS OF THE BLACK BASS. and sometimes the and sometimes upon both together. of state. Rixford to the large- Bass. the nest. I record the following interesting item for the benefit of . Florida. the female remains upon the approach uutil extremely pugnacious. Rixford. when cannibalism ceases and source. When the spawn and ing to is over. The male the milt upon or over process the spawning lasts for two from time to time. milt. other. the female alone. to never the edges of be toward each sometimes in contact. nest a week or ten days The young fish continue uutil commence at once or to prey upon each other and they are no two three weeks old." there is more danger from that This accords. or biting pressing the female with his mouth. Rixford. . with my though I have never observed the male the abdomen of own observations. tremulous spawn motions . the male jerky. in the main. their bellies would as their sides. but I pressing the from the female with his mouth. as then. the male disappears from the scene. The her male presses the roe from the with female by a series of bites or pressures side along her belly the female ejects lying upon during roe or the operation. and the three days. his mouth. 49 possession. occurrence feature. . with they circled around quite close the saw bottora. this however. C. mouthed Major Arnold's observations were confined to the small-mouthed. often seen I have male. spinning rapidly or were around which sank at once ejecting the eggs When the fish to the bottom. common who observed in that seem.

It was that or had the come nest under of building and these fish teen at within two three feet of the surface in ten fif feet of water. a collection of the head lakes and ponds in Michigan. My lakes own opinion of is that such nests are constructed in considerable depth. observers. and of a a Mr.50 future SUPPLEMENT TO THB BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. and both Mr. with can shores. Mich. apparent of de the sign on the top brush heaps were. of the State Fish Commission. can give peculiar confessed they had never seen an account of It may be some of your correspondents know of it and further light on the subject. This habit of the before. new feature in the habits which of the the of Black Bass notice of during those gentlemen. he guarded which rested on the bottom the water. of that city. of the eggs ? Perhaps more sunlight is wanted. Rapid's." Philadelphia. of some Mr. May it not be that some character of the bed of these bodies of water. top of the brush pile on which Bass I have Parker heard of they rested. during my late vacation. spawning time. I am at a loss to give a better explanation of the matter. placed with ring lake moss and other vegetable of matter. and the nest building is resorted to to aid in a better or more speedy hatching found. and extended nearly to the made surface a of Not and knowing the nest what they critical examination found them always by in the Bass which had constructed in the same manner of nests made nests would in the bed be three never or their ordinary In many cases the four feet in diameter and larger than the which they protect the stream or pond. Hill told me he had frequently observed. it published. I Parker. where and suitable bottom in to shallow water expedient proper not steep be pur found. where the nests are renders it impossible for the spawn of the fish which in habit them to properly develop if deposited there. Hill and Dr.. bringing :" eggs within of the distance of the " Homo. Hill. the Bass the resort this for the to " pose of surface. thus writes Forest and " Stream While in Grand informed was by Dr." .

consisting in length. By S. small-mouthed In says : " regard to the Bass.). showed all five food specimens under one inch July. A. of Fishes. The fishes species. and per which showed seven per cent. of and of Growth. eaten were to determine the Two eaten specimens be tween two and three inches long had only insects. of crawfishes. for a number of His years. examinations have been of the most careful and painstaking character. years. A. <Bulletin iii. Nat. Forbes. and eighty-six per cent. from half inches long had and one and a very young fourth inches to amphipod. reference Natural The following of results have Bass been attained in to the food the Black species.habits op the black bass.. . a few insects.* Of the large-mouthed Black Bass he of examined the food ages. of a a Six specimens.) large Four insects (forty-six cent. Untomostraca. Illinois State Laboratory History. taken in June. August of different that the entire consisted of minute Crus case of a tacea. except in the single fish. fourteen adults and seventeen of young and of different The first group. 18. 1880. In the fourteen adults the food consisted of seven specimens per cent. State Hist. Professor Forbes of I have made full notes of the food twenty-seven speci- *The Food Lab. one eaten minute per fishes (twenty-nine Crustacea cent. 51 Food Professor S. of small fishes. the drop not ping to twenty-five enough per cent. has been engaged. varying from three to three and one-half inches in length had eaten nothing but insects and their larvse. in the study of the food of fishes and birds. Ills. the Forbes.

and in those ranging from three to four inches in length the amount of fish food increased to fourteen per cent. upon extraordinary weight of The large a more specimens mentioned on exaraination of careful the photograph. . of craw fishes. had remainder of only five per the food consisting cent. of seven per cent. and insects their larvae.* occasionally taken. of of Entomostraea. I do on not doubt that this although beginning. but. Since of Mr. the in sect cent. from one to two inches in the length. to be and are small-mouthed examples Bass without any doubt. of fishes. five per cent. usual of that species. the larvae of certain insects more plentiful under the stones of rapid streams.. conditions In some waters. 1881. fishes sixty-two per cent. showed. more Entomostraea in still and other while minute Crustacea are abund are water. Black Bass are exceptionable size and weight page 166. three adult and the others young. with seventy-nine per The three and adults had eaten thirty- per cent. the maximum which is about five the pounds. in addition to the insect food." will also be found to feed more first Entomostraea. Ten specimens. under favorable of of food and environment. eight food dropped to of Crustacea. judging of from the general at at the food this and the preceding Bass later ages. insect food is possibly important to it from the Seven small-mouthed eaten Bass. I had none of these species under an resemblance of inch in length.52 mens SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS.. Cheney of took those fish. he records capture two *Book the Black Bass. Some different ant allowance should waters be the made for the character of the as in which speciraens were collected. between two and three inches long. I find.

large- a mouthed Black Bass which. The " greatest girth of the head is Bass. Cheney eight weighed and measured its weight as as pounds and ten ounces. this fish in New as to the Forest given Stream. in lily-bound lake. weighed " clear. New York. small- Mr. larger fish and The other and was captured in the same waters by a Mr. Boynton. and and twenty-three of nose and one-eighth measured. lows : its dimensions were by the editor fol Its maxillary bone measures four and three-fourths inches ." near Florida. and its girth eighteen and when three-fourths inches. " The head and in girth." York. pounds. and was seen by a police officer and weighed by Mr. the large-mouth Bass Florida taken up to fourteen pounds. eight and one-quarter pounds. girth. Fred Mather mouthed this fish pronounced it a Bass. saw to fork of tail-fin. length. Glens Falls. Cheney. inches . and of twenty-nine sent and " one-half office of inches. Mr. H." sixteen and one-half Since the I have publication with of The Book of the Black of killed. deep. twenty-two one-half eighteen and and inches. and have seen larger ones . 53 same waters more of these or small-mouth giants near from the (Long One pond. caught. in a in that state. from tip one-half to tip was of tail. the head is seven and one-half inches from the tip of the upper jaw to the end of the opercle. two comrades. he states. its extreme length twenty-five inches. of which is probably the largest small-mouthed Bass there is any it positive evidence." inches.HABITS OF THE BLACK BASS. and the lower projects one jaw inch. who : of its pro portions as follows end weight. gives them. the fly. Altoona. and from one-half snout. and gives Mr. thirty-seven and inches. Ross. of Glen taken lake). W.

notwithstanding the this evidence heretofore adduced support of fact.54 with SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. sleep during to Webster. which roneous conclusions. After a few bottom springs. they leave their near accustomed haunts. in the catching of North and of West. Hibernation. do not hibernate. may Hibernation a account for their does hasty and not necessarily imply.y themselves and remain in a listless condition. not well Perhaps the term hibernation is these understood by er writers. as supposed or profound according close by some. the Bass of deepest holes. in the neigh as as low shelving rocks. moss. if possible. is to pass the season of winter in state of complete " quarters. When the temperature falls running borhood seclude streams of retire to the 50. in lakes and retire of ponds. or at least the largemouthed Bass. weeds. So or also. in northern and western waters. or of in . when they may be induced to take a bait in a . etc. one weighing fully twenty pounds. they will venture out into water of somewhat less half- depth. is fact too well known to a doubt. is sometimes heralded by correspondents the angling journals as a proof that former observers have been mistaken. in But. bait and troUing spoon. under which the. That both species of Black Bass hibernate in the a north admit erly of parts of the country. especially if the temperature approaches nearly to 50. torpidity the entire winter." seclusion and that that is just what the Black Bass both species do. To hibernate. masses days of warm or mild weather. to the deepest places. the occasional a Black Bass during the winter season. and that these fishes. every investigation is one who has given the subject any intelligent prepared to admit.

. and a cold snap they again retire to the deepest 50 55 When the temperature rises above ^ay to not does fall below again. they leave I am their winter quar ters for that From habits the the personal observation pretty familiar at all with the the of both all of species of Black east and Bass. of seasons of year. 55 hearted manner. approach of while the mild weather lasts . according the waters. on the water. season. with those in the Gulf Black Bass hibernate in to the temperature of a greater States. exception of I that. but.HABITS OF THE BLACK. in the states the am Mississippi (except convinced New England States). both species of or less degree. BASS.

" In the range of " their sight." various scents attract or repel perceiving odors. show an conclude nerves of must fishes extraordinary de that velopment. perceive fishes yet.CHAPTER YII. it is evident that they (56) their prey or approaching danger from a considerable . certain that fishes possess the and in Dr. while fishes. This fact since is patent to all observant of anglers. air-breathing animals." very inferior to the higher the same time. INTELLIGENCE AND SPECIAL SENSES. Izaak Walton was much nearer But good. being well of developed. I think. has been long before the time honest Izaak Walton. yet it is the fashion for biologists to pacity. This. high-mettled " and timorous merlin is bold. distance. simple the truth when he said : than "A trout that is more more sharp-sighted watchful and any hawk than you your have named. Giinther." vision are at and acuteness of says Dr. Giinther says : It is faculty and of that them. Sense The olfactory has no relation as organ of of Smell. classes of vertebrates. ca experienced fly-fisher accord deny . we naturally will they are as sharp-sighted no in their element as we in ours. " whatever with the function respiration. old to fishes only a moderate visual as compared with land animals. Sense As the optic of Sight.

Hodg fishes were alike showed how the eyes of men and in main parts. however. he in direction that the incident ray the fact that under certain conditions be invisible to a an angler on the bank of might fish in the stream. " occupies pretty nearly the that the sight of aud we therefore. seeing that he is feet high. pointed as an unfortunate angler who was six out. but the the gentlemen assembled was probably heard that. 57 meeting ofthe Manchester tion. Hodgkinson pointed out. A. Hodgkinson had hopeless iu as promised him. by the difficulty that we do not know exactly what the sight of fishes is. we are met. see broken it is impossible for fish to the bank. for. the greatest divergence whole being that. whereas the optic nerve in man occupies only a small portion of the brain. as Dr. pass me Dr. in England. brain . is out. in order practically to discover they tho distance they must stand from the water in order to be invis exultation when damped ible. wading in many streams is a necessity. but we must assume it to be not much unlike our own. and we are not without grounds for the kinson their assumption.INTELLIGENCE AND SPECIAL SENSES. undergoes and . would require him. and . The case. By drawings both on a blackboard. to could stand eighty- four feet from the of water's edge before he take advantage the invisible mantle Dr. must take their height and multiply it present by fourteen. Hodgkinson then dealt with phenomena of age of rays light from the the change pointed out rare medium air to the dense dium water. they which. of fishes is the more sensitive. Hodgkinson gave Angling. in may the pre fishes it sume." the " Optics of which is thus a recent " At Anglers' Associa on an address noticed by the London Fishing Gazette :" "In considering the subject of angling optics. the so smooth as not quite so water this. or as the doctor not gener water pointed in which and the fly-fisher ripple angles is ally a mirror. " the object on two legs that may be on In fishing for trout. Dr. Dr.

was far away from the legs. the man's body. together the two and whether its feeble brain the can ever connect air and distinct water objects body up in the tremely doubtful. but how his aspect was affected by the showed not tom of the river. Hodgkinson like to the fish when he only what the angler looked color of the bot waded. " the legs down in the is ex The tank by which Dr. then ever saw a wader with his two halves united. In this way. for example. the point where tie figure to represent a invisibUity begins the effect which above much (four the degrees) has could of be clearly seen. and even to Umit their capacity for hearing accurately those produced in the water. where. and by use of a lit man. we should expect to see No fish nothing but sky. from Mr. they are incapable in the air. as well as water apparently lifting the object the position which it occupies. Hugh Owen. if visible at all. legs were actual that whUe wader was duplicated upside far his the concerned. and that of such cover as there might be as on and the bank. to say.58 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. Take this. look through slip of glass placed at right angles to the he looked. another pair appearing down on legs. by means of an ingeniously constructed tank Dr. if we put ourselves in the position of the fishes. ways point by directing toward which his a vision various depths water. in " Land and Water " : " It is exceedingly doubtful if fish possess the faculty of hear- . and overhead. that while among physiologists fishes hear sounds produced hearing those produced in the water." Sense It is the can of rule of Hearing. The rather startling the announcement was so made demonstrated. Hodgkinson from was enabled one end to demon observer al strate his theories was made so that from the of could.

59 ing. a As fishes live in mals." meaning The considerable ear of fishes "lies close under the roof of the skull. fables. direction. necessary medium as water . of have course. the " vibrations '' "jars" shocks. fish beneath the cause surface of the They assemble only be such they see a figure. There can not be a doubt that fidh have or no possible vibra a conception of either vicinity. A distant and vibration disturbs of a as a near one feeding eagerly steam at the bait will be alarmed and dispersed by the beat vessel a mile off. . the Such to the sounds made in the air will communicate vibrations water. in so dense a ear. of course. but for this reason it is the fashion to say that they can only hear vibrations communicated through no external nor kind. Buckland has ac described the nature of the sensation they do possess. As we to the higher sinks ani and however. from that the higher animals. the medium of the water or the or " shore.INTELLIGENCE AND SPECIAL SENSES. as curately vibration. the auditory organ gradually further . and one denser medium than terrestrial ani that sound. distance fish of the tory disturbances they shoal of fishes as much at receive. they. in the ordinary sense of the term. and partly pass gill slits or spiracle. which are con (when present). sound of All the or of stories of whistle not a bell a fish coming to be fed are. to thc waves of operculum sound. Mr. we should readily transraits the waves of naturally expect to find a corresponding more difference in the construction ear of of of the organ of hearing. and are accustomed to be fed upon occasions. and is thus easily accessible ducted partly through the through the mals. not While the internal in fishes differs only in is one degree. such specious and questionable state ments as the He knows better." No can angler or fisherman of experience and observation be made to believe above.

in its degree of development. simple allied form. by means sonorous undulations must be conducted with greater ease to the ear. "All fishes have an organ of hearing . this families. N. but it is not so easy. to prove they do not hear those of sounds. the intestines. article per few in sensible " from an by W. further inward from the surface. much in the His bright the same way that the brain. in connection which is established anterior in Percoids of and the the two of horns the air-bladder skuU. Thus a new method for con ducting the sound waves is necessitated. as was argued in fish case. differing. (Wiedersheim.) roof of place which "Many Teleostei [true fishes] have fontanelles in the skuU. in tympanum." and the foUowing the struc tures become developed. the heart. in form the functions of I append a such a cases. Accus no notice. closed by skin or very thin bone only the at the where the auditory organ approaches surface. tomed to demonstrations. not a rudimentary or but one complete in its kind. It appears Pacific Life " produced matter to be not unlikely that fish take no notice of sounds in the air. may.60 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. Lockington." (Giinther. etc. the skeleton . the monkey simply took eyes never even winked. Take the I have sense of sight as amused myself a cage with an Ulustration of that hearing. unless we can argue the from a fish's point of view. and differing from ours only gan. remarks :" a manner. I might say monkeys can not see. often strike a monkey that lived in such by making believe to a glass front." are attached to fontanelles the occipital region ofthe (Giinther. Arguing.) "In many Teleostei a most remarkable relation obtains be In the most tween the organ of hearing and the air-bladder.) The air-bladder. in fact.

is indisputable . that same if as a hears. if it for the purpose . from the standpoint his own senses. is probable." distinguish. even though they may not take notice of them. and range differs in human hear sounds animals individuals. either be that the fish ought. fi. To conclude: that hear tion . For this our perception of sound we are which dependent upon our sense of hearing.shes hear. is adapted only to a certain range of sounds . they may hear what we not. their senses differ in range and delicacy from . scarcely admits of ques they hear some sounds produced in the air. he has argued. know that more can some other persons imperceptible to us. StUl is this yet true of other . that they in the water. of which ends in this. and therefore that "The microphone has sound is present in numberless instances not evident to our senses. some sounds produced fish have ears. that they do not hear many sounds which we hear. sec of cause. to notice a sound he makes fish ond. or any other gone part of a fish differs from that a quadruped or from our own. far toward proving what philoso phers had previously become convinced of by deductive reason ing. but is almost certam. readily that ours. the limbs. the range of its hearing must be nearly the his " own. or at least do not discriminate be that tween sounds which we. for we all us. or. that there is no motion without sound. but lacks (so far as I know) experimental proof . 61 of the skin. with our more highly All organized organs. can first. Strict experiments upon the hearing of fishes have yet to be Most of the observations yet made are faulty.INTELLIGENCE AND SPECIAL SENSES. be deaf to " sounds audible to made. the observer has supposed hear.

averaging were one and a half the pounds each. with a small ler leading poured and also ran along above dependent tube ending in a sprink to the top of each cask. temperature The the proper and aerated by means of a adding ice occasionally. W. heavy with spawn. Ohio. ON STOCKING INLAND WATERS WITH BLACK BASS. to the Pittsburgh. of Pittsburgh. well in the lake. ten some thirty hours. five iron tanks. ninety successfully miles east of under of Sandusky. and three feet in diameter. large air-pump and fifty feet of by one-inch rubber perforated hose. A LAKE six Fork Fishing and Hunt of successfully The transportation stocked with the hundred and sixty Bass from the direction club. was adult Black Bass in June.. as They were on the road. the casks. weighed A large tin tube The Bass and from three-fourths of a pound to two one-half pounds. into which water was entered the casks in a fine spray. belonging to the South ing Club. Mcintosh. A. was carried out very of Mr. Pa.CHAPTER VIII. season was The females backward. at one end of which was a series of tin tubes. lake. . three feet galvanized three feet in diameter. was vice-president the The fish and were placed in fifteen and oak casks. 1881. The with loss per (62^ cent. a from of Sandusky to the or as lake. Bass have done only sixty fish. high. water five feet kept at high.

alluded June. probably in consequence of the long journey. 1883. one hundred and forty were placed in Nene.) . river river They were from four to seven inches in length. brought from America in Feb ruary. Scotland. and forty-five smaU-mouthed Bass which Mr. 1884. deep.) The are ponds of at Count Von dem to above. were per Not only in cessfully country have both species of new waters been suc stocked with have been transplanted to the Netherlands. The and has a number of small gravelly bottoms." the Welland the only rivers Eng the Bass have been put {London F'ishing Gazette. which I placed iu two seven " Of the ponds. the fish are with swift currents Fishing in will be prohibited for some and years. six following year. and also backwaters.. doubt I3iat next spring the smaU-mouthed Bass will have no swarms with . " Bass. T. but they are in December 1." (Max Von dem Borne. Silk. 4. Berlin. 63 myriads of ceived the Bass. located Berneuchen. Germany and Black States the Of twelve hundred Black Bass brought from the United by Mr. W. supplied with gravel beds for spawning. Jr. Borne. 1884.ON STOCKING INLAND WATERS WITII BLACK BASS. but they England. quiet holes. 1884. and have I put them into another pond which is free from other fish. and the pond actuaUy I have caught with a small net more than two thousand. several large-mouthed. the greater number died. Germany. until are well established. three he wrote : "To-day I had the satisfaction of finding that the fry. Cireidar No. I think the Nene land where lakes. Eckardt. young our own or eight inches long. German Fishery Association. 1883. so that this spring there remained only three of the former and ten of the latter. large fish had spawned. On June 15.

" fry this Count Von dem Borne has species.64 spawn. took on a small lot the steamer . S. 1885. SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. and is shipping them to " Europe. Mr. he und published a small tise.000 season. 1884. 1885. 1885. comprising both species. 1885. thirteen of he "My 11. Fish Com. Amsterdam Black sexual Aquarium at present possesses four fine all prob specimens of reach Bass. which grow well." Black Bass have them spawned. 1882. I had 1 in the fall 1884. am pleased . Trout Bass). Mr.) says : In June. 219. " Der Schwartzbarsch and der Forrellenbarsch and a (The in Black Bass 1888. Geo. five young New York. than he other parts of can now more Black Bass. at Black Bass " to the Zoological Garden Amsterdam. of both trea take care of. Journal of the Society for the Pro December. Shepard Page Black Bass. the In 1886. the motion of In the Fresh-water Fisheries in the Netherlands. of In sent March. and will. iv.. Eugene G." In of April. Blackford. and placed in ponds that have In " August.800 fish. I have caught no other the fry." says: "The ability. in maturity. where they arrived in excellent condition.200 he wrote : I to say that the fish of multiplied abundantly. TJ. in larger edition He is very fish and enthusiastic regard to the Black Bass as a game food fish. and have caught more than 22. and that the experiment wUl be (BuU.

in Scot and placed in a loch belonging to the Duke of Suth erland.ON STOCKING INLAND WATERS WITH BLACK BASS. S. 65 Spain. adult Baird. Two Bass died before reaching Liverpool. Sutherland. and Blackford. The balance were land. Fish Commissioner. Six of of the fish were supplied by Mr. . from New York to Liverpool. fish were New York. U. Eugene G. of and twelve young five adult supplied by Professor the Spencer F. safely transported to Goldspie.

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AND IMPLEMENTS. .PART IL TOOLS. TACKLE.

