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CAM Magazine August 2008 - Interiors / Finishes

CAM Magazine August 2008 - Interiors / Finishes

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Publicado porMatthew Austermann
Welcome to the August 2008 issue of CAM Magazine, featuring Construction Law and Interiors/Finishes.

FEATURES INCLUDE:
• 300-Year-Old Bur Oak Tree at Henry Ford Estate
• How Detroit Industrial Turned from Boom to Bust
• On the Jobsite at Oak Pointe Country Club, Brighton

INTERIORS/FINISHES
• 2007 intex Awards
• Cleaning - The Forgotten Division

LIGHT/UTILITY CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT
• University of Michigan Lurie Nanofabrication Facility
• Husqvarna K950 Ring Saw Comes to the Rescue

CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT
• New Student Center for Eastern Michigan University Eagles

• Industry News
• Safety Toolkit
• Product Showcase
• People in Construction
• and Much More!

CAM Magazine is published by the Construction Association of Michigan.
Welcome to the August 2008 issue of CAM Magazine, featuring Construction Law and Interiors/Finishes.

FEATURES INCLUDE:
• 300-Year-Old Bur Oak Tree at Henry Ford Estate
• How Detroit Industrial Turned from Boom to Bust
• On the Jobsite at Oak Pointe Country Club, Brighton

INTERIORS/FINISHES
• 2007 intex Awards
• Cleaning - The Forgotten Division

LIGHT/UTILITY CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT
• University of Michigan Lurie Nanofabrication Facility
• Husqvarna K950 Ring Saw Comes to the Rescue

CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT
• New Student Center for Eastern Michigan University Eagles

• Industry News
• Safety Toolkit
• Product Showcase
• People in Construction
• and Much More!

CAM Magazine is published by the Construction Association of Michigan.

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Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: Matthew Austermann on Mar 09, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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Plus: BIG THINGS IN SMALL PLACES – University of Michigan’s Lurie Nanofabrication Facility

AUGUST 2008 VOL. 29 • NO. 8 • $4. 00
“ V O I C E O F T H E C O N S T R U C T I O N I N D U S T R Y ”
IN THIS ISSUE:
IN THIS ISSUE:
CONSTRUCTION
LAW
Changes to AIA
Contract Documents
CONSTRUCTION
LAW
Changes to AIA
Contract Documents
HEROES OF
HORTICULTURE
Celebrating Fair Lane’s
300-Year-Old Bur Oak Tree
HEROES OF
HORTICULTURE
Celebrating Fair Lane’s
300-Year-Old Bur Oak Tree
and Chic Finishes
Garner INTEX Accolades
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:08 AM Page 1
Group Insurance
and Solid protection
AD-MNL-0004 03/07
Good employees are essential to the success of your business. And retaining your employees can be
challenging. That’s why your Association sponsors the CAM Benefit Program ... a valuable group health
insurance program with a wide range of benefits options.
By combining our responsive local claims services with our new medical and pharmacy insurance
carrier, Madison National Life, you now have an opportunity to select a full array of employee benefits:
Medical PPO • RX Drug Card • Dental PPO • Life
Rob Walters • CAM Administrative Services
Ph: 248.233.2114 • Fax: 248.827.2112
Email: rwalters@camads.com
The CAM Benefit Program is underwritten by
Quality, Affordability...
New Rates for 2008!
Call us today for pricing and further details
Redford
Grosse
Pointe Park
Eastpointe
St. Clair
Shores
Hamtramck
Highland
Park
Center Line
Melvindale
Lincoln Park
Taylor
Dearborn
Dearborn
Heights
Inkster
Farmington Hills
Royal Oak
Ferndale
River
Rouge
Grosse
Pointe
Farms
Grosse
Pointe
Woods
Southfield
Oak Park
SPRINGWELLS
TRENTON
WAYNE-CANTON
SEVEN MILE
FRENCH ROAD
Detroit
REDFORD
KOENI G
CONCRETE
MICHIGAN
FOUNDATION
COMPANY
Since 1924
Brian Burzich
Customer Service
Cell: 734-216-6407
bburzich@mccoig.biz
Office: 734-326-4200
Fax: 734-326-3504
McCoig Companies
KOENI G
CONCRETE
MICHIGAN
FOUNDATION
COMPANY
Since 1924
Brian Burzich
Customer Service
Cell: 734-216-6407
bburzich@mccoig.biz
Office: 734-326-4200
Fax: 734-326-3504
McCoig Companies
KOENI G
CONCRETE
MICHIGAN
FOUNDATION
COMPANY
Since 1924
Brian Burzich
Customer Service
Cell: 734-216-6407
bburzich@mccoig.biz
Office: 734-326-4200
Fax: 734-326-3504
McCoig Companies
Seven Mile Plant
313-368-1133
Redford Plant
313-368-1133
Springwells Plant
734-357-2124
French Rd., Detroit
313-921-3410
Wayne-Canton Plant
734-326-4200
Downriver Plant
734-282-9104
Serving Metro Detroit with six permanent plant locations
that are strategically located, along with several
portable plants, to provide you an unmatched capacity
for Service on Demand. All plants and materials are
NRMCA, MDOT and County Certified.
A Great Mix of
Personnel & Technology
A Great Mix of
Personnel & Technology
Place your concrete order at any of our regional locations
G READY-MIX CONCRETE PRODUCTS TO FIT
ANY RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL OR
MUNICIPAL JOB APPLICATION
G SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY TRACKING SYSTEM
MONITORING EACH ORDER IN REAL TIME
G SOUTHEAST MICHIGAN’S LARGEST FLEET
OF FRONT-DISCHARGE MIXERS
G RELIABLE, CONSISTENT CONCRETE
DELIVERED ON-TIME
G INTEGRATED DELIVERY SERVICES FROM
STRATEGICALLY LOCATED PRODUCTION
FACILITIES
G MAXIMIZING CUSTOMER PRODUCTIVITY
AND EFFICIENCY
G COMPREHENSIVE CONCRETE MATERIALS
RESEARCH/TESTING LABORATORY
G DEDICATED, EXPERIENCED PEOPLE
WITH INDUSTRY CERTIFICATIONS
G READY-MIX CONCRETE PRODUCTS TO FIT
ANY RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL OR
MUNICIPAL JOB APPLICATION
G SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY TRACKING SYSTEM
MONITORING EACH ORDER IN REAL TIME
G SOUTHEAST MICHIGAN’S LARGEST FLEET
OF FRONT-DISCHARGE MIXERS
G RELIABLE, CONSISTENT CONCRETE
DELIVERED ON-TIME
G INTEGRATED DELIVERY SERVICES FROM
STRATEGICALLY LOCATED PRODUCTION
FACILITIES
G MAXIMIZING CUSTOMER PRODUCTIVITY
AND EFFICIENCY
G COMPREHENSIVE CONCRETE MATERIALS
RESEARCH/TESTING LABORATORY
G DEDICATED, EXPERIENCED PEOPLE
WITH INDUSTRY CERTIFICATIONS
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:08 AM Page 2
Group Insurance
and Solid protection
AD-MNL-0004 03/07
Good employees are essential to the success of your business. And retaining your employees can be
challenging. That’s why your Association sponsors the CAM Benefit Program ... a valuable group health
insurance program with a wide range of benefits options.
By combining our responsive local claims services with our new medical and pharmacy insurance
carrier, Madison National Life, you now have an opportunity to select a full array of employee benefits:
Medical PPO • RX Drug Card • Dental PPO • Life
Rob Walters • CAM Administrative Services
Ph: 248.233.2114 • Fax: 248.827.2112
Email: rwalters@camads.com
The CAM Benefit Program is underwritten by
Quality, Affordability...
New Rates for 2008!
Call us today for pricing and further details
KOENI G
CONCRETE
MICHIGAN
FOUNDATION
COMPANY
Since 1924
Brian Burzich
Customer Service
Cell: 734-216-6407
bburzich@mccoig.biz
Office: 734-326-4200
Fax: 734-326-3504
McCoig Companies
ns
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:08 AM Page 3
4 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
FEATURES
14 Heroes of
Horticulture
300-Year-Old Bur Oak
Tree at Henry Ford Estate
16 How Detroit
Industrial Turned
from Boom to Bust
Detroit Area Industrial Construction Market Trends
18 On the Jobsite
Heat Rising – Oak Pointe
Country Club, Brighton
INTERIORS/FINISHES
20 2007 INTEX
Awards
ACT Honors Winners
and Finalists
26 Cleaning –
The Forgotten
Division
“ V O I C E O F T H E C O N S T R U C T I O N I N D U S T R Y ”
®
CONSTRUCTION LAW
32 Changes to AIA
General Conditions
Will the New AIA General Conditions
Remain the Flagship of the Industry?
CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT
38 Nano-Construction
Placing Complex Systems in Small Places
DEPARTMENTS
8 Industry News
12 Safety Tool Kit
48 Product Showcase
52 People in Construction
59 CAMWelcomes New Members
60 Buyers Guide Updates
61 Construction Calendar
62 Advertisers Index
ABOUT THE COVER
2007 Resilient Floor INTEX Award Winner: William Beaumont
Hospital, Center for Children’s Surgery.
Photo ©2008 John Lacy, Proshooter.com
Clark Hill’s Construction Team is made up of attorneys
from multiple practice groups who share a common
characteristic: significant real-world expertise spotting,
acting upon and solving the challenges faced by
businesses in the construction industry. In a world of
generalists, count on our focused construction expertise.
800.949.3124 | www.clarkhill.com
We Understand Your Challenges
We Offer You Solutions
We Share Your Passion
Count on More.
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:09 AM Page 4
Clark Hill’s Construction Team is made up of attorneys
from multiple practice groups who share a common
characteristic: significant real-world expertise spotting,
acting upon and solving the challenges faced by
businesses in the construction industry. In a world of
generalists, count on our focused construction expertise.
800.949.3124 | www.clarkhill.com
We Understand Your Challenges
We Offer You Solutions
We Share Your Passion
Count on More.
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:09 AM Page 5
6 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
PUBLISHER Kevin N. Koehler
EDITOR Amanda M. Tackett
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR E. Dewey Little
ASSOCIATE EDITORS Mary E. Kremposky
David R. Miller
PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Matthew J. Austermann
GRAPHIC DESIGN Marci L. Christian
DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Gregg A. Montowski
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Cathy A. Jones
DIRECTORS
OFFICERS
Chairman Jeffrey W. Cohee,
Frank Rewold & Son, Inc.
Vice Chairman Rick J. Cianek,
Fraco Products
Vice Chairman Ted C. McGinley,
Gutherie Lumber Co.
Treasurer Robert J. Michielutti Jr.,
Michielutti Bros., Inc.
President Kevin N. Koehler
DIRECTORS Stephen J. Auger,
Stephen Auger + Associates Architects
Brian J. Brunt,
Brunt Associates
James C. Capo,
DeMattia Group
Brian D. Kiley,
Edgewood Electric, Inc.
R. Andrew Martin,
F.H. Martin Constructors
John O'Neil, Sr.,
W.J. O'Neil Company
Glenn E. Parvin,
C.A.S.S.
Jacqueline LaDuke Walters,
LaDuke Roofing & Sheet Metal
Michigan Society of
Association Executives
2002, 2004, 2005 & 2007
Diamond Award
2003, 2006 Honorable Mention
Gallery of Fine Printing
2002 Bronze Award
MARCOM International
Creative Awards
2005 Gold Award
The Communicator
International
Print Media Competition
Overall Association Magazine
Magazine Writing
CAM Magazine (ISSN08837880) is published monthly by the Construction Association of Michigan, 43636 Woodward
Ave., P.O. Box 3204, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204 (248) 972-1000. $24.00 of annual membership dues is allocated to
a subscription to CAM Magazine. Additional subscriptions $40.00 annually. Periodical postage paid at Bloomfield Hills, MI
and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER, SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO: CAM MAGAZINE, 43636 WOODWARD AVE.,
BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MI 48302-3204.
For editorial comment or more information: magazine@cam-online.com.
For reprints or to sell CAM Magazine: 248-972-1000.
Copyright © 2008 Construction Association of Michigan. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without
permission is prohibited. CAM Magazine is a registered trademark of the Construction Association of Michigan.
2006
GRAPHIC DESIGN USA
AMERICAN INHOUSE
DESIGN AWARD
When you have to swim with the sharks…
Don’t go it alone. At McAlpine & Associates,
we guide our clients through troubled waters with a
mixture of experience, tenacity and aggression.
We’re specialists in complex business and
construction litigation.
To schedule a
consultation,
contact us at…
248.373.3700
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INSURANCE
& BONDING
General Insurance • Surety Bonds
1175 West Long Lake Rd. Suite 200 • Troy, MI 48098
248-828-3377
Fax 248-828-4290 - Bonding
248-828-3741 - Insurance
e-mail:mmiller@vtcins.com
www.vtcins.com
Del Valenti
Bob Trobec
Al Chandler
Mike Miller
Ian Donald
Rod Gawel
Tim O’Malley
Joe McIntyre
Kathy Irelan
Tom Skuza
Jason McLelland
Jeff Chandler
Jim Boland
Julie Rourke
Ken Boland
Teresa Casey
Tom Morris
Gary J. Beggs
REPRESENTING
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:09 AM Page 7
8 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Miller Canfield Attorney
Mark J. Bennett Authors
Publication on Green
Buildings and Sustainable
Development
Mark J. Bennett, senior counsel at
the law firm of Miller Canfield and
leader of the firm’s Climate Change
initiative, is lead author of a new pub-
lication called, “Current Critical
Issues in Environmental Law: Green
Buildings and Sustainable
Development,” which was published
by LexisNexis in June. It is a comprehensive resource for attor-
neys and other professionals working in the area of green build-
ing and sustainable development.
The 54-page resource includes an overview of the primary
forces motivating the widespread adoption of green building
principles throughout the real estate industry. The guide pro-
vides detailed, hands-on tools to assist practitioners with identi-
fying issues in a transactional setting both on existing properties
and new construction projects. Additionally, it includes an
overview of available tax incentives, grants and other financial
tools for select states to help clients enhance the value of their real
estate investments. It also includes a detailed overview of the
LEED® certification system and its practical application.
“The dramatic pace at which green building and sustainable
development is impacting the real estate community demands
that attorneys and other real estate professionals equip them-
selves with the most recent, up-to-date information to develop
strategies to meet their projects’ goals,” said Bennett. “The Lexis-
Nexis publication provides this assistance to the industry in a
comprehensive and easy-to-use approach.”
The publication is co-authored by J. Cullen Howe, an attorney
with Arnold & Porter in New York City, and James L. Newman, a
LEED accredited professional with Newman Consulting Group
in Bloomfield Hills. For more information on or to order the pub-
lication, visit the LexisNexis Bookstore at
http://bookstore.lexis.com/bookstore/product/71521.html or
call the LexisNexis Sales Group at 1-800-223-1940.
Barton Malow Welcomes Largest and Most
Diverse Intern Class in Program’s 24-Year History
Thirty-eight students arrived at Barton Malow Company’s
offices and jobsites to begin work as LEAPS (LEArning
Practicum for Students) summer interns. The company began
the program in 1984 to give minority and female architectural
and engineering students a competitive edge in the job market.
While initially focused on southeastern Michigan, LEAPS now
draws students from around the United States. This year marks
the largest group in program history.
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:09 AM Page 8
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 9 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
This summer, interns come from the fol-
lowing schools: Michigan State
University, Eastern Michigan University,
Lawrence Technological University,
Pennsylvania State University, University
of Michigan, Ferris State University,
Purdue University, Virginia Technological
University, Virginia Central University,
Georgia Institute of Technology, Arizona
State University, Southern Polytechnic
State University, and the University of
Florida.
The LEAPS Program gives college stu-
dents paid, real-life experience in the con-
struction industry. They work on a project
site or with in-house staff according to
their individual interests and goals, and
take part in such activities as project site
tours, officer interviews, and community
service.
This year’s interns work on project sites
across the United States, including
Roseville, Fraser, Lakeview, Troy, and
L’Anse Creuse Public Schools in Michigan,
Gwinnett Braves Baseball Stadium in
Georgia, Goodyear Spring Training
Facility in Arizonia, Maryland General
Hospital in Maryland, St. John Health
Providence Park Hospital in Michigan,
and Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital in
Wisconsin. Interns are also assigned to
Barton Malow’s Architectural Engineering
Services, Preconstruction, and Specialty
Contracting divisions.
Interns are often invited back to the pro-
gram to continue to build their careers.
“By the time an intern graduates, he or she
will have experiences and exposure to sev-
eral aspects of the construction industry
that typically take years to gain,” said
Ryan Maibach, vice president and pro-
gram director.
Barton Malow Company provides con-
struction management, design/build, pro-
gram management, general contracting,
technology, and rigging services through-
out North America. The ISO (quality) cer-
tified company has LEED Accredited
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CMCI has protected over a million square feet of floors.
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*Call for details
CMCI
CMCI
Detroit Office:
3365 Michigan Ave.,
Detroit, 48216
e-mail: sales@xxpert.com
Shelby Township Office:
53081 Providence Drive,
Shelby Twp., 48316
ph: 586-405-2252 G fax: 586-580-3953
Telecommunications
Voice
G
Data
G
Video
Dedicated to quality, reliability and
professionalism. Specializing in:
Business Telephone & Voicemail
Systems
Video Surveillance
Access Control
Audio/Video Distribution Systems
Structured Cabling
Voice, Data & Fiber Optic Cabling
Computer Data Networks
Network Support Services
Wireless Transmission Systems
Computer Room Design, Build and
Cleanup
Voice Over IP Solutions
Backup Solutions
Business Telephone & Voicemail
Systems
Video Surveillance
Access Control
Audio/Video Distribution Systems
Structured Cabling
Voice, Data & Fiber Optic Cabling
Computer Data Networks
Network Support Services
Wireless Transmission Systems
Computer Room Design, Build and
Cleanup
Voice Over IP Solutions
Backup Solutions
web: www.xxpert.com
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:09 AM Page 9
10 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Professionals on staff and is an industry
Building Information Modeling (BIM)
leader. Niche market specialties include
healthcare, educational, federal, industrial,
energy, and special event facilities. Barton
Malow has a staff of over 1,500 in 11 offices
and is headquartered in Southfield.
Annual firm revenues exceed $1 billion.
For additional information, visit
www.bartonmalow.com.
Spalding DeDecker Associates,
Inc. Hosts Engineering and
Surveying Fair
Spalding DeDecker Associates, Inc.
(SDA), a regional civil engineering and
surveying firm based in Rochester Hills,
recently hosted a K-12 Engineering and
Surveying Fair. A group of SDA volun-
teers worked together to host the fair
held at the firm’s office. The purpose of
this event was to build awareness and to
promote the civil engineering and sur-
veying fields. SDA hopes to alleviate the
huge shortage of students pursuing these
fields, by exposing children to careers in
the hopes of encouraging them to investi-
gate these technical professions.
Interactive, hands-on activities includ-
ed a weights and measures contest, an
instruments and pacing contest, as well
as a guess the angle contest in the survey-
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
Plunkett Cooney has been part of
Michigan’s construction industry
since 1913. Clients tell us they
appreciate our fearless determination
to obtain the right result from the
boardroom to the courtroom.
A leading advisor to developers, design
professionals and contractors, Plunkett
Cooney can provide legal counsel to
assist you in achieving your business
goals.
SCOTT H. SIRICH
Construction Law Practice Group Leader
(248) 594-8228 • ssirich@plunkettcooney.com
TM
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:09 AM Page 10
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 11 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
ing field. The day included exploration of
several arenas, including electrical cir-
cuits, SimCity, motion - momentum and
impulse, quick fixes for traffic crashes,
designing for “greener” stormwater,
building tall, bridge building, geology
and material testing. Games included
Egg Drop and Build a Barge.
Led by Cheryl Gregory and Tom Dohr,
SDA volunteers included Mark Balon,
Nadette Bullington, Lori Chevalier,
Cathy DeDecker, John DeDecker, Mike
DeDecker, Richard Dee, John Dell’Isola,
Jake Ensley, Leonard Harwell, Beth
Kilbourne, Eric Kipp, Sarah Lambdin,
Bill Lambdin, Brian McKissen, Joe
Muller, Erika Muller, Jake Munchiando,
Jennifer Petz, Dave Potter, Crystal Sapp,
Maria Sedki, Yazi Shamina, Alex
Shteynvil, Dana Suggitt, Jason Toner,
Paul Tulikangas, Paul Wade, and Scott
Wanagat. Grant DeWitt with PM
Environmental, Inc. hosted a geology sta-
tion. Johanna Banicki and Penny
Dwoinen with Testing Engineers &
Consultants, Inc. hosted a material test-
ing station.
“As employee/owners of SDA, we
expect everyone at SDA to be engaged in
our professions,” said David A. Lakin,
PE, president of SDA. “We’re seeing a
decline in the number of engineers and
surveyors graduating from colleges all
over the U.S., so we think it’s important
to show our young people what we do
and how important it is for our future
generations. This Engineering and
Surveying Fair serves a dual purpose of
engaging our staff while exposing young
people to our professions and hopefully
steering them in this direction.”
Dow Building Solutions
Announces Price Increases
to Address Impact of
Extraordinary Hydrocarbon
and Energy Costs
Due to continuing and unprecedented
increases in energy, feedstocks, raw
materials, and transportation costs, Dow
Building Solutions has increased prices
in the U.S. and Canada by up to an addi-
tional 10 percent for all product lines.
“The price of oil has risen drastically
over the past year – 80 percent – and nat-
ural gas prices have increased by 40 per-
cent. The building materials industry,
like many other Dow businesses, is feel-
ing the pain of this phenomenon at many
Jeff Gantz
Raplh Rexroat
laminate/post forming
wood doors & frames
custom veneer work
Jeff Gantz
Raplh Rexroat
laminate/post forming
wood doors & frames
custom veneer work
Jeff Gantz
Raplh Rexroat
laminate/post forming
wood doors & frames
custom veneer work
Jeff Gantz
Raplh Rexroat
laminate/post forming
wood doors & frames
custom veneer work
As a full service Carpentry &
Architectural millwork company we
utilize integrated technology to deliver
higher value to our clients. Estimating,
Shop Drawings and Real Time Scheduling
are linked to state-of-the-art woodworking
machinery. Our technology investment
reflects our commitment to clients;
quality and value you can depend on.
Brunt Associates, Inc.
48953 Wixom Tech Drive,
Wixom, MI 48393
(248) 960-8295
Fax: (248) 960-8296
www.BruntAssociates.com
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:09 AM Page 11
12 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
levels,” said Torsten Kraef, president and
general manager of Dow Building
Solutions. “Transportation costs have
been drastically affected by the rising
price of fuel. With margins quickly erod-
ing, we must take these steps now in
order to be able to meet customer
demand for our products and reinvest in
the future.”
The price increases were effective July
1 for all orders shipped on or after July 1
for the following products: STYRO-
FOAM™ Extruded Polystyrene
Insulations, Dow Polyisocyanurate
Insulations, Dow High Performance
Underlayment & Protection Board
(Fanfold), WEATHERMATE™ Brand
Housewraps, STYROFOAM™ Spray
Polyurethane Insulations, GREAT
STUFF™, GREAT STUFF PRO™, ENER-
FOAM™, INSTATIK™, and TILE-
BOND™ , FROTH-PAK™ Insulation &
Sealants, STYROFOAM™ Sill Seal, and
WEATHERMATE™ Construction Tape,
Straight, Flexible & Sill Pan Flashings.
The price increases took effect July 15
for all orders shipped on or after July 15
for the following products: STYRO-
FOAM™ Panel Core Products, STYRO-
FOAM™ Oncology Board Products, STY-
ROFOAM™ Surf Board Products, and
TRYMER™ Polyisocyanurate Pipe
Insulations.
“While it costs more for us to make our
products, our customers recognize that,
now more than ever, our products bring
even greater value to their construction
projects,” noted Kraef. “Our STYRO-
FOAM Insulation and WEATHERMATE
Weather Barrier Solutions, for example,
help increase energy efficiency and reduce
moisture, which can lower the overall cost
of home and building ownership - an
important consideration during a time
where energy costs are skyrocketing.”
Lincoln Electric Supports
American Welding Society
Foundation in Campaign to
Relieve Welder Shortage
The American Welding Society herald-
ed the $300,000 donation of The Lincoln
Electric Company to the AWS
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
NATIONAL CENTER FOR DISPUTE SETTLEMENT
Your source for
construction industry
impartial mediators
and arbitrators
G claims resolution
G worksite conflict resolution
G grievance & employment
dispute resolution
G partnering
G union-management relations
G cross-cultural training
G joint strategic planning
where interests converge
agreemements emerge
22500 Metro Parkway G Suite 200
Clinton Township G MI 48035
Phone: 586-741-0870
Fax: 586-790-4774
www.ncdsusa.org
NI OSH
recently created a
warehouse of infor-
mation about safety
and health for the
outdoor worker,
which of course
includes construc-
tion workers. I wanted to point this out, as
the “new” information covers hazards
faced every day by construction workers
using little or no protection. Physical haz-
ards to construction workers include
extreme heat, extreme cold, noise, light-
ning, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation from
the sun. Extreme heat conditions can cause
heat stroke (a life threatening emergency),
heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat rash,
and other problems. Extreme cold condi-
tions can cause hypothermia, frostbite, and
other problems. Too much noise exposure,
a well documented but very often over-
looked problem in construction, may
cause a temporary change in hearing or a
temporary ringing in workers’ ears (tinni-
tus). Repeated exposures to loud noise can
lead to permanent, incurable hearing loss
or tinnitus. Also, lightning kills about 80
people in the United States each year and
injures hundreds. Among construction
workers, laborers, machine operators,
engineers, roofers, and pipe fitters have
been struck by lightning most often on the
job. UV radiation can cause problems such
as sunburn and skin cancer, especially in
fair-skinned workers.
All of this information and more
can be obtained by visiting:
www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/outdoor.
You may want to take a look at it. If you
have any questions about this or any
other safety issue, you can always find
me at the end of 248-972-1141 or
forgue@cam-online.com.
Joseph M. Forgue
Director of Education
& Safety Services
SAFETY TOOL KIT
WORKING OUTDOORS
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:09 AM Page 12
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 13 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Foundation to help relieve a nationwide
shortage of welders. In association with
this donation, Lincoln and the AWS
Foundation will collaborate on new mar-
keting initiatives to promote welding
careers and help bolster the ranks of
welders.
According to AWS and other industry
research, the average age of a welder is in
the mid-fifties. Fewer graduates entering
the profession, coupled with the continu-
ing retirement of experienced welders,
has led to a shortage of skilled welders
that could weaken the U.S. manufactur-
ing sector and overall economy.
Lincoln will donate the funds over a
two-year period beginning in 2008.
Lincoln will also contribute marketing
support and partner with AWS to produce
a promotional welding career video to be
used online, in classrooms and through-
out industry. The video will feature sever-
al well-known personalities who have
sponsorship agreements with Lincoln.
In addition, this donation will support
the AWS Foundation’s Welder Workforce
Development Program. The foundation
launched the program in 2006 to address
the critical need for recruitment and spe-
cialized training of entry-level welders
while supporting industry workforce
needs. It is an essential component of the
AWS Foundation’s $10 million capital
campaign, Welding for the Strength of
America, which is aimed at facilitating
programs, scholarships and other initia-
tives in support of the welding industry.
At the end of 2007, the AWS Foundation
had raised $2.6 million towards its cam-
paign effort.
Ronald C. Pierce, AWS Foundation
chairman, said, “This generous contribu-
tion to our campaign will enable AWS to
launch much-needed programs and mar-
keting initiatives toward the promotion
of welding careers. Lincoln electric has
always been a very important partner to
AWS, and their continued support helps
us build a stronger welding workforce
for America.”
REFER AN ASSOCIATE TO
BECOME A MEMBER OF OF.
Help us increase our membership base, which will
enable us to expand our range of services, keep pricing
consistent and better serve the membership.
Think of people and firms that you do business
with that are not listed in the CAM Buyers Guide.
These people are not members of your association.
Sign these firms up for membership with CAM and receive
$50 toward renewal of your MEMBERSHIP,
CONSTRUCTION PROJECT NEWS subscription
OR
one of the following, a $50 HOME DEPOT Gift Card
or a $50 SPEEDWAY Gas Card
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Also visit us at www.cam-online.com
August 1-13 6/30/08 10:09 AM Page 13
THE CULTURAL LANDSCAPE FOUNDATION’S
HEROES OF HORTICULTURE
14 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
F
or CAM Member Marc Dutton of
Waterford, historic preservation has
been a lifelong passion. As a youth
working in the irrigation industry, he
quickly learned that the name John A.
Brooks was tied to important projects
across the city of Detroit, including the
Tiger’s first baseball park (Navin Field),
the Michigan Central Depot, the Henry
Ford Highland Park Plant, and the vast
personal estates of Detroit’s auto barons
Ford, Dodge, and Fisher. As the use of irri-
gation systems spread nationally, Brooks
pop-up sprinklers beautified the grounds
of the Capitol in Washington, D.C., Grant
Park in Chicago, and Central Park in New
York. When the lack of a successor to head
the Brooks company threatened it with
extinction in 1988, Marc Dutton bought the
business, preserving the irrigation icon,
and in the process provided himself with a
direct purpose in maintaining the historic
sites that had long captured his interest.
This national cause was receiving local
attention. A Bur Oak tree stands on the
historic grounds of Fair Lane Estate,
Henry Ford’s lavish home in Dearborn.
The oak is presumed to be 300 years old
and one of the rare remaining Bur Oaks of
this age in the region. Last fall, The
Cultural Landscape Foundation of
Washington, D.C. (TCLF) named the Fair
Lane Bur Oak one of the Landslides:
Heroes of Horticulture. In conjunction
with this honor, it has now been pho-
tographed by internationally celebrated
photographers commissioned by the
famed George Eastman House
International Museum of Photography
and Film (Eastman-Kodak). A special
spread in Garden Design magazine result-
ed, and a tour of the spectacular Eastman
House photography is currently making
its way across the nation.
Dutton, who regularly coaxes life out of
the remaining original Brooks irrigation
system on the Fair Lane grounds, is locally
championing efforts of The Cultural
Landscape Foundation (TCLF) to bring
attention to the Heroes of Horticulture and
the need to preserve the Heroes for future
generations. Dutton is on a mission to pro-
tect Fair Lane’s Bur Oak - as well as the
country’s other cultural landscapes
deserving of preservation.
At a special luncheon held at the Fair
Lane Estate on June 5th, Dutton convened
approximately 50 notable dignitaries (his-
torians, university experts, environmental-
ists, landscape architects, and other inter-
ested parties) to a special by-invitation-
only summit. Attendees heard a presenta-
tion by keynote speaker Charles
Birnbaum, founder of The Cultural
Landscape Foundation (TCLF), regarding
the legendary Heroes, including their at-
THE CULTURAL LANDSCAPE FOUNDATION’S
HEROES OF HORTICULTURE
The 300-Year-Old Bur Oak Tree at Henry Ford’s Fair Lane Estate
Above: Charles Birnbaum (left) of The
Cultural Landscape Foundation was the
keynote speaker at the Heroes of
Horticulture luncheon. Marc Dutton (right)
organized the event at the Henry Ford Fair
Lane Estate.
Below: Charles Birnbaum was presented
with a Detroit Red Wings jersey during his
visit, to commemorate their Stanley Cup
victory.
Photos by Marci Christian, CAM Magazine
August 14-19 Tree-Econ-Jobsite 6/27/08 3:16 PM Page 14

CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 15 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
risk status and the necessity to prevent
their further destruction. Among these
Heroes: a famed Horse Chestnut Tree that
remains standing in front of the home of
legendary women’s-rights advocate Susan
B. Anthony; the giant American Sycamore
standing on the Antietam National battle-
field near the Burnside Bridge during the
Civil War; plus indescribably beautiful
gardens in cemeteries and accessible sites
around the country.
The Cultural Landscape Foundation,
based in Washington, D.C., was estab-
lished in 1998 and is the only not-for-prof-
it foundation in America dedicated to
increasing the public’s awareness of the
important legacy of cultural landscapes,
and to help save them for future genera-
tions. Through education, technical assis-
tance and outreach, TCLF broadens the
support and understanding for cultural
landscapes nationwide in hopes of saving
America’s priceless heritage for future
generations.
A cultural landscape is a geographic
area that includes cultural and national
resources associated with a historic event,
activity, person, or group of people. As
with historic buildings, these special
places reveal aspects of a country’s origin
and development. The ongoing preserva-
tion and interpretation of these cultural
landscapes can produce an improved
quality of life and a sense of place and
identity for future generations. Marc
Dutton is proud to be a part of these
efforts.
The Marc Dutton Irrigation and John A.
Brooks, Inc. companies are familiar to
many for the irrigation support they pro-
vide in and around Michigan, including:
the Josephine Ford Fountain located at the
entrance of Greenfield Village; the envi-
ronmentally acclaimed green roof – the
world’s largest living roof – at the Ford
Rouge Plant; the Riverfront Fountain at
the GM Headquarters; refurbishment of
the Blue Cross/Blue Shield Detroit
Fountain; and irrigation at the Detroit Zoo,
Providence Hospital, and a vast number of
golf courses.
The public may view the Fair Lane Bur
Oak in person at Fair Lane Estate during
normal operating hours. More can be
learned about the TCLF by visiting
www.tclf.com and individuals are invited
to view all of the Heroes of
Horticulture at a special webpage:
http://www.tclf.org/landslide/2007/.
CAM Magazine would like to acknowledge
the contributions of Karen McLaren and The
Cultural Landscape Foundation for informa-
tion included in this article.
Beautiful foliage surrounds the grounds of the Henry Ford Fair Lane Estate in Dearborn,
home to the 300-year-old Bur Oak Tree.
August 14-19 Tree-Econ-Jobsite 6/27/08 3:16 PM Page 15
16 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
A
fter booming for five years from
1998 through 2002, industrial build-
ing activity - the largest segment of
the Detroit area’s non-residential
construction market - has been in a slump
since 2003. Just as residential demand
declined after the burst of the housing boom
in 2005 with the start of the reset of
adjustable rate mortgage interest charges, so
did demand for industrial building construc-
tion. CAM’s Industrial Construction
Barometer is contrasted with industrial
building occupancy in an accompanying
chart entitled, “DETROIT AREA INDUSTRIAL
BUILDING OCCUPANCY / CONSTRUCTION
BAROMETER.” As demand for industrial
building space (based on occupancy tabulat-
ed by the Friedman Real Estate Group)
expanded during the ‘90s, the volume of
square footage installed in new structures,
and added or altered in existing facilities,
climbed to a peak of 131 in 1998 (2000=100),
then declined before topping out one more
time in 2001 and slightly lower in 2002.
Thereafter, construction plunged with the
slackening in building occupancy through
2007. As there has not been much investiga-
tion regarding how this situation developed,
it seemed appropriate to try to put it into
better perspective for CAM’s membership.
During the ‘90s, as competition in the
North American automotive market became
increasingly more intense with the establish-
ment of domestic manufacturing capability
by Asian and European automakers and
expansion of their distribution network, the
Chrysler, Ford and General Motors market
share deteriorated from a peak of 72.8% in
1996 to 62.8% in 2001, to 52.9% in 2006 and
50.9% in 2007. This is shown in the chart
entitled, “NORTH AMERICAN AUTOMOTIVE
SALES / DETROIT MARKET SHARE.” From
2001 through 2006, Detroit’s automakers,
likewise, attempted to stimulate motor vehi-
cle demand, the same as homebuilders, real
estate brokers and lenders spurred the hous-
ing demand. Their dealers offered very gen-
erous sales incentives or low interest rate
loans, vehicle leasing, longer loan periods,
substantial price rebates, and other pro-
grams to keep assembly plants open and
running to order to survive in a market place
with increasingly more popular foreign
nameplates. That buoyed sales to abnormally
high levels. These incentive packages, low
fuel prices, and more moderate incentives by
foreign makers, drove vehicle sales of the
Detroit three automakers and their foreign
competitors to 110.7 million units to retail
customers and fleets in the U. S. and Canada
in the years from 2001 through 2006, (18.4
million annually), 7.7%, or 1.3 million greater
than the 102.8 million units purchased in
1994 through 1999.
Then it became obvious that the market
for personal transportation had become sat-
urated with the slowdown in the pace of
industry sales to 17.8 million in 2007 and
projection of about 16.4 million in the U. S.
and Canada in 2008. The contraction in the
E C O N O M I C O U T L O O K
HOW DETROIT’S INDUSTRIAL CONSTRUCTION BOOM
TURNED FROM BOOMTO BUST
DETROIT AREA INDUSTRIAL CONSTRUCTION MARKET TRENDS
By Don Wilson
August 14-19 Tree-Econ-Jobsite 6/27/08 3:16 PM Page 16
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 17 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
sales and production of domestic brand
vehicles accompanying the slowdown in
industry sales is portrayed in the chart enti-
tled, “DETROIT AUTOMAKERS NORTH AMERI-
CAN VEHICLE SALES / PRODUCTION VOL-
UME.” Besides market saturation, another
factor slowing new vehicle demand is the
slackening in the replacement rate for vehi-
cles on the road, as computed by R. L. Polk &
Company. 5.2% of cars were scrapped in
2007, down from 6.8% in 2001. Demand for
new vehicles, particularly pickup trucks and
SUVs, is also being depressed by the high
price of gasoline and the decline in their
value as trade-ins on new vehicles.
As a result of the market share loss and the
saturation of the North American market
with cars and trucks, the Detroit automakers
reduced their North American vehicle pro-
duction capacity to a calculated level of 11.7
million vehicles during 2007. This was
derived from data featured in a June 8th arti-
cle in the Detroit Free Press per data set forth
in the 2008 Harbour Report, recently
released by the consultancy, Oliver Wyman.
Such capacity is estimated to have been cut
again to 11.2 to 11.3 million in 2008, as dis-
played in the chart entitled, “DETROIT
AUTOMAKERS PRODUCTION CAPACITY / UTI-
LIZATION RATE.” In 2007, the Detroit’s
automakers utilized about 79% of that
capacity, down from 86%% in 2006.
Utilization will most certainly be less again in
2008 based on the lower motor vehicle vol-
umes being assembled in first several
months of the 2008 model year.
The effect that reduction of North
American production capacity by the Detroit
automakers has had in the Detroit area is
portrayed in the chart entitled, “DETROIT
AREA VEHICLE PRODUCTION CAPACITY /
CAPACITY UTILIZATION / INDUSTRIAL FACILI-
TY UTILIZATION.” Overall utilization of facili-
ties in the Detroit area’s industrial sector
closely correlates with the operations of the
Detroit automakers, as measured by the pro-
duction capacity and its utilization because a
significant proportion of manufacturing, at
least two-thirds of manufacturing activity in
the Metro area, is generated by activity in
motor vehicle assembly and parts and acces-
sories manufacturing, according to the 2002
Census of Manufacturing conducted by the
U. S. Bureau of Census. About 82% of motor
vehicle production capacity in the Detroit
region was utilized by Detroit’s automakers
in 2007, up from 78% in 2006, but well below
the 92% posted in 2000. The impact that such
downsizing has had on all industrial facilities
is that their utilization rate is estimated to
have plummeted to around 70% in recent
years due to the down-sizing in manufactur-
ing and in the non-manufacturing industries
that supply other products or services or
depend on the household purchasing power
that weakening with the contraction of these
industries.
One of the major reasons that the Detroit
automakers continue to operate without a
profit is their inability to fully utilize their
plants. Operating them below 100% does not
make full use of them. Running above 100%
wastes money on the payment of overtime
wages required at such an operating level.
Don Wilson is a consulting economist based in
Hartland, Michigan. He has specialized in work-
ing for trade associations, banks, chambers of
commerce and municipalities since 1982.
August 14-19 Tree-Econ-Jobsite 6/27/08 3:16 PM Page 17
18 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
I
n February 2007, a devastating fire literally burned the club-
house at Oak Pointe Country Club in Brighton to the
ground, leaving owner, Dallas-based ClubCorp USA, with
no suitable facility in which to house a long list of planned
events for the club’s 850 members. The ground upon which the
building had sat quickly cooled, but the desire to raise a replace-
ment facility as quickly as possible turned up the heat for a ded-
icated project team that included construction manager
Campbell/Manix, Inc., Southfield, and architect TMP
Associates, Inc., Bloomfield Hills. Before shovels hit the
ground, TMP Associates and ClubCorp prepared a comprehen-
sive project program to ensure that the new clubhouse met all
needs and expectations.
“A comprehensive program was prepared because the owner
was not planning any new construction in the immediate
future,” said John Danckaert, AIA, project manager for TMP
Associates. “They were not prepared for such a catastrophic
event. Our biggest challenge in the beginning was getting the
owner to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the old build-
ing and agree on a new design formed around the foundations
HEAT RISING
By David R. Miller, Associate Editor
Photos courtesy of Campbell/Manix, Inc.
salvaged from the wreckage that would eliminate old problems
and improve on the features most liked.”
ClubCorp owns many clubs nationwide and the company
avoids the cookie-cutter approach by giving each facility a dis-
Rendering courtesy of TMP Associates, Inc.
The project team raced to replace the clubhouse at Oak Pointe
Country Club, which had been destroyed in a February 2007 fire.
August 14-19 Tree-Econ-Jobsite 6/27/08 3:16 PM Page 18
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 19 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
tinct, high-end look. TMP rose to the
challenge of applying ClubCorp’s vision
to the needs and desires of their estab-
lished membership. TMP played a criti-
cal role in making a design suitable to the
club’s clientele that reflects the best qual-
ities of Midwest architecture. Design ele-
ments reflecting regional style include
classic arts and crafts details and materi-
als combining a warm color palette to
greet and embrace users.
Accommodating the level of planning
that was needed to produce the design
added time to the project schedule, so
considerable forethought went into accel-
erating construction. Most of the new
three-story clubhouse, which totals
approximately 37,000 square feet, sits
atop the first floor foundations and utility
lines that survived the fire. The club-
house integrates the existing foundations
and expands on them by adding trench
footings and deep foundations on the
north and east sides, beyond the perime-
ter of the old structure. To save a signifi-
cant portion of the salvaged first floor
structure, careful testing and field meas-
urement was performed to verify the
bearing capacity and dimensions of the
existing foundations. Isolated structural
modifications were necessary, but this
approach saved time and money over
removing and rebuilding the support
system.
A significant quantity of pre-finished
products was also specified to reduce
construction time. By pre-finishing
doors, exterior siding and trim, window
packages, and many other products, so
they arrived ready to install, the project
team shaved additional time off the con-
struction schedule. Many of these prod-
ucts were also installed earlier than they
might be on a similar project, thanks to
construction innovations employed by
Campbell/Manix.
“We temporarily waterproofed the sec-
ond floor, so we could work on the first
floor, even though the roof structure was-
n’t up,” said Douglass W. Manix, presi-
dent of Campbell/Manix. “You usually
need to have the roof on and the windows
in before you can start the finish trades,
but we were able to start the first floor a
month early this way.”
By getting a head start on the first floor
and working extended shifts,
Campbell/Manix is on track for a planned
turnover of the facility in August 2008 [at
press time], even though construction did
not begin until November 2007.
The new design reflects the best of Midwest architecture, including classic Arts and
Crafts details and materials.
The project team shaved time off the construction schedule by pre-finishing doors,
exterior siding and trim, window packages, and many other products.
August 14-19 Tree-Econ-Jobsite 6/27/08 3:16 PM Page 19
20 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
T
he Architectural Contractors Trade Association (ACT) recog-
nized four area subcontractors for their hard work and out-
standing construction projects at the 13th Annual INTEX
Achievement Awards this past spring. This year’s INTEX
Award ceremony honored the nominees and their projects that
were completed in 2007.
Over 185 people attended the award ceremony, including ACT
members and industry and union partners.“Even during the difficult
economic climate Michigan is experiencing it is still imperative we
recognize the hard work our industry accomplishes,” stated Philip G.
Ruffin, ACT’s president. “For 13 years ACT has acknowledged the
quality work the subcontractor community has made to our indus-
try through the INTEX Achievement Awards.”
2007 EIFS INTEX Winner
Saylor’s Inc.- Elder Automotive, Land Rover, Jaguar, Saab
Dealership
• Project Manager: Jim Salloum
• GC: Aristeo Construction
• Architect: AZD Associates
• ACT Supplier: Sto-Ex
Construction Challenge: Provided the owner with an EIFS system
that appears to be more like traditional building materials. The
curved rotunda on the building resembles limestone. All finishes
are custom-blended colors selected by the architect for this project.
Work was completed during the winter months, which required tem-
porary enclosure and heat.
2007 EIFS Finalist and Nominees were:
• Pontiac Ceiling & Partition Co. - The Mall at Partridge Creek
• Saylor’s Inc. - St. Johns Ambulatory Care Center
I N T E R I O R S / F I N I S H E S I N T E R I O R S / F I N I S H E S
ACT Honors
Winners and Finalists
Phot os ©2008 J ohn Lacy, Pr oshoot er. com
Elder Automotive, Land Rover, Jaguar, Saab Dealership
August 20-31 Interiors 7/3/08 2:58 PM Page 20