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CHAPTER IX. reduced to ten and a half feet and eight (69) . in a healthy and fine fishing scientific ments. and to ob serve the coraraendable enterprise manifested by the manu facturers in producing light. are especi ally meritorious. be if a fly-rod. in my judgment. of weights. in order that the Black Bass fisher may be fully informed in regard to these various improve deep root. Indeed. For instance. feet long and weighing ten ounces. ingenuity and manufacture of good in the fine taste employed in this branch of the arts exceUed in any other . It is a source of great pleasure and satisfaction march of to the angler of ment the present day to note the improve fishing tackle. ffy-rods. and with a proportional lessening of their of rods. FISHING RODS. study. to mention those that. And this twelve workmanship is really the case. In no direction has this improveraent been nounced more all pro than in and both bait one to two kinds. for angling an it would seem to imply that the love that and practice of has taken state of growth and development. elegant and suitable imple ments of the craft. the skill. that fishing Rods calibers and This reduction in the weight and length of rods necessa rily implies in their an improvement in materials and construction. all of which is highly and is scarcely gratifying. gling are I deem it my province. ounces. have been reduced in lengtli from feet.

The Henshall Black Bass Bait Rod. Kentucky. and to send me the exact . Perhaps it would be too egotistic to say that this short and and ening but I lightening assured and of rods of in general was induced. and elegant rod and to the fact that it the pleasures of subserves all the purposes. which. are incor rect for the standard eight-ounce Henshall rod for ordinary Abbey & Imbrie. anglers. used for the same kind of fishing. I was Cyn- to select the best-balanced rod eight and a quarter feet eight ounce in the lot. in Cincinnati. it foUows that it be more care be constructed of better materials and fully qualities skillfully made. but was dis book. that this is in to be attributed directly and to the superior exceUence this short. promotes Black Bass angling in a much greater degree than the oldI am very much gratified fashioned long and heavy rods. to preserve thc sarae (or better) for casting the fly and kiUing the fish. Irabrie cations of to rae for the dimensions when and specifi residing at thiana. to think that this may be the case. correct for a rod Black Bass fishing. by the introduction the Henshall Black Bass rod.70 to be must SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. to be rubbed down and varnished for the season's work. It occurred in this too late to rectify in that mistake was applied The Mr. I wrote to the coachmaker and the Henshall rod. most am by some of the candid result manu a great facturers. On the page 217 of " The Book while of the Black Bass " are given specifications of an ash and lancewood rod as made by of entirely maximum weight (ten ounces) for heavy fishing. measure of by many light. and at a time when I had sent all of my rods to a coach-maker. covered way: ray own. rod altc gether.

the an ash the rod rod. with artisan complied strictly my the diagram and specifications to directions. f of an inch. Afterward. however. the length the and was corrected in the as subsequent issue. of course. the female ferrule. 71 rod with dimensions. nicely-bal as sorae anced and well-proportioned eight-ounce that they feel anglers light rods. where the joints are Length each piece concerned) : (without ferrule). was. great for and are lancewood so as The rods referred to above. ash and ferrules. really. end of Diameter (outside) of butt-cap. and eight one-fourth feet as follows (these diameters of are of of properly of the inside diameter the wood. and subsequently learned that the coach-maker had selected an admirablymade balanced rod of the required weight of red and length. many weight. each piece given 34J inches beyond the includes wood. are or more eight ounces. Also. which project somewhat The correct diameters and measurements of an lancewood Standard Henshall Rod. large end). caliber of as it was constructed mostly too cedar. inclosing indicated The sent also at which a sketch of a the points to make the measurements. and I Abbey & Imbrie. and weighing just in length. and. (sec piece." was an error in one of which diameters This was this rod ^-^. 38 inches. but. typographical error. . prefer them to those of less In the first there ond of edition of " The Book the of the of Black Bass. of an should have been a instead y'^ inch. seeing the rods from these specifications.FISHING RODS. of as printed. I found that they were too heavy for ordinary Black Bass fishing. and upon to Conroy & Bissett.

reel-seat. ." to on page 214. of Manchester. sraall | of an inch. Vermont. extending from nine to twelve inches below the seat. end of butt-piece (feraale inch. diameter). of Post MiUs. it is a positive disadvantage to single-handed rods to have a grip. 7 inches. Mr. of Diameter The tip. on the contrary. 1881. of (4J inches from extreme butt). f of of an Diameter inside sraall end of second piece of ferrule. These ticular and measurements strictly adhered every par by Mr.* which inadvertently are omitted iu that to in connection. ash and lancewood Henshall rod manufacturers of Some depart from these several specifications by making the grip adds of the butt inches of longer. but this only to the weight and length the rod without being any real benefit. ounces and a rod a thus structed will weigh but . Orvis. Greatest bulge Length grip 1 inch in diameter. Chubb. H. diameter). 4 inches. The used specifications and measurements' as given above are are con also correct for a split-bamboo metal eight rod where reel-bands instead of a solid reel-seat. or hand reelpiece.72 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. Vermont. F. i of extreme an inch. in their rods. Thos. (female ferrule. Chas. ^^ an inch. of of Diameter Diameter inside reel-seat. " above are the specifications referred of the original Com and ing Black were Bass Rod. Length of grip (from of extreme butt to reel-seat). but if metal reel- * Book of the Black Bass.

I have " is to use a short handle to a of lighter wood. into which butt-piece nJetal is inserted. or red used cedar. in ceed eight order that the and weight of the may not ounces. making handle the a from fifteen inches long. bethabara. from two of The handle to four inches thirteen to proper comprises above the grip." being fashioned from instead an of a single wood. always been partial a butt-piece. stubby handle affixed to many modern rods. rod with artistically-fashioned. to my eye. fashioned. the joint being closed by tapered collar or winding check. if artistically order butt-pieces. with the butt-piece tapering rapidly from it (instead of a gradual taper). of of seven and one-half in When the butt wood the HenshaU that rod is constructed of entire rod any the ex not heavier than of split is. making or with a rod of eight ounces ounces.FISHING HODS. lancewood. is the heavier woods. reel-bands. black wal nut. and with reel-bands metal reel-seat. ferrules of -^-^ of an inch seat less diameter may be employed. ash when the is made or greenheart rod best plan. this is best accomplished with some piece. swelling hand proper. a certain adap tive beauty and fitness that I fail to see in the short. reel-seat. and where boo. bamboo. it presents. is for terial. weight. that its " balance " and action be impaired. to the and with a graceful hollow taper from the reel- seat such light wood as ash. including piece of the and grip. However. or split-bam the short handle of lighter ma perhaps the better way in and to preserve qualities of elasticity a balance. 73 is preferred. where this is done. and the reel-seat. The diameter of the lower end of the butt-piece (where of it joins the handle) should not exceed thc diameter the .

at that time never heard of or seen a rod joint without dowels. and ever since I have been a It is now firm believer in this improved joint. which to most fly-rods to their great advantage. There are various which and ways of finishing of the "grip" of wood the the handle. where a used on three-eighths ferrule is the smaller cnd. smooth. or smaller an end of the butt-piece. beautiful verse appearance. the grip may be or fashioned or hard rubber. or strips of rattan and . last year. dowel sold the old-fashioned ferrule has had of with . the inside diameter of the wind must not be greater than one-half inch. . corrugations. with short. it would be found . having. which were ness and a very firm grip ornamental of desirable. some as with I saw.74 upper. with of cord. of Where it is presenting a very desired to obtain a firmer hold thc hand. it tendency is now to introduce also applied and popularize this forra joint. cork. that is. If there of were want ing any joint over the dowel proof of the practical superiority the non-dowel and mortise joint. or method is to wrap the grip or it may be grooved with fine trans Another be fluted longitudinally. insuring light the hand. and pig-skin. tapered cylindrical ferrules. covered corrugated. various materials. SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. may be formed smoothed and the same as polished. thirty years since I made my first rod with fiush joints. One of the specifications of the Henshall rod is that the in and joints be stead of mortise made flush. fly-rods may be the grip etc. fluted. in with England. handle. NON-DOWELBD JoiNT. and as so raany of these rods have been a great dur ing the past ten or twelve years. more than one- eighth of ing check inch .

I used a split-bamboo fly-rod . Orvis. inventor. But it can not be done with ferrule joint . discarded the latter for the former of over. the flush cylindrical nugatory and and superfluous all Avhich locking devices. for no amount of This fact renders springing it back and forth will loosen it. 1886.FISHING RODS. non-dowel joint I have never had the either accident The cause of the separation and throwing be this : apart of dowel-mortise joint I conceive made to the male ferrule. in the tract a nail by working it from side can be easily demonstrated by separating the tapered dowel joint by working it back and forth in this manner. with the hands close to the ferrules. This fact same ex the continual eventually the joint. 75 in the fact that so Reuben Wood skill and many old anglers. and the its dowel rod acts as a wedge. the female point ferrule. salmon cleats. and to way that we to side. to separate the latter it is necessary to pull or twist it apart. And. with and prevent its separation In July. but in consequence of too deep a mortise at that . having the mechanical their own to construct style rods. more to have arrived at this determination of each other. Chas. screws. and conclusion most valuable independently each one Many of the improvements and inventions have been made in like manner. supposing himself to be the and sole I have of often thrown apart the tapered doweled joints and of the and in casting with both fly have had them break near the lower end old style rods bait rods. have been in to secure the joint. with of and mortise being tapering. proposed casting. as Thaddeus Norris. they all seem joint many years ago. with the cylindrical. F. to occur. tends the in casting separate to springing loosen this wedge. strings. ferrule dowel.

I hold that the tapered dowel. est the rod never came apart. In casting of heavy the mullet bait. . well-finished rod. in this style of fishing. Now this was a handsome. on the Restion constantly with it for ten days. by drum and another maker. bonefish of five pounds say just how many. Chubb). in consequence be ing weakened by the mortise at that point. Thos. non-dowel gouche joints (made and cast river. crevalle tarpon up to forty and up to thirty. made by Abbey & Imbrie.76 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. I can bluefish not as high as ten. was not so pleasant. in casting the bait in playing fish. in the correspondingly tapered mortise. and for which I paid a long price. and at last rendered below the fer of the butt-piece casting. and it was by breaking square off just while shaking being in casting. they were in as perfect the at being taken apart night as they were together in the morning. with doweled joints. During one of my visits to Florida I used for sea fishing a heavy HenshaU ash and lancewood rod of eleven ounces. once while they several playing hors de rule of combat heavy fish. and an ash and lancewood striped Bass rod of joints. for although the joints seeraed to fit perfectly. fifteen ounces. nor was there the slight or loosening a either of joints. and with as perfectly fitting doweled joints as I ever saw in any rod. with flush joints. with doweled With the former I killed redfish. but certainly hundreds of various sizes and that rod is just as good to-day as when I first received it. made of the best materials. a particle play of a heavy . separated a no looseness times or perceptible. H. But my experience with the heavier striped Bass rod. by an average of eight hours a day . but nor neither the constant casting of a long and fish affected the joints apposition upon when put heavy line. pounds.

My eventually separate. on. and bed. rules may be banded if the metal is very thin. the joint is formed by the ferrules only. be split. like wedge. a perfectly fitting will ex dowel a joint. to give a more Fer any disadvantage in other ways. by metal disks. The fer hold other rules should be perfectly fitted to each entire extent. which is apt to be the case with those drawn from German silver. It is be short. which Ferrules should be can not be drawn so thick as brass. say " required. and are neither so Swell ferrules nor unnecessary.FISHING RODS. is really worse tlian (as is often the case) latter where the mortise is bored perfectly straight. to exclude The fer should be fitted without wrapping of silk put on at plan is to wrap on a guide female ferrules. in the case. are which wrapping of the guide thus serves a double purpose. and perfectly cylindrical. Viewed in this light. Ferrules should The one male ferrules should be of a " inch. for a tapered dowel in a straight hole is worse than useless. and a A good the ends for a finish. pin. perfect fit. 77 a will ual become loosened in its casting. the ferrules may. or be swaged into a hexagonal form for split-bamboo rods. The lower end of the throughout their male ferrule. nor two inches for tho second joint. good The ends of strong as cylindrical and uniform ones. however. and the bottom caps or rules of the female ferrule soldered should be protected moisture. which wUl give all the corresponding length. not necessary for the female butt ferrule to exceed two and a half inches in length. that is. the . where the dowel is accurately fitted to tapered mortise. or serrated. without affixed with shellac or cement which instead of using and a metal renders has a tendency to weaken the rod. so that the extends cutting the wood. from contin the joint perience proves it. or ring immediately below the upper to the ferrule.

made by strictly in accordance with the short. the flutings from slipping or turning in the hand. with an action Mr. and they seem to the best satisfaction. They eight serviceable." The next is an all-lancewood with black walnut. hand rods. In will order to show the different several styles of briefly describe that are and before a Henshall rod. Orvis's work is so grip is required to hold the rod. Chubb writes me: "We try to have each as near just the ' Henshall and rods to your specifications as possi raakes all ble. We this we know is what them take give so well. Chubb. Both are page made specifications given on 72.78 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OP THE BLACK BASS. sell a great many. and both have are reel bands instead some of metal reel-seats.iiiyrfi Ash and Iiancewood Henshall (Thos. and less Mr. ^^"l" lyih . exactly according to with butt-piece taper ing gradually from the reel-seat. F. I me as I write. It is likewise made specifications already noted. fluted handle of Chas. wound with cane strips and silk. made First are an ash and lancewood split-bamboo. H. weighing right. ' that is just ounces. Chubb. The fluted black yellow vent walnut handle is in pretty whUe contrast to the pre lancewood rod and the mountings. H. by the Thos. removal of the ferrule more difficult to the angler for the purpose of repair. furwell known in connection with the Henshall rod. that the .) Bod. Orvis. and with three-eighths and The grip in both is one-quarter inch cylindrical ferrules.

below the long. It is a a well-made a rod. of rubber grip. I find that many anglers are wiUing . for a rod is thereby rendered set a straight. It has the prescribed ferrules in size and form. not curved from quick. the and being black polished is in fine contrast to the light reel-seat. and the only possible that can be raised against it is its weight being heavier even greenheart. 241 New York. being bamboo and red cedar . is colored several bamboo. An all-bethabara. B. handsome. G. being a so likely to become continual strain. is an exquisite rod. or in one of steel. and with mountings. while careful work. permanently Bethabara makes objection or very than lively rod. nicely balanced. Orvis's Next is a Broadway. both in construction and action. Spalding & Bros. However. and and German silver ferrules reel-scat. and with fine It has above very the ornamental butt-piece and handle . reel-seat formed cedar of alternate painted strips of and below the grip. Mr. inches too The butt.FISHING RODS. by A. After an experience and rod of several with seasons. action. but a first- split-bamboo. with a hard solid metal by A. including a agate-lined tips. with German silver ferrules of the and the correct sizes pattern. Shipley & Son. fluted spirally.. the latter. split-bamboo. and has the correct its finish is in keeping with style and sizes of all of ferrules. delphia. This quality is always of the utmost importance . 79 rod weighs ther notice here is not needed. I find that bethabara is very tough a rebound or resiliency found in no other class elastic. and is wrapped with silk in the manner of a split-bamboo. and metal reel-seat. This just eight ounces. which adds unnecessa Hen Phila with rily to the weight and length of an otherwise perfect shall rod. however.

I\OUND BAIT.) SpUt-Bamboo HenshaU Bo . (A. B.) Bethabara HenshaU Bod. Chuhb. Shipley & Son. H. SpUt-Bamboo HenshaU Bo (Abbey & Imbrie.) a an BI^S^^ (Thos.

and which he styles " Dr. rod This is made handle is made of and spruce. is to the grip mountings. German a silver of mind. metal The are mountings are all of German silver. and silk and is wound above and below with rattan strips thread. and the grip is just six inches long. now and shows what remarkable progress has been made in this branch of industry of late years by our rod makers. my length that adds somewhat unnecessary to the weight and length of the rod." & Son. This is and an excellent rod. of rod composed & Imbrie. but this is essentially wrong in a singleIn a handed rod. of a work of art and skill in its construction. the grip being corrugated to in entirely a sure a with firm hold of the hand. only fault. including grip and reel-seat. Henshall's And last.FISHING RODS. delightful exhibition of skill taste. . has structed of lancewood. made by Mr. comes a split-bamboo. rod the tips lined I with agate. H. Leonard. with a plain grooved reel-seat and reel-bands. least (in weight. MiUs Favorite. but in nothing else). who. and according to the table of specifications before given. This It is weighs hardly inches its seven ounces. L. extending a foot or more below the reel-seat. for Wm. con hard rubber. rod that is held in both hands a long grip is entirely proper. except that the ferrules are -^ of an inch less The in diameter. as the Henshall rod is intended to be. and is the ever most powerful one for its in and ounces that handled. 81 on account to of put up with an ounce or two of extra weight its A other desirable qualities. action. to and good angler. and a marvel ingenuity a The list an of rods given above makes a handsome and. made by Abbey handle. I am aware that many anglers prefer a long grip.

.82 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. "3 o S3 . n I The above are all three-piece rods. f ? O B (3 H o I a c o I.am o S d n a p. but are shown with extra tips.Q CQ .. 09 .

the and am now convinced Black Bass materials. lead the are under world. the present light. minnow- casting. gentle art. Black Bass Fly Rods. The fly-casting tournaments the National Rod and Reel Association have demonstrated that the rods of a long Eind comparatively heavy as better work has been done decade ago were a mistake. become convinced of the justice of these remarks. rod lasting debt of gratitude skilled In order to makers. fishing. bait-fishing branch of it. ten. and and approved is indeed a pleasure the highest hooks. with shorter and lighter I have past experimented a good deal in this direction that for the best not during the five years. reel weigh from seven (with bands instead of a metal reel-seat). . than ten and a half feet in to eight ounces should be less than and should length. is . fly-rod. a The anglers of America.- veterans of and the gentle art to take a retro compare now the rods out of a our quarter of a century ago with those turned by best makers. a rod weighing seven and one-half and measuring ten and a quarter feet in length. " who will always prefer baitwith fishing short." rapid-running reels. more explicit. A. of course. (Master only An of the of first importance for much fly-rods have been fly-fishing is the fly-rod. it is only necessary for the spective glance. 83 as ever. and to our of Eu rope. rods. a if constructed of and made in nor more first-class manner. is the baccalaureate degree of angling. To be ounces. for Black Bass . moreover. for their efforts in this direction. and. lines of small caliber. shortened during the past few of years. next of in degree to gling) The tool and fiy-fishing.FISHING RODS. and graceful Henshall rods. which is the M. There are anglers.

if of the best quality. the rod will require a little more backbone than is usually found in trout the rods. is better than many split-bamboo rods as now made. and is the raost re used in rod-raaking. To be obtain required given in a necessary spring. in length and The the the will especially for the waters an ounce in weight may be Florida. but the best are in On the other hand. silient raaterial coraparatively light. where run exception- ahly large. first-class bethabara. backbone Of course. consequently. the correct tool for ordinary Black Bass fly-fishing . and and a lighter though rod can. though necessarily be in the upper two-thirds of the most of the flexibility gives rod. there is good and no material combines so many It is essential qualities as split a bamboo. snap. for it must be borne in mind that it is not the largest Bass that rise to the fiy. but as the flies to be used are gen erally larger than trout flies. In my opinion. but nearly pli pliancy. and plenty of " " for playing and landing the fish. flexible. nearly in this quality than any wood. much consideration must material of which to the it is to be that constructed. strong. resiliency for striking. This ancy for casting. approaching steel more other wood. Thomas H. be the Bass of used than in bait fishing . and as the Bass is usuaUy a much heavier fish than the brook-trout. a trout rod of about these dimensions will answer very well for Black Bass fishing.84 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. greenheart. Chubb makes rod from the specifica- . carefully selected. or ash and lancewood a fly-rod. Ash and lance when bethabara. make excellent rods. a foot added. a ferior to a good split-bamboo rod. and sorae other woods. Mr. and if it is raade up in first-class manner. and stiffish back Black Bass fly-rod. of rod should have a stiffer back than trout fly-rods should still retain same weight and same length.

^^ of an inch." I have are used two of these rods rods during the past for Black Bass they fly-fishing. female an inch. have reel-bands being . that I have to be and and ever used. -^^ inch. } of an inch. are ease pliancy for casting . f of an ferrule. -^ of Diameter. Length Length of of each piece. Length of grip. of an second Diameter (inside). specifications and for the above-described rod. have spring life retrieving a long line with strength for killing quickly. and They and are short enough handy . 41 inches. The wood. which he styles in his catalogue the HenshaU Black Bass Fly Rod. piece. butt-piece. 3 inches. 85 tions " as given above. made and willow mount spruce. without ferrule. 7 inches. ferrule. and certainly the best con sideration. female handle-joint. handle. bulge at of Diameter Diameter of greatest of gripj \f of an inch. are as follows Total length of rod. with the grip ings are German silver. Length of reel-seat.FISHING RODS. and are in split-bam cylindrical and of plain in lancewood. butt-piece Diameter neh. from extreme butt to top of wind ing check. (inside). Diameter of reel-seat. 5 inches. the short handle have the short. taking every thing into season. in lance : weighing 7^ ounces. and have backbone made These boo and three-piece rods. non-dowel They ferrule and grooved reel-seat or joint . 12 inches. wound with cane the The Henshall Black Bass Fly-Rop. . 10 feet. extreme tip.

and I could " could be made with play ments of a not understand enough how a steel tube to answer the require The steel fishing rod. twisting bending motion. but not brazed . in the Horton steel rod. through which the line passes. thinking a real rod of steel would ever be ing rod Connecticut. or were steel-like action. Anglers have been were wont to as say of good rods that they in as pliable and strong that steel. it admits of a simulating the action of a wooden rod. thus ingly well tempered. however. of which I imagine is like one of the most important features their construction. little made. It wiU be observed that whUe the ferrules used in this min rod are the same as rod of those in a short-handled greater Henshall length now-casting split-bamboo. but I never imagined how it could be success fully accomplished. and therein lies the whole strip of secret. the twisting motion could not be The tubes are exceed obtained in a brazed or drawn tube.86 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. the edges in apposition. for. of telescoping a one within the other. The a small rod has a wooden handle. bent around a mandrel. which is really an article of much merit. is composed of three tapering tubes. I knew that " a solid steel rod would be far too heavy. Each tube is formed thin close steel. of with opening just above the reel-seat. being as well as practically a a slit tube. Steel Fishing Rods. the gives of the several pieces in the fiy-rod it greater pliancy. running through the inside the rod and out . Such a But there has recently been introduced a steel fish by the Horton Manufacturing Company. thing as a steel rod has been talked of as one of the possibilities. difficulty has been which solved. of Bristol. an ordinary rod.

I have tried these rods. and its very different in casting the fly or a minnow. improved. and find that there friction of the line (if as much) in running inside of through the the rod. however a valuable split-bamboo or : I believe it to be a thing. if money. as I have not tried it in action is not actual fishing. weighing eight ounces or . good I will say this much. though wooden rod. more many rods that it is virtually indestructible. no more weighing eleven ounces. as one of The caliber of of running through is about the same and split-bamboo length weight. of course.FISHING RODS. not equal to first-class and. a not and and invention. Further than this I can not say. 87 one of at the end of and the tip. than in the rod sirailar rings or guides. better. it is are sold fully for as good. than It the can be. lighter rod next season. ten feet is long. a and I understand that company will introduce less.

sliding buttons. a " we now " multiplying which com and reels made with both drag a " " click." flat. Manufactur ers and inventors have taxed their ingenuity in devising the best and most suitable reels for both fly-fishing and baitments in happy to be able fishing reels for Black am I to that the improve Bass fishing. This reel was originally made for bait-fishing only.CHAPTER X." and a bination the might be termed tautology. and the American reel." mechanical is perverted outgrowth of what was originally a valid and useful arrangement." The The use of being drag is obvious operated by in of such alarm consists of a piece thin spring bent back the the other end end of upon itself soraewhat attached in the form one end being to the sliding steel pin block. is to day the best in the But the enterprise of some makers has been directed in have wrong channels . and (88) . to engage in the small the shaft of the spool. ion on free. They both the and are still. world. a free-running reel. FISHING REELS. The manufacture some of the now famous Kentucky were. alarm. as the American rod. for instance. fishing have fully kept pace with the improvements in fishing rods. Next to the a good rod there is nothing that contributes as a well-made state to pleasure of and the angler so much reliable reel. reel was first begun made with a forty years drag and an " ago. watch of an elongated " U.

a click which a can good be readily thrown in arrangement. It was invented the butt to of meet the requirements of still-fishing." well-known and also retained the " drag. The former is a pawl en a with gaging. constantly and operated permanently. Now " " " click proper is alarm of the Kentucky and a very different affair from the reel." until the singing a " the " alarm announced that welcome con tingency. and is used only in reels intended for fly-fishing. and all out of gear. " the functions of a " click proper." . but. the shaft pinion. action " Originally reels.FISHING REELS. This would be all well and excellence ofthe " Kentucky " certain manufacturers enough if they produced an exact ing the proper function " of the " imitation. And now for the in reason combination some why the click and drag exist in reels. the popularity multiplying reel induced to imitate it. 89 the " " alarm or subserve not intended in any sense to represent. stuck where the cane rod was frequently in the bank (often lieving rod or the by a spike provided for that purpose). so as admit of being the for either bait-fish ing also or fly-fishing. the In this of case a adjustable click answers all purposes " drag. so as to materially retard the reel." all such reels were the single- click but now many multiplying purpose reels are made to subserve the same by an " adjustable or ex click. not realiz they substituted alarm." rendering the latter superfluous. thus re lazy angler from the necessity of holding the while " watching his fioat of waiting for a " bite. Of late years. by the action of strong spring. pensive This is very their multiplying to reels should be used constructed in this way. the spring was not being stiff enough to retard the action of the reel." that is." for it the click.

and all re to the reel-plates. and with a an thickness at the ends of the plate of one-fiftieth of inch. and the manufacturers as a to the expediency sizes at and desirability the said adopting reel-seats.90 so as SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. the reel-plate to fit the reel-seat on his without reference reel-seats of rods makers. and after This became so aggravated that the National Rod Reel Association took conferring plates and of with of cognizance of the matter. and subserves old shallow groove in the wood. he fash own particular of other much ioned the rods. to and discard the have the altogether. to discard the made alarm light enough to the purposes of I like the latter plan the best." bination reel was made I have either a always advised alarm those ordering the Kentucky to reel as to have the and spring made stiff enough act click. of Heretofore. with a curve made upon inch in diameter. of an one-half inch wide. this com sell. much needed sizes were of reform A very gard has been introduced in or cross-bars. Most of our manufac turers conform to this rule. to conform of to the outward appearance and ostensible construction the Kentucky to " reel. or drag spring fly-fishing. It is lighter than its purpose as well any as other reel of fastening. subserve drag . any the . that the trout standard size of reel-plates meeting for Black Bass reels should be two and a half inches a circle long. through the anglers have of suffered very to in non-fitting reel-plates reel-seats. The best reel-seat is the with reel-bands. in case reel-plates made where a manufacturer any made both to the sizes and rods reels. it and uniformity in the of reel- was finally resolved. and it is earnestly hoped cut that all will eventually do so. . past evil Consequently. Of course. a society. or.

If it is too If the placed shallow for the with cross-bar of a a a gouge chisel reel. or with aflat and narrow rira. The inner side. Click Reels. 91 made modern inventions. make the rod " The fact is. instead so as of being the usual flat disks. fits too there is loosely. which. to the concavity the end plates. to the weight of the rod. grooved. Chubb. tightens it. It weight gives say that the additional it should balance better balance wood is idle to the or rod a without it. Thomas H. which skill sometimes and entails deal labor and no little tered a second or a it may have to be al fit the metal reel-seats third time to . of struck up to be convex on the outside. of other rods. no piece of paper or cardboard. " in addition to having improved end click. The solid metal reel-seat subserves no and adds one or two ounces important purpose. in which the spring are arranged in an improved raanner. are plates." properly used reel-seat is put on will not conform to the them standard size of reel-seats. Among the improved click reels is one patented an by The Mr. as now adopted. it is only necessary to deepen it reel penknife. then let go back to the old wooden reel-seat. or edge. Any reel can be to fit it in a few or a moments. elliptical space pawl of the click between them. the metal If rod makers sell." and reliable is of a new and novel form. allows and being an opposed concavity of the spool plates. solid metal under the cross-bar. and . With reel-seats remedy but by altering a gcjod the cross-bar of of the reel. reel that the stick raay swell (without it) and cause and the to if the it to groove is well varnished the rod will not swell.PISHING REELS.

) . Treble Multiplying Beel. (Wm. Mills & Son. H.92 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. Chubb. (Thos.) Ifew Style Click Beel.

with as a triple and constructed entirely of metal. the ratchet as by . pinion pinion a spur wheel upon and engaging is of with said toothed outside ring plate wheel. which is eminently well adapted A reference to the illustration will show for fly-fishing. though a neatly and lightly made. to the frame the spool. all the advantages of a single click which handle. only three times reel. of very strongly. By this in the tion a as sarae (which is the reel. and the gearing is all in the same direc thus making it the handle. the end of the the spool. is a very light and compact reel. German silver. and tho reel . or cams. . it is sarae and and tarded click soraewhat by this ratchet-wheel. Mills & Son click and manufacture very novel corabined multiplying reel. but in reeling up the line the inoperative. Wm. and The reel is perfectly sym- raetrical form. As the line is pulled off the spool. of fast. and the line is reeled cogs are rapidly without hindrance. 93 are thus entirely in protected. of a with teeth the inside. to which is also af arrangement spool moves as the plane. Thus it has a protected multiplier. that its the peculiar mechanism consists in an application of principle of the epicycloidal wheel. It is to is added its value reel. a The riveted to the revolving disk) fixed the handle. on engages with co^s.FISHING REELS. a treble multiplying The automatic drag is this reel is to also novel a feature. The central pinion countersunk on admit coiled watch which axis re a spring of with a ratchet or pawl shallow its free extremity. on The the invention attached shaft of consists of a fixed ring.

94 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OP THE BLACK BASS. (Thos.) Beel. Henshall- VanAntwerp Chubb. "Silver King" Multiplying BeeL Conroy. J. H.) (Thos. .

in one of which is placed plates. has been reels made in the of There the are now a multiplying half dozen for Black the Bass fishing. of the Fish a Commissioners symmetrical with of that state) end and It is perfectly so as reel. Vermont. however he may comparisons of are choose. from positive angler may take his choice. of Mt. odious. a con the gearing. other. to get and with the confidence. Wm. SterUng. and the spool backlash in spite of their and persistent efforts. require the adjustable click and automatic drag in the the The control automatic drag was designed to not meet ments of those anglers who can educate the thumb to minnow. click does any expert. 95 Multiplying Reels. Among many really good ones. utmost answer with assurance. indeed is taste as to which Antwerp reel is manufactured by The reel was Thos. H. Ken The Henshall-Van " " tucky (one myself.fishing reels. overrun most patient automatic To meet this difficulty the as drag ure acts in the place of the thumb. of matically. the rendering own use of the line as or in casting the a For my I prefer. and the line snarl. Van Antwerp. of Post MiUs. and it is simply a matter so selected. designed by Dr. multiplier without drag of any of kind. in a but there are good anglers who can acquire not. Chubb. the at each end. that he is sure one that will fully his purpose. by a sliding button the side the xeel. very rapid in bait fish some rea ing . the spool plates being cavity and struck up to form. But the direction greatest advance. and . successfully the knack thumbing the spool and will satisfactory manner. which reels in the market. for son. on the amount of press auto brought to bear upon the spool can be regulated. perhaps.

(Abbey & Imbrie.) .) "Imbrie" Compensating Beel. Mills & Son.96 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. " Imperial " Black Bass Beel. (Wm.

simply by the pressure of the a fish is hooked the tension can likewise the thumb-piece from a regulated a by free-running used spool rim light drag. Kentucky. and is made of gears the best quality steel pivots German has steel and throughout. by which be properly adjusted.FISHING REELS. rorary of watchmaker of of of Mr. which gives greater power in reeling and more freedom in is made casting than the ordinary straight cogs. or The wheels and pinions are cut with oblique teeth cogs. as it is the same as applied a to reels about forty years ago a by Mr. be to of or the line thumb . or overrunning on or backlashing be be prevented the pressure the spool can regulated by the leveras drag. Chubb's silver. the can reel as It will hereafter be the placed on the same click or the automatic drag. Frankfort. were and contem- The same reels both makers built upon the plan. just tension can the sliding button With this thumb-piece any amount of be brought to bear upon the spool. which operates mentioned. these of Paris. constructed his spool-shaft with conical fitting into screw-pivots with a beveled recesses. ran as smoothly of as when made. The reel . I ex amined one of Snyder's reels. Meek. by virtue of the compensating device.any wear taken up. On the the end is an adjustable click. which. plate or a complete stop. reel Either the is in the drag it be operated while motion. that had been in first constant use than thirty years. The bearings can of the shaft are compensating. heavy drag. Kentucky. or thumb- piece. Snyder. Snyder ends. to be only in side of fly-fishing. when cast the same spring ing. or when stopped. 97 . but Mr. reel Mr. or . for more year or two ago. This compensating principle I know to be a good one.

balance handle. to multiply two of or four times. The compensating de vice is a very desirable feature. at the choice the purchaser. but subserving the same purposes). and as the bearings become worn. It is class manner throughout. and a very handsorae. This consists of as swiftly and beveled recesses in the ends of the shaft. It is a double multiplier. which are or tapped disk. well and substantially made in hard rubber and German silver. Thos. New York. an makes several multiplying for Black Bass fishing. with an adjustable click. through the center of each outside plate. and being fitted accurately in all its parts. into which are fitted the the " conical ends of screw-pivots " (just the reverse of Snyder raethod. and a patent adjustable the back plate. adjusting their conical points perfectly to the coni- . is as well adapted a for fly-fishing as bait-fishing.98 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. and German silver It has full steel pivots. or axis of the spool. 65 " Fulton reels St. is of the greatest merit. in two styles. the best with being his Silver King. works reraarkably smooth and rapid. J. steel- reel." This is excellent reel. and is made in a firstquite light. patent " Abbey pivot & Irabrie's one Irabrie " compensating. being double multiplier. they can be adjusted and compensated by the device mentioned. mentioned above. symmetrical end plates of cap. answering equally well for fly-fishing or bait-fishing. in the The usual heads of these pivot-screws are covered which by caps manner. sliding the and reel screw-off click on for oiling. and handle.. styles of Conroy. that can be operated while (and with is in motion the rod hand if necessary). spool. substantial reel . caps hard rubber. causing the spool to revolve noiselessly as though running on jewels. or by removing the pivots can be screwed in out.

99 cal recesses of the shaft. screw-off It is caps pivots of double multiplier. plate (the wrongly the crank A novel feature in connection with this out reel of is a simple so device for throwing the handle in and gear. much By the pillars the capacity to of size the or spool increased without an adding it on the weight of the reel. thus doing away with con siderable friction greater ease and operated allowing the bait to be cast with delicacy. Mills & Son's new " very meritorious the everlasting. and end plates hard is rubber. The device for this purpose is and arrow-shaped by a short. it to be operated while the reel is in motion.FISHING REELS. with for oiling. unsteady. and Imperial" avoiding the the spool in or this por renders practically Wm. wabbling. and allowing is as well adapted for the flj'-rod as for minnow-casting. lever which occupies appropriated the position on the crank plate that is wrongly on page by the click button in the illustration 96. reel can By this compensating device the thus be made to run and smoothly always. It has cut improved shows adjustable click on the back plate). with raised raised pillars. that in casting the minnow the spool revolves entirely independ ent of the handle and gearing. ." reel Black Bass reel is another candidate for the favorable con sideration of steel the and angler. dinary tion of reels after " noisy working of they become worn. has a strong a frame of German silver.

DBF 5 G 4 F 3 E 2 1 C D Tapered Snameled Fly Lines.) Braided SUk Iiiues. Mills & Sou.100 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OP THE BLACK BASS. (Wm Mills & Son.) . (Wm.

the lines heretofore furnished for bait-fishing of " were open to several objections. and more compact." third less in but caliber or No. They but little (101) . While the tapered. 5 and line. the Bass fisher has much to congratulate Reel Lines for Bait-fishing. are or No. On the page 258 in The Book of the Black Bass. as I had invited the manufacturing matter. smaller being more closely braided they absorb are much in size. The styled Henry letter " H. be fully strong. These lines seem to be and all that can be wished for as reel lines in bait-fishing. himself for. they to seem as to contain the same amount of stock. would and suggested how a much in use could line of be made. in have been in the market several years. and while they are a than the " G. 6 in size . and expressed soon be produced.CHAPTER XI. and the said company." Hall Company's lines. FISHING LINES. state better line than any the hope that such a attention fishing line Henry Hall Company to the I am happy to be able to the extensive concern of the that suitable lines were shortly for afterward manufactured by response to those suggestions. enameled silk line is all that can be desired for fiy-fishing. just alluded to." I made statement yet that the perfect line for Black Bass bait-fishing was the future.

killed Bass averaging three not sustain more pounds with a line that this than a pound. like most raw silk lines. usually It sustains a dead weight of ten pounds. The dressed or boiled line is very firm and light. sustaining or pounds. and fully as strong. SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. an objection first sight might be deeraed this by some. The process waterproofing. The proof Henry Hall Company also by a new process. makes the line perfectly black in color. weighing not quite two grains to one hundred and one hundred yards weighing the yard eighty-five grains.102 water. which at however. reflect a tests. as the waterproofing detract in any way does not di a result its flexibility too or softness in any degree that had before been irapossible to obtain. which does use as a makes not line water from its minish bait line. sea-grass eight It is of the same caliber as a the No. in color. one-third grains grains white or two hundred mottled and thirty-five to a hundred It is and green. and a trifle the boiled silk line. and hark back to onr youthful experience . which is at least three times the I have often would strength actually required with a pliant rod. But I have experimented with line by numerous lighter tints. and slightest difference to the Bass themselves. These lines selected made in several styles. as all waterproof lines were stiff and of unyielding for minnow-casting. The raw silk heavier than line is very hard and compact. dead weight. yards. and consequently are render very freely in casting the the best silk minnow. It is of a pinkish-drab light chocolate color. 1 strain of line. weighing about two and to the yard. and of dressed and raw silk. alternating with lines of have never discovered that it made the practical And if we will moment.

enameled. silk for lines. but testable contingency is obviated to the harder for being de when cable-laid a considerable this extent. or sunfish. it has been some about perfect for a number work However. indeed. I examined fly-lines. The Hall silk which Company or about also makes a cable-laid line of No. London dealers which showed me. boiled light-tinted lines into vogue. but A. or in lines for Black strands silk . the best English compare Recently. improvement in the best as line for of fly-fishing. lines a shown manufacturers not whose in this class of was formerly very satisfactory. for it twists wet. and even where amount of every casting is it ab done. shiners. account of twisted lines . enameled line that is . when we fished with for gudgeons. have lately commendable spirit by turning out much better lines. silk Spalding & Bros. of and with or our adolescent days. but there was nothing that could of to those American manufacture. when in England.FISHING LINES. sorbs The one advantage of twisted line is all that but little water. by twisting silk together two three sewing we we somehow always preferred as successful black were just in luring the wily Bass the those somber. 1. home-made came lines. sent me metal-center. G. and thus causes kinking . Reel Lines There has been waterproof no for Fly-fishing. years. as compared to still fishing it will answer moderate a other purpose. black sewing fingerling trout. the same size as the "H" line on is tho best twisted line I its non-liability to ever saw for bait-fishing. 103 in angling. for a kink. when we made our own Bass fishing. they claimed to be the best fly a line in the world . with much pride. as we were after braided. the metal-center line.

is As the line is probability thoroughly the wire water proof. far of ahead of the best produced in England. and the equal any The enameled line made in the United States. around which the that it does not stiffen the line to might extremely small line is braided. center consists of wire. though for that are matter any an of the enameled strong The metal en'ough. be imagined. .104 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. there not much of becoming oxidized or rusted. advantage of a a smaller metal-center line is that it the can be used of caliber and still retain same weight a as a larger line. The wire is an appreciable so copper so fine as degree. and at the same time it is probably little lines stronger.

for we obtained from the from the eeeropia strands over three yards (nine feet) long. them for greatest which seeras render it more tenacious. than from the Chinese strands of satisfactory lengths have seems to be a want of some of some peculiar skill in the silk- treatment or or manipulation of the larvse. hatched as Platysamia raised Telea and the In a an article of (Forest and Stream. Orvis. Chas. 1886. or of weak vinegar. F. i e. larvae very successfully. or a lack silk-worm proper be produced..CHAPTER XII. and (106) . out and After leaving The a few hours. for . known phemus. they as related could were taken drawn to their worm. length. SILK. Orvis strands one We drew many the worms ing put two strands. Mr. or the glands. Vermont. order to the silken strands of the desired Among those who have been interested in the of matter is Mr. each worm giv each sac. in strength. from from both varieties. there special knowledge. in be regard to the Chinese length was aU that desired. much can species of our native silk-worm longer gut. we solution of acetic in a dilute to acid. the two cecropia who. leaders. produce in the drawing out of the fluid silk.WORM GUT. while been frequently taken. Before drawing. having poly- procured a number of cocoons of species of native and silk-worms. but. Manchester. of several strands It has of long been known that from the larvse moths. Deceraber 16) giving says : history ' ' his experience.

e. strength com the product of Chinese It could hardly from have been in the drawing." weak Dr. and it was hard and strong. An easy way to experiment in the matter would be to . or. that " according to weather temperature. Mr. we hopes were vain . for the had previously drawn gut Chinese worra. and as for single as strong the Spanish gut. poly2>hemus strands nearly our as long . according to the next variety. for a leader in to nine feet in length. in China and Spain is to soak the for from two to twelve in vinegar of full strength (accounts required vary) hours. when they had dried. the he had previously drawn gut from the Chinese hard and by the same treatment that he strong. But alas. be can produced fully strong is a fortune in it piece of as as the best Spanish If it be done there a from six somebody. than in cool the time as being states less in hot . and.106 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. . experiments in this direction will con until the native gut can gut." applied to the American worm. i. worm drew the The worm without practice any kind of preparation. pared with found that the they we had but little worm. and the color was perfection. delicately tinted either green or pale brown. We drew many strands. Garlick. " Orvis " placed the larvse. but all with no better It fore will be observed a " that Mr. Orvis worm. according to Dr. who to claimed produced strands equal in Spanish gut. treatment It is hoped that tinue to be made. it method would seem that or either foreign is not well understood. proceeding in the same manner. at all. for the day. few hours " in the vinegar. will bring a good price. that the American silk-worm requires a different mode of no treatment in this respect. while be drawing. Garlick (page to have 272. Book of Black Bass strength ").

beech. Fernald Standard vol. Cassino & Co. maple. E. 1884. with . 456-457) : silk- The Cecropia a wide worm. and all are more or with blue . along the sides. elm.SILK-WORM GUT. near the middle A red band.shaped the wings near the middle. willow. Platysamia cecropia. the following good de scriptions are abridged C. those They construct elongated." S. eggs. 107 collect spin the fully the grown as their cocoons. It has than most appetite. larvse just before they are ready to they are quite plentiful in the central portions of United States. and a double broken band on ones. plum. oak.. The tu . coarse. and of a pale green. and change in color and size at each moult until mature. H. crosses kidney. dull brown The wings of the moth are of a rich brown color. History. the second bercles on the third the back fourth segments are coral red except others on and are yellow. with a large or less with red. those on the last segments. which ii. reddish. The female lays from are creamy-white and eight or two to three hundred striped with which and hatch in ten days. when they are three or four inches long. through which runs an irregular the fore wings. shaded more gray scales. edged on the inside with white. The young caterpillars are black. The outer edges of the wings are pale black line the hind on silky brown. Boston. The base of the fore wings is dull red. are less arraed with black bristles. cocoons. has re distribution in the United States is six one of our a largest moths. In from their especially in button bush order or water-sycamore swamps. and or bluish-green color. to enable any (" one to identify Natural the moths and larvse. expanding markable inches or more. of each wing. pp. birch. the apple. and margined with black. sprinkled with spot. among which are etc. which. feeding on no less fifty different species of plants.