Distributed by:
Frames, Doors & Hardware, Inc.
33026 Capitol
Livonia, Michigan 48150
(734) 422-5400 • FAX (734) 422-6335
118 Rosehill, Suite 1
Jackson, Michigan 49202
(517) 787-5800 Fax (517) 787-3034
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 21 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
2007 Resilient Floor INTEX
Winner
Shock Brothers Floorcovering, Inc. -
William Beaumont Hospital, Center for
Children’s Surgery
• Project Manager: Daniel Shock
• GC: Barton Malow Co.
• Architect: Harley Ellis Devereaux
• ACT Supplier: Florstar Sales
Construction Challenge: Hand cutting of
the wave patterns in the flooring match the
waves in the ceiling. Utilizing a PLS laser
ensured the ceiling lines up with the floor-
ing. Another construction challenge was
installing custom transition metal with a
curved pattern in the waiting room between
the carpet and vinyl tile, plus leveling the
William Beaumont Hospital,
Center for Children’s Surgery
August 20-31 Interiors 7/3/08 2:58 PM Page 21
22 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
solid vinyl tile to meet the metal evenly. This
project was completed under separate phas-
es with a tight schedule required to meet
the owner’s needs.
2007 Resilient Floor Finalist and Nominees
were:
• Master Craft Carpet Service - MGM Grand
Casino & Hotel
• Quality Floor Covering - Grand Blanc
Police Headquarters
• Master Craft Carpet Service - Henry Ford
Hospital, W. Bloomfield
• Shock Brothers Floorcovering, Inc. -
Westview Elementary School
2007 Carpentry INTEX Winner
George I Landry, Inc. - 41-B District Court
• Project Manager: Richard Landry
• GC: The Dailey Company
• Architect: French Associates
Construction Challenge: The challenge was
the detail to all the lines in the courtrooms.
High-quality workmanship executed within
I N T E R I O R S / F I N I S H E S I N T E R I O R S / F I N I S H E S
41-B District Court
August 20-31 Interiors 7/3/08 2:58 PM Page 22
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 23 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
strict timelines was another project chal-
lenge. The lobby kiosk was added on after
the fact, and had to match the woodwork in
all the courtrooms.
2007 Finalist and Nominees were:
• Edrick M. Owen, Inc.- Grand Blanc Police
Headquarters
• Nelson Mill Company- U of M
Cardiovascular Center
• Westwood Carpentry Company - Walsh
College Addition
2007 Wall & Ceiling INTEX
Winner
Acoustic Ceiling & Partition Co.-
University of Michigan School of Public
Health
• Project Manager: Brian Gebhardt
• GC: Walbridge
• Architect: Centerbrook Architects &
Planners
• ACT Suppliers: Commercial Building
Materials, Oakland Building Materials, and
Selleck Architectural Sales
Construction Challenge: The core chal-
lenge was the difficult design and the many
different facets of work the company was
contracted to perform. The plaster ceiling,
serving as a tunnel for Washington Heights
Commercial • Industrial
Since 1974
27270 Gloede • Warren, Michigan 48088
Ph (586) 774-3110
Fax (586) 774-7055
Since 1963, the GREAT LAKES
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assisted our members and
the Architectural and Design
community in selecting the
proper ANSI installation
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If you have any installation
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please give us a call…
we’re here to help.
GREAT LAKES CERAMIC TILE COUNCIL
P.O.BOX 696 • FARMINGTON, MI 48332
248-476-5559 • 734-622-9468 FAX
GLCTC@CORE.COM • WWW.GLCTC.US
August 20-31 Interiors 6/27/08 3:19 PM Page 23
24 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Street, is an engineered, barrel, light-gauge system capped
with plywood, plaster and a patterned 24 x 24 design. The
lecture hall and lobby presented many challenges, as well.
These spaces feature radius soffits and curved walls that
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University of
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of Public Health
August 20-31 Interiors 7/3/08 2:58 PM Page 24
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 25 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
detail the bridge at the second floor in the
main lobby.
2007 Wall & Ceiling Finalist and Nominees
were:
• Denn-Co Construction- MGM Grand
Casino & Hotel
• Pontiac Ceiling & Partition Co.- U of M
Cardiovascular Center
• Ann Arbor Ceiling & Partition- Mercy
Memorial Hospital, North Renovation
• Ann Arbor Ceiling & Partition- Walsh
College Addition
• Diversified Construction Specialists-
Google, Birmingham
• Huron Acoustic Tile Co.- 41-B District
Court
Established in 1995 to acknowledge out-
standing achievements in interior and exte-
rior construction projects, the INTEX
Achievement Award is open to all union
contractors. The ACT Promotion Committee
and a panel of architects judge the projects.
Criteria for the award include aesthetics,
workmanship, difficulty of installation and
scope of work. In the past 13 years, over 35
INTEX Awards have been given out to 27 dif-
ferent companies.
The INTEX Award is sponsored by the
Architectural Contractors Industry Fund in
conjunction with this year’s sponsors. ACT
would like to thank its title sponsor, the
Michigan Regional Council of Carpenters.
ACT thanks its presenting sponsors:
Carpenters Labor Management Productivity
& Training Program, Laborers’ Local 1076
Labor Management Trust, MUST, and
Oakland Companies.
ACT thanks its gold sponsors: AGC of
Michigan, Commercial Building Materials,
Construction Association of Michigan,
Livonia Building Materials, Master Craft
Carpet Service, Painters District Council #22,
Ryan Building Materials, and Saylor’s Inc.,
ACT thanks its silver and bronze sponsors:
Acoustic Ceiling & Partition Co., Allied
Interior Products, City Renovation & Trim,
Denn-Co Construction, George W. Auch
Company, Mechanical Contractors
Association, Michigan Building Construction
Trades Council, NAI Acoustical & EIFS
Distributors, Novara Tesija, PLLC, Plasterers
Local 67, Pontiac Ceiling & Partition Co.,
Radio Distributing-Mannington, Selleck
Architectural Sales, and Stafansky, Holloway
& Nichols, Inc.
Jackson Park Agency
7321 Park Avenue, Allen Park, MI 48101
Phone (313) 388-7000
August 20-31 Interiors 7/2/08 10:39 AM Page 25
26 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Services, Livonia, taking ownership, contributing to the phasing
schedule, securing locked areas, communicating with all punch crews
and moving along the project to a successful finish on time with no
extra cleaning costs. The defense against being backed into the cor-
ner to make your delivery date is a proactive approach to the Cleaning
Division.
THE WINDOW GUY DOESN’T DO WINDOWS AND THE FLOOR GUY
DOESN’T DO FLOORS
Now, more than ever, the current economic times affect your bud-
get and, at Value Engineering time, cleaning is an item placed so low
on the totem pole that sometimes the customer will even elect to
wash their own windows.
There is a lot of room to shift the responsibility of cleaning, especial-
ly with the inconsistencies of specifications either allocating all phases
of cleaning to the general contractor or, in the majority of specs, have
divisions bearing cost-impacting finishes, protection and cleaning
requirements that often are not the expertise of the installation trades.
Granted there are many trades that often self perform these finishes or
have great relationships with janitorial trades to subcontract this por-
tion, but many more trades exclude this work, not motivated by the
idea of going back 3-6 months after their installations to assess what it
would take to restore their brand new work. Some may say that it’s
S
tuck somewhere between General Conditions and Soil
Remediation, there lies the specification for Final
Construction Cleaning to deliver to a customer their new
building.
Cleaning is considered, for the most part, as incidental and usually
does not qualify as a major expense. It’s something for which estima-
tors often plug in a square footage number; it’s often not considered
a significant cost item that could drastically vary depending on design
and site conditions. This forgotten division should be a part of the
competitive bid process. This will have a positive impact to budget,
schedule and closeout procedures.
Current construction clean-up costs range from .10 cents to $1.00+
per square foot. No magic number there. Contractors are faced with
pulling a number out of a hat and hope that the trick works. It’s the
fear of losing a bid that creates the submission of very lean numbers
at bid time. The general thought process that cleaning is insignificant
enough that someone on-site with a broom can handle it, mitigates
this. Given the current economic climate, combined with the desire to
keep labor busy, there’s no doubt that some general contractors are
putting their finished product and reputation at risk by implementing
this method.
A general estimate is without consideration of special cleaning
needs, such as high glass cleaning and specialty floor treatments. It
does not take into account, for example, the specification requiring
the cleaning of all owner-provided shelving and fixtures. Restaurants
contain specialty equipment, healthcare facilities have exam rooms
with special cleaning needs, and there’s special TLC required for the
owner who takes occupancy prior to the turnover of the building.
Also not included are jobsite conditions that exacerbate the matter,
such as restoring unprotected floors, high duct work, and paint scrap-
ing from most every surface that was victim to your lowest bid
painter. Cleaning during punch work is an orchestrated performance.
If planned and executed with finesse, your cleaning crew can drive
your finish.
PETOSKEY PLACE APARTMENTS, DETROIT
A good example of this is Petoskey Place Apartments, a large multi-
family residential housing project, finished in phases, over a large site.
The field supervisor was at a disadvantage when the project was at its
finish point. 250 doors got locked (and unlocked and locked, etc…)
and balancing punch crews of all trades with scheduled inspection
and owner walk-throughs looming. This project was handled seam-
lessly by the cleaning crew of American Carpet Care and Janitorial
I N T E R I O R S / F I N I S H E S I N T E R I O R S / F I N I S H E S
By Denise Dabbagh, American Carpet Care & Janitorial
The Forgotten Division
“WHO CAN YOU TRUST TO PROVIDE JUSTICE TO
YOUR CUSTOM ARCHITECTURAL WOODWORKING NEEDS?”
August 20-31 Interiors 6/27/08 3:19 PM Page 26
“WHO CAN YOU TRUST TO PROVIDE JUSTICE TO
YOUR CUSTOM ARCHITECTURAL WOODWORKING NEEDS?”
The Trend Millwork Group of Companies
Union Manufacturers Since 1964
Lincoln Park, Michigan / Detroit, Michigan
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
August 20-31 Interiors 6/27/08 3:19 PM Page 27
28 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
tors’ review of the plans and specs is the lifeline of the estimator, espe-
cially in fast track, crucial bid times.
It makes sense to rely on the cleaning professionals to provide you
the same estimating service. And more importantly, to obtain costs
for items that trades often exclude. Too often “Scope Busts” uncover
underlying features that will eat up your profits… and they never do
it in the beginning of a project, do they?
Example – Scope Bust: In the 125 RFIs and 13 change orders, the
scope was changed partially from carpet to tile. A change order is
issued based on your floor sub’s quote that did not include finishes
while the specifications require an almost unheard of amount: six (6)
coats of a premium sealer over 10,000 square feet of tile. Whether it is
the general contractor or the subcontractor, someone is going to bear
this cost, somewhere in excess of thousands of dollars.
Example – Late Contract and Bad Scheduling: A three-story elabo-
rate window enclosure is installed, the glazing trade demobilizes and
six months later the landscaping is in and you’re ready to clean the
windows. The lift can’t be used now, inside or out, and you just dis-
covered concrete on the lower panes. Now what? It will be either the
glazing trade (that clearly excluded the cleaning - but find it in their
contract) or the general contractor (or a negotiation of the two).
Either way, it’s time to consume these costs.
Based on quality control averages, contracting firms with militant
on-site management, the support of corporate offices, and in-place
company processes to protect all work on the project, are a very small
percent of the contractors doing business. These firms are to be com-
hard to get some trades back out to the project when you have mortar
on your windows and the floors have been trashed.
THE ESTIMATING PROCESS
Estimating for general contracting relies on the subcontractors to
‘dissect’ their scope of work and advise of ‘definable features of work’
that otherwise have a chance of going undetected. The subcontrac-
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Detroit, Michigan
(248) 207-6944
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August 20-31 Interiors 6/27/08 3:19 PM Page 28
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 29 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
insured, and one that has in-place safety procedures and specializes in
all types of construction clean up. This company should take full “own-
ership” of the clean delivery of the project. Retain this company from
the start of the project. Include contract provisions for intermittent
inspection by the cleaning company at milestones throughout the
project, to call attention to site conditions that will affect their work, as
any other trade would. For example, before the HVAC trade begins
work, they are on-site assessing the work of the electrician, plumber
and carpenter. As a subcontractor, advising, informing and educating
the general contractor is a service that provides value for everyone.
Your cleaning contractor would then be able to tell you that it
would be better to clean the skylights prior to hanging the cable tray
that, when in place, would require scaffolding. These pre-work assess-
ments save the general and the subcontractor time and money!
BACK-CHARGES: DIRTY WORDS ON THE JOBSITE
When it comes to cleaning, your trades, if given the option to clean
up or leave it behind with no reprisals, will most likely do the latter.
Construction managers who don’t retain a grip on the clean-up rules
and procedures on a jobsite will ultimately lose control of jobsite
cleaning efforts.
Therefore, have your cleaning crew on-site to inspect a pile of
debris that no one will claim. Have them take pictures, itemize debris
categories and provide full documentation for your back-charge.
Having your cleaning crew policing this will enable the processing
and enforcement of your Notice to Cure and/or subsequent back-
charge. Note: Put this practice in place early and you may only have
mended, as they are the leaders of our industry.
On the other hand, firms that leave the competitive bidding, selec-
tion, work scope and contract to a late decision or to field supervisors,
often find the cleaning overlooked and let out at the end of the pro-
ject. The project’s end (fast track) schedule may dictate last minute
efforts utilizing non-prequalified subcontractors or in-house labor.
This may get the job done adequately, however this method is futile
in removing grease from concrete, asphalt from carpet or other tricky
jobsite problems.
CAMPUS MARTIUS PARK, AUBON PAIN BUILDING EXTERIOR
2005/DETROIT INSTITUTE OF ARTS, PROJECT SERVICES 2007
These projects are good examples of high profile and high pressure
finishes. Both projects were faced with the sensational task of a tele-
vised opening. The importance in these cases elevated things to levels
that would usually override any best-laid plans. The crews of
American Carpet Care and Janitorial Services were available for imme-
diate deployment to the sites, and they put forth their efforts to help
unveil the spectacular expansions and rebirth of these long awaited
projects. It was a daunting task. Amid the trades finishing their work,
there were stage and tent erectors, sound and light crews, artists, per-
formers, decorators and caterers. The mission of the company for both
projects was to eliminate any new construction residue, quickly and
efficiently. Their tasks varied from pressure washing, stainless steel and
window cleaning, polishing acres of marble, to vacuuming the red car-
pet on their way out.
A chosen cleaning company should be an established firm, fully
August 20-31 Interiors 6/27/08 3:19 PM Page 29
30 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
this declaration as depicted above, you will
have a clean and safer jobsite.
In order to combat unexpected costs for
clean-up efforts at the end of a project, fol-
low these eight important tips:
• Estimating methods should include
Cleaning as a Division. Compressively bid
construction clean up at bid time, includ-
ing floor treatments, concrete sealers, glass
and glazing, exterior building wash and
jobsite janitorial for larger projects.
• Qualify and contract cleaning at the start of
a project, and review all in-place processes
for clean-up and on-site maintenance.
• Require monthly inspections, as needed,
for feedback from the cleaning contractor.
• Utilize the cleaner for documentation and
motivation to the subcontractors to clean
up. Review all back-charge policies and
current implementation methods.
• Allow the cleaner to participate and aid in
coordinating punch list efforts. Final coor-
dination by the cleaner will deter extra
charges caused by callbacks that could
have been avoided.
• Practice dedication and diligence regard-
ing quality control guidelines and proce-
dures to protect work in place.
• As much as the schedule will allow, make
sure that the cleaner is the last trade on-
site prior to owner and architect walk-
through.
• Negotiate a final touch-up to be included
in the contract, and obtain fixed costs for
multiple touch-ups. However, if the previ-
ous seven tips are followed, the project
turnover should be running smoothly with
outstanding trades, and there should be no
need for multiple attempts to clean up
after punch list crews.
In conclusion, if you’ve ever experienced a
strained relationship with an owner or archi-
tect due to a project end’s execution of the
cleaning, process, or with significant hits to
your bottom line, then evaluate the following:
good cleaners consider cleaning an art. It is a
spectacular process to take something out of
the debris and make it shine like a new penny.
There is a satisfaction in doing a quality job
and making every trade’s work look good.
American Carpet Care and Janitorial
Services, based in Livonia, is owned and operat-
ed by Adam and Denise Dabbagh. Both have
backgrounds in construction and a lifetime of
experience delivering buildings from both the
general contracting end and the janitorial sides
of construction. Serving all of Southeast
Michigan and Ohio, the company’s website is:
www.americancarpetcare.us
• Merely speaking of back-charges, verbal
only notification, or failing to follow
through, will only breed uncontrolled con-
tract breaches, fighting about trash and a
mess of a jobsite.
• Declare cleanliness and safety on your job-
site. Sometimes it’s tough, but if you make
to do it once. When the proper rules are in
place, posted at the site, included in subcon-
tracts, and implemented daily, jobsite harmo-
ny and sub cooperation will be maintained.
With regard to back-charges, the general
contractors (even trades to third-tier subs)
should be proactive by doing the following:
I N T E R I O R S / F I N I S H E S I N T E R I O R S / F I N I S H E S
August 20-31 Interiors 7/2/08 10:31 AM Page 30
August 20-31 Interiors 6/27/08 3:19 PM Page 31
WILL THE NEW AIA GENERAL
CONDITIONS REMAIN THE
FLAGSHIP OF THE INDUSTRY?
32 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
A201-2007 and the counterpart ConsensusDOCS 200 take simi-
lar approaches in the areas where the A201 has been changed,
there are differences which are notable.
DISPUTE RESOLUTION
For the first time in 120 years, the A201-2007 does not require
binding arbitration as the default dispute resolution process.
Instead, the A101-207 cover agreement now requires that the
parties check a box to select arbitration or litigation or fill in a
blank for a custom dispute resolution process. Importantly, the
document provides for litigation if the parties do not make a
selection. Interestingly, the ConsensusDOCS 200 also provides
for a choice of process, although does not specify which will
apply in the event a choice is not made, which will likely result
in litigation being the legal default in most states. Both docu-
ments require mediation as a precondition to binding dispute
resolution whether litigation or arbitration.
The choice of dispute resolution method is a recognition that
a growing number of parties prefer litigation in complex cases
where arbitration can be just as costly or more than litigation,
particularly given the fact that the American Arbitration
Association (AAA) rules typically require 3 arbitrators in cases
where the amount in dispute exceeds $1,000,000. Indeed, most
large and complex cases before the AAA now involve consider-
able motion practice and discovery which is nearly identical to,
or more involved than, litigation given discovery limitations in
many federal courts. Additionally, while it may take longer to
T
he American Institute of Architects (AIA) has published
contract documents since 1888 and generally modifies
its documents every ten years. The AIAgenerally solic-
its comments on existing versions of its documents
from owner, engineer, attorney and contractor groups, and then
proposes changes to those groups and engages in some direct
negotiations with various group representatives after which its
Documents Committee approves the final document changes
for publication. The A201-2007 was approved for publication in
the last quarter of 2007 and will replace the A201-1997 in May
2008. While many of the changes are of little consequence and
thus are not discussed here, the major changes in the A201-2007
deal with dispute resolution choices and procedures, the archi-
tect’s role in making initial decisions on disputes, access to
financial information, the commencement of statutes of limita-
tion, and insurance requirements.
Perhaps more notable than the changes in the document is
that for the first time in many years, the Associated General
Contractors of America (AGC) has declined to endorse the use
of AIA contract documents. Instead, the AGC has endorsed a
rival family of contract documents published by the newly cre-
ated ConsensusDOCS, LLC. The AGC and 20 other endorsing
groups claim that the process used to generate the
ConsensusDOCS contract documents, which are based on the
AGC contract documents, is more open and collaborative and
thus produces documents which more accurately reflect the
interests of all of the participants in the industry. While the new
C O N S T R U C T I O N L A W C O N S T R U C T I O N L A W
WILL THE NEW AIA GENERAL
CONDITIONS REMAIN THE
FLAGSHIP OF THE INDUSTRY?
For the first time in 120 years,
the A201-2007 does not require
binding arbitration as the default
dispute resolution process. By Mark L. McAlpine
August 32-37 Law 6/27/08 3:23 PM Page 32

CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 33 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
get large construction cases to trial, once
the trial starts it generally proceeds to
completion while arbitrations tend to be
segmented due to arbitrator/party avail-
ability which leads to still higher costs.
Where the parties choose arbitration,
the A201-2007 now allows consolidation
of arbitrations where the agreement
underlying the other arbitration does not
preclude joinder and the cases involve
common issues of law or fact provided
the procedures are materially similar. By
comparison, ConsensusDOCS 200
requires the joinder of all parties neces-
sary to fully resolve a dispute into the
same proceeding. In any case, the need to
choose between litigation and arbitration
will require a discussion between the par-
ties which may in certain cases lead to
hybrid procedures which address the dis-
advantages of either process.
The role of the architect as the initial
decision maker (IDM) on claims is also
potentially changed. Section 6 of the
A101-2007 allows the parties to select an
IDM other than the architect. This is in
response to concerns of contractors that
the architect’s duty of loyalty to the
owner, its receipt of payment from the
owner and its own interests in disputes
involving the design issues make the
architect a poor choice to review disputes.
While the architect will still be involved
in responding to a notice of differing site
conditions, the IDM would be involved if
either the owner or contractor dispute the
architect’s determination. Obviously it
will not be feasible to use an independent
IDM in smaller projects and the parties
may be well advised to use a dispute
review board on larger projects with a
greater ability to make some binding
decisions. ConsensusDOCS 200 does not
have an IDM provision; rather, it requires
a series of direct negotiations which ele-
vate to more senior decision makers
before the parties proceed to mediation.
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES WAIVER
The AIAadded a mutual waiver of con-
sequential damages in the A201-1997, and
while the provision has been much debat-
ed, the A201-2007 retains the provision.
While AIA recognized that owner groups
claim that the provision has a dispropor-
tional impact on them, it left the clause in
the document because it wanted to avoid
large uninsurable claims. While
ConsensusDOCS 200 also provides a
mutual waiver of consequential damages,
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August 32-37 Law 6/27/08 3:23 PM Page 33
34 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
it provides a space where specific types of
consequential damages - for instance, lost
rents - can be claimed. The retention of
the consequential damages waiver in the
A201-2007 ensures that the clause will
continue to be one of the most modified
clauses in the document where more
often than not the clause will be deleted.
ACCESS TO FINANCIAL INFORMATION
The A201-1997 gave the contractor the
right to request evidence of the owner’s
ability to fund the project before and dur-
ing the performance of the work. The
1997 version was changed from the 1987
version which had been viewed as only
allowing a demand for financial assur-
ances at the start of the project.
Apparently concerned that the pendulum
had swung too far in favor of the contrac-
tor, and indeed abuses have been known
to occur, the A201-2007 now limits the
contractor’s ability to demand subse-
quent financial assurances to situations
where (1) the owner has failed to pay in
accordance with the contract documents;
(2) there has been a material change to the
contract sum as a result of change orders;
or (3) the contractor has a reasonable con-
cern as to the owner’s ability to pay. Each
of these opportunities is problematic. For
instance, the contract documents provide
for a number of situations where the
owner is entitled to withhold payment,
and what is a material change or what
constitutes reasonable concerns are some-
what subjective so as to leave both parties
to wonder as to their rights and obliga-
tions. By contrast, the ConsensusDOCS
200 allows the contractor the right to seek
additional financial assurances during
the project in much the same way as the
now superseded A201-1997. What is clear
is that it will be more difficult for the con-
tractor under the A201-2007 to receive
evidence of financial ability on the part of
the owner once the work has commenced
such that this is an area where the con-
tractor may wish to seek modifications to
clarify its rights to that information.
New language in Article 9 of the A201-
2007 allows the owner to request evi-
dence that subcontractors and suppliers
have been properly paid and, failing
receipt of that information within seven
days of the request, the owner can contact
the subcontractors and suppliers directly.
If a subcontractor or supplier has not
been properly paid, the owner may, at its
option, issue joint checks to the contactor
C O N S T R U C T I O N L A W C O N S T R U C T I O N L A W
August 32-37 Law 6/27/08 3:23 PM Page 34
August 32-37 Law 6/27/08 3:23 PM Page 35
36 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008
C O N S T R U C T I O N L A W C O N S T R U C T I O N L A W
“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
and the involved subcontractor or suppli-
er for work properly performed or mate-
rials or equipment properly provided.
Owners will want to reinforce language
in Article 1 of the A201-2007 to ensure
that subcontractors and suppliers cannot
enforce these provisions as third party
beneficiaries, and to limit the owner’s
obligation to continue issuing joint checks
once an initial joint check has been issued.
All parties should also be aware that
under the Construction Lien Act, an
owner of private projects may make
direct payments to a subcontractor or
supplier who has not been paid pursuant
to the contractor’s last sworn statement
after giving 5 business days notice to the
contractor. Obviously this and the joint
check option under the new A201 must be
exercised carefully.
STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS
The A201-1997 specified the events
which would cause the statute of limita-
tions on the commencement of an action
to begin to run such as the date of sub-
stantial completion, final completion and
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CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 37 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
past. Although it could be argued that
the 2007 changes, insofar as they adopt
approaches used in ConsensusDOCS doc-
uments, represent an attempt to head off
any real competition and as such give the
members of ConsensusDOCS indirect
influence on the AIA documents.
standard practices which will be modified
by the parties for the particular risks asso-
ciated with their project. The AGC’s
refusal to endorse the AIA’s contract doc-
uments will likely mean that contractors
generally will have less influence in
future changes given that the AIA had
valued the AGC’s endorsement in the
date of warranty work. The effect of the
contractual commencement dates was to
avoid the application of a “discovery
rule” used in many states to determine
the date upon which a statute of limita-
tion begins to run. The application of the
discovery rule starts the statute of limita-
tion to run upon the discovery of the
cause of action rather than upon a date
tied to a contractual event such as sub-
stantial completion. The A201-2007 now
provides that causes of action must be
commenced within the period specified
by the law of the state where the project is
located but in no event later than 10 years
after the date of substantial completion.
These changes address owner concerns
that they are unfairly treated if a state
applies the discovery rule regardless of
the contract language and the concerns of
contractors and architects about being
exposed indefinitely to liability in the
absence of the new contractual 10 year
statute of repose. ConsensusDOCS 200
does not provide time limits on causes of
action thus leaving the issue to state law.
INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS
The 1997 version of the A201 intro-
duced a new type of insurance called
Project Management Protective Liability
Insurance (PMPLI) which was supposed
to bring all of the project participants
under a PMPLI policy. The A201-2007
drops the single policy concept in favor of
requiring the contractor to name the
owner and architect as additional
insureds under its commercial general lia-
bility policy and name the owner as an
additional insured under the contractor’s
completed operations coverage. In mak-
ing this change, the AIA recognized that
the PMPLI policies were simply not being
used and that the additional insureds
approach more accurately reflects the
actual practices of the industry.
CONCLUSION
There is little doubt that the A201-2007
will remain the leading standard contract
document for the foreseeable future given
that architects and owners typically select
the basic contract documents. However,
the industry now has a choice in
ConsensusDOCS 200 even though the
documents are fairly similar overall. The
AIA’s 2007 changes for the most part rep-
resent changes in the industry in keeping
with the tradition of establishing a base-
line document which attempts to reflect
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Wysocki and Berg, P.C.
Construction Law Specialists
Solving corporate and litigation problems
for the construction industry
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Buchanan
400 East Front Street, Suite G
Buchanan, Michigan 49107
Telephone: (269) 697-4863
Facsimile: (269) 697-4867
August 32-37 Law 6/27/08 3:23 PM Page 37
PLACING COMPLEX
SYSTEMS IN
SMALL SPACES
38 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
C O N S T R U C T I O N H I G H L I G H T
PLACING COMPLEX
SYSTEMS IN
SMALL SPACES
By Mary E. Kremposky, Associate Editor
T
he smallest particles met the largest machines at the job-
site of the University of Michigan’s Lurie Nanofabrication
Facility (LNF). Nanofabrication research – working with
the smallest of particles to create products with extraordinary
capacities – is part of the work within the walls of a new clean-
room addition built adjacent to the original Michigan
Nanofabrication Facility (MNF) and its fully operational clean-
room. Skanska USA Building Inc., Southfield, employed its full
arsenal of construction equipment and its skilled project man-
agement team to deliver an extraordinary facility that will seal
the facility’s position as one of the best academic labs in this
region of the country. The expertise of SmithGroup Inc., Detroit,
designed this high-tech incubator and its complex labyrinth of
mechanical and electrical support systems.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SMITHGROUP, INC.
August 38-47 Highlight 7/3/08 3:09 PM Page 38

CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 39 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
A SCIENTIFIC SHOWCASE
Opened in December 2007, the building’s
brick patterning is a clue to the cutting-edge
research now underway within the masonry
walls of this rectangular addition. “The brick
work emulates an abstract composition of
integrated circuits, expressing the work tak-
ing place inside through the brick outside,”
said George P. Karidis, PE, LEED AP,
SmithGroup vice president and director of
mechanical engineering and lead mechani-
cal designer. Karidis’ professional experience
emphasizes high-technology facilities serv-
ing a broad range of corporate, university,
and government clients. His experience
includes work on BorgWarner’s China
Technical Center in Zizhu, China, the CIA
headquarters expansion in Langley, Virginia,
and the Auburn Hills world headquarters of
Chrysler LLC, formerly DaimlerChrysler
Corporation.
A Tour Aisle showcases the state-of-the-art
research within the facility via a continuous
glass exterior wall without mullions or
columns and a sleek, silver canopy of com-
posite metal spanning the building’s entire
north face. The Tour Aisle gives visitors, stu-
dents, and the merely curious a glimpse into
this unfamiliar world where researchers work
intently on unlocking the powers of emerg-
ing technologies.
Dennis Schweiger, LNF facilities manager,
summarizes the capabilities of this cutting-
edge facility: “The LNF is operated by the
College of Engineering to support research
on the theory, design and fabrication of elec-
tronic, optoelectronic and MEMS-based
devices, custom integrated circuits, and
microsystems, as well as on novel characteri-
zation and metrology techniques. Research is
also underway on organic and polymer-
based devices for use in organic/molecular
electronics and displays, as well as on
nanofabrication and materials for use in nan-
otechnology.” While the terminology may
seem alien, the results are very much of this
world. “Applications include healthcare, envi-
ronment, national security, energy and quan-
tum-effect based technologies,” added
Schweiger.
The building’s infrastructure was as com-
plex and as carefully calibrated and planned
as the research facility, itself. An extensive
network of systems services the new 7,600-
square-foot cleanroom embedded in the
core of this 37,000-square-foot addition.
“Approximately 1,100 tons of refrigeration
and four on-site boilers support the clean-
room,” said Karidis. “We can provide 65,000
cfm of makeup air for the new cleanroom
and 31,000 cfm of supplemental makeup air
for the original cleanroom. There is a great
deal of capacity and controls for such a small
area.”
The infrastructure weaves and coils tightly
through the three-story building. “In some
instances, there is literally only half-of-an-
inch between piping systems,” said Shawn
Champion, Skanska superintendent. “More
than anybody, three firms made this job
work: Shaw Electric, Ann Arbor; Boone & Darr,
Inc., Ann Arbor, mechanical contractor; and
their sheet metal sub, Dee Cramer, Inc., Holly.
They all did a phenomenal job. The job went
smoothly because these three companies
did such great CAD work.”
DESIGNING ON A NANOSCALE
Karidis compares fitting these extensive
systems into a small addition with the sci-
ence of nanofabrication, itself. “It is a bit of a
puzzle to fit everything in that tight space,”
The raised floor in each cleanroom bay is fully grounded to the structural steel
and features static-dissipative vinyl floor tiles. This strategy protects research
efforts conducted with electrically sensitive tools and materials on a micrometer
(1 millionth of a meter) and nanometer (1 billionth of a meter) level.
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40 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
said Karidis. “In one sense, it is analogous to nanofabrication in which
one is carefully designing at the nanoscale to use every square mil-
limeter of product to its best advantage. Likewise, we optimized the
physical space available to us.
Karidis describes the interior arrangement as a three-layer clean-
room with a penthouse: The actual cleanroom occupies the main
level and is configured as a series of bays and chases, a subfabrication
level below distributes utilities and houses sophisticated support
equipment, and an interstitial space directly above the cleanroom
houses the air handling units responsible for recirculating and filter-
ing the cleanroom air. “Having support space below offers greater
flexibility in adapting new equipment, tools and technologies to the
cleanroom,” adds Karidis.
Completing the assemblage of support spaces, a four-layered com-
panion “stack” on the south side of the main building contains the
electrical substation, cleanroom service access, low temperature
chillers and boilers. Not classified as part of the cleanroom support
system, the penthouse or fourth level contains the make-up air-han-
dling units.
Planning and early design for this elaborate facility consumed
three years and continued after construction commenced. “The proj-
ect involved an unprecedented level of coordination and decision
making between the University, SmithGroup and specialty consult-
ants,” said Karidis. Additional programming elements included high-
ly specialized labs in the original building and conversion to a com-
bined and redundant exhaust system for both new and original
areas. “If we had not been engaged in such robust planning, we
would not have been able to make the significant sea change from
individual exhaust systems in the original cleanroom to a more reli-
able combined exhaust system in a timely manner,” said Karidis.
WORKING AT THE MICRO AND MACROSCOPIC LEVELS
Skanska worked closely with the University throughout construc-
tion to maintain operations in the existing cleanroom. Sensitive
instrumentation and meticulous research in the existing MNF was
only a wall away from an active construction site. “Equipment in this
facility is sensitive to even the slightest vibrations,” said Champion.
“Even everyday traffic along nearby Beal Avenue can be detected by
their instruments or tools.”
Construction tools are of a greater order of magnitude. The proj-
C O N S T R U C T I O N H I G H L I G H T
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An extensive system of aluminum composite metal panels form part
of the Tour Aisle. The metal panels and glass wall without mullions
together lend a precision, high-tech sheen to this cutting-edge
research facility.
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August 38-47 Highlight 6/27/08 3:28 PM Page 40
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42 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
ect team had to find a meeting ground
between researchers working with delicate
circuitry and contractors commandeering
the usual flotilla of heavy equipment in a
construction zone. “When we were compact-
ing the ground during site utility installation,
every time we used a vibratory roller we con-
sulted with the research staff in the existing
building to prevent damage to research
operations or multi-million dollar tools and
equipment,” said Champion.
Protecting the existing cleanroom from
vibration even led to the selection of an
auger cast pile system. With a full basement
and placement close to pedestrian and vehi-
cle routes, the new addition required an earth
retention system. “Because ground vibration
was a major concern, we used the least dis-
ruptive or vibration-producing method of
shoring soils,” said Champion. “We installed
auger cast piles, which involve drilling into
the ground and pumping concrete as
opposed to pounding in H piles, sheet piles or
another driven-type retention system.”
Tangent (adjacent) piles and secant (over-
lapping) piles with numerous tie-backs
C O N S T R U C T I O N H I G H L I G H T
The intricate labyrinth of mechanical systems includes high-pressure clean steam on the third
level.
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CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 43 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
offered another layer of protection. Both
form an almost seamless line of defense
against potential soil or water leaks between
piles. Mother Nature added her own mix of
obstacles. Drilling 25 feet to 30 feet below
grade, Skanska encountered unexpected
cobble and boulder fields in the soil, plus an
old, abandoned sewer line. “These condi-
tions would slow progress and wear down
drill bits,” said Champion. “It was just a mat-
ter of perseverance.”
BUILDING A CONCRETE WAFFLE
The sub-fabrication level is formed of cast-
in-place concrete floor slabs, walls and
columns. The sub-fab also houses three pits:
a round stormwater pit excavated 15 feet
below the sub-fab, a 3-foot-deep pit excavat-
ed at the south end to contain a 7,000-gallon
acid-waste neutralization system, and a 4-
foot-deep pit for three new acid-exhaust
scrubbers.“As a coordination and safety issue,
the pits had to be continuously barricaded for
much of the project,” said Champion.
The sub-fab columns support the clean-
room’s waffle slab, a monolithically poured
slab composed of approximately 800 individ-
ual compartments. Champion explains how
to make a waffle: “We scaffolded the entire
area to create a flat plywood floor, placed pre-
formed fiberglass domes in a grid pattern to
give shape to the waffle’s individual compart-
ments, filled the spaces between the domes
with rebar, and then poured the concrete.
The fiberglass molds were removed with
compressed air afterwards. Basically, we had
to create an entire false first floor out of scaf-
folding and plywood to form the concrete
slab.”
Half of the waffle compartments have a
central, 14-inch opening used to connect the
cleanroom’s diverse services, including
process exhaust, reverse osmosis and deion-
ized water systems, and high purity gaseous
nitrogen for drying silicon wafers. “Safety was
carefully managed, because there were sever-
al hundred of these openings in the floor,”
said Champion. “We had to have lifts and
equipment all over this slab for the duration
of the project. A structural engineer designed
an inch-thick plywood shield to cover the
whole floor and prevent accidents.” Spence
Brothers performed all the concrete work,
including the waffle slab, poured founda-
tions, and flat work.
A COMPOSITION IN STEEL AND GLASS
A standard structural steel frame forms
most of the building. The Tour Aisle, however,
presented its share of design and construc-
tion challenges. Champion explains construc-
tion of the aisle’s custom steel frame: “At the
western half of the Tour Aisle, custom-fabri-
cated beams are configured in a 90 degree
angle resembling two steps. The beams are
welded to the existing steel columns of the
adjacent Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science building housing the MNF.
The beams are supported at mid-span by a
line of new steel columns before cantilever-
ing over the Tour Aisle.
The same line of new steel columns is the
starting point for the steel beams of the Tour
Aisle’s eastern half and for a series of diagonal
tube steel braces. The braces reach down and
across on a diagonal, holding the can-
tilevered steel beams in place like a strong
steel arm. “The weight of the masonry wall
August 38-47 Highlight 6/27/08 3:29 PM Page 43
44 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
above the glass rests on the cantilevered
beams held by the tube steel braces,” added
Champion.
An intricate shoring system was construct-
ed in the aisle’s east end. “The beams had to
be laid in place first, but without the tube
steel to hold them up, we had to support the
beams with an elaborate two-story-high
shoring system supported from the subfab
floor slab,” said Champion. “Removal was
allowed only when all the connections had
been fully bolted. All tube braces were weld-
ed using full penetration welds. This com-
plex construction, with its network of
shoring, columns, beams and braces was
quite a sight to behold.”
GHOST TOOLS
Complex construction continued in the
interior of this singular facility. The clean-
room’s raised floor is fully grounded to the
structural steel to dissipate static electricity
and prevent damage to the electrically sensi-
tive tools. “In addition, the flooring is static
dissipative tile, a flooring capable of transfer-
ring the discharge of static electricity from a
person’s body and grounding it through the
whole system,” said Champion.
Purifying the air in this sensitive clean-
room is achieved via installation of approxi-
mately 18 recirculation air handling units
and 18 plenum modules, both hoisted,
attached and suspended from the third-floor
structural steel. Together, plenum modules
and air handlers form a type of second floor
above the clean room. “The team successful-
ly and safely worked around these temporar-
ily suspended systems before permanent
attachment with structural steel rods,” said
Champion.
The end result of years of planning, design
and construction is one of the most stellar
academic laboratories in the region. “The
LNF offers complete capabilities for the fabri-
cation of solid-state materials, devices, and
circuits using both silicon, compound semi-
conductors, and organic materials, which is
quite unique,” said Schweiger. “In addition,
because of the support of the National
Science Foundation through the National
Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, the
LNF provides direct staff support to its users.”
The future has already been planned with-
in this forward-thinking facility. “As with any
University project, a great deal of planning
had to be done to guarantee the new facili-
C O N S T R U C T I O N H I G H L I G H T
STRENGTH
Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Patton, P.C.
1000 Maccabees Center•25800 Northwestern Hwy. Post Office Box 222•Southfield, Michigan 48037-0222
248.746.0700•Fax 248.746.2760
E-mail: kgleeson@swappc.com • www.swappc.com
Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Patton, P.C.
1000 Maccabees Center•25800 Northwestern Hwy. Post Office Box 222•Southfield, Michigan 48037-0222
248.746.0700•Fax 248.746.2760
E-mail: kgleeson@swappc.com • www.swappc.com
Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Patton, P.C.
1000 Maccabees Center•25800 Northwestern Hwy. Post Office Box 222•Southfield, Michigan 48037-0222
248.746.0700•Fax 248.746.2760
E-mail: kgleeson@swappc.com • www.swappc.com
Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Patton, P.C.
1000 Maccabees Center•25800 Northwestern Hwy. Post Office Box 222•Southfield, Michigan 48037-0222
248.746.0700•Fax 248.746.2760
E-mail: kgleeson@swappc.com • www.swappc.com
Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Patton, P.C.
1000 Maccabees Center•25800 Northwestern Hwy. Post Office Box 222•Southfield, Michigan 48037-0222
248.746.0700•Fax 248.746.2760
E-mail: kgleeson@swappc.com • www.swappc.com
Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Patton, P.C.
1000 Maccabees Center•25800 Northwestern Hwy. Post Office Box 222•Southfield, Michigan 48037-0222
248.746.0700•Fax 248.746.2760
E-mail: kgleeson@swappc.com • www.swappc.com
Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Patton, P.C.
1000 Maccabees Center•25800 Northwestern Hwy. Post Office Box 222•Southfield, Michigan 48037-0222
248.746.0700•Fax 248.746.2760
E-mail: kgleeson@swappc.com • www.swappc.com
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The six Strobic fans combine to draw a total
volume of air of more than 150,000 cfm
from the two buildings.
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August 38-47 Highlight 6/27/08 3:29 PM Page 44
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August 38-47 Highlight 6/27/08 3:29 PM Page 45
46 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
ty’s adaptability for future generations of research pro-
grams,” said Schweiger. “The entire facility is designed and
built around a “ghost tool” set that provided the necessary
guide points for power, water, air and electrical manage-
ment.”
The complex systems supporting this acclaimed clean-
room are the product of the well-planned and coordinated
efforts of the University of Michigan, SmithGroup and
Skanska. A broad spectrum of researchers now have access
to this state-of-the-art laboratory, and the general public has
access to the advancements in healthcare and technologies
emerging from this academic research and development
laboratory in southeastern Michigan’s own backyard.
THE FOLLOWING SUBCONTRACTORS CONTRIBUTED TO
THE PROJECT:
• Metal Studs, Drywall, Acoustic, EIFS – Ann Arbor Ceiling &
Partition, Ypsilanti
• Rough & Finish Carpentry – FBK Associates, Rochester
Hills
• Painting & Intumescent Fireproofing – Cavalier Painting,
Sterling Heights
• Cleanroom Partitions, Access Flooring, Plenum Grid,
Cleanroom Protocol & Cleaning - Performance
Contracting, Carmel, IN
• Resilient Flooring & Carpeting – Shock Brothers, Roseville
• Epoxy Floor Coatings – A & S Industrial Coating, Warren
• Fire Protection, Demolition of Fire Protection – John E.
Green Co., Highland Park
• Building Temp. & Process Controls – Siemens Building
Technologies, Inc., Livonia
• Electrical – Shaw Electric, Ann Arbor
• Masonry Mock-Up Panels – Giannola Masonry Co., Clinton
Township
• Site Work, Mass Excavation – Eagle Excavation, Flint
• Temporary Fencing – Reliable Fence, Clinton Township
• Site Utilities – Tri-County Electric, Saline
• Nitrogen Tank Relocation, Process Piping, Plumbing &
HVAC – Boone & Darr, Inc., Ann Arbor
• Gown Room Demo – Blue Star, Inc., Warren
• Structural Steel, Metal Deck, Misc. Iron – Douglas Steel
Fabricating Corp., Lansing
• Hydraulic Elevator – Kone, Livonia
• Spray-On Fire Proofing – DennCo Construction, Shelby
Township
• Earth Retention & Waterproofing – Davis Specialty
Contracting, Milford
• Concrete Foundations & Flatwork, Site Grading, Paving
and Concrete – Spence Brothers, Ann Arbor
• Masonry – Leidal & Hart Mason Contractors, Inc., Livonia
• Aluminum Curtain Wall, Doors, Canopy & Louvers –
American Glass & Metals, Plymouth
• Roofing – CEI Roofing, Howell
• Overhead Doors, Loading Dock Equip., Furnish Doors –
Detroit Door & Hardware, Madison Heights
• Clean-Up – DLS Service, Ypsilanti
• Halon Fire Protection Relocation – Healey Fire Protection,
Orion
The general contractor, architect or owner identifies the sub-
contractors listed in the Construction Highlight.
C O N S T R U C T I O N H I G H L I G H T
LNF’s Quintessential Clean Room
Engineering proper airflow, managing exhaust and
maintaining a constant relative humidity of 42.5 percent
were key objectives for the Lurie Nanofabrication
Facility’s building infrastructure.
CLEAN AIR
• “The air flows in a laminar, straight down direction,”
said George P. Karidis, PE, LEED AP, SmithGroup vice
president and director of mechanical engineering
and lead mechanical designer. “Basically, the air
passes through a full array of air handling units,
plenum modules and HEPA filters at the ceiling plane
and is returned through the raised floor grating sys-
tem and then back up through the service chases
between the clean bays. The idea is to drive all parti-
cles generated in the cleanroom down and out of
the space as directly as possible.”
• The project expanded the original lab’s Submicron
Room, a cleanroom space with a Class 10 designa-
tion – the highest level of cleanliness, with no more