or by the experimenter putting his head beneath the surface of the water. to three hundred eggs. remains falls to the ground. of a full-grown is over three inches long. colors for leaders. speculating order sible. the segments orange with a segment silvery spot on The last mark. in order to view the leader through the same medium as the fish. and convex portions whitish. a shade of above. using aquaria. light-green and color.. 1867). is bordered hya a whitish oval purplish- brown which V-shaped often It spins cocoon. Telea polyphemus. the the tubercles middle. and the nearly cylindrical sides brown. days. Anglers. in ing the American silk-worms. during Those especially interested Mr. now as as ever. is our best Each feraale lays from two native silk-producing species. etc. elm. curved white and black line. where the insect the winter in the pupa state. The American silk-worm. and near their and apex is a black lilac eye-spot with a bluish crescent in it.108 a SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. in as pos to render them little discernible to the fish to this end Many experiments or glass have been made by especially constructed. with seven oblique yellow on on each side. caterpillar These hatch in from ten to feeds on twelve The when the leaves lines of oak. tanks But the praiseworthy experiments to determine the color . Leaders. Trouvelot (American rience and experiments are referred to the articles of expe rear Naturalist. which are about one-sixteenth of an convex on inch in the diameter. slightly the top and bottom. as are continually to the most suitable theorizing and. for his and in obtaining the silk.

province of speculation and But when we enter and the con jecture. standpoint. though we bring to our aid all the known I lately read. or mist color. forts derstood. or. my own satisfaction at any color of leader or snell will answer equally well. we are doomed to disappointment. and perhaps oilght without any well-defined reason. that have demonstrated. that the an English the angler declared that the it was a salmon took fly under delusion that shrimp. and I least. however commendable. at least. successfully. My own experiments in this direction havenot been to few. in other words. I have satisfied however. to by our own. some resources of the science of optics. which as is. that . because the water. experiment with will the fish themselves. measure try to see for the fish. practical anglers show for many years with no other result than to that the finer the gut the better.SILK-WORM GUT. otherwise our ef be like the play of Hamlet with the melancholy The sense of sight in fishes is but little un Dane left out. in the same The only way to is to experiment with profit. has been my Experiments to this end have been made by visible to the fish. as shrimp bait with the fly. alone. except that it to be least visible to the fish. 109 of leaders least to end sure experience. though I confess that I was formerly partial to a slight bluish stain. such. their visual capacity where. while said angler was artificial beneath the surface of flies on the surface appeared show of to him like To have should -with made some proving his salmon and statement he have first demonstrated that as could be taken situations. in this direction. our own fact precludes all analogous reasoning from myself. indeed. without reference to color. the shrimps. from hyaline to black. are in disappointment . the anatomy of their visual organs.

with success. acute it is to be that their discernment is as that brook-trout. stain or and as staining does this may possibly be the case. but. than in That the dent color of the leader is that the not important is very evi when we refiect boy with line of wrapping of cord. snells and leaders of the finest silver suture wire. and other the large hooks. as I do their to not think it any greatest difference. to or which the hook is leader snell. it seems to consistent with to color. practically. being more in than for any not weaken and accordance with the eternal fitness provided things. they we see as well ours. they have to be content are not pliable enough. simply . The as and me. or coarse white as lines . and are too heavy. for trout and Black Bass. and snells As to leaders makes in fly-fishing. the as the dye certainly can not add to its strength. is have them required. much fine as possible. desideratum.110 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. or the angler with line twisted affixed or of black sewing-silk. perhaps better. On the whole. accompaniment. red. the gut. then. refuse the bait be snells. for the rod and amount of strain exerted by a fish on the tackle is very color less than is popularly supposed. Though any tints of I prefer lines and leaders of neutral as may answer. white. the strength this is not much with a flexible rod. presumed of a marine wire fishes. it is best. I have used. practically. I think with our leaders and snells as we shall we find them to-day. as others with not lines the ap proved colors. other good reason. is as successful in taking of trout most Black Bass with bait. I think. in their own element. strands without or blue. Sharks do and hesitate to take the bait and even with nor the huge hook chain swivel cause of yet do codfish. to use leaders and snells of unstained gut.

nine with loops at each end. so of about four inches. good plan of A very anglers. say. lapped about two inches in forming that the knot.SILK. when wet. very six-foot leader. the two inches long two the forming loop . roundest. of presented strands for tying. three for one The flies easily. leader of six feet made in this way. but double three about make one strand strands back loop. now or of the most outre with most in color.WORM GUT. 11. will and that there be then each (instead two). excellent mode of the reader will and if making the loop is as follows : refer to Fig. and draw tight. now tie the knot in the manner as shown in the illustration short ends referred to. meanwhile. and its ex planation on page 281 ("The Book made much clearer gut of the Black Bass"). the remembering. . may stand at thus prevent it becoming right curled around it. a Two be of these or lengths to these can be of looped together for feet. and away from the stretcher a fly. angler which In this way a number of casts may be used as found necessary. in order that the drop fly when attached angle to the leader. can also attached looped can ends prepared. and a loop the . lap on itself. a be If the is using. Ill and most per selecting those that are the finest. the forraer toward to be clipped off short. usual the matter will be the In forming the knot for the two tying to ends are lengths together in making a leader. Leaders are the dropper flies. mostly made and is by far the loops for attaching An preferable way. This will on leave two other on one side of are the knot. fect. who tie the gut strands making leaders is that used by some together in lengths of three feet. on page 278. that a sight of the angler himself is more fatal to successful fishing than a display of coarsest leader. or This loop should point the reel end of the leader.

at is always weakened when six or more pounds tested to the breaking likely less to or one of . But if will leader low test is applied. which than it a will in fishing. will a leader that breaks be eight pounds at more the first trial. end. Snells. Most Black Bass flies or are or Snoods. repaired the leader in length also same and the with middle. and still at the third trial. a good last until worn out. not sustain than six pounds at a the next. eye. or should be very two require careful or to apply and a force than three actual pounds. and by as separate snells each they can be readily attached for droppers. and when the . instead of being tied on snells of inches in length. is really is all the leader can be put to without injury. Silk-worm point. In testing the the angler weight of more strain gut more strength of leaders for Black Bass not fishing.112 with SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. the of stretcher and dropper flies attached to the end seen loops how " the lower three-feet it " length. of several double gut. for Black reputable maker. when bought from a leader. by simply looping on attached another three-feet flies already a as It will be seen how easily with leader can be or in the manner. These separate snells should not be more than three or four inches long . change it wiU readily be cast and easy would be to the unlooping before. There is really no necessity for testing a first-class Bass or trout fishing. by discarding the broken frayed portion replacing it another three-feet length. This is rauch the best way. as suggested. in actual fishing. be as They using can easily looped looped at on for stretchers. a now made with short loop. thus.

SILK- WORM GUT. instead chafed or it is stronger. thc latter three four inches in length Short leader much snells inches is really long enough. than " " they fit the modern fly-books Thc eye or loop of the of fly may gut. will increase be no disad . 113 should not exceed fly is tied directly or to the snell. however. as be formed of the smaUest and sized wire not gimp. droppers will stand out better from the and longer ones. better. can It will. become frayed. the weight of the fly somewhat . but this vantage in fly-fishing for Black Bass.

this eye the snell is passed and fastened by one of several proved eye is. on the same plane with the while vertical. Recently the old " " eyed hook has been with revived : in the Eng old- land for that artificial flies. is turned down . fashioned form had the either turned or shank. brazed or unbrazed. as the loop of the snell can be readily passed through snell plan of the . the each of which has its advocates. the im knots or hitches.CHAPTER XIII. in large sizes. nor fret his to the particular knot or hitch by which to attach eye should making the eye of gut or gimp in Bass files is really to be preferred to any form of eyed hook. but the a by any form of of the new hook gut can not is so small passed that. gut. on which doubled must be fastened suited by for a single gut with some sort of It is best the very are mer small hooks. be through it. for the very finely drawn. though some prefer it turned Through up. and over and the lat secure ter. HOOKS. or of which with eyed the snells are made. the turned down eye is deemed the best form. making and more snell very than eye neat attachment secure eyed hook knotted except . then drawn neater with tight. But the Black Bass fisher whether soul as need not worry his brain as to be turned up or down. turned up or (114) . consequently it knot. What hooks. but eye this difference up. for the the small gut and loop at the head of the a fly. and the trout flies of England gossa usually tied.

spinners. 20 being a large size and 1 a smaller size . flights. a manufacturer employing a very few hands his hooks backward. etc. Pennell has written a book iu which he adopts this numbering . the famous hook manu facturer.. in the This is logical. 1 he calls 0. gangs. 00. The quently must it be drawn through the plates to reduce it. AUcock. flies . 115 down . however. sizes larger than No. of etc. 000. seat. way that the wire is for the finer the wire the more fre has worked weU for centuries. and who wanted the Redditch manufacturers to depart from a uniform system of established system. much ex During ercised my visit. This system numbered. and Mr. I saw in Eng than land more " novelties. snaps. link-swivels. says : "In Redditch smaller we number from 1 to 20. 000.HOOKS.. and adopt the K-endal On this subject Mr. for nearly a numbering hooks that had been century. May files. to number chooses that ' it is sufficiently elastic. 1 we number 0.'" of extension either . dry and flies and floating gimp . S. traces gags . 00. in new dresses. it that the boasted conservatism ens as soon as the average Englishman last year and weak he takes to angling. allowing way. the British angling regard mind was in to the re-numbering angler who a new fish " hooks. propeUers. beware of imitations. but the only reason given for this new system is "Now. etc. lock seem brake-winches and metal center registered would fast joints. and started by or an " interested " had of " invented patented registered form hook (with the turned down eye). those smaller than No. of for the and fly-fisher." and revivals angler of old obsolete ideas. the same size becoming the higher the number. were ever dreamed in my American angling of philosophy.

As the hooks as that are most in vogue in the United States. are all numbered the ing Redditch system. it coating . hooks seem and coarser for larger and and they to be stronger. Snelling Hooks. and to soften the gut crimp it by biting with the teeth or pliers . nothing tightly. sooner or later. it breaks the and when the gut is shrinks upon drying. If properly done it will never pull loses its life after a time. but let me caution the tyro. to folly use when they can better be dispensed hook sraall In tying red shades gut. off It destroys the temper the protective or of a hook to burns gut fiber of the to bite expanded by soaking and crimp it . The best way to tie a gut snell to well-waxed silk a hook is to use and but thread. best. of and the kind. bend. or pinching it with by advise hira to do nothing heat it. and to wrap evenly off. DubUnaccord Sproat. the color is The the silk must be well-waxed. Aberdeen. use finest for very as suitable. it would be in the nature of a calamity to change to the or it for the Kendal any other system. and hollow-point Limerick. It has been recommended. them from no constant good wetting they may do a drying. use the best sewing-silk ones the . Carlisle. cement rots and leaves the wrapping loose. to the wrapping . becoming silk Rubber and brittle. O'Shaughnessy. and At the it is with. and agree very closely in all the sizes. if they do harm. in tying gut snells to hooks. or to heat other wax. and so will all and cements.116 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. and to soaking. the shank of the hook and coat it with rubber or cement. thereis nothing shoemak- better for purpose than the best light-colored . tied on.

for one-third small medium-sized hooks. and and begin wrapping the at (around the gut. then take the hook between you are right- the thumb and forefinger the end the left hand (if shank handed). evenly and closely down toward the bend of the hook. Now. proceed as fol lows : First wax the silk well of . and has a tendency to stretch or loosen the wrapping at that point . and continue the wrapping for a short distance. for large hooks . shank and lay the silk alongside the gut. by placing the point of the hook against the ball of the thumb and making traction on the snell. and laying along the a shank of with its end beyond the end ofthe shank. it is much or better of more to it on front the shank. their two ends silk together . which can be folded in piece of soft leather to back proper prevent soiling but the one's fingers. The invisible knot is formed in two ways : one by revers ing the hook in the fingers to the of the left the hand. using as much strain in wrapping as the silk will bear. or six or eight turns. barb with of the gut to the right. below the end of the gut. and When it is the strain the back the direction the traction is away from the end of the shank. passing the loop over and around the bend the hook . leaving of loop the silk to continue the wrapping. and finish the wrapping with the invisible knot. 117 a er's wax. shank. gut and silk. while with the gut in front of the shank this is obviated. wrap Begin the wrapping just below the end of the shank. leaving its tip bare. of and the uppermost . as can be easily demonstrated. Some the place on writers advise laying inside of the gut and on the of shank. silk so that the shank points left. to tie a tapered hook to gut. then. around the shank. and itself) the end of the firmly.HOOKS. lay thc along the inside and the shank or of for half its length.

through turns. draw It is more clipping off the end closely. Another way of making the invisible knot. its loop the hook. the and then drawing the ing tightly. is to lay a doubled being toward gut. silk and baek by its end. drawing is to be closely clipped off. each turn. by and out means of which under the wrapping thread is back these last turns. but pass not the bend of or along the wrapping.118 at SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. and include this doubled thread in the last four five turns so around as the shank and and wrapping of quite firmly silk before. it is to be well coated with the end means of a camel's snugly and tightly When the wrapping is shellac varnish by hair pencil. . easily done than described. the then the end the wrapping and after through pulled loop. completed. until four or five turns are made. or rather a same silk different way of doing the thread of finer (unwaxed) thing.

day in and day out. Nearly special favorites. Grizzly King. almost any diffident. times they will take any thing made of feathers. Red Ibis and the several hackles or palmers. that to induce Perhaps. is admit generally by fly fishers. often preference is purely fanciful. large the ordi nary trout fly. The facts are. ted on various and water. and after skill flies of certain colors. a angler has his the Very . But that there are some flies that more generally and uniformly killing. that. ness. tinsel. ARTIFICIAL FLIES. what what color or combina colors. but when they are shy and freely. in most instances. which is nearly twice exactly. seem or combinations of a rise. but they answer as good a purpose for the Black Bass as when made of as the proper size. These were all originally trout files. when fish are rising fly will kill . (119) . than all. it is the manner of offering. for I believe that. renders a particular fly more killing are others at cer tain times. all but it is or pardonable weak which we are more less prone and then it do much harm. or just form or size. rather than its peculiar features. Professor. more choice in the matter than the fish themselves. Some silk. they prefer.-*. There are flies and flies.CHAPTER XIV. it is only colors. We really do tion of not know. fully that cast. to can not we are both in general and every flies. a fact proved by practical experience. Among these are notably the Coachman.

Gray. particular vanity of the Black Bass color or size is most if he is color-blind. Red. Expe or rience and observation teach us. Perhaps this where are can be better shown of in the following table. wings hackle readily NAME OF FLT. Red. Yellow. Dun. Yellow. however. White. wool. just what form or tempting. White Gray. Rod. Black. Blaok. seems and black. Yellow. White. and at still other of times they will rise an artificial fiy. White. Red. Herl. Gray. at that the Black Bass. HACKLE. they usually kiUing flies. or a bit of rag. Yellow. Gray. Green. at other times they will notice only certain . Gray. yellow. Red. White. colors and fishes. . WINOS. Herl. Red. Brown. nothing in the semblance again. " Then. Red. Green. Black. Yellow. Red. Red. and of any known colors color . Gray. Gray. Gray. I^ontrefll Polka King of Abbey the Water Red.to or sizes. Brown. Green. Brown. Red.120 or SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. BODY. Black. we should have an easy task. Yellow. and the predominating seen : colors body. HenshaU W^hitp Miller f-irrav Drako Brown. White. " ing in on some we waters are comparatively If knew the colors. Brown. brown green. Red. Gray. like most other game for red. Gray. a fly or flies that are kUl useless on others. Red Ibis Lord Baltimore Oconomowoc Oiieen of the Water Ppofeaaor Red. and flies embody and to have a penchant many artificial times gray and one or more of these are in their construction.

and handsomest. cinnamon peacock (woodcock). Hoboken. gray (dove) . father naturally thinks his own children the best. white. Alfred M. this is one of the rious privileges of the art of angling.ARTIFICIAL PLIES. wings. two fibers (green) The Lord Baltimore fly originated with of Prof. black and spots (guinea fowl) tail. I as a gen in my hands have all proved very killing. for own each angler will adopt few flies for mentioned his fishing. with gold tinsel . Mayer. smartest. orange or yellow . Body. mixed. wings. a merely eral mention them. with mixed. mulae for their follows Polka. Oriole. white with gold hackle. dun (hairs from Body. Oconomowoc. white and deer's tail) . The last four in the table especially useful on dark days. the red. the praise or condemnation construction are as Henshall. are gray. leaving The for : others due them. and hackle. Body. hackle. of the Stevens Institute Technology. tail. black. ginger . 121 flies that I use The above list embraces except all of the in Black Bass yellow fishing. Body. and glo by a on all occasions. scarlet. black yellow. tail. deer's from tail . others. them none of which nevertheless may have been continue and above. . twist . to the exclusion of soon guide. wings. or toward evening. Oconomowoc. Its formula is as follows . brown black . I may be pardoned for placing As in the above list and strongly recommending and as general flies to my Polka. black. creamy-yellow. white hairs from peacock's wings. and hackles. : New Jersey. but he swear will to use them. tail. red . Most and of the flies in the own above table are general favorites. tail-feather. Oriole. brown. Henshall. herl . hackle.

Professor Mayer aptly named his trout fly. and I give its formula in an interest in it may try it : that any one feeling Golden Dustman. Lord Baltimore while I designated Professor Mayer I. black. taU. of Lord Baltimore. a fly to embody these colors . for several seasons. and as they are the heraldic colors of the State of Maryland. wings. Sometimes it is the rising to it madly on other occasions most killing fly at all I ever when they not would notice cast. the or " Oriole. the Bass no other fly . hackle. bronze (wild turkey) ." my Black Bass fly. of my own design ing. natives Baltimore. golden yellow . the head is the bend . being " . unknown to the other. Body. of tail and wings. but it is fusing it altogether. always taking I have not yet deterrained the most occasions on successful. suitable conditions and for using it. hackle. that the hook is end of reversed while . and knowing that black and yellow formed a good and taking combination in an artificial fly. which beautiful as from the Baltimore oriole. the Bass re the other fly in the cast." honor own hanging bird. each designed. I have been experimenting with a fly. order colors." from the crest of Abbey they call & the Imbrie have " and manufacture made what same Fluttering same It is that in the patterns and except in the manner as the conventional fly. that is as yet a puzzle to me. though I am inclined to think it best It is constructed entirely of metallic cloudy days. bronze (peacock herl) . with smaU upper wings jungle-cock. Lord Baltimore. the tail near of the fly is at the the shank. fibers golden pheasant. patented Fly.122 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. and orange of . Body. is. songster was named in the same as its colors were his black and orange. and were the heraldic colors of Lord Baltimore.

\bbcy & Imbrie. is more likely to fasten the it is almost sure to be hooked if it touches the fly. the wings and hackle. used fish. They are every progressive fly-fisher should worthy of a trial. as in which. than the ordinary fly. it is clairaed. and add a few of his favorite flies. The barb being near the head of the half-drowned insect. and not had experience like them very much. to his fly-book.ARTIFICIAL FLIES. as it is further claimed. though enough with them to determine any well or all whether they are better. tied in this manner. or opposite will to the point. A glance at the above illustration explain this better than any descrip tion. instead closing. expand lifelike motion. 123 Patent Fluttering Fly.) of the hook. fly. . It the the will readily be seen that when this fly is drawn through of water. sirailar to that of a struggling. (. gives it a ordinary fly. I have I have these flies. under circumstances. fluttering.

) . (Thos. Conroy.) Hammered Spoon Bait. J. Hammered Spoon Bait.124 SUrPLEMKNT TO THE BOOK OF THE HLACK BASS. (Abbey & Imbrie.

and it is. murderous-looking instruments use of the most torture ever devised Walton. perfo .CHAPTER XY. trolling spoons. ARTIFICIAL BAITS. There are situ ations where the small be cast with a revolving spoon with a single hook light rod and still remain within the pale never legitimate angling . In trolling spoons the changes that have been rung upon the original oval metal spoon. painted and spin until nickel-plated around . ribbed and rated and fluted. remarkable . the eyes and made and to floats metal minnows fl. to say the least. Every conceivable or shape and which the old spoon could be cut. spinners. insects and nondescripts. with a single hook. when it is judiciously employed. Probably in no direction has there been more ingenuity such as displayed than in the production of artificial baits. has been resorted to .ies. but there is using more than a single hook. surprising to see the number of forms that have been evolved from into still that simple impleraent. and it has been hammered and corrugated . the brain begins to whirl. Crustacea. bent twisted. iijdeed. and are and become dazed in their and contemplation. embossed. propellers and artificial minnows. and and doubled balls and trebled. and grooved. for the the foUowers spoon of the meek and gentle The trolling properly can of made and has its legitimate uses. any excuse for (125) . and are of Some cruel fearfully wonderfully made. frogs. have it revolve. have been.

or his children. and Spalding Brothers. they hook was attached we could use raake be of surpassed if or single instead with a the triple hook triangle. I have foiind dead Bass the entire by preraaxillary bone (upper lip and jaw) torn these murderous irapleraents. the pot-fishers. 1. being hooked. No. The their spoon with a used lower section hararaered and plain above. Trolling Spoons. more certain of being landed. preferable and double hooks and gangs are English abominations invented or humane ? devised by the devU. when hook is All triangles. Why or do manufacturers persist in affixing the triple a single hook. and all humane and genuine anglers those should love fair play and use light and elegant tackle. so triangle. One the of the most effective " improveraents in spoon. I never see or hear of an more using or recommending a gang of three or hooks for trolling tho live minnow without setting him angler down as a pot-fisher who . " spoon-baits is so-called haramered the " oval spoon with convex surface and It is simply the old " hammered or pressed numerous sunshine into polygonal depressions facets for the play and As made when revolving. hav ing the hammered sectioii nickled and the plain section gilt.126 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. Spaldings them clear conscience. . deprecate and discourage the cruel practice. to trolling spoons. Imbrie. presenting sparkle of the light and by Conroy. much more efficient. away does the with off not have his mouth so torn and lacerated as by villainous triple hook or gang. I have the sraallest size. and if he breaks pike fishing. can not and Abbey & . for There is nothing so effective as the single The fish is more certain of hook for any kind of fishing. and a ridges.