than 10 particles larger than 0.5 micron per cubic
foot of air. The new cleanroom bays carry a Class 100
ranking; the general aisle linking the bays has a Class
1,000 designation.
MANAGING EXHAUST
• The project provides a new combined exhaust sys-
tem with six high-dispersion induction exhaust fans
servicing both cleanrooms. “Wet scrubber systems
neutralize acid exhaust from research processes,”
said Karidis.“The solvent exhaust and the general
exhaust are not scrubbed, but ultimately all the
exhaust is handled by one combinedmanifold
exhaust system.”
• The exhaust system weighs 50,000 lbs., including the
six vertical, in-line fans on top of one plenum box.
“We actually had to design a truss system to support
the new exhaust system above the original clean-
room roof,” said Karidis.“The original cleanroom did
not have interior columns, so the trusses had to span
the full width of that building.”
MAINTAINING RELATIVE HUMIDITY
• “To control the relative humidity, the mechanical sys-
tem engages both normal and low-temperature
cooling coils in the summer and clean steam humidi-
fiers in the winter,” said Karidis. “The North Campus
chilled water plant provides the bulk of the cooling,
but we have a supplemental low temperature chiller
system to meet the facility’s 68 degrees F tempera-
ture and 42.5 percent relative humidity design con-
ditions. Either temperature or humidity changes can
effect the research work.”
August 38-47 Highlight 6/27/08 3:29 PM Page 46
August 38-47 Highlight 6/27/08 3:29 PM Page 47
48 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
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These “Collar keys” come programmed
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The Plexidor Electronic Door itself is
sturdy, rust-proof, energy efficient and
does not blow open. The product is made
with aluminum framing and high impact
ABS panels, the same material used for
football helmets. A safety mechanism pre-
vents the door from closing while
obstructed, preventing pinched tails, paws
or fingers.
The Plexidor Electronic Pet Door comes
in bronze and white, and in various sizes
to match all pets. The product line ranges
in prices from $129 to $800, depending on
size and model. They can be purchased
direct or through dealers, and are also
available at www.dogdoors.com, or by
calling 800-749-9609. Installers are posi-
tioned all over the United States and
Canada.
Firestone Industrial Products
Offers Ride-Rite™ Air Helper
Springs for Isuzu® N-Series
Cab Forward Trucks
Firestone Industrial Products Company,
LLC has announced its Ride-Rite air
helper springs are now available for 2005-
2008 Isuzu N-Series cab forward trucks,
both Regular Cab and Crew Cab.
The Isuzu cab forward Ride-Rite kit
maximizes the truck’s load support to
improve its ride quality and stability by
using air pressure to adjust Firestone’s air
helper springs.
Isuzu N-Series cab-forward trucks -
which are used in various industries such
as electrical contracting, food service,
landscaping and delivery services - often
carry heavy loads that weigh down the
truck. Firestone’s Ride-Rite kit provides
extra support to safely and comfortably
haul heavy loads.
In addition to smoothing the ride,
Firestone’s Ride-Rite systems help main-
tain braking effectiveness, reduce tire
wear, level off-center loads - individual
inflation valves allow for separate side-to-
side adjustment - and increase vehicle sta-
bility.
A pair of Ride-Rite air springs provides
up to 5,000 pounds of load leveling capac-
ity. (Note: Air springs do not increase the
load-carrying capacity of the vehicle. Do
not exceed the vehicle’s recommended
Gross Vehicle Weight Rating [GVWR]).
Firestone’s Isuzu Ride-Rite kit (part
#2440) includes everything needed for an
easy installation that typically takes
between one and two hours and comes
with a two-year limited warranty. The
system’s reinforced double convoluted air
springs install between the frame and the
axle.
The Air-Rite™ air accessory system,
which enables drivers to make air pressure
adjustments with a push of a button
installed on the dashboard, is also avail-
able to complement the Isuzu Ride-Rite
kit.
Trained technicians are available toll-
free (800.888.0650) to answer any product
application, installation, or warranty ques-
tions, Monday through Friday from 7:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. EST.
For more information, visit
www.ride-rite.com.
E-Z Drill Offers All-Steel Trailer
with Tank for Spraying
Concrete Cures
Known for its lines of concrete drilling
and doweling equipment, E-Z Drill offers
a Cure Sprayer Trailer. Constructed
entirely of heavy-duty steel, the unit
offers a durable, simple way to cure con-
crete while preventing shrinkage and
cracking.
The unit operates with a 5-horsepower
Honda engine and a Roper pump. The
self-loading design pumps cure directly
from a barrel to the machine’s 100-gallon
tank within about 15 minutes. The Cure
Sprayer Trailer handles a variety of con-
crete cures, making it easily adaptable to
varying temperatures and moisture levels.
The highway-rated trailer features fork
tubes and a 2,000-pound rated axle. The
40-foot-long half-inch sprayer hose has an
adjustable nozzle to control the amount
and distance of the cure spray for consis-
tent coverage on varying slab sizes.
For more information E-Z Drill con-
crete drilling and doweling equipment,
contact E-Z Drill, P.O. Box 517, 4615 W.
Lakeview, Stillwater, OK 74076; call 800-
272-0121 or fax 405-372-1429; e-mail
sales@ezdrill.com; or visit the website,
www.ezdrill.com.
P R O D U C T S H O W C A S E
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:50 PM Page 48
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 49 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Lincoln Electric Re-engineers Popular
Excalibur® Stick Electrode
The Lincoln Electric Company has re-engineered its popular
Excalibur® 7018 stick electrode, part of the company’s premium
line of low hydrogen stick electrodes. The flux coating on the
7018 now allows for easier striking and re-striking with a more
stable arc and exceptional slag control, which is especially ben-
eficial for out-of-position welding.
Lincoln Electric’s Excalibur stick electrode line offers several
desirable features. It provides a clean weld, consistent starting,
quick puddle creation and no starting porosity. The unique slag
system results in great puddle control and clarity. Coating burn-
off is uniform and ideal for jobs requiring steep rod angles on
out-of-position welds. Excellent tie-in prevents undercutting,
which reduces grinding and slag inclusions for high quality
welds.
Typical applications of this product include structural steel,
bridges and pipe, as well as fittings and tie-ins in the petro-
chemical and power generation industries. Excalibur stick elec-
trode allows all-position welding of mild steels and some high
strength, low alloy steels. It also tolerates steels with poor weld-
ability, such as high sulfur and high silicon steels.
All Excalibur products are manufactured to ISO 9001 and
14001 certification. Excalibur also conforms to AWS, ASME,
ABS, Lloyds, DNV, BV, GL and CSA specifications.
For more information on the Excalibur line – which is now
available at welding supply stores – or a copy of Lincoln
Electric’s new Excalibur new catalog,
call (888) 355-3213 or visit www.lincolnelectric.com to obtain
Bulletin C2.10.
New Howard Leight® Accessories Improve
Earmuff Convenience and Comfort
Howard Leight has introduced two new accessories for its
broad line of earmuffs: a Polar Hood, specifically designed to be
worn with earmuffs, which ensures optimal attenuation for
CALL
DIG
BEFORE YOU
ALWAYS
One free, easy call gets your utility lines
marked AND helps protect you from
injury and expense.
Safe Digging Is No Accident:
Always Call 811 Before You Dig
Visit missdig.org or call811.com for
additional information.
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:50 PM Page 49
50 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
workers exposed to cold climates who also require hearing pro-
tection; and the Slim Belt Clip designed to provide handy storage
when earmuffs are not in use.
Compatible with all Howard Leight® earmuffs, the balaclava-
style Polar Hood provides protection in cold climates while
ensuring optimal earmuff attenuation. Patented side panels elim-
inate any gaps between the earcup and ear, forming a tight
acoustic seal around the ears—without distorting sound or atten-
uation. Its weatherproof design provides warmth and protection;
making it well-suited for construction workers, oil/gas/petro-
chemical, food production and other workers exposed to cold
weather conditions. Aseal around the face prevents further expo-
sure, and the adjustable design includes a front zipper for venti-
lation and a foldaway visor. Bright green trim enhances visibility
and safety outdoors. The Polar Hood is available in two sizes,
small/medium and large/extra large.
The Slim Belt Clip is easy to attach to a belt or pants pocket. It
has a low profile so it is not in the way when not in use, and is
very lightweight. Earmuff headbands simply slip onto the under-
side of the clip and remain readily accessible when entering or
experiencing hazardous noise.
For additional product information, contact Sperian Hearing
Protection, LLC, 7828 Waterville Road, San Diego,
CA 92154; telephone: 800/430-5490; fax: 401/232-3110;
email: rbessette@SperianProtection.com; or website:
http://www.howardleight.com.
Iron-A-Way’s Built-in Ironing Centers At CSH
Save Space While Maintaining Aesthetic Appeal
Custom Service Hardware
now stocks IRON-A-WAY
Ironing Centers that save
space while maintaining aes-
thetic appeal and providing
peace of mind with their inno-
vative design and features.
All come with a birch door,
can be inset or surface mount-
ed, are hinged on the right
hand side (left hand hinge can
be special ordered), and have
outer dimensions of 15” W x
47-7/8” H x 7-7/8” D.
IRON-A-WAY model
IW.A-42 (see photo) is an
electric built-in ironing cen-
ter with an industry standard
42-inch long ironing board that folds back into the wall. The
ironing board swivels 90 degrees left and right for more versa-
tility and this model offers four inches of height adjustment
with auto return to normal position when the board is folded
back into the wall. Asilent timer automatically shuts off the iron
after the set amount of time determined by the user. IW.A-42
offers flexibility in confined areas and has a premium sized hot
iron storage area, a built in work light, storage shelves, an elec-
trical cord wrap, and an on-off indicator.
IRON-A-WAY model IW.E-342 is another electric-built-in
ironing center, which includes all the core components neces-
sary to start your ironing center. It features a 42-inch ventilated
steel ironing board; a premium sized hot iron storage compart-
ment, a convenient storage shelf, and an easy access appliance
outlet for your iron.
IRON-A-WAY model IW.NE342 is a non-electric built-in iron-
ing center that is built with all the same quality materials as the
electric models and features a 42-inch ventilated steel ironing
board. It offers easy hide-away ironing board convenience at an
affordable price, a hot iron storage compartment that eliminates
waiting for the iron to cool down, and a convenient storage
shelf.
IRON-A-WAY’s built-in ironing centers are professionally
designed and all include the most premium sets of features that
allow for the utmost ironing board ease and comfort when iron-
ing. In today’s busy lifestyles, the demand for innovative
durable products has helped make many homes function more
efficiently and with less effort. IRON-A-WAY’s built-in ironing
centers are expertly crafted to provide these innovative features
neatly tucked out of sight. The ironing centers are built with
unmatched qualities and performance proven features that have
not only improved ironing convenience, but have redefined the
old fashion way of ironing.
For additional information, contact Custom Service
Hardware, 1170 Wauwatosa Road, Cedarburg, WI 53012;
800-882-0009 or 262-375-7960; fax: 262-375-7970;
e-mail: service@cshardware.com or visit www.cshardware.com.
New Kubota M59 Power Utility Tractor
Kubota introduces its high-performance M59 power utility,
59-horsepower tractor loader backhoe (TLB) designed to tackle
any task. Designed with strength and supreme versatility in
mind, the M59 features an integral mainframe to absorb the
loads of every day loader and backhoe work.
The M59 features a powerful 59-horsepower, three-vortex
combustion system (E-TVCS) diesel engine that allows
increased airflow into the combustion chamber and increases
efficiency. The system includes a large displacement engine to
help reduce noise and vibration and features a standard spark
arrestor muffler, built-in for safety when working in dry areas.
The M59’s HST-Plus hydrostatic transmission provides control
of both the HST pump and motor with key features including
hydro dual speed, load sensing ability, HST response control
and auto throttle advance.
Kubota’s M59 TLB offers a host of features designed to make
digging work easier. With a backhoe that offers 12-foot digging
depth, bucket digging force of more than 7,600 pounds and dip-
per digging force of 4,731 pounds, the M59 can handle even the
toughest soil conditions. High capacity hydraulic pumps allow
for smooth and efficient management with virtually every mate-
rial – stone, gravel, sand, silt or clay. The M59 offers convenience
P R O D U C T S H O W C A S E
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:50 PM Page 50
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 51 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
with a quick mount attach/detach system
for easy backhoe removal and enclosed
hydraulic hoses for improved visibility
and an overall cleaner design.
Kubota’s M59 loader is cost and time
efficient, offering increased productivity
and an incredible lifting power of 3,960
pounds. With a maximum height of 10.5
feet and a seven-foot bucket, the loader
makes the M59 a productive machine.
The braceless frame, slanted boom and
sloped hood design improve operator vis-
ibility when changing front attachments.
The M59 employs a quick attach coupler
and optional third function valve for easy
use of attachments.
In addition to a wide range of capabili-
ties, Kubota’s M59 was designed with
operator comfort top of mind. Along with
features such as a comfortable armrest
and convenient side position display, this
TLB boasts a full-flat deck that provides
ample legroom and makes mounting and
dismounting effortless. An efficient
“backhoe crawling mode” feature allows
movement at “creep” speed while at the
controls of the backhoe. This is especially
time saving when repositioning along
lengthy trenches. The four-post rollover
protective structure improves operator
safety.
In addition, Kubota offers a Category
I/II three-point hitch for a variety of tool
handling capabilities, which make it more
powerful and easy to utilize. With remote
hydraulic control valves, a greater selec-
tion of hydraulically powered imple-
ments can be used with the M59. The
hydraulic-independent PTO enables the
use of rear-mounted, PTO-driven imple-
ments such as rotary tillers and snow
blowers to maximize the M59’s versatili-
ty. For efficient implement changing and
easy use of attachments, the M59 employs
a quick attach coupler and optional third
function valve.
For product literature or dealer loca-
tions, contact Kubota Tractor Corporation
at 3401 Del Amo Blvd., Torrance, CA
90503; 888-4-KUBOTA[888-458-2682], ext.
900; or visit www.kubota.com.
Next Generation Environmental, Inc.
Asbestos and Lead Abatement, Envorinmental Remediation,
Specialty Coatings
21st Century Salvage, Inc.
Industrial and Commercial Demolition,
Dismantling, Salvage and Strip Out
High Tech Industrial Services
Industrial Cleaning, Water Blasting, Duct Cleaning
and Plant Decommissioning
CHARLIE MARTIN
President
cmartin@ngsg1.com
10750 Martz Road
Ypsilanti, MI 48197
Ph: 734.485.4855
Fax: 734.485.6959
Next Generation Services Group
i
n
c
.
Speak Up!
The Editors of CAM Magazine
invite comments from
our readers.
Send your remarks to:
CAM Magazine
43636 Woodward Ave.
P.O. Box 3204
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204
Or email us at:
editor@cam-online.com
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:50 PM Page 51
52 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Hamilton Anderson
Associates (HAA), a
Detroit/Las Vegas-based
design firm, is pleased to
announce that Ofra
Gelman, AIA has joined
the firm as principal.
Gelman has led teams in
numerous developments in Las Vegas
and for the city of Henderson. Gelman
will function as Managing Principal of
Hamilton Anderson Associates’ Las
Vegas office.
The Michigan Chapter
of the American Institute
of Architects has selected
Kevin Shultis, AIA, NCARB,
LEED AP, vice president
and Learning Studio
Leader of SmithGroup’s
Detroit office, to receive
the prestigious 2008 AIA Michigan
Hastings Award. Shultis’ recognition fol-
lows his impressive 5-year track record
as a co-chairman and chairman with AIA
Michigan’s Government Affairs
Committee. In his tenure he helped in
defending the rights of Michigan archi-
tects. Shultis received his award at the
Annual AIA Michigan Celebration of
Excellence in Architecture in May.
Ann Arbor-based archi-
tectural firm
Hobbs+Black Associates,
Inc. is pleased to
announce the following:
David Barduca, LEED AP,
has recently earned LEED
Accreditation with the
U.S. Green Building
Council. Barduca joined
Hobbs+Black in 2007.
Also, the Huron Valley
Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects
recently honored two
Hobbs + Black staff mem-
bers. Ann Kenyon, AIA, LEED AP, with
their Emerging Architect Award, recog-
nizing her exceptional contribution to the
profession. In 2007, only ten years after
receiving her Masters Degree, she earned
the title of vice president at
Hobbs+Black, becoming the first woman
architect to hold the esteemed position at
the firm. Kristina Glusac, AIA, received
the Distinguished Community Service
Award, which honors an AIA Huron
Valley chapter member who has per-
formed outstanding service to the broad-
er community through involvement in
government, volunteer, or service organ-
izations, or who has provided pro-bono
services to community organizations.
S o u t h f i e l d - b a s e d
Barton Malow Company is
pleased to announce the
following promotions:
Phil Kirby, based in Barton
Malow’s Central Virginia
Office, has been named
senior vice president,
Eastern Region. Kirby
will now oversee opera-
tions and business devel-
opment for offices in
Maryland, northern
Virginia, and central
Virginia. Len Moser has
been promoted to vice
president, National Sports, and will pro-
vide sales, preconstruction and construc-
tion support services for sports projects
nationwide. Phil Roy has been promoted
P E O P L E I N C O N S T R U C T I O N
888 West Big Beaver Road, Suite 1200, Troy, Michigan 48084
www.oaklandcompanies.net
Our Primary Client Goals:
Protect Your Assets • Control Your Costs • Provide Exceptional Service
ISO 9001:2000
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OAKLAND COMPANIES
INTEGRITY • COMMITMENT • SECURITY
Ph (248) 647-2500 • Fax (248) 647-4689
INSURANCE BONDING
Hastings Mutual Insurance Company
Hastings, Michigan G www.hastingsmutual.com
Gelman
Barduca
Kirby
Moser
Kenyon
Shultis
August 48-64 7/3/08 3:00 PM Page 52

CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 53 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
to vice president,
Southern Region, with
responsibility for Barton
Malow’s Atlanta office.
Ryan Maibach has been
promoted to vice presi-
dent of Specialty
Contracting, and will be
based in Oak Park,
Michigan.
Troy-based Controlled
Power Company, a global
manufacturer of complete
commercial, industrial,
and medical electrical
power solutions, recently announced the
promotions of Margaret Santamaria to
Midwest regional sales coordinator from
customer service coordinator, and Stacy
Biglow to customer service coordinator
from assistant engineering coordinator.
Santamaria replaces Carole Lize, who has
retired after a 30-year tenure with the
company.
J.S. Vig Construction,
based in Taylor, has
announced that Frank
Burdick has joined the
firm as project manager.
Burdick will be responsi-
ble for field supervision,
project budgeting, sched-
uling and subcontractor
selection. Also, Bryan
Cassette has joined the
firm as construction coor-
dinator. Cassette will be
responsible for maintain-
ing the company’s web-
site, coordinating market-
ing strategies and implementing a cohe-
sive database system. He will also assist
in a variety of construction initiatives
both on-site and off-site. J.S. Vig
Construction is a full-service general con-
tractor and construction management
company.
Professional Concepts Insurance
Agency (PCIA), Brighton, is pleased to
announce that Danna Aringo Reyes, a
first year graduate student at the
University of Michigan, is the winner of
the first annual PCIA Michigan
Architectural Foundation scholarship. A
resident of Ypsilanti, Danna is earning
her Masters of Architecture. Danna
received her scholarship at the annual
AIA MI Honor Awards and Recognition
Program held in May at the Inn at St.
John’s Conference Center in Plymouth.
Dietrich, Bailey and
Associates (DBA), PC, has
announced that
Stephanie L. Harbour, PE
has successfully passed
the U.S. Green Building
Council Professional
Accreditation Exam and
will be the firm’s LEED
Accredited Professional. DBA, celebrat-
ing its 40th year in business, is a multi-
disciplined design firm specializing in
Civil Engineering, Landscape
Architecture and Land Surveying with
offices in Plymouth and Monroe.
Plunkett Cooney, headquartered in
Bloomfield Hills, has added to its techni-
cal expertise with the recent addition of
Beth Niepokuj as the firm’s litigation sup-
port manager. Established in 1913,
Plunkett Cooney is one of the Midwest’s
Burdick
Cassette
Roy
Maibach
Harbour
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:51 PM Page 53
54 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
largest full-service law firms with more
than 150 attorneys in nine Michigan cities,
Columbus, OH and Indianapolis, IN.
Fishbeck, Thompson,
Carr & Huber, Inc. (FTC&H),
Engi neers/Sci ent i st s/
Architects/Constructors,
is pleased to announce the
addition of Steve Luzkow
based in their Farmington
Hills office. Luzkow
brings over 29 years of environmental
expertise to FTC&H.
NAWBO, the National Association of
Women Business Owners, Greater Detroit
Chapter, has welcomed its incoming
2008-2009 Board of Directors. The fol-
lowing women have been elected to serve
as Board members: Kathleen Alessandro,
Energized Solutions, LLC, Dearborn;
Nancy Brownrigg, Brownrigg Companies
Ltd., Auburn Hills; Kim Crabtree,
MetaOps, Livonia; Angela Dodd, FayeZ
Interiors, Southfield; Peggy Feltner,
ZenaComp, Farmington Hills; Dr. Randi
Lou Franklin, INTER-LINGUA, Grosse
Pointe Farms; Patricia Henry Poyle,
Henry Business Solutions, Birmingham;
Jill Gleba, Gleba & Associates, Troy; Ruth
Johnson, DYNAMIS Consulting &
Training, Detroit; Miriam Muley, The 85%
Niche, LLC, Grosse Pointe; Nipa Shah,
Jenesys Group, LLC,
Novi; and Theresa
Thompson, Tea Time
Events, Shelby Township.
OHM (Orchard Hiltz &
McCliment, Inc.), an engi-
neering and architectural
firm headquartered in
Livonia, has announced
the election of two new
members to its Board of
Directors: Shirley Ybarra
and Vyto Kaunelis, as well
as the re-election of
Charlie Mahoney.
Troy-based design firm Ford & Earl
Associates recently announced that Paul
Van Der Kolk has joined the company as
project designer and junior architect. Van
Der Kolk comes to Ford & Earl Associates
with nearly ten years of experience in
retail, residential and institutional design
and project management. Also, Janet
Wilson, associate, project leader, has
PEOPLE I N CONSTRUCTI ON
Ybarra
Kaunelis
Luzkow
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:51 PM Page 54
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 55 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
earned her Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design (LEED) accredita-
tion. Wilson has over 20 years experience
in commercial interior design now
enhanced by her knowledge of sustain-
able green building and development
practices.
Detroit-based DeMaria
Building Company has
announced that Jeff
Burch, safety coordinator,
and Dave Sargent, cost
engineer, have earned
LEED Accreditation with
the U.S. Green Building
Council. Also, Philips
Vallakalil, senior project
manager, has earned the
designation Certified
Construction Manager
(CCM).
C2AE, a full-service architectural, engi-
neering, and planning firm based in
Lansing, recently announced the election
of its Board of Directors at a recent meet-
ing. The appointed Board members
include: Raymond Tadgerson; William
Kimble; Dennis Bekken; Paul Rozeboom;
Kevin Feuka; and Larry Fox. Continuing
as long-time principals of the firm are:
Dennis Jensen, AIA; Mathew Jarvi, PE;
and Gary Arnold, PE. The firm also
announced the re-appointment of its sen-
ior associates: Robin Rapelje; Sandra
(Sam) Scott; and Maureen Wegener. The
list of re-appointed C2AE associates
includes: Scott Cook;
Cindy Filley; Gary Fedewa;
Craig Jansen; Kevin
Makarewicz; and Betsy
Ormsbee.
Soil and Materials
Engineers, Inc. (SME),
Plymouth, has announced
that the Washtenaw
County Board of
Commissioners recently
appointed James M.
Harless, PhD, CHMM, RBP,
to the Washtenaw County
B r o w n f i e l d
Redevelopment Authority (WCBRA). Dr.
Harless is a senior consultant at SME.
Also, the Transportation Research Board
(TRB) Executive Committee recently
appointed Starr D. Kohn, PhD, PE to Chair
the TRB Committee on Pavement
Monitoring, Evaluation, and Data
Storage. Dr. Kohn serves as a senior vice
president and manager of pavement
services at SME.
C O R P O R A T E N E W S
Michigan CAT and LeeBoy are pleased
to announce that they have finalized an
agreement that awards Michigan CAT
exclusive distribution rights for the entire
family of LeeBoy/Rosco paving and con-
struction equipment within the state of
Michigan. The LeeBoy family also
includes the Rosco product line of paving
products and asphalt tools.
LeeBoy/Rosco’s extensive line of motor
graders, drum rollers, multi-purpose
asphalt maintainers, asphalt distributors,
pavers, brooms, pneumatic rollers, chip
It’s official. Safway Services is now
ThyssenKrupp Safway, Inc. So
what’s different? Just our coffee
mugs. Our high quality and safety
standards remain the same, and
you’ll work with the same local
people. In fact, we’ve been solely
owned by ThyssenKrupp AG since
2000, and continue to be a proud
member of the world’s largest
network of scaffold companies.
Same quality people.
Same expert service. New mug.
Detroit Branch
5500 Rivard Street
Detroit, Michigan 48211
Toll free: (800) 899-5189
Phone: (313) 872-8500
www.safway.com
Sargent
Burch
Harless
Kohn
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:51 PM Page 55
56 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
spreaders, pothole patchers and force
feed loaders bring more than 30 new
models to Michigan CAT’s already exten-
sive line of equipment offerings.
Barton Malow Company, headquar-
tered in Southfield, recently received the
General Motors 2007 Supplier of the Year
award for its significant contributions to
GM’s global product and performance
achievements. The 16th annual award –
themed the “Best of the Best” – was given
during ceremonies at the Sawgrass
Marriott Hotel in Jacksonville, Florida.
Also, the Barton Malow Company and
HKS Architects, Inc. have been chosen as
the design/build team for the Gwinnett
Braves Baseball Stadium in
Lawrenceville, GA. The $40 million stadi-
um is scheduled to open in April 2009.
Barton Malow’s Southern Region opera-
tions have been based in Atlanta since the
office opened in 1986.
Lake Orion-based Stephen Auger +
Associates Architects (SA+A) has
announced that the firm has been award-
ed the contract to provide architectural
analysis and design services for the St.
Vincent de Paul Parish in Pontiac. St.
Vincent de Paul is a late nineteenth cen-
tury Catholic Church in the Gothic
Revival style located off Woodward
Avenue in the City of Pontiac. The
church was placed on the Michigan State
Register of Historic Places in 1987 and
the National Register in 1989. The goal of
the parish is to upgrade the interior fin-
ishes including lighting, mechanical and
sound systems, restore art glass, and
improve liturgical function.
The Huron Valley Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects recently
recognized Ann Arbor-based
Hobbs+Black Associates, Inc. The firm
received Honor Awards for their work on
the TAQA NewWorld Corporate Suite
and the W.R. Wheeler Service Center,
both based in Ann Arbor.
Caterpillar Inc. has recognized Ohio-
based Lincoln Electric Company as one of
the construction equipment company’s
outstanding suppliers at both its
Cleveland and Mentor, Ohio consumable
plants. Lincoln Electric, a Caterpillar cer-
tified supplier since 1991, received
Caterpillar’s Supplier Quality Excellence
Process Certification according to the
MQ11005 Standard – making Lincoln
Electric the first welding consumable
manufacturer to receive this prestigious
designation.
Soil and Materials Engineers, Inc.
(SME), Plymouth, recently teamed with
several Michigan communities to secure
$3.2 million in federal grants for
Brownfield redevelopment projects.
SME prepared winning applications for
the following: Allegan, Otsego, Plainwell
Consortium, $200,000 U.S. EPA
Brownfields Assessment Grant; Calhoun
County, $200,000 U.S. EPA Brownfields
Assessment Grant; City of Grand Rapids,
$200,000 U.S. EPABrownfields Assessment
Grant; City of Kentwood, $200,000 U.S.
EPA Brownfields Assessment Grant; City
of Southfield, $200,000 U.S. EPA
Brownfields Assessment Grant; and City
of Wyoming, $200,000 U.S. EPA
Brownfields Assessment Grant. SME was
part of the team that a secured a $2,000,000
U.S. EPA Brownfields Revolving Loan
Fund (BRLF) Grant for the Downriver
Area Brownfield Consortium.
P E O P L E I N C O N S T R U C T I O N
Top Performance
in ROOFING SERVICES
T. F. Beck Co.
Rochester Hills MI
248.852.9255
J. D. Candler
Roofing Co., Inc.
Livonia MI
313.899.2100
Christen/Detroit
Detroit MI
313.837.1420
Detroit Cornice & Slate Co.
Ferndale MI
248.398.7690
Fisher Roofing Co., Inc.
Dearborn Heights MI
313.292.8090
LaDuke Roofing &
Sheet Metal
Oak Park MI
248.414.6600
Lutz Roofing Co., Inc.
Shelby Twp. MI
586.739.1148
M.W. Morss Roofing, Inc.
Romulus MI
734.942.0840
Newton Crane Roofing, Inc.
Pontiac MI
248.332.3021
North Roofing Co.
Auburn Hills MI
248.373.1500
Dave Pomaville & Sons, Inc.
Warren MI
586.755.6030
Royal Roofing Co.
Orion MI
248.276.ROOF (7663)
Schena Roofing &
Sheet Metal Co., Inc.
Chesterfield MI
586.949.4777
Schreiber Corporation
Detroit MI
313.864.4900
SOUTHEASTERN MI CHI GAN ROOFI NG CONTRACTORS ASSOCI ATI ON MEMBERS
SMRCA
When you have a roofing problem you need top
performance. SMRCA Roofing Contractors are
established companies with years of experience in
providing responsive service, superior workmanship
and exceptional value. Our top performance provides:
SMRCA Contractors are Union trained
professionals bringing industry leading
service, quality and knowledge to
every project. Call us today at
586.759.2140 to receive our free
“Roofing Facts” brochure or contact
one of the SMRCA Contractors below
for a no-cost estimate on your next roofing
project or visit us at www.smrca.org.
• M.U.S.T. Safety Training and Drug Testing
• Michigan roofing contractor 2 year standard
workmanship warranty
• It is our expertise in various roof systems to fit
architectural requirements and owner’s needs.
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:51 PM Page 56
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 57 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Mercedes-Benz has selected Rand
Construction Engineering, Inc., a
Brighton-based design/build construc-
tion company, to renovate and expand
their present Research Park Drive facility
in Ann Arbor. Also, JP Morgan/Chase
Bank has selected Rand Construction to
build a LEED silver certification banking
center in Rochester Hills.
NSF International, Ann Arbor, recently
received an award to honor its 20 years of
commitment to Ann Arbor Public
Schools’ Partners for Excellence Program.
The Partners for Excellence Program wel-
comes community involvement to fur-
ther enhance student achievement, aug-
ment classroom learning and encourage
students to become confident learners.
In other news, NSF has announced that
Shell International Petroleum Company
Ltd. is the first company to receive
Certification to ISO 21469: Safety of
Machinery - Lubricants with Incidental
Product Contact - Hygiene
Requirements. NSF is currently the only
company offering American National
Standards Institute (ANSI)-accredited
ISO 21469 Certification. ISO 21469
Certified lubricants offer new assurances
to processors of specialized products
with strict hygiene and safety require-
ments to meet. NSF International, is an
independent, not-for-profit organization
that certifies products and writing stan-
dards for food, water and consumer
goods
Comstock Park-based Midlink Business
Park and Signature Associates have wel-
comed Polymer Solutions Inc. to
Midlink’s mixed-used business park.
Polymer Solutions has leased 110,000
square feet in Midlink’s East building to
expand its plastics recycling business.
The company’s move to Midlink has
brought 55 jobs to the Kalamazoo com-
munity. Also, W. Soule & Company has
leased 68,000 square feet, expanding its
existing facilities at Midlink’s East build-
ing to accommodate the growth of its
specialty fabrication division, Soule
Fabrication Group. W. Soule has had
facilities in Midlink’s East building since
July 2007.
DeMaria Building Company, Detroit, is
pleased to announce the following con-
tract awards: Jones Lang LaSalle
Autodesk has hired the company to com-
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:51 PM Page 57
58 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
plete the Lake Point Office Center
Renovation in Novi. This includes the
renovation of the three-story, 45,000-
square-foot building that houses
Autodesk, a design software company.
The building will also be CI-LEED certi-
fied with a Gold rating. Also, the
Thompson Educational Foundation has
hired the company to construct the UPA
Math & Science Center Middle School in
Detroit. This includes construction of an
80,000-square-foot addition, which will
primarily be used as a Science & Math
Middle School, reconstruction of a sur-
face parking lot, and a vehicular circula-
tion lane. The new structure will also
provide a new entrance to the Detroit
Science Center, a Science Center Café and
a Gift Shop.
Alta Lift Truck Services, Inc., Wixom,
has been nationally recognized by Yale
Material Handling and Combilift Ltd. as a
Dealer of Excellence for 2007. The
Dealer of Excellence Award is the highest
award a distributor can receive and is
distinguished annually. Alta Lift Truck
Services Inc., founded in 1984 by
President Steven Greenawalt, has nine
Michigan locations.
Plunkett Cooney, Bloomfield Hills, was
recently honored as one of the 2008 “Top
100 Law Firms for Diversity” by
MultiCultural Law Magazine, an annual
legal publication that acknowledge lead-
ing law firms for diversity and highlights
successful minority and women lawyers.
PEOPLE IN CONSTRUCTION
24236 Mound Road, Warren, Michigan 48091
Commercial • Industrial • Institutional
Cleaning Services
PROFESSIONAL DUCT CLEANING
Cleaning & Sanitizing • Complete HVAC Systems
Restroom/Laboratory/Paint • Exhaust Systems
EXTERIOR BUILDING CLEANING
Architectural Metal • Precast • Brick • Stone
INTERIOR BUILDING CLEANING
Degreasing • Prep for Paint • Exhaust Fans • Floor Cleaning
DEEP CLEANING
Machinery De-greasing • Kitchen Facilities
Parking Deck Cleaning • Warehouses
Loading Docks • Compactors
40 Years In Business
(586) 759-3000 Fax (586) 759-3277
Since 1968
“SPECIALTY CLEANING”
www.acmemaint.com
October
• Metals/Steel
• Signage
FALL 2008
SPECIAL ISSUE
C O M I N G U P I N
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:51 PM Page 58
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 59 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
ALPHA AMUSEMENT SERVICES
MADISON HTS
ALU-LITE TECHNOLOGY
ORION
ARIZONA HEATING &
AIR CONDITIONING, INC.
SAGINAW
BENJAMIN MOORE PAINTS
SOUTH LYON
BETTER PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE, LLC.
FARMINGTON HILLS
BROOKS ROOFING COMPANY
BEAR LAKE
CANCILLIARI ENTERPRISES, INC.
GROSSE ILE
D & D STONE, INC.
NEW LOTHROP
DEAN HOLMES
EXCAVATING LTD
DAVISON
DEHONDT ELECTRIC, INC.
SHELBY TWP
FOX BROTHERS, CO.
HOWELL
FRED BARNETT INSTALLATION
ROSEVILLE
HILL STEEL & BUILDERS
SUPPLIES, INC.
FLINT
HOLLY AGGREGATE & METALS
OXFORD
IMAGE BUILDING SOLUTIONS
ROYAL OAK
KENKY
CLIO
METRO FIRE SYSTEMS
FENTON
ROBINSON ELECTRICAL MECHANICAL
RIVERDALE
STELLAR MANUFACTURING
STERLING HTS
WM FLOYD HEATING CO.
GRAND BLANC
313•531•2700
CONNELLY CRANE
RENTAL CORP.
One Of Michigan’s Largest
Also Serving the Lansing Area
1-800-750-6698
CONNELLY
12635 MARION • DETROIT (REDFORD)
1-96 & TELEGRAPH AREA
• CRAWLERS
TO 250 TONS
• HYDRAULIC
TO 365 TONS
NOW AVAILABLE:
FIXED AND SELF ERECTING TOWER CRANES!
Full Line of Towers Available
Call us to learn more about why a tower crane
should be considered for your jobsite.
• CONVENTIONAL
TO 250 TONS
• ROUGH TERRAIN
UP TO 70 TONS
• FREE JOB PLANNING
AND LAYOUT AVAILABLE
• FORKLIFTS
UP TO 10,000 POUNDS
Complete Crane Rental
Services Since “1943”
W E L C O M E N E W M E M B E R S
&
W E L C O M E N E W M E M B E R S
N E W M E M B E R S
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:51 PM Page 59
As you all are probably aware, the 2008 Construction Buyers
Guide has been out on the street for several months now. In an
effort to keep our information as accurate and up-to-date as
possible, we’re including here all the changes and corrections
we have received for members’ company listings as of June
15. Changes from the book are in bold.
To see continually amended company listings, check
out the Buyers Guide Online at www.cam-online.com, updated around
the 15th of every month.
Return to this section every month in CAM Magazine to get heads-up information and
news involving the Construction Buyers Guide. Questions? Contact Mary Carabott at
248-972-1000 for answers and to find out how to add to your online listings. No updates
will be made to the online Buyers Guide from July 15 thru January 15.
To obtain additional copies of the Guide, stop by the CAM office and pick them up at
no additional charge, or send $6 per book for shipping to have the books sent to your
company via UPS. Please call ahead of time for authorization if your firm requires a sub-
stantial number of copies.
Invoices for the listings have been generated and mailed. Prompt payment ensures a
good-standing membership and ability to list in the 2009 Buyers Guide. We will glad-
ly answer any questions regarding charges on invoices.
Preparation for the 2009 Buyers Guide has begun – look for renewal forms in your
mail in mid-August.
60 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Art Home Design
23262 John R Rd.
Hazel Park, MI 48030
Phone: 248-546-2777
Fax: 248-546-5006
Christian Brothers Electric
98 Northbound Gratiot, #28
Mt. Clemens, MI 48043
Phone: 810-841-0646
Fax: 586-477-1229
Comprehensive Management
Growth Group
2000 Town Center, Suite 1900
Southfield, MI 48075
Phone: 248-346-2510
Fax: 248-281-0493
Daniels Services
(Formerly NSMG/Delphi Glass Corp.)
3380 Jolly Rd.
Lansing, MI 48910
Phone: 517-394-431
Fax: 517-394-5364
Environetics, Inc.
7071 Orchard Lake Rd., Suite 210
West Bloomfield, MI 48322
Phone: 248-851-2100
Fax: 248-851-3489
Dallas Kitchen Building Co., Inc.
17401 E. Ten Mile Rd.
Eastpointe, MI 48021
Phone: 586-445-0840
Fax: 586-445-0842
Masonry Institute of Michigan, Inc.
24725 W. Twelve Mile Rd., Suite 388
Southfield, MI 48034
Phone: 248-663-0415
Fax: 248-663-0420
Prairie Lakeside, LLC.
(Formerly Lakeside Bldg. Products, Inc.)
40 Floral Ave.
Mount Clemens, MI 48043
Phone: 586-468-1405
Fax: 586-468-1852
Rice Associates, Inc.
33018 Grand River Ave.
Farmington, MI 48336
Phone: 248-442-0472
Fax: 248-442-0828
C A M B U Y E R S G U I D E U P D A T E S
Specializing in
E.I.F.S.
Commercial Exterior
and Interior
Plastering
21750 Schmeman
Warren, Michigan 48089
(586) 775-8700
FAX (586) 775-7717
800-910-1123
Local 517-468-7677
Fax 517-468-4836
CLEAN TOILETS
DEPENDABLE SERVICE
We feature anti-bacterial hand
cleaners in all of our units
Buckhoist Units • Rooftops
Construction • Residential
Sinks
Handicaps Available
SERVICING LIVINGSTON,OAKLAND,
WAYNE, WASHTENAW AND
INGHAM COUNTIES
UPDATE UPDATE
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:51 PM Page 60
CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 61 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Industry Events
Aug. 1 – Sto Bucket Drumming Contest
Deadline
Sto Corp. of Atlanta, GAhas announced
the first annual Sto Bucket Drumming
Contest. The competition is free and open
to industry members in conjunction with
any Sto distributor. There are several cate-
gories, with cash prizes for the winners.
Complete rules and details are available
at www.stocorp.com/bucketdrumcontest.
Aug. 6-9 – SMPS Event
The Society for Marketing Professional
Services (SMPS) has announced its
National Conference, to be held at the
Colorado Convention Center in Denver.
To register, go to www.smps-mi.org and
click on “events.”
Aug. 11 – 2008 NAWBO Greater Detroit
22nd Annual Golf Outing
This year’s golf outing will be held at Fox
Hills Golf & Banquet Center in Plymouth.
E-mail info@nawbodc.org for more
information.
Aug. 12-Sep. 16 – CAM Golf Outings
Aug. 12 – Fieldstone Golf Club,
Auburn Hills
Sep. 16 – Forest Lake Country Club,
Bloomfield Hills
Reserve a spot or sponsorship in one or
all of these outings by calling Diana Brown
at 248-972-1000.
Sep. 11-14 – American Society of Concrete
Contractors’ Annual Conference
Demonstrations of pervious (porous)
concrete placement and three-dimension-
al (3-D) paving will highlight this event at
the Crowne Plaza Riverwalk in San
Antonio, TX. The event will include
roundtable discussions, demonstrations
and networking opportunities.
For more information, visit
www.ascconline.org, or call 314-962-0210.
Sept. 25 – Fourth Annual Building
Connections
Building Connections is the largest
annual gathering of the construction com-
munity in Southeast Michigan, providing
a unique opportunity for informal and
social interaction while supporting the
Boy Scouts of America, Detroit Area
Council. This year’s event will take place
at The Cranbrook Institute of Science
Museum in Bloomfield Hills.
For more information, call 313-361-4228
or e-mail rfields@bsamail.org.
Training Calendar
Source Educational Classes
Cooper Lighting’s SOURCE will offer the
following educational classes in 2008:
Aug. Retail Lighting Solutions
Workshop
Lighting Fundamentals/
Lighting Basics
Sep. Energy Solutions for Commercial
& Industrial Lighting Design
Advanced IriS Solutions
Oct. Lighting Fundamentals/
Lighting Basics
Healthcare Lighting Solutions
Workshop
Exterior Lighting Design Solutions
Nov. Energy Solutions for Commercial
& Industrial Lighting Design II
Fundamentals & Lighting Basics
for Distributors & Contractors
Dec. Lighting Fundamentals/
Lighting Basics
The SOURCE is located in Peachtree
City, GA. Visit www.cooperlighting.com
or call 770-486-4680 for more information.
• BONDS
• CONTRACTORS
INSURANCE
• ENVIRONMENTAL
INSURANCE
• LIFE & HEALTH
Over 50 Years
of Experience
(248) 355-4411
24724 Farmbrook Rd.
Southfield 48034
Gus E. Zervos
CEO
Steve M. Zervos
President
Zervos Group,Inc.
C O N S T R U C T I O N C A L E N D A R
Please submit all calendar items no less than six weeks prior to the event to:
Calendar Editor, CAM Magazine, P.O. Box 3204, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204.
CONSTRUCTION
CALENDAR
CONSTRUCTION
CALENDAR
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:51 PM Page 61
62 CAM MAGAZI NE AUGUST 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Acme Maintenance Service..........................................58
Aluminum Supply Company - Marshall Sales .......40
Barton Malow ...................................................................30
Brunt Associates, Inc. ......................................................11
Bryan Equipment Sales - STIHL Dealers...................31
CAM Administrative Services.........................................3
CAM Affinity .....................................................................IBC
CAM ECPN...........................................................................47
CAM Membership............................................................41
Cipriano Coating Technology......................................24
Clark Hill, PLC........................................................................5
Concrete Moisture Control..............................................9
Connelly Crane Rental....................................................59
Consumers Energy...........................................................49
Cummins Bridgeway.......................................................54
DTE Energy .........................................................................45
Danboise Mechanical .....................................................12
DeBacker & Sons, Inc.......................................................60
Doeren Mayhew...............................................................57
Donnelly & Associates, Inc., Raymond J. ..................25
Duross Painting Company............................................23
Facca Richter & Pregler, P.C. ..........................................33
Frames, Doors & Hardware, Inc....................................21
G2 Consulting Group......................................................62
Great Lakes Ceramic Tile Association.......................23
Gutherie Lumber Company .........................................13
Hartland Insurance Group............................................35
Hilti, Inc. ...............................................................................15
Jackson Park Agency ......................................................25
Jeffers Crane Service.......................................................28
Kem-Tec...............................................................................34
Kotz, Sangster, Wysocki & Berg....................................37
Laramie Crane ..................................................................34
Lifting Gear Hire Corporation......................................29
McAlpine & Associates, P.C. .............................................6
McCoig Materials ............................................................IFC
Michigan Propane Gas Association....................42, 43
Michigan Regional Council of Carpenters..............BC
NCDS (National Center for
Dispute Settlement) ..................................................12
Navigant Consulting.......................................................58
Next Generation Services Group................................51
Nicholson Construction.................................................57
North American Dismantling Corp............................36
Oakland Companies........................................................52
Osborne Trucking & Osborne Concrete,
John D. ............................................................................22
Plante & Moran, PLLC......................................................17
Plunkett Cooney...............................................................10
Rick's Portables Sanitation, LLC...................................60
SMRCA..................................................................................56
Scaffolding Inc...................................................................33
Spider - A Division of Safeworks, LLC........................62
State Building Products .................................................36
Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Patton, P.C. ............................44
Sunset Excavating............................................................54
Superior Materials Holdings, LLC................................53
ThyssenKrupp Safway, Inc. ............................................55
Trend Millwork, LLC.........................................................27
UHY Advisors........................................................................8
Valenti Trobec Chandler, Inc. ..........................................7
Wayne Bolt & Nut Co.......................................................61
Woods Construction, Inc. ..............................................24
Xpert Technologies............................................................9
Zervos Group.....................................................................61
A D V E R T I S E R S I N D E X
A Division Of SafeWorks LLC
with Spiders
Personnel/Debris
Safety Net Systems
• Expert Installation
• Protect Workers, The Public,
And Adjacent Properties
• Fall Protection
• Personnel and Debris Nets
Spider
A Division of SafeWorks, LLC
28825 Goddard Road, Suite 108
Romulus, MI 48174-2701
Phone: 734-229-0850
Protect Your World
Protect Your World
®
August 48-64 6/30/08 9:51 AM Page 62
Discount fleet purchasing or
leasing on all makes & models
of cars, trucks, cargo vans
& construction trailers.
Call Ardene Reilly at (866) 834-9166
Call Derek Dyer at (734) 953-9700
Are you taking advantage of these
¹:ª::¹ '::. ¹:]is
Call Peggy Wessler at (248) 377-9600
Call Mary Carabott at (248) 972-1000
Call Diana Brown at (248) 972-1000
Bowling, dinner/poker tournaments,
sporting clays, golf outings & more.
.!¶ I::i .::..:
Call Gregg Montowski (248) 972-1000
sss.!¶I!.'!.::s
Everything you need to know about
CAM at your fingertips. Check out the
CAM Buyers Guide online.
Call Amanda Tackett at (248) 972-1000
.!¶ ¶i]i:.:
Monthly industry magazine covers
construction news throughout the
state, as well as timely articles
and product information.
Call the CAM Marketing Department (248) 972-1000
.!¶ I..: ¹i.::s