ARTIFICIAL BAITS. water It is a very durable bait and is made in . Mr." a for being made of shell ciful it can never be bent twisted into the fan effective forms of some of the metal ones. hook. and will be readily adjusted to a snelled hook be found very suitable for the white water of riffles and rapids. This small of a or an arti spoon can ficial fly. on a fly-rod. 127 with a single hook. and it will always be or spoon. and the sraallest waters." he the calls the " Capelin of phantom. in swift. the with good effect. Mills & Son. sizes are well for the fly-rod in broken Adjustable Fly-Spoon. After divesting it of several triangles hooks which are always attached to arti ficial minnows. Imbrie minnow of sent me for trial as a soft and " flexible artificial which the style " known the phantom.) One is the of the neatest things in the way of adjustable fly-spoon revolving bait Wm. and re-investing it Avith a single small I used it with remarkably good success in the rough under mill-dams. It is very adapted as a lure. Artificial Minnows. tumbling waters. There is nothing in this line pearl spoon more beautiful " than . (Wm. Mills & Son.

It is well known that very large a Black Bass have been it remains caught with a live mouse will bait. and who next day repaired to the spot and suc ceeded in taking it . Fur Body. Improved Artiflcial Mouse. ( Ihos. Three inlet of years ago I was trout-fishing was of a on Slate river.128 a SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. and when in Artificial Baits. the stream I observed a On reaching a field-mouse swim the pool a ming across. me. and when it fine trout rose for it.) The trout as above is well calculated and very life-like iraitation of a mouse and is to deceive.ke. Conroy. the Gogebic la. it weighed fully one and a half pounds. I sat in the on either the boat casting paddled of under the banks hand as my boatman wider portion noiselessly along. and was a good fish for that stream. . but and reached as the center of saw he did so. first-class color. sents a spinning in swift water pre bright and sUvery very life-like appearance. being raanner. turned tail disappeared. J. and to be seen whether the imitation be as successful. heavy rain. and homeward bound on account bow of returning down stream. I had seen what Upon my arrival at the hotel I iraparted to a friend who was very anxious to kill a large trout.

tioned on page The Book of the Black of Bass." owing to a better understanding America.. sucker-like. or river chub added which Hybopsis kentuckiensis. and is a favorite bait on Kentucky and are a Ohio streams. creek chub as as Semotilus atromaculatus the horned. but it would cause confusion to allude to their scientific names. NATURAL BAITS.CHAPTER XVI. in coloration. There dozen " or more species of minnows are used for bait. " and which and " indiscriminately " called by anglers chubs shiners . minnow. and is a very common brassy much mottled with almost dark blotches . only in Black Bass fishing. There is tural Baits. minnow. tough lips. tific not much to be added to the Chapter changes or on Na There have been 318 " some in the scien men nomenclature ofthe cyprinoid of fisheSj of minnows. the steel-backed To these raay be Campostoma anomalwm. (129) . the ichthyology Notropis . and North The the common shiner is now known as megalops . it has thick.

J. (Thos.. Y.130 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. Conroy. Conroy's Improved Fly-Book. 65 Fulton St. N.) .

to meet the wants anglers. and the choice must be left entirely to the angler's taste or fancy as to the different methods of securing the articles. to observe the improve not only raents and inventions that are being made. two three. Fly-Books. frame. of Every thing that be devised thought put to increase the angler's pleasure or comfort is into practical shape. which completely across are fastened to the (131) . scalloped spiral accommodate a dozen flies. in or this department. The fly -book. is so some them. Tub list added of miscellaneous implements is constantly or requirements of being to. Every and manufacturer of has or patented at and least one fly-book. two stretched and secured by means of long and closely-coiled at equal springs. and also as "Bray" to details patent of construction and finish. MISCELLANEOUS IMPLEMENTS. It is the interesting. flies. fly-leaves of or stiff waterproof metallic surfaces. manufactured and by Spalding board is with Brothers. The a is a very strong are at made substantial leather book. sure where there much competition there is to be production of good It is really hard to choose between those now made. can each season. upon looking over catalogues of our large dealers. one both to ends of which riveted strong nickel The snells are the page. placed distances apart.CHAPTER XVII. but surprising.

132 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. .

These bars and the to each other on riveted fly- frames of are placed opposite ends the two each sides other the leaf. is is from flies. and The fly-leaves are made of and celluloid. hooks. neatly stitched strong spring double parchment. a keeping and it perfectly a straight. course. be the pocket are which are extra parchment made The cover of book is entirely the of leather. closed by a neat " spring catch. a very page. 133 and page by strong. and. with large leather pocket at each end of book. to absorb regardless their very readily attached or length. fly-book is neatly made of end for leaders and snelled is closed neat and flies. and held straight. or clasp. is fitted with flat metal hooks. stretching to its full extent. with Between the fly-leaves the moisture are leather leaves faced wet flannel. They by a . flat to the nickel riveted page at bars running through them the edges. of snell and the loop the the snell attached the flat hook the rack at opposite end of the leaf. The racks. or of bound on the edges. The of snells detached. riveted a through to those the the leaf in very secure manner. Conroy's At Improved each patent fly-book has double parchment with silk. leaves. with their hooks springs. tween and hold dozen flies to leaves. " the securely Thos. The whole is secured by a A. and the are firmly are to through the leaf. substantially made.MISCELLANEOUS IMPLEMENTS. firmly reverse of stitched nickel of together strong double side racks. J. B. Shipley & Son's patent either leather. with pockets at short-looped very strong clasp. and a parchment for lead ers. spring is of at The one fly to is affixed of to the hooked the of spiral end the fly the leaf. with metal end are on frame. springs One bar and the double rack the other with neat spiral terminating end of also in hooks. A large and pocket whole placed at one part of the book for leaders.

Mills & Son. The "Levlson" Fly-Book.) . (Wm.. N. 7 Warren St. Y.134 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS.

135 Patent CeUuloid Fly-Book. Thos. of keeping it without regard These nor clips and clasps add much do not increase the bulk while the book in to its weight. Shipley & Son. ends for securing The other has cor adjustment of frames nickel the for the the flies. (A. flat spring for securing . B. though in scalloped nickel somewhat at different two ends manner. Chubb has of patented and manufactures two pur styles fly-book.MISCELLANEOUS IMPLEMENTS. H. with between for securing the snell. instead snells spiral springs. irrespective rugated nickel their length. to its length. the flies are placed position and removed very readily. of with two bars between. clasps which have. on which are placed short spiral springs of at the snells.) have two metal clips at each end rows of spring straight clasps for attaching the fly-hook. of One has frames and the the fly-leaf for affixing the flies. Mr. two nickel bars at equal distances be tween. a both of which subserve the same poses.

Y. 18 Vesey St.136 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. Patent Clip(OpBn) The "Southside" Fly-Book. N. (Abbey & Imbrie..) .

parchment. Imbrie also makes " Endicott " book. instead snell. the " Levison. there are smaller The books are made entirely with an improved form of clasp. Wm. and page holds dozen. to on the spiral spring and patent clip principle. in of fly-books. of a loop. By The means of can the hook. in first-class and durable manner throughout. are have hooks. style. substantially with leader pockets flies. addition ones of short-looped and leather leader pockets. The of flat spring are leaves are page spring two dozen flifes. at one end The flies and neat slotted as are adjusted spiral by means of slotted at a hooks springs the other.MISCELLANEOUS IMPLEMENTS. Abbie & Irabrie's made clip sizes is in several and different styles. snells with knot. to flies. 137 to of any length. short snells are are secured of by parchment bands. the Mr. The frames the two spiral and of bars are placed opposite and a riveted each other on sides the leaf firmly the together. be readily attached as the looped at snells are kept and perfectly straight and full length any fly can be removed without by disturbing fly-book and this method." fine leather in a tho usual with pockets and clasp. felt leaves for absorbing moisture from wet The flies and snells are attached at full length by the the patent clips at top and bottom of the pages. others. and Between the fly-leaves material. addition other styles . the The pages are arranged for both Black Bass patent and trout flies. stitched very The leaves along the and formed In for double parchment neatly edges. and leather absorbent Thc books pockets strongly and neatly for leaders and snelled spring catches. and closed by durable is patent fly-book. Mills & Son's made of metal made of leather.

which for holding them. leather strap and flat loops.) Tackle-Books. never full. wrapping silk.. Tt' Y^''' 'P^*^ '^^'^^-' double-looped snell :T and short-looped flies. There is nothing have been shown handier than a good tackle-book is made so I of an one by Mills & Son It has half extra a which leather. sinkers. that. like dozen large small pockets sneUed pocket hooks. etc. l(Wm. has a large lines.138 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OP THE BLACK BASS. firmly closed by "^ a long ^ . loose hooks. Hook aud Tackle Book.t is for leaders or and each can style. . m the beUows or accordeon omnibus. article flies. or eyed-hook flies are usedfit is jus he It is be ti ^zed for short-looped supplementary one. MiUs & Son.

Another one that I procured from MiUs & Son is just the It will thing. box in the the large for eyed-hook flies. (Wm. by the tedious rubbing with gutta-percha. This often causes vexatious delay to the impatient angler. but it is too large into any pocket. 3J by . with a small I bought one England. use. enclose the leaders. in cen box will answer nice the purpose. Almost any round metal entirely kind obvi of a flat.) Leader-Boxes. unless one especially made for it. Mills & Son.MISCELLANEOUS IMPLEMENTS. which are thus size always Its cost is only fifty cents. being damp ready for 4J inches. go into an ordinary pocket. Before using leaders it is them of of course or necessary to more straighten process by soaking in water. and being It is fitted with two ened. nickel-plated will tarnish. pieces of thick felt. but it can be ated by the use of a leader-box. has not rust or rounded corners. 139 Iieader-Box. ter to of go and a very one one. Its which.

No. No. Chas. No. 3. F.Wet Frames. 65 Fulton St. Landing. Thos. Orvis. No. Mills & Son. 3. 1. N Y . 1.140 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS.2. No. J. Vt. 2. Wm. Manchester.. Conroy. 7 Warren St N Y . Patent No.

The long handle is for fishing of from a boat or the bank. a long of bamboo. from the to the more simple wooden-bowed net able net-frames of elaborate and port Avhalebone. The rim of the net is a piece to or flat steel. the " The net can be carried creel or The J. The strong ferrule. C. which. when the natural spring the metal holds every thing firmly and securely. long handle. brass at or nickel-plated. Orvis very useful and meritorious frame. when not in use it is in into the serted end. There is in no reason landing-nets. and is readily attached detached from the handle . which has the a screw-cap Dorsal Fiu and at the Wm. net- Mr. " can be straightened inserted into in the the hollow bamboo handle. Bailey patent landing-net frame. why the angler can not now be suited for they are made in every style. combining two handles. will show The ends holes (a a) in them which ring holder and over the pins {b of ring to the spring-brass ring (A) have are passed through slots in the attaching the b). nickel-plated. and patented a " " net- handle. 141 Landing-Nets. short handle is used in wading the stream and has a ring at the end for attaching a loop by which it can be fastened to a button on the coat or creel-strap. . F. sold by Thos. is another example of the principle of carrying a the net-ring in hollow bamboo handle. the of method of and a glance at the illustration the handle. makes a steel and brass. which are joined by a one and a short one. MiUs & Son have ring tool. which is very of compact convenient The net-ring is of made flexible metal.miscellaneous implements. pocket. Conroy. end when released from its and socket the the handle.

Double Foard's Disgorger. (A.) Single Foard's Disgorger. B.) . J. Conroy.) Combination Disgorger. (Thos. (Thos. Shipley & Son. J. Conroy.

and the hook will come out with the instrument. draw the line taut. Mills & Son have a disgorger with a long and wire stiff handle. or it may he a pike. Very at the same time to prevent the fingers of the angler from dis being scratched or lacerated by the teeth of the fish. often a Bass. by Thos. for admitting to a the snell. and it is difficult to eye. and push the whole down till the barb is disengaged. a gorger becoraes ingeniously One of There are a very useful tool.miscellaneous implements. and dislodge the hook. while the It is a very useful. or wall is hooked in the throat or gullet. It has the a V-shaped knife the other at a one extremity for dis lodging hook. are the knife the being a slotted tube. B. the screw-driver may be required for taking apart a refractory reel. 143 Disgorgers and Extractors. J. a number of the best is sold Foard's use patent fishhook extractor or disgorger. then clasp the line against the side of the shaft. cut ting There these are a number of other forms in the market. con venient and combination. being a shank of the instrument is portable file. of The file is while useful for touching up the point the hook. the end of The directions for its the instrument corre employraent arc to sponding to the size of the hook. but among the best. pickerel. and run the instrument down into the bend of the hook . purpose Another tool for this is sold by A. with end of the tube ground sharp. In order to render this easy to do. . screw-driver. Conroy. devised implements for the purpose. Wm. Shipley & Son. edge.

^#/v -t^-'-yif^j (A.) (Wm. Mills & Son.144 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. Shipley & Sou. B.) .

thus keeping the bait time . continuous A. of Wm. sold by A. Mills & Son. G Spalding & Brcs. (A. B. G. is made of perforated outer pail tin. The "Acme " minnow-bucket. it can be raised or lowered to a alive for the an indefinite of allow selection bait without wetting the hand. is substantially made of heavy tin and handsomely japanned. to aerate The ofthe water through the perforations. free plenty tages of space between it water. and keep the bait alive. the water has a tendency flowing during transportation. and Shipley & Son's double minnow-bucket durably made and handsomely japanned The inner of pail is strongly and orna with cir mented.MISCELLANEOUS IMPLEMENTS. 145 Minnow-Buckets. The inside pail of perforated tin can be removed and placed in the water. and the all for a culation of the It has the well-known advan the double pail. Spalding & . Rudolph's Patent Floating Minnow-Buoket.) Rudolph's floating minnow-pail.

namely : A.146 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. and the outside pail can be dispensed with.. of minnow-bag. strong round- . G.) The or fioating principle which is also applied well adapted to a netted pocket. and The cuts show the minnow ready for use. means of which it will float at the can the water and when fishing use of from the a boat it be made fast by a string. two is to the use the angler when are fishing a stream anglers in the same pocket at his own end of by boat. Angler's Pliers. by . who always wants a companion or pocket two in his boat. pail is one of of the best articles in this line. (A. the and The inside has an air is made strong galvanized chamber secured to the inside surface of of lid. Or where there be appreciated by the social angler. combin ing six different tools in one. A very useful little impleraent is shown below. Bros. a convenience that will wading. Spalding & Bros. each can have his minnow the boat. Rudolph's Patent Floating Minnow Pocket. folded. wire-cloth.

screw-driver. F. reel repaired. reamer. a With this rod or a tool. (Thos. it ment. Conroy. and are made of the best They and in the best manner. It Rod Holder. means or of in Fig. thumb as 2. as and the angler to dispense the services of a boat It it can a be fastened to as either the gunwale. bit of string and a piece of wire. only four ounces. B. whether be taken out or replaced in mo the is below the grip. 147 Angler's Pliers. 1.) nosed pliers. This device is intended for enables man. The that crotches for the no more rod are covered with rubber. steel reli weigh able. The a cut is one half the size of the pliers. fine wire cut E. strong wire C. cutter. trolling with or still fishing.B. broken disabled should may be quickly remedied or be carried in every angler's pocket. orto seat. can reel While the or above soft is held a perfectly secure. to By the screw can be adjusted any angle direction. and will be found thoroughly ter. knife for splitting shot. so there is liability of scratching or bruising it than . .MISCELLANEOUS IMPLEMENTS. in Fig. J. rod it works on a ball-and-socket joint.

better than canvas. Wading-Shoes. as a they the hard board. (A. Spalding & Bros. answer While leather brogans the purpose very comfortable. verj give the attention leather when wading-shoes next needed through are as fishing . and are however. while wet. neatly of tinned. is the plan for accomplishing this attend Very few anglers. Fig. It is made of malleable iron. L Universal Bod Holder. and stiff consequently. 2. A good wading-shoe is a great desideratum for the are stream and fisher. do . it is necessary to take t. G. loth to when to this needed matter as they to should.) Fig. a liberal application oil. leather They and are not strongly made of heavy dry quickly. and is well adapted for the purposes its con struction. will Conroy's Improved Wading-Shoes average angler be found to satisfy shoes.he in order that they may be kept soft and of castor result. best best care of them admirably. if held in the hand. pliable .148 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS.

A good boat can blessing As tools a and a comfort that while every particular is hardly be overestimated. employing the same but the best and and tackle. and and to have the with idea that boats with cranky leaky. 149 Improved Canvas 'Wading-Shoes. In Black Bass rivers. ponds.MISCELLANEOUS IMPLEMENTS. slipping They on are supplied with soft and hob-nails with or prevent rocks. that and part of angler's that should attention which its irapor a tance demands. (Thos. Conroy. outfit a fishing receive on lakes.) harden to without with drying. do not give thought care to the boats they all use. J. in none rule. FiSHING-BOATS. They are are will inclined to accept seem any thing an in the shape of a boat that float. a and broad the deep boat is a sine qua non. from for a calm indifference which they will sit day wet . may be worn wading stockings. anglers.

Waukegan."Eureka" (R. Douglas & Fishing Boat. Co. Ill .. J.

such that there now no employraent unsafe most usual of death-traps leaky on ex a cranky. has been small given by builders angler to the construction of suitable and boats. order to these requirements. who build tenany thing from a steam-launch or a sloop-yacht to a pound canoe. depend but that is no hiring fishing and them at fishing resorts . have given much thought and attention to the building ceeded of fishing-boats a at a moderate price. J. but not Of late years great so much as attention to it logy. boats. Illinois. cuse. angler year yet well-modeled and afford desirable can spend boat. during purchase freight charges of a dry and comfortable boat. enough tention should should not be given and It to be too long. to its and considerable construction. of Waukegan. and the angler can . in and capable of meet fishing being easily model should rowed be or and paddled at . so they be ordered by telegraph. or the philosophic unconcern with which they safe will spend half their time in a bailing out the water. and. dry. who use I am aware anglers. boat for light.MISCELLANEOUS IMPLEMENTS. 151 feet.. should have beara render give stability. "Eureka" Fishing-Boat. this style of They men are enabled by building boat in large numbers. Douglas & Co. R. can in employing on them the sarae work They have them on hand. excuse for the scows and at a moderate price. but one a that 'can to own who few days in the to do this fishing. safe. and have suc in producing very an low-priced. the that and year round. that the skiffs. so for the is as sportsman. In the first place. for the amount vacation would usually paid for boat hire be more than ample for the good. always.

Mich Sectional Bottom. Osgood. A.Osgood's Portable Folding Canvas (N.board of 12-foot B Showing Cnmp-stools and Side-board . Battle Creek.

all stems selected oak.." safely recommend their for anglers. also a fastened on with The boat iron coats and is fitted with good pair of ash oars malleable rowlocks. 15 ft. I have number of and canoes by R. . particularly the : " Eureka. steady. The row and the sockets pull are fastened of bolts is so that they can not off. all uses. in grades. 110 are made in two sizes : 13 ft. in its box and by rail to any part of the country. and it has and wales are of strakes on a side.. and to seat. 100 38 and 10 or 12 inches are deep. can twenty-five and thirty built dollars. or white used cedar. Instead wales wood knees. strong very serviceable boat for nearly Osgood's Portable Canvas Boat." is made with either square and or sharp stern. call almost anywhere. five which makes it perfectly flat board.. J. It is bottom on built follows of Instead keel. x They in. It fine-looking.MISCELLANEOUS IMPLEMENTS. white The frames. work. or and weigh about and pounds. raakes a and has three it. and in basswood boats the bottom and first two strakes are of pine of the three upper strakes basswood. boat. | inch bottom. inch thick in clinkers. 153 within a be supplied with a good after ordering. and few days This style of boat they " Eureka. at They boats built of bass- wood. they which use a malleable iron brace from stove-bolts. pine. If the in his pack angler wishes a portable and boat. one that he can take or buggy drive to his favorite ship water near horae. and f locks are of their own design on with or cedar. a twenty. the former being the stiffest best for or angling. it has a ten-inch thick. Douglas & and as Co. and only The planking is f inch in carvel boats. x 36 in. is of paint on seated for three persons.

3. but an use stronger . The chest with materials used in in its construction sizes are first 8 ft. perfectly staunch. it is it is possible all to manu facture it. It is made several from 33 . as near perfect as "As now made. camp-stools. Any lady the to water it. It has makes of it very steady other boats of the can row and flat bottom. boat.154 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. gunwale. for it does not require one-half strength to handle that a wooden boat does. which entirely free from the roU of same size. and has with the added since it was many improvements have been first introduced. and pack oars and paddles are jointed. as generally as Osgood's and it deserves all the praise bestowed as a highly spoken of Portable Folding Can upon it. tools or ingenuity are set it up. No danger its tipping the made over. class x throughout. stretcher and packing-chest . work The canvas a is drawn smooth. It is live light a sea birch-bark canoe. there is none that is so well known and so by vas sportsmen Boat. showing boat in folded. and no It can be ready for required in five minutes. Mr. The able above is a view of the boat in its compact or port form. bottom-board. stood It has been in severest ordinary wooden skiff would be for many years. it will in where swamped." Fig. modeled and and the fittings easily. Osgood says : tests .

pounds. fitted ft. is 12 size. ac cording to . weighing price varies size. 155 inches. x 36 inches. pounds. for two persons. according to size with The best The way it is for angling. every thing complete fifty from thirty to fifty dollars. and weighs from the twenty to seventy-five up. and 33 inches. X to 15 ft.MISCELLANEOUS IMPLEMENTS.

.

PART ni. . ANGLING AND FLY-FISIHNG.

.

the birds." than formerly.CHAPTER XVIII. The ances with art of angling. has an innate love for all his surroundings the trees. whether captured the hook. in its turnings and windings. its overhanging branches (159) . spear or seine. of now meet with the opprobrium of true disciples own the craft. all by innocents. THE PHILOSOPHY OF ANGLING. The years. that its nearly approaches and deserves its of appellation of gentle Fishing the for count. the flowers which be pot-fisher likes " come part and parcel of his pursuit . progress of by of a comparison any love of angling increases with the lapse love grows by what it feeds on. nor and allies without whom he more could love his view practice it. or resting upon its grassy banks. fishing for the spoils it brings. than the astronomer the heavens with pleasure on a of It is the love its depths and the stream cloudy. become true could no and tried friends art. Wiser tice the and more the other out-door recreation. by The angler wending his way by the silvery stream. have become angler " abhorrent and " despicable practices. caught. with the will improvements not suffer and appli thereunto pertaining. and its shallows. starless night. and lingering death. of and the slaughter when the a torturing and the fish. for its healthful guild and more humane so sentiments prac now prevail more " among the art. The the genuine loves " angling for its sake .

nor even lumber logs roll free .160 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. the shoals that embank seeks them by an deep. but I from presenting to the reader the following eloquent similitude and beautiful comparison between the angler's stream and showing the easy and tion from the love of angling to the love of the stream of ure's Life. wades which your spirit should wade cheerily the trout fisher " his brook. because the trout love waters not follow them. Truly. and shoot and across. natural transi nature and nat God. grassy slopes. with many a snag in the midst and fallen tree "And there the fisher loving the the bends that the instinct like their own lock the pools. though I can not refrain come of a race of preachers . that charm. therefore. but one so joins days before to make as stream. where can His brook is wild. and every difficulty fly he that teases him to more eager quest of " his water-sprites. from of : I feel more extract a sermon like presenting it because it is an of one (Rev. were complete while the day calls. Live its life after as as if life them in it. H. with their twilight noons and mystic noises. the stream and its surroundings the angler. If it were otherwise he would find much or pleasure in fishing in the flume of the fish-culturist. Not that it the contains and aU varieties of expe rience. concealment of trackless woods. in all to I am not much given to preaching. eddy. Dr.) who has both of the love God and the love angling deeply engrafted in his heart "Act. are all in viewing the fish in the fish-monger's stall. gives to the art of angling its to the chiefest and presents and proper the Bass of or the trout and angler in its true setting leaves fiowers and spark as ling water. and boats that waters twist plunge. meets When no upward flash his reels his line in ex- .

which in every to knowledge condition of indeed is but and evil overcome. eternal sport in end.THE PHILOSOPHY OF ANGLING. 161 and again pectation to give a merrier all hum to the are next throw. snarled "And that wrist tingles through casts that take no prize. whose trout-stream from end to end is God. until another capture renews its thrill." Luck Nay. strides and without casts of the evil could not be in all alike as and the confi dent soul. wrist until expectations fulfilled once when his tingles to the trout's jerk still and swirl and jurap. It is to be lived its as a whole. as giving value in failure. torn garments. "And coraes so with life. Broken leaders. "Aud if by these the soul gains nought else. the whole which feels the whole brook's beauty at every step. fills its creel with secrets of infinite love and wisdom wisdom wise too loving to wish less than man's perfection love too to spare any pain necessary to attain Godlike enough for time or eternity. it gains immortal health . as the guage of success in evU. as the good. at to the next. lines. bruised limbs. . time. do not spoil his hilarity. day's sport in every minute. Happiness from an energetic sense of entire significance passing phase of it -in mystery.

I might answer this question by asking another it that the sportsman grouse : Why is in or a day's outing. the angler is usually of nature not reflect upon sportsman not is fully be as so logical. respond to It is best that it is so. for we really know very little about it. on the most propitious so sions. After a careful was reading of this chapter it would seera nothing to add to this very uncertain sub ject . circumscribed we there "hundreds. Why the is it then that angler's fly or bait? few. to find all Then again we should not expect the fish on (162) . We only know that when fishing a favorable locality where there are that there "thousands" of waters where Black Bass. in in certain with the best dogs. especially after an unsuccessful day. but why rises is it so ? This is the query that naturally to the ang ler's mind. CONDITIONS WHICH GOVERN THE BITING OF FISH. for . but whUe the this. great finds so few quail comparison to the numbers known to "use" localities? self preservation The inference is is the first law conscious cause of plain in either case. out of so many. is he does aware of the fact that the fish fuUy of his presence as the grouse or quail is of that the sportsman and his dogs." are certainly do well. or even in sraall. to secure a half-dozen or a may be.CHAPTER XIX. as the case fishing. score occa by of the most careful fish.

As predacious expect naturally served fishes then feed mostly by night. rest or sleep during the day. enough not. during the night. the majority that obtains the minority only that does satisfy its wants. perhaps. well can verify this which It is the fish their known that the last few hours of daylight the best for are fly-fishing. that do take fish with so during the day though evi we often their stomachs full.CONDITIONS WHICH GOVERN THE BITING OF FISH. and as they only rise to the . for I have ob that they were always near water so the shores or on the shal lows fins at night. that their who dorsal take were often out of proceed the Any one will the trouble to with a cautiously along the statement. and was most plentiful this is really the case. Predacious fishes I are more active during the night. almost Predacious fishes feed entirely night. and. we would to find them at that time where their food . believe. and Then it is from the minor are ity that our we must look for the few that likely at to see and take lure. in water. for swallowed. then search I account for by the fact that shores approaching the shallows and in nightly for food . are lantern. In the it is struggle for existence among animals. shores at night. including fishes. they are still on or undigested food is usuaUy in a fresh condition. or keep in very shallow water. and hungry dently ones. showing that it has been recently the such feed. in shallow. fact. as minnows. while the smaller fishes. etc. to prevent their be ing swallowed by their larger and piscivorous congeners. only the . 163 no the feed to at the same time .. if of we did so we would or have cause complain their not rising to biting. are more active during daylight: for it is not unlikely that they seclude themselves.

of satisfy their appetites to respond wiles of the angler. fly in comparatively shallow water. the more favorable for the fly-fisher. conditions are thus The hypothesis. sleep that game and night and rest or by day. to the that fishes feed mostly at that it is only the few the night before quite of that failed to that are apt fully one.164 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. is a reasonable " and one will account for most the bad luck " the angler. . then.

It is sad to " contemplate the extinction of the angler's pride " in pub lic waters. The brook-trout streams. placed and and my desire to have it in new waters. THE BLACK BASS AS A GAME FISH. ever familiar love it before I am not so with blinded the by prejudice Black Bass. Owing to my admiration for the Black Bass as a game fish.CHAPTER XX. my and efforts my championship of its cause for many years. but the stern fact remains that in this utilitarian age its days are numbered and its fate irrevocably sealed. to place it in the front rank of game fishes. I do not wish to disturb any one's preference. (165) . prejudice in the matter. I into am waters utterly opposed to the introduction in which there is the remotest or rainbow-trout Black Bass for the no one chance brook-trout in love to thrive. but I do want to dis abuse the minds of anglers of all must go. Mj^ offending hath this extent. but I but that I can share that saw a I was for several reasons is des " tined to become the favorite game-fish of more. I am sometimes. and It has already gone from many is fast disappearing from others. to the thoughtlessly and unjustly. which perfectly Black Bass . no Let us look this thing squarely in the face. with and my " favorite advising the stocking of trout-streams fish. Nothing can be further from the of truth." America. I yield to and admiration with for the brook-trout. of " accused of being opposed brook-trout.

Much has been tion all with said about the " trout hog him " in connec the decrease of the trout. and walls of the streams battered decimated.166 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OP THE BLACK BASS. As the red " man disappears " before the the tread of the white goes man. and where its breeding grounds are undisturbed. But upon while he deserves the honest the odium and contempt heaped by . hemlock. it disappears altogether. down. rance and the is redolent with balsamic the natural food of the trout is produced in the greatest abundance. it dete nurabers and and vitality. the with living arrow of mountain streams him. the mosses dry. riorates the conditions of of breeding-grounds in size food supply and of the the brook-trout are changed. but the fittest to consequent on changes mutations the march civilization). " until finally. spruce by pine. But the iron has pears entered its soul. and the brook-trout vanishes the axe of the lumberman. where where the cold air mountain brooks retain their fra- low temperature. the hot. the decrease in size and increase in temperature. disclosing stream the most secret recesses of of mid-day. As the buffalo giants of disap before are before the iron horse. the wintergreen and trailing the partridge- berry. the rank As the file the forest the laid low. creature of shaded The trout is essentially a Its natural home is in waters and the pine forests. for the pine and waters arbutus struggle feebly existence . . and forest and to the bright glare moisture of the earth and is become shriveled ground dissipated. balsam. the in accordance with principle of the irarautable laws " of nature and great the survival of of the fittest (not the fittest survive of from the the angler's point and view. fiery and wooden sun leaps The ferns through the breaches.

a trout fair trial first. nature of The character of a fish's teeth de its feed of termines the its food and the manner of ing. then. and Let us. all or some introduce the rainbow-trout. lancet-shaped.Black he has disappeared . with trout-waters. or the when English brown trout. cherish spotted favorite of our public foster and protect the crimson- youthful days as long as possible in waters. but by the alteration of ^iural conditions irease their existence until in size and quality. and when these succumb. introduce the But let us give these cousins of the brook Bass. the as result would be the same were the trout undisturbed and peaceable possession of the streams. and not till then. For many years to come brook-trout will be artificially the na- and the supply thus clubs kept up in preserved waters by wealthy ar.THE BLACK BASS AS A GAME FISH. soft. so of far the fish-hook is concerned. and Varden. 167 allowed angler. or the Dolly of the Pacific black-spotted trout. and intended . dissent from the statement of sometimes waters. and without prejudice. of The bluefish has the of most formidable array teeth any fish its and size compressed. brush-like teeth. ponds and large streams in the Eastern States into which the Black Bass can be introduced without interfering cultivated. they will gradually definally they will either cease as lo be cr degenerate to such a degree to forfeit even this ftr'iiseworthy I '. .s but so than the brook-trout. in teeth the Black Bass has while of fact. miniature shark exceedingly strong and sharp. covered with enamel. then. while the axe the lumber man continues to ring its death knell. incapable wounding.he must protection. made that Black Bass is the bluefish voracious fresh The Black not more Bass is so are all game fishe. There are plenty of lakes. small.glirvg of .

the brook trout cuirass courtier. The a brook-trout has Bass. beauty of the great and the mosquito by breaking glassy wildly below reflecting the nothing to the over madly rushing black rocks. but the Black Bass. on a good sal in New Brunswick. fishes. of capable of swallowing big fish than their Black Bass equal weight. large. half pound a to two pounds in weight but the fiy made life burden the The glory pools and by day. a doughty warrior whose prowess none I have fished for brook-trout in the where would Canada. I think. availed swollen smarting brow. they by devouring be intro pike or ca the fishes themselves. fresh-run salmon is the handsomest is a and most a perfect in form. the most brook-trout. I have cast mon stream from early morn till dewy eve. The salmon king. than any other. in his virescent and can spiny crest. for three days in succession without a single rise. should not duced into the pickerel same waters with of brook-trout. from black night. not supposed The Black food. for the with taking in crawfish long and aggressive claws. and in dental destructive possibilities is not far behind it. and the quiet. which is swallowed whole.168 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OP THE BLACK BASS. I have cast standing in a birch-bark . The For Bass the best of other game fishes. of and by some. only for holding its prey. and it be a scramble as to which should get it great lusty wilds of a trout. is gainsay. a dozen would rise at every cast of the fly. is the bluefish pacity The and fresh waters. long a stronger and sharper teeth than the mouth. is as a beautiful of all fishes. but by devouring more their this reason. purpose of The as mouth of the Bass is very wide. eyelids and stream green spires of spruce and fir. ger and a longer. for gets the swaUowing large not.

THE BLACK BASS AS A GAME PISH. in silence and solitude. while sitting reflected on but in all in vain. scene limpid lake rushing river. The swift-flowing. the scudding of made full compensation. even salmon or trout. of and vocal with myriads voices where the rod and Black Bass rose responsive swish of dropping or the fly. dian At such times of would fiash or on memory's mirror many a fair cool. glare of crystal stream back the fierce silence either the northern and flowed toward and the sea. in wading some rushing. as an angler. his bull-head. that the I have naked an abiding lowly. I love the brook-trout best But. to the shadowed of by the umbrageous trees. while killing of large many fish. can squirrel. I can find more true enjoyment. canoe until and both arms and legs were weary with then rested by casting sun. and butterflies do their part streara and in catching little birds. more blessed peace. if the sunfish. rock loth to leave his lair beneath of some root or shelv ing the the melody of a the birds. streams. may fail to fully satisfy him. and bees the by hira . while tossing the . flecked by the shad ows of overhanging elm and sycamore. 169 the strain. rocky stream. a the chirp void and cricket. solemn grandeur hum of bee disturbed the painful silence of the Cana woods. Or. the tinkle of a cow-bell. I can find something beautiful or interesting in every fish or swims. should the Bass be coy and shy. filled up The true or angler find real pleasure silversides. with for every one. from the humble scavenger of the affection waters. to the soil silver-spangled dainty and lips food king who will not deign to during his sojourn in crystal of all. for neither note of bird in silent. stood nor The fir-clad hills rose boldly on side.

and head swathed gauze. my brother. paying trout. gage of to the knight in Lincoln-green. After kiUing species of game-fish east every the of the Rocky Mountains. with the lovely face. I am If this be treason. of my ears con the rippling laughter the woodland the merry stream. in its stiff gloved than to and silent lordly demesne. . lands. fern fragrance find the of more and flower. my eyes purring under of the and quivering leaves meadow. in annointed hands. I find all from Canada to Florida. and and a few in foreign knightly Bass his tourney-field sufficient. It is my honest conviction. bee the bittern. my breath in this inhaling upland clover and elder-blossom I say I court can true enjoyment or salmon. content. make the most of it. and wren and catching and sweet glimpses hill robin. the the joyous tone of matin of thrush.170 silken scious SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS.

if the subject. and that little was mis leading. result in my opinion. that the Black Bass was would rise to the artificial fly. . large or small mouth. season where of not rise artificial fly at some the year. it is a pleasure for me to state that. of and viewed in the light of our present knowledge ened. in my opinion (based on a large experience). related. FLY-FISHING. (HI) as all unprejudiced trout-fishers must admit. In a most by many. was Up and to that time the brook-trout of idol the the fly for any fly-fisher. then practiced writers on ing for Black was Bass. to bait fishing. and denied by anglers. of actual due more to prejudice than to the experience. this is ^ ^ as much as can be said for the brook trout. this opinion is certainly strength not confirmed. there are no waters while inhabited it will by the Black to the certain Bass. other fish. of But the yielding to none in my love and admiration for brook-trout. The literature have been period of Black Bass the fishing evolved during past may truly be said to Previous to this decade. but this. apparently it was doubted unknown to few ang angling. and with it was deservedly the pride deeraed heresy to cast the salmon. the exception. incorrect or almost without glaringly false in most instances.. very little mention was made of the two species of Black Bass by our angling authors. subject and to states and conditions of the water.CHAPTER XXI. although by lers. and Fly-fish exception. deed. etc.

In the order to be successful angler must know the fly-fishing for Black Bass. though may find some exhibiting credulous fly!" the guilty huge piscine trophies to with consolation or quasi-satisfaction in our " friends the usual remark : admiring Caught on the and Seriously. take the fiy. when and where of the fish to be found differ seasons when shallow they frequent deep. that the largest artificial fish. trout or Bass. conditions. ivhen of water. enjoyable than lake is by far more preferable when and pond-fishing. which or on deep. but dor we compels us to acknowledge the correctness of it. for it is love's labor lost to cast the fiy the year. it is only the Bass are on the shallows or on the riflles that the fiy-fisher . still reaches In streara-fishing. is a damaging our piscatorial pride. do not. when proper employed. and will rise to the fly under the same favorable Practical Hints. and water. truism. Those bait to who or wish to lure the finny This can giants must perforce use admission the troUing-spoon. argue it is entirely unnecessary. It is true that the Black Bass and rises to the fly more freely uniformly in some waters than in others. but this fact And likewise is it a holds good also as to the brook-trout. that the Black Bass is a game-fish of high now when of equal weight ficial fiy. and con others. at this late day.172 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. or be pos in the haunts much are sessed of that knowledge born of and habits He the at of the must Bass know ent that is only of experience. and trout is the peer of the brook tackle is or salmon in fighting qualities. to that the Black Bass will or will not rise to the arti known to many anglers. waters to be fished. ceded The fact is by degree. as a rule.

deepest lakes of that he would be considered or daft to whip the pools of exposed water. and fished with the current. These times this of season is often the best. defends bravely He knows. his feudal stronghold. and so cover all the water (within forty or fifty feet). he when the Bass-fisher knows the will habits to the Bass stream as well. of The habits many the brook-trout have been carefully of studied conse generations fly-fishers and naturalists. shoals. the mid-surface of deep as or ponds. bars. to the likeliest spots. and the neighborhood are rushes and usually in the spring or early summer. as the water has then become seek the right temperature to induce the fish to shaUow feeding by grounds. when patches. slowly but surely ascending toward their spawning grounds. driftwood. and on lakes when they frequent of reefs. weed shoals. He the should cast about him in a semi-circle. 173 will fill his creel. there will rise be less speculation whether or not to the fiy. be waded. except in large. bars. the water is about right in depth for fly should always The fishing. fur thermore. as course. the eddies of bowlders or half-submerged rocks. . if practicable. quently the trout-fisher knows that during the months he will certainly find his quarry in the summer shallow streams. and in autumn. he casts his like the can de the arc of within reach of larger circle. giving preference. So. deep and cool lakes. and or hollow bank. He also knows that the big trout has a local habitation he holds ever under some root. for in midsummer the Bass retire to deep water.FLY-FISHING. he being scribe at center and spokes of a wheel. or rock. lengthening his cast. a being the radii. for it follows that wherever the angler can wade. then. near logs. as which as by right of knight of old possession.

a living inches below the fly. the shallow pools above and below rapids and riffles. as I have often . and overhanging bushes and hollow banks. as one days. it is well to try all such places. any fly offered . which usually happen take almost when the fish the feed. being the very best time on bright On cloudy days there is not much choice. or where no current. ledges. or a little after. hour is always no more favorable than another. the flies spots at almost a should also cast. to follow. and during more early morning hours and late in the evening . to as nearly as allowed sink several a may be. permitted to sink over likely every Lakes deep ponds should be fished from on in the deeper reefs or water and or casting inshore grow boat. keeping the bars. Sometimes but rushes or nevertheless the Bass in pretty deep water. usually be found near or among them. along the edges of tall weeds will rushes or weed patches." well as the Miller or and will It only remains now to say to the reader. the flies danced over the surface by to should be roved. sunny days being to one the best. and under over After casting. drowned insect to the there is extreme length of On be lakes. and then and he the surface float away like line. light-colored flies for dark days dark flies for bright rather The ward old rule of and and safe evening. about sun set.174 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. fioating logs or It thc the will be found that Bass is rise to the a fly water stirred or ruffled by brisk freely when breeze. imitate. thus it is frequently the case that dark flies will kiU in the dusk of evening as " " " Coachman. tending to prove are well on is a the rule. and sometimes near or under drift. shoals. skittered or jerky or tremulous movements. the exceptions days.