Accurate up to date project bidding
information on Detroit area and state
projects. Access bidding information &
blueprints, plans, specs, 24 –hours a day,
7 days a week, via your computer.
Call Bernice Tanner (248) 972-1000
.!¶ ¹i.::s
Features the largest selection of bid
documents in the state. Private phone
rooms, lounge, plan duplication &
facsimile services available. Lien
forms also available for purchase.
Call Joe Forgue at (248) 972-1000
Variety of classes & seminars
offered winter, spring & fall,
taught by industry professionals.
.¹.:i.:. |.!¶¦..|
Call James M. Finn at (248) 358-4140
Full service credit union, created to
serve you with 22 Michigan locations,
visit them at www.cfcuonline.com.
Banking Made Better.
.:.:..:.:. ':¹:i
.:¹. !.:.
A CAM Membership benefit for union
contractors employing Carpenters,
Cement Masons, Laborers or
Operating Engineers in Southeast
Michigan.
Call Forrest Henry at (248) 972-1000
.!¶ .i:: !:i.:.: I:::::
Design & Construction Exposition
in Novi attracts almost 10,000 people
annually. Opportunity to showcase
construction products & services
to key markets.
.!¶ .s.::.:.
Call Ron Riegel at (248) 972-1000
Call Dee Macy at (586) 790-7810
.!¶ ":s:: .:s.:.:i.:.
Group self-funded workers’
compensation insurance program
designed for & operated by
the construction industry.
Call Rob Walters at (248) 233-2114
.!¶ ¶:s:: '.:.i.::
CAM-sponsored employee benefit
program provides local claim &
administrative services for group, life,
health, dental & long term disability,
at competitive rates.
Web design, content management
hosting, e-mail & domain setup,
marketing strategies & consulting.
Visit us at: www.eliquid.com
¹:ª::¹ '..:.:. I:..:.:
Call Steve Guadette at (800) 954-0423
!:::... ï:::
!i.i : '..:.:. I::::
Call Ron Kozak at (248) 530-2155
T-Mobile has calling plans for the
on-the-go professional... at home,
at the office, on the road.
Call Chris Bageris at (248) 722-9134
High-performance business
communications solutions: CAM
Members receive free consultation and
15% off your communications solutions.
!:::... '.:.] ¹:]is
Call Tom Farnham at (989) 615-2736
Speedway SuperAmerica SuperFleet
fueling program can save your
company 4 cents per gallon
of fuel $ 15% off at Valvoline
Instant Oil Change locations.
!:::... .i : ¦.:s
î.¡.] I::::
Call Amy Elliot at (586) 757-7100
New car & truck purchasing & lease
program helps Members get the
lowest possible price.
.!¶ î.¡:: I.¹:
More than 16,000 copies of this
comprehensive construction industry
directory are distrubuted. Marketing
opportunity through special classified
section. Offered online and in print.
August 48-64 6/27/08 3:51 PM Page 63
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