A Reminiscence. your own way. an rush ing waters of the dam. mingling its regular. and all the time the sight of important rule in first. strike upon sight or touch. and . sinking low beyond the across fields. last fly-fishing notice keep your out of the fish if you would have him flies. was decrepid and the little river. while Up the stream a hundred mill. casting The sun of yellow cool and dark shadows beneath below. walls and old wheel moss-grown roof proclaimed went its hoary Its rumbling on its merry round. above most all things. and cast as erately quickly skillfully as you can. the sun. the lighting up the crimson of the newly-dyed sumach on fescliff. with rhythmic plashing the monotone of the tumbling. but get and play and land your fish in him in the creel as quickly as you your safety to your tackle . flinging bars of of flame through the the slender strips portal fleecy clouds that stretched western the steel-blue sky. and. in the Toward the close of a day mild September. I was leisurely riding my tired mare across the ford of a narrow rocky river that wound around the foot of a thickly-wooded cliff. an old stone lichen-covered age. 175 said before. spanned and old-time. yards whose away. leaning over the water. but always delib carefully. keep temper . Always keep a taut line .FLY-FISHING. another Down the covered stream hundred yards. bridge. blue-grass and broad-leaved tobacco. do can with your fish outright be notfishfor count remember . with here and there a pool in the shadow or a ripple in stretching away a mile or two across the fer tile bottom lands were fields of waving corn. kill fore putting him in your basket. fragrant clover. flashing on the foaming waters of the falls. gray. stood.

but what was a that ? bar of oneself. to the convenient umbrella lirab of low-branching from the saddle. double-tongued occurred hypocrite. from the refreshing stream. Beneath the bridge cows stood grateful ribbons the long.176 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. as the stream laved their cloven feet and their breath ex odors of haled the butter. sublime glories of of The the the Alps . there another evidence of the insincer ity of From a corner of my piU-bags I brazenly took out a . paled the vine-clad ofthe Riviera alike before this calm and peaceful. the soft Italian skies . a group of ruminating. splendors the Tropics . and from its folds my drew forth a fly-rod that had been artfuUy and surrepti tiously concealed man. tied elm. I and gazed upon the lovely thought that nowhere else of the world but in this broad land ours could such a a view be found. the watching for the very thing that Bass ! leap of Silently the reins unstrapped I rode my mare to the shade a of the cliff. heart-satis fying. the slopes olive-crowned hills all of Andalusia. tooning with golden streamers and silver dank. silvery sheen flashed for a moment in the sun and dropped back into the eddy behind I pretend to be yon huge gray boulder under the cliff ! pshaw ! how idle it is to attempt to deceive surprised. All the tirae that I upon canting was a the matchless an hollowly and falsely des beauty of the stream and its was surroundings. white clover and golden As my in all mare drank deeply scene. green arms of the old water-wheel. soul-filling. homelike But scene. sleek-coated whisking their tails in calm contentment. like artful. sweet cream. I.

or the blackbird that was drinking the stream. The flies dropped just and as " over beyond the smooth. just there for an instant.FLY-FISHING. from which I two jagged rocks that rose of Then like circles sunshine at all a my head. disappeared. a bless my soul ! it is my that- reel hum ! I must stop Then. whose glossy. saw a swirl the verge of Then I behind the gray bowlder to a squirrel but me pre tended to be listening barking at from the projecting limb of a hickory. line and leader there but in reality was a book of flies ! What an arrant humbug I was ! But together. green leaves were just touched with the faintest suspicion of old gold. From of a pocket of my professional I brought to the light be a prescription day what. edge of all over the -water together ! stepped until from bowlder to the bowlder. me. 177 buckskin bag. in the shadow of and I had reached a vantage point at the foot the riffle. to that kingfisher's drawn into its eddy they and something seemed to lift the were and then what a lively staccato rattle ! that is giving so merry as I follow the erratic But. guilty thing I began casting in ever-widening the time pretending to watch the play of the on the water. and a " polka " and a " " professor were soon dancing I had the cliff. in which was a small click-reel with its line coat of enameled silk. purported to book. half as high by as my cast. How guilty I felt ! I just heard the splash was no time for moralizing of another Bass ! I soon had rod and reel. gray polka water bowlder. Then I behind the " made another oast as straight as the and maple boll me. with sun of around I knew in my face and broken water half a dozen deep holes and sheltered eddies within would the length be completely hidden in front of me. . ostensibly.

quickly dispatching him. coat I drop and the butt the rod and reel into my out pocket. as he begins his the sunset sonata and the my reel a castinet accompaniment now.178 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. Then Then I kept busy leading can I have leisure to look up at my squirrel. and only But now I have led the cap arm's length above my head. flight of a dragon-fly across the stream. to the great and who scolds and scampers away Then. serving my strained line cutting and as I look up at a crow flying overhead I see that my rod is bent. and altogether there seems as to be something unusual going out into the sunshine with I look in the water. and bristling fins and red. who. the the and there leaps the Bass ! and again 1 Then of again the singing of the reel as he dives to the depths allegro pool. filling wreaths and my pipe. the blue smoke is borne away up the face while ascends of in curling the the hoot the cliff on soft evening air. then while slowly is the reeling in the poured out on line. toss the foot of the hickory. tive into the deep pool below me. Ah ! listen to the yonder of mocking-bird atop click of of beech. I can't help ob like mad through the water. the and andante of the glorious songster bird and Bass of quivering I and last the air and the trio as of all the firmle. . while lifting the spent warrior in green and silver sheen. the tinkle of a cow-bell and of of an owl comes from the direction the old bridge. with the nut in his cheek. on extended jaws there leaps am a Bass ! my line away from jagged do so by holding my rod at rocks in front. hug my vertical rod. with a hick ory nut in his paws is raining down the pieces of its hull in a green shower at again the river's side. and near the cliff. him among the ferns at displeasure of my squirrel. and strained and twisted.

Egad ! no The reel and the cicada now have mistaking that tug ! it ! The line hisses through the water ! Look out for the aerial flight. is calling from The mocking-bird at has found his gate. The whippoorwill the cliff. are the mill-wheel and is hung " rubies.FLY-FISHING. the water tumbles over the fall lonesome sound. the the and the polka dancing on saffron cicada's crimson foam to the another rise strident strains of fiddle. and as the first appears. the be and crows caw loudly. ? Another Bass. rain what a leap ! crimson ! ! Again the cicada and buzzing rod reel He breaks the sun falls air back ! now The the is bending. How 's Uncle Dave ? an' " Howdy. now in s along the shining water. there' See that sharp rock ! how he dashed the duet again. its perhaps ! No. and string them on a willow wand. mate. The are lowing the farmer's right. gentle swish of " the " supple rod " is music sweet as each the professor and now the polka follow other. the bat ! Ah." " " HeUo ! Aunt Judy. have been a swallow dipping The " wing. I stop at the little tumble down gate so cabin of " feel before the de fresh' Old Dave. My patient Jenny ! " nag is neighing for her master. Lor' honey. The has stopped . bless me ! here 's another up Bass ! mill-wheel with a I step ashore. with professor the fall is " flame. Doctah ! ^jist mitey po'ley bress you. "All I do not silent star guilty in the gloaming . it must What. de dat's ole man all. 's He . the shrill again blundering golden. The squirrel is in his cows nest. surging is through the and frogs pipe down and. kin hobble roun'. 179 the But the bathed in lated " " sun is on the edge of horizon." who " cot de rheumatiz in las' spring.

Good ! " And -lenny and I jogged along toward the world. A gentleman fishing along. . at them as and I came They 'll the make a fine breakfast for night you Uncle Dave in morning. Aunt Judy nearly two the river gave Bass for you they 'U down pounds apiece. here's two to me nice how " Come go here. home.180 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. 'lowed to 'gin but 'less he wum no cuttin' 'bacca fer fas' Mars' Brack nex' week men's kin !" chaw! he won't cut moreen a 'bacca mitey Don't tink he's long fer ole Kaintuck. under the bright stars. at peace with all .

tongue and water-lilies. every rock-bound. the comparative ease with which exception- it has been my To the unversed and to witness ably large fish are killed by one of this little giant of a rod. on. as fortune to in the real an amount many occasions. . in the shallower portion the river. who knows the latent virtues Long and a ago. on On that (181) lovely July I killed. CASTING THE MINNOW. or masca longe. the Thousand Islands of the St. or in the log fire in camp.CHAPTER XXII. were when Black Bass. deer. Thb capabilities of the minnow-casting rod are equal to most of good the possibilities of prove on bait-fishing. along the edges of the rushes. that a dear friend (poor Dick ! he is dead now) and I were casting the morning minnow for Black Bass. Lawrence possessed attractions for the lover of the beautiful and the angler to be found in almost lily- that is hard to a realize at the present day. fringed cove. before every island and boasted the a summer cottage steam-launch. art of angling it is simply wonderful to see what of strain the little rod will successfully endure. shines out It of was below Grenadier Island. of Such time I remember well . and one day that hal cyon period is marked on the calendar of memory by a pure white stone that sometimes. an ash and lancewood. when the fit " of retrospection " is in hollow down by the flare vividly in the the bright coal fire in the grate.

it is under the Florida that the giants palms live-oaks to of Southern angler is more likely of encounter finny and that will test the strength and endurance of his tackle. and gamer fish than the weighed mascalonge good alluded redfish to and. I can certainly guess within five pounds of the weight of one within these limits. and with and ordinary and Black Bass a tackle. and I was using an eight-ounce. A few days wife and after Christmas. a half mile above its confluence with Indian river. was a in twenty as minutes. with St. mascalonge. I a called it thirty. many I was casting the up the same rod a minnow for Black just Bass.. redfish. a mascalonge weighing and thirty-two pounds. that weighed fully thirty-five pounds. tarpon. ash lancewood Henshall rod. in in the winter of 1881. skill and exercise to the full his stock piscatorial finesse. On this occasion. on another oc casion. or similar rods and many pike. But. between ten and twenty pounds. eight-ounce rod. though. with the same. as I have running from twenty to forty pounds. killed trout. but the above salt-water tackle.182 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. Lucie river. killed and landed tarpon thirty-three pounds. and mentioned I hooked. We had been up one of the branches of the river fishing and for Black Bass. groupers. in Southern and the tackle of Florida. I killed not weigh Bass. It heavier . or channel this rod tackle. above I did it. etc. in fifteen minutes I have. mention minnow- merely of instances to prove the power the casting Black Bass rod of eight ounces in weight and eight . in twenty minutes. my (opposite I were fishing San Sebastian river Kane's cabin).

and this must be my excuse for alluding to them here. 183 and a quarter feet in length. the same being 97 feet. the remarkable progress modes of in that best of all be remembered that Black the bait-fishing . most While minnow-casting for Black Bass is the lar me popu method in vogue in the West. but minnow-casting as not only firmly es an original and American method of ang adapted ling and that is peculiarly extensive waters. The introduction of this any may rod has this no doubt done of more than thing else to popularize style fishing. and we now consider as tablished. for it must Bass fishing north of the Poto mountains mac and east of Alleghany is of compara tively As recent Black Bass was origin. casting programme I in having contest the of minnow for Black Bass admitted in the the tournament of 1884. as it has not been many years introduced into eastern waters. to see the favor and with which very gratifying to it has been received in the that has been it is Eastern made States.CASTING THE MINNOW. I have seen it employed in the waters tributary to the Red river of the North. Mayer. when the longest cast. to apply of of Michigan and Canada. half-ounce sinker. in the Northern As the past Peninsula Provinces between. an to bait-fishing in our varied instance of its popularity I might add that. in nearly all the Florida. and in many waters numerous I have as well also seen it in instances made to estuary or coast fishing. At the subsequent tournaments the casting continually events at with a . during five years. and in Wisconsin. was made by Professor Alfred M. the since the a member of of Committee special " of Arrangements Reel for " of the tournaments succeeded the National Rod a and Association.

were until at the last one. 4 inches. about nine ounces in weight. three of them went beyond fifty yards. F.184 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. there fifty yards . improved. Dresel. The and rods used were about a quarter feet long. A. The weight of one-half ounce. held in cast upward of May. and one three gentlemen who reached the extraordinary distance sinker eight cast and was of 168 feet. 1888. and out of five casts made by Mr. . the successful competitor.

artistic What finished. fly-fisher but gladly hark back to those golden days ! What a monument of patience he was. or yanking into the bush behind him ! And how well he knew every muskrat's run. and what a fatalist as to luck. and every kingfisher's perch. merged or an expectancy of osprey on his cliff! he knew every and watching his fioat with all a kingfisher on his dead " hole. im patience during his or would days of angling. or perched upon a gnarled root.CHAPTER XXIII. unwritten mysteries of the art." boy roving fisherman to fill his string. " who began on or red-eyes. STILL-FISHING. " his float. and every snag . or even bull-heads of bibed his first lessons in the pin-feather virtue suckers. how he had (185) . and just just how long to let it or every how deep run sub " to before his hook into the limb overhead. and what a firm be liever in the secret. as he sat motionless on a or rock. would not tarry long in one spot . a sunnies." And how place " well and " rock. though the fish watching his " " cork never so intently." or or gudgeons. The boy who began fishing on a small trout stream. he soon learned experiences that he must be But the " brim. though. and every bank-swallow's hole . What boyish angler's heart does not leap when he thinks " of his " in angling ! We were all still-fishers then. and. lay prone upon a and grassy bank. the eagerness branch.

but a child of larger His life may have been saddened with the experience of time his hands hardened with years of toil his heart seared with the inhumanity of " of man but he " still retains seated at the innocence and freshness his youth when the waterside with the peeled sapling in his stiffened hands . childish faith in his methods that are totally unknown. and with what on consumraate and and enduring faith he waiting and would spit his hook. for every water-snake. resume watching ! How far Oh ! bright. and-turtle. until ! great the stream it will soon be lost in the I have right great gulf the unknown sympathy." snake. or unlucky muskrat. or old utterly lost to the blase casting.186 an eye SUPPLEMENT TO THB BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. and through the gaps in the trees. reptilian zest assaults would rest him . hand at fiy-fishing. indeed. his expectations and as great. his anticipations as as pin-hook easily satisfied. or minnow- His tastes in the are as simple. a rock on and the butt these of his and start in quest of it . stirred within ten rods of him ! And or when an and bull-frog or that turtle. if not down There is a juvenility. and how he his mammalian forays. down deeper. days of the best growth. how he would lay " pole. sunny. and with what renewed would repair to his fishing. or kingfisher. but.- his enjoyment as ample of us. ever widening much and growing of down. golden days of youth ! how very far we have traveled down the stream since then ! We may look back. and respect. He is. over the low hills catch a sparkle of the stream behind above us and and . frog showed itself. and a envy for the still-fisher. is alas ! we can never go on and back never return and ! Our is course ever on. and ornithic sallies.

for 'stravagance I eber see. an' his little shiny switch. to which the lad listener. cos' an' put de lin' cabin chimbly to up in de lof de Bass chan'1-cat nex' an' won't know wedder it two cents or out so de price ob a year- mule. side flaxenmill- boy of eight summers sat side by under a dam. He jis' goes o' a- in de water he'll done cotch his deff rheuma an' tiz one ob dese days a-whippin' a-flippin' his fiddle-string holt. ben' an' de Bass an' cotch run off wid de line out Mars' de little pole. but Uncle an' Enoch. shiny fish-poles an' con- trapshuns dat run riot wid his money. An haired old negro house-servant and a bright-eyed. wadin' wat an' beats me. line wid little teenty fedder-flies. dats' papa don't like to yank 'em out quickly. The old man was engaged was an eager in earnest conver save when of sation. an' an' twis' an' an' de Bass pull de line agin. honey. fish-pole is de strettes' an' He's de beat- De bestes' slimmes' ellum saplin' you an' kin fine.STILL FISHING." time to tink 'bout " quick dey ain't got Yes. wintah. fishing. All de fish in de Elkhorn enes' wouldn't man " 'gin to pay intrust on 'em. jump out to see wat . Dick wind 'em up agin. Percy Lee. 187 its moist whispering in his ears breath stealing through his grizzled locks and its rippling smile flashing on his tired eyes ! the voice of the stream A Retrospection. case you yank 'em it. all cut in de An' fall in de lite ' ob de moon. peeled in de shade." so "No. it's jist wasteful 'stravagance fer papa to silver reel buy sich lavish. or interrupted a by the pulling out of a fish the re-baiting hook " : yo' Yas.

an' he do . chan'l an' cats we to ! aft-a-wile quiled he growed up den he "An' marri'd Alice. an' hug you up. no matter how offen I 'splained to her how Mars' Dick tender- to ketch minded " an' 'em.dis same place wid laws-o'marcy use' wat gorms snek out Mis' Bass. to happen nex'. he use' to sot o' in an' . yo' dat his fishin'. was a papa went de sogers. to see she was so chicken-hearted she an' bar An' de a-floppin' red-eyes new-lites on de hook. de big you tear-drops a wud an' down her an' pink cheeks an' she wud run grab and ebery time I dat was de baby want me cotch'd fish. an' dey hav' mo' fun dan a bag full monkeys at " de circus. cud Liza Jane brung she was a she'd tin' de baby.188 gwine o' SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. But an' new-lites'. den to begin all ober agin. Uncle " Enoch. Percy Lee. fish when he wud little boy. wud a-fishin' an' me. kep' But an' Mis' Alice yo' nebber papa an' jis' tellin' me a how he use' to wat root larn to fish . me. de wah. an' des go whar dat to sycamo' whar you set- now roll he use' fish." Yas. Mars' wen Dick an' was a little lara'." But papa says he used to fish with cane poles and min nows. an' she goes trapesin 'long wid de baskit she'U ketch . "An' Mars' now Dick drags de sho' Mis' Alice wid an' him. cudn't You see. An' de cura an' brung a lot a nex' summah an' Yankee Kurnel from showed 'way up Norf a-visitin' he Dick how to fish an' wid switch poles fedder- flies. away to fite an' den de an' yo' wah cum on. an' jis' like yo'self. when Alice to cum heah wid use' teenty little baby wid Mis' . kiss you. aftah she des was too to larn. honey. an' wat sot on wud ole say. yo' how I kech 'em. papa cum Den home o' highfalutin Mars' noshuns wid him.

an' !' "An' wen roun' de Bass is tucker'd Mars' out on Dick shuv a little net under an' him. time dun mess pan-fish. an' she nebber did cotton wums." . honey. dey as foolish Mars' as dey now was marri'd. bravo. fresh libber. to talk an' he tell when jis' Mis' Alice 'bout was a de fish lam' like I use' to him spoon he little 'fo' like yo' ownself . yo' his pipe. Cum. Mis' "An' Alice an' she meks de fedder flies fer to an' Dick. Mistah fer dat. or Gib hira vict'ry got a good or gib him deff. crawl-debbils she nebber cries now when de Bass snaps 'em.STILL FISHING. he can't fool de chan'l-cat wid generation ob vipers a piece of " my young inarstah. you heah me him sling dem fedder-flies. claps her ban's sez : Good boy . less fo' be gwine Mistah Crow dun lite out his roost long ago. craw-fish. we chan'l-cat 'em . honey. no. home . papa jis' den him smokes Mis' Alice an' sot look it. Dick sum an' o' dampness she watches an' laffs. dar an' totes him at ashore au' . 189 an' her deff ' day. But. is too wise in dis fat o' He wants a soft craw. an' raps an' him an' de hed.

I found the former to be with only smaU-mouthed Bass infected latter to be a true mascalonge. burnt of by the the edge of the lake. They would to have resented warmly any imputation that they were other (190) . no excuse or that say that the Bass were there to be the parties knew no better.CHAPTER XXIY. and the ease with there I witnessed scenes heard of acts should bring (that may serve to point a moral) that the blush of shame to the cheek of the most hardened . the mascalonge of Eagle waters. At that time Gogebic lake count of which and tape worm. enough to fill guides at I saw two piles barrels. vying number. save ! to who with each other as who should fishing bring for count. Three and or four years ago I was attracted to Gogebic lake and Eagle waters " in Northern Wisconsin to investigate thc " so-called razor-back Black Bass of Gogebic. least fisherraen. and Nine-tenths trolling-spoon were were caught with the hand-line the mark by anglers Heaven. of calling for there is a dif by men ference in degree giance as well as " in kind those claiming large them alle to the " gentle art. TROLLING. or in the greatest It is caught. arrival several On the first evening of my of Black Bass. and yet they or at were perpetrated themselves anglers. and the was somewhat famous on ac its great numbers of they could be caught. While Black Bass.

Then I went ashore and shot four por- my pistol ! Now here was a bloody-minded butcher with with who was not con tent. it before with liundred Bass insolence to climax of with the spoon. 191 than of humane. and and brag a gentlemen of to cap several can not the his truculence he boasted shooting that of innocent porcupines. and ' took in out of the would wet a hundred and twentyall of ' have had " more but I lost three or my spoons. have mercy do us. and we started in to 'em out ! And these young sponded " had probably time to the commandment. or as my feUows. I clean can kill any and ani a mammal. I example. I will give a veranda and scrap that conversation that I overheard on the hotel evening. the conscientious sportsmen. and whose means defense is that a to hump up its back and erect . get out of one's harmless. clumsy only its quills animal way." Now. bird fish hands with . " Thou shalt men upon and not again kill. for I of but I do hold that the is murder. "Well. five kies old man. but of who slaughtering over had the effrontery . reader can then judge for himself " draw his " own conclusions. what luck to-day? Bully ! I Bass. killing the meanest creature mal At the or same with time." re with Lord.TROLLING. an animal sportsman never "Pshaw!" thinks of molesting. who with had been camping down the lake for chimed in a several a week. we shot nearly fifty in a week near our camp . and incline our hearts to keep an am this law. or a or as being any better than wanton Christian. not not pose as a saint. or they of gnawed the axe-handle and chewed clean up a pair " two boots. a the help of his boatmen. companions " young man.

and grouse-hens with men were what half-grown broods seemed. . in set and and murder men who are in their ways. that the I ing.192 clear when SUPPLEMENT TO THE BOOK OF THE BLACK BASS. are a for whom there is no hope But there few new hands of who do these . be deemed and by the force bad example and it is for their benefit that I have out of written what might otherwise place. conscience. these tenders to the apt they name of angler or sportsman. here. assure the reader above is a mild sample of of scrap of conversation what I actually heard that even more added given even Some boasted killing Bass than the in dividual mentioned. things thoughtlessly. dulge their thirst for blood and confirraed of who guise innocent . where of such as one is or to meet at raen any sumraer under hotel the fishing sport shooting . when done in a sportsmanlike manner. but I believe they other accomplishments. improvement or reform. and I can utilize the sarae. there is mere pre but enough. lying to their Then there does still were grouse and deer killed out of season in mUk.

as we intended give said it to "cracker" family with near our " camp. Happening piece of a to have a fish-hook in my pocket. up a when in Florida. with the strong probability another deer or several turkeys." the deer's tail. into the boat.CHAPTER XXV. When the sun nearly down we had one deer. was cluded. the horizon. the head household of being down shakes. of We did to of not wish a to cut into the venison. through (193) . fires kindled order by the Indians burn into the in to make a fresh " burn for the deer to feed The well river expanded just above quite a shallow lake. and also had found a turkey-roost near by. two of us had gone several miles river one day for deer and turkeys. a huge ball soraewhat off of fire. to ground buUd at a fire and sleep tree. pole. slender and tying and the bob to end With piece of strong twine comrade some three feet long. grown with lily-pads." the and We had only the liver it the deer for supper. bonnets and saw-grass. Then. the we got cutting a long. instead of returning down the under a river to camp. I and made a " bob. SKITTERING AND BOBBING. so as to be on the daylight in the morning. and had located several We con more. with some other viand. Once. my The crimson paddling the sun was at edge of I manipulating the bob. the atraosphere being to " smoky from old grass on. concluded to wishing to vary for a Black Bass try cut off a in the river.

194
which

SUPPLEMENT

TO

THE

BOOK

OF

THE

BLACK

BASS.

meandered

several

channels of open

water.

As

we

approached

the

lake,
filled

toward
with

the sun, it

seemed

that these
occasional

channels

were of a

liquid

fire,
in
to

and a

the
small

leaping
served

mullet,

or

dropping
and

of

alligator,
and

to heighten this effect,

simulate

sparks as
a

flames.
over sea.

The

pure

white

wings

of

the

egret,

it flitted
rubescent

the water,

seemed

like

miniature sails on

As my Companion noiselessly paddled the boat along the fringe of rank grasses and luxuriant aquatic vegetation, I

danced the bob along
and now

and over
water

the water,

now

low,

now
and

high

dipping

in the
an
a

skimming,
as

leaping

fly
a

ing

till it

seemed

cervine

ignis-fatuus,
rose

uncanny thing, hirsute will-o'-the-wisp.

indeed it was,
until

Several Bass
active

to

it,

and swirled at

it,

one

more

than the

rest grabbed

it

by

a vicious

lunge,
the

and

the

hook
but

was

firmly
to

implanted in his jaw.

It

was

work of

a minute

land him in the
we repaired

boat,
to

and

he

was soon

joined
was pal

by

another,

when a

our camp-fire which
on

now

throwing

cheerful, ruddy light
of

the

pines and

mettoes.

This

was one

the

occasions

when

the

" bob,"

or

the

the trolling-spoon may be legitimately skittering-spoon, used ; for we not only took great pleasure in the novelty of
or

the sport, but

we

enjoyed

a

rich

repast

that

night

after

roasting the Bass in their scales in the hot ashes, broiling the deer's liver on a split stick, grilling a few crackers of

hard-tack,
enough

and

for

a cold

making a cup of hot, strong coffee leaving breakfast at daylight in the morning.

CHAPTER XXVI.
CONCLUDING REMARKS.

If

this book should be the

means of

making
or of

a single

day

happier
crooked

in

the

life

of

any angler,

making

some

things

straight

to the young

life be

of

one

Bass that

might

saving the have been otherwise killed by
or of

hand,

illegitimate
glad

means or sacrificed
written

that it is

and not

for any

personal

to unworthy motives, I shall for these considerations alone, ; profit or aggrandizement has it

been

penned.

And though there have been rods, and reels, and lines, and other articles of tackle named for me by enthusiastic friends
and

admirers, the honor

recompense,

for

I

assure

the

reader

itself has been my only that I have never re

ceived, ward for any

and

would scorn

to accept, any

pecuniary fee
or

or re

thing

devised

by

myself,

made

prominent

by my efforts, for Black Bass fishing. My sole aim and intention has been to
Bass
as a

elevate

the Black

game-fish,

and
and

to

provide

suitable
a more

tackle

for its
and

pursuit and

capture,

to inculcate

healthful

humane

gentlemanly spirit among If I have succeeded, in the slightest degree, my work has " like virtue, a reward proved, as Walton said of angling,
to
itself."

and

anglers.

It is
now

with a saddened

heart,

and an

feel

that it is the

finish the concluding last that

chapter of will ever

unwilling pen, that I this supplement, for I
added

be

to this book.

(195)

196

SUPPLEMENT

TO

THE

BOOK

OF THE BLACK BASS.

There is

not much

likelihood

of

there

for adding any thing more to its pages it is not at all likely that any one will to it after I am gone.

being any occasion during my life, and
ever add

any thing

I feel like
pool

one who
will see

that he

is making his last cast on a favorite A pool that is en no more forever.
associations.

deared to him

by

the fondest
smile
and whose

A

pool

whose

every ripple is a look of gladness
current seems
"

every changing
and whose

mood

is

a

delight

steadily

flowing

to beckon him to follow to
country, from whose bourn

The

undiscovered

No traveler

returns."

THB

END.

IISTDEX
-TO-

SCIENTIFIC HISTORY OF THE BLACK BASS.

American Fishes in Linnsean Col

Geographical variation, 29.

lection, 12. Arkansas, Black Bass of, 29. Bean, T. H., 12.
Black Bass Black Bass Black Bass, Linne's specimens, 13. of Arkansas, 29.
of of of

Grystes,

15.

Grystes salmoides, 22. Grystes salmonides, 15.

Huro,

15.

Black Bass

Blaek Bass Black Bass Black Bass Black

of of

Florida, 24, 29. Illinois, 24, 27. Mexico, 25. Mississippi, l!4, 26, Texas, 24, 27, 29.
11.
specimens, 13

Huro nigricans, 16. Illinois, Black Ba.ss of, 24, 27. .Jordan, D. S., 14, 20.

Labraces,

16.

Labrus, 13. Lacepede, 11, 12.
Lacepede's type specimens, 13. Le Sueur's specimens, 14.

Bass, Scientific History,

Black Bass, Type Bosc, M., 11.

Linnseus, 11, 12.
Linne's specimens, 13. Longworth, N., 14.

Calliurus, 16. Cope, Edw. D.,

29.

Florida, Black Bass of, 24, 29, Garden, Alexander, 11, 12.
Garden's specimens, 11. General and special features, 29.

Mexico, Black Bass Mieropterus, 15, 16,

of, 25.

17.

Mieropterus dolomiei, 18, 20, 21. Mieropterus dolomieu, 11, 13, 16,

Generic

characterizations,

15.

Orysles Gtintlier, 15. Huro Gtinther, 15. Mieropterus Cope, 16. Mieropterus Gill, 17. Mieropterus Jordan, 16.

17, 18, 19,20,21, 22, 24, 2.5, 26, 27, 28. Mieropterus dolomieu, Lac, syn.
onomy of, 17. Mieropterus floridanus, 24.

Genus Mieropterus, 15.

Mieropterus nigricans, 19, 24.

(197)

13. Mieropterus salmoides (Lac. 21. 12. 26.) Henshall. of Black Bass. 24. Lac. Cope. ) Gill. Wm. 13. Specimens. . 11.. Micropter'us pallidus Hay. dolomieu. 22. Jordan & Ever Jordan & Gil Specimens. Specimens. Synonomy of M. Lac. 24. Mieropterus 27. Blaek Bass Morphology. 27. Scientific History of. 27. 24. Micropter'us dolomieu Gill. Mieropterus salmonides. 29.) Specific descriptions des of M. LacepSde's. 17.) Henshall. 24. 13. Goode.21. Type. 13. Nelson. Mieropterus sal'moides Bean. (Lac. synonomy of. 23. 19. 26. 13. 20. 19. 27. 22. 17. 15. 14. Type specimens. 27. Hay. 15. 26. 29. 20. 24. mieu. 16. 20. 26. 22. 26. 15. 25. Micropter'us dolomiei Bean. 24. 13. 25. Mieropterus dolomiei Forbes. 21. 26. Mieropterus dolomiei Goode. Cope. Mieropterus pallidus. Mieropterus dolomieu Jordan & Ever mann. Specimens. 22. salmoides Mieropterus dolomieu Mieropterus Mieropterus Mather. Specimens. Henshall. Mieropterus pallidus Cope. salmol Henshall. 19. Mioplosus. 27. synonomy of. 19. 19. Mieropterus. Micropter'us salmoides bert. Texas. 24.198 INDEX TO SCIENTIFIC HISTORY. Mieropterus nigricans Mieropterus florida'nus Mississippi. 21. Jordan. 24. 15. Milbert's specimens. Murie. Le Sueur's. 25. salmoides (Lao ) Mieropterus dolomieu Jordan. 24. Linne's. 11. Mieropterus salmoides Mieropterus salmoides Mieropterus salmoides Mieropterus salmoides mann. Synonomy of Mieropterus. 20. salmoides Nelson. Black Bass of. Oswego Bass. Milbert's. Mieropterus dolomieu Jordan & Gil bert. Mieropterus salmoides (Lac. 25. Specific descriptions of M. salmoides (Lac. 21. Mieropterus salmoides Gill. Nomenclature. Special features. dolo Synonomy of M. Mieropterus salmoides Forbes. 27.

167. philosophy of. 119. 185. Black Bass. trout. lines for. genuine. 45. 45. Advice to tyro. Angling. Blaek fishes. 162. 127. 47. Boat. Angler. 103. 167. 41. 146. A retrospection. 47. 29. canvas. Black Bass. 193. against. Biting of fish. American silk-worm. 191. 159. teeth of.INDEX TO LIFE HISTORY AND ANGLING. artificial. 39. tackle. Black Bass. 128. Blaek Bass fishing. Box. Baits. 53. pleasures of. habitat of. 41. (199) . 60. Angling. fly. distribution. Black Bass in brackish water. 175. 48. nests on. 138. Black Bass 169. Black Bass in confined waters. 29. stoeking waters with. habits of. Angling. Books. 160. coloration. Braided lines. 149. flies. A reminiscence. eggs of. of 127. 105. 171. Black Bass. 47. game-fish. Artificial minnows. 139. Texas. 46 Black Bass Black not piscivorous. sermon on. 50. Bobbing in Florida. of. voracity of. experience in Bass-cult Bass. 174. Arnold's ure. 187. 45. leader. minnow. Artificial mouse. natural. 108. Black Bass ponds. Boats. 153. literature of. 48. 57. flies. fishing. 165. 48. Artificial Artificial Blaek Bass Black Bass Florida. rules for. 125. 131. 48. Buckets. Brook 167. food of. Brook trout. Blaek Bass for stoeking waters. Adjustable Air-bladder fly-spoon. 145. Baits. the true. fishing. 44. heaps. 79. 101. Black Bass. Black Bass Blaok Bass as a as a food-fish. Books. Angler. Angling of boyhood. optics Bass. Black Bass. Black Bass butchers. Brush extinction of. 175. Bethabara Henshall rod. 129. Bait-fishing. objections of of of Black Bass Arkansas. Blaek Bass. 159 Angler's pliers. 169.

200

INDEX

TO

LIFE

HISTORY.

Burning

Black

Bass, 190.

Disgorger, Shipley's, 143.
Distribution,
181.
geographical,

line, 102. Canvas boat, 153.
Cable-laid

41.

Dowel-mortise

Capabilities
"Capelin''

of

Henshall rod,

phantom, 127.

Drag Drawing
"

joint, 75. in reels, 88.
silk-worm
"

gut, 106.

Casting Casting

the

fly,

173.

Dubuque
ness, 33.

on comparative game

the minnow, 181.
of

Cause of decrease trout, 166. Cecropia silk-worm, 107. Cells, pigment, 40. Change
of

Eagle Waters, 190. Ear of fishes, 59.
"

E.

F."

on

comparative

game

coloration,
of

40.

ness,

37.
American silk-worm, 108.

Character

waters,

43.

Eggs Eggs Eggs

of of

Chinese silk-worra, 105. Chubs, 129.

Blaek

Bass, 48.
silk-worm, 107.

of cecropia

Clarke,

S.

C,
34.

on

comparative

Enameled

gameness,

Click in reels, 88. Click reels, 91.

line, 101. England, Black Bass in, 63. England, angling novelties in, 115.
"
Eureka"

fishing-boat,
with with

151.

Climatic influences, 43. Coloration of Black Bass, 39.
Coloration
of sea

Experience

rod-joints, 76.

Experiments

leaders, 108.
-

trout, 39.
qualities, 29.

Extinction 184.

of

brook trout, 165.
minnow

Color

of

leaders, 1 10.
of game

Extraordinary

casting,

Comparison

Concluding

remarks, 195.

Conditions governing biting, 162. Construction of fly-rods, 83. Construction Construction
of of

Eyed hooks, 114. Feeding of fish, 163.

Henshall rod, 71.

leaders. 111.

Cross-bars,

90.

Cylindrical

ferrules, 77.
on comparative game

Ferrules, 77. Fish, biting of, 162. Fishes, air-bladder of, 60. Fishes, ear of, 59. Fishes, feeding of, 163.
Fish-hooks. 114.

"Cyrtonyx"

ness,

.35.

Decrease

of

brook
of of

trout, 166.

Dimensions Discomforts

HenshaU rod, 71. trout

fishing, 168.

Disgorgers, 143.
Disgorger, Foard's, 143.

Disgorger, Mills', 143.

Fishing boats, 149. Fishing boat, Fishing boat, Osgood's, Fishing for count. 159. Fishing, fly, 171. Fishing lines, 101. Fishing reels, 88.
"

Eureka,"

151.

153,

INDEX TO

LIFE

HISTORY.

201

Fishing Fishing

rods, 69.
rods, steel,

Food 86.
Food Food

of

Blaek

Bass, 45. Bass, 51, Bass, 52.
a,

of

large-mouthed

Flies, artificial, 119. Flies, general, 121. Flies, Henshall's, 121. Flies, killing, 119. Flies, table of, 120. Floating minnow-bucket, 145. Florida Black Bass, 53. Florida, bobbing in, 193. Florida, large Bass of, 63.
Floridian waters, 44. Fluttering fly, 122.

of small-moulhed on

Forbes

food, 45, 51.
Black Bass
as

Game

fish,

47,

165.

Game qualities, 30.

Gangs,

should not

General

and special

be used, 126. features, 29.

Geographical

distribution, 41.

Geographical variation, 29. Germany, Blaek Bass in, 63.

Gogebic lake, 190. Golden Dustman fly, 122.

Fly-books, 131. 131. Fly-book, Fly-book, Chubb's, 135. Fly-book, Conroy's, 133. 137. Fly-book, 137. Fly-book, Fly-book, Shipley's, 133. Fly-easting on lakes, 174. Fly-fishing, 171. Fly-fishing, lines for, 103. Fly-fishing, practical hints, 172. Fly-fishing, time for, 174. Fly, fluttering, 122. Fly, Golden Dustman, 122. Fly, Mayer's, 122.
" Bray,"
"Endicott,"

Grip

of

Growth

Henshall rod, 72. of Black Bass, 51.

"

Levison,"

Gut, drawing of, 106. Gut, silk-worm, 105. Habitat of Black Bass, 41. Habits of Black Bass, 48. Habits of brook trout, 173.
Hammered spoons, 126. Handle of Henshall rod, 73.

Hatching

of

Black

Bass, 48.

Hearing, 58.

Heavy large-mouthed Bass, 53. Heavy small-mouthed Bass, 52. Henshall fly-rod, 85.
Heftshall rod, grip of, 72. Henshall rod, standard, 71. Henshall's flies, 121.
Henshall-Van

Fly-rods, 83. Fly-rod, Chubb's, 82. Fly-rod, construction of, 83. Fly-rod, Henshall, 85. Fly-rod, Orvis', 82. Fly-rod, Shipley's, 82. Fly-rod, specifications for, 85, Fly-spoon, adjustable, 127.
Food
and

Antwerp

reel, 95.

Hibernation, 54. Holder for rod, 147.

Hooks, 114.
Hook
and

tackle

book, 138.

growth, 51.
as, 47.

Hook extractors, 143. Hooks, eyed, 114.

Food fish, Blaok Bass

Hooks, numbering

of, 115.

202

INDEX

TO

LIFE

HISTORY.

Mascalonge'

Hooks, snelling of, 116. Hooks, tying, 116. Implements, miscellaneous, 131.

on

Henshall rod, 182, gameaess,

Mather

on comparative

31.
Metal-center

Intelligetiee,

56.

line, 103.

Invisible knot, 117. Ira Wood on comparative
ness, 33.

Metal reel-seats, 90.
game

Joint, dowel-mortise, 75.

Joint,

non-dowel, 74.

Kentucky reel, 89. Killing flies, 1 19.
"Kingfisher"

on

comparative

gameness, 32.

Knot, invisible,
"Lambert"

1 17.

on comparative game

Minnow-buckets, 145. 145. Minnow-bucket, Minnow-bucket, Rudolph's, 145, Minnow-bucket, Shipley's, 145. Minnow-casting, 183. Minnow-casting lines, 101. Minnow, casting the, 181. Minnow-pocket, 146. Minnow-rod, capabilities of, 181. Minnows, 129.
"Acme,"

ness, 36.

Minnows,

artificial, 127.

Lancewood Henshall rod, Landing-nets, 141.

78,

81.

Miscellaneous implements, 131. Mouse, artificial, 128.

Landing-net, Bailey's, 141. 141. Landing-net, "Dorsal Landing-net, Orvis', 141. Leaders, 108. Leader-boxes, 139. Leaders, color of, 108. Leaders, construction of, 111. Leaders, experiments with, 108. Leaders, testing, 112.
Fin"

Mouse,

trout rising

to, 128.

Multiplying

reels, 95.

Murderous sportsmen, 192. Natural baits, 129. Negro philosophy, 187. Nests on brush-heaps, 50.

Netherlands, Black Bass in, 64. New England a zoological island,
42.
Non-dowel joint, 74.

Length

of

snells, 112.

Lines, Lines, Lines, Lines, Lines, Lines,
171.

bait, 101. fishing, 101. fly, 103. Hall Company's, 101.
metal-center, 103.

Numbering fish-hooks,
Objections
"Opinicon
ness, 32.
against
'

115.

Black Bass, 45.

on comparative game.

Optics Organ

of
of

angling, 57.

waterproof, 102. Literature of Black Bass

hearing, 60.

fishing,

Original habitat, 43. Pearl spoon, 127.

Loojjs

of

leaders, 111.
spawning, 49.

Philosophy

of

Angling, 159.

Manner

of

Pigment cells, 40.

INDEX

TO

LIFE HISTORY.

203

Platysamia cecropia, 107.

Bass-fi-shing, 169. Pliers, angler's. 146. Ponds for Blaek Bass, 48.
Pleasures
of

Portable

boats, 153.
on

Pot-fishers, 159.

Rod, Henshall, Chubb's, 78. Rod, Henshall, Leonard's, 81. Rod, Henshall, Orvis', 78. Rod, HenshaU, Shipley's, 79. Rod, Henshall, Spalding's, 79. Rod, Henshall, standard, 71.
Rod holder, 147.

fly-fishing, 172. Predominating colors of flies, 120.
Preservation Propagation
of of

Practical hints

Rods, fishing, 69.

trout streams, 107.

Qualities,
Redfish

Blaek Bass, 48. game, 30.

Rods, fly, 83. Rods, improvements in,
steel, 86. Rules fur flies, 174.
of

69.

Rods

Razor-back Black Bass, 190. on Henshall rod, 182.

Salmon

fishing,
Roe"

vicissitudesof,168.
on

Reels, 88.
Reels, click, 91.

"Salmon

comparative

Reels, multiplying, 95. Reel, Chubb's click, 91. Reel-groove, 90. Reel, Henshall-Van Antwerp, 95. 98. Reel, 99. Reel, Reel, Kentucky, 89. Reel-line, bait, 101. Reel-line, fly, 103. automatic click, 93. Reel, Reel-plates, 90.
"
Imbrie,"

gameness, 34. Salt water, Black Bass

in, 44,

Scotland,
Sense Sense
of of

Blaek Bass in, 65, hearing, 58.
sight, 56.

Sermon

on

angling, 160.

"

Imperial,"

Shiners, 129. Shoes,
Sight
wading, 148.

Mills'

fishes, 56. Silk-worm, American, 105, 107. Silk-worm, Chinese, 105.
of

Silk-worm gut, 105.

Reel-seats, 90. Reel, Silver Reel, Snyder's, 97.
"

Skittering
98.

and

King,"

Small-mouthed

bobbing, 193. Bass, food of, 52.
116.

Snelling hooks,
112.

Remarks, concluding, 195. Reminiscence, a, 175. Retrospection, a, 187. Rising to the fly, 172. Rivers in Florida, 44. on comparative game Rob Roy
'

Snells, SneUs, length of, 112. Snoods, 112. Spawning, manner of, 49.
Special senses, 56. Specifications for fly-rod, 85. Specifications for Henshall rod, 71.
rod,

"

ness, 36.

Rod, Henshall, Abbey & Imbrie's, Split-bamboo Henshall 81. 70, 81.

78, 79,

148. True angler. Stoeking Stocking 47. trolling. 71. Trolling 126. 174. Von dem Borne Teeth of Black Bass. 67. tackle. hammered. 126. Testing leaders. 185. fishing. Trout streams. 62. Spoon. 126. many forms of hook Stni-fishing. Steel fishing rods. of Transportation Black Bass. on game quali Tarpon Henshall 182. waters with brook trout. Spoons. 62. 128. Spoons. discomforts of. decrease of. pearl. Trout Stoeking 167. Standard Henshall rod. Telea polyphemus. Table flies. 116. 127. Trolling 125. inland waters. stocking. Zoological island. 108. Wading the stream. 168. Trolling. 120. Time for fly-fishing. legitimate 125. Waters. 1 1 2.204 INDEX TO LIFE HISTORY. spoons. Waterproof lines. 167. 169. of on Tying hooks. Tools and Wading-shoes. 126. 30. use of. on 173. 102. single for. ties. a. use of Henshall rod. 138. 190. waters with Ba. New England 42. 183. . 86. 166. Universal rod. Black spoons. Trout rising to mouse. Trolling spoons. 62 Triple books an abomination.ss. Tackle-book.

.

.

.

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