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Frontiers in Clinical Drug Research - Alzheimer Disorders: Volume 6

Frontiers in Clinical Drug Research - Alzheimer Disorders: Volume 6

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Frontiers in Clinical Drug Research - Alzheimer Disorders: Volume 6

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415 página
4 horas
Publicado:
Jul 31, 2017
ISBN:
9781681083391
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

Frontiers in Clinical Drug Research - Alzheimer Disorders is a book series concerned with Alzheimer's disease (AD) that causes dementia, or loss of brain function. The disease affects the parts of the brain that deal with memory, thought, and language. Chapters in each volume focus on (Alzheimer Disorders) drug research with special emphasis on clinical trials, research on drugs in advanced stages of development and cure for Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders.
Frontiers in Clinical Drug Research - Alzheimer Disorders will be of particular interest to readers interested in drug therapy of this specific neurodegenerative condition and related brain disorders as the series provides relevant reviews written by experts in field of Alzheimer’s Disease research.
The sixth volume of this series features chapters covering critical discussions on AD management and new therapies. The topics reviewed in this volume include:
- treatment of brain inflammation in Alzheimer’s disease with traditional medicine
- stem cell strategies for the modeling and therapy of Alzheimer’s disease
- retinal neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease
- biological mass spectrometry for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease
…and more.

Publicado:
Jul 31, 2017
ISBN:
9781681083391
Formato:
Libro

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Frontiers in Clinical Drug Research - Alzheimer Disorders - Bentham Science Publishers

Table of Contents

Welcome

Table Of Contents

Title Page

BENTHAM SCIENCE PUBLISHERS LTD.

End User License Agreement (for non-institutional, personal use)

Usage Rules:

Disclaimer:

Limitation of Liability:

General:

PREFACE

List of Contributors

The Treatment of Brain Inflammation in Alzheimer’s Disease. Can Traditional Medicines Help?

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Anti-inflammatory Agents in AD

Risk Factors for Developing AD

Prevention of AD

Ceramide and AD

The Blood Brain Barrier and AD

Visfatin and AD

Traditional Plant Medicines for AD

The Modern Approach to Curing AD

Concluding Remarks

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

References

Stem Cell Strategies for the Modeling and Therapy of Alzheimer’s Disease

Abstract

1. INTRODUCTION

2. NEUROPATHOLOGY OF AD: KEYS TO DRUG DISCOVERY AND ANIMAL MODELS

The β-amyloid Hypothesis of AD

The Hyper-phosphorylated Tau Protein Hypothesis of AD

The cholinergic hypothesis of AD

2.1. Drug Discovery of AD

2.1.1. Treatment of Amyloid Pathology

2.1.2. Treatment of Tau Pathology

2.1.3. Treatment of Synaptic Dysfunction

2.1.4. Neurotrophic Factors (NTFs)

2.1.5. Cell Transplantation

2.2. Animal Models of AD

2.2.1. Transgenic Animal Models of AD

2.2.2. Selective Cholinergic Lesion Animal Models of AD

3. STEM CELLS AS USEFUL TOOLS FOR CELL TRANSPLANTATION, DRUG DISCOVERY AND AD MODELING

3.1. Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells (NP/SCs)

3.2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs)

3.3. Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs)

3.4. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (IPSCs)

3.5. In Situ Generation of Neurons in the Brain

3.6. Modeling and Therapy of AD with Genome Editing

4. PERSPECTIVES

ABBREVIATIONS

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

References

Retinal Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s Disease

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

THE RETINA – AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE BRAIN

VISUAL CHANGES IN AD

Visual Abnormalities

Pupil Abnormalities

RETINAL CHANGES IN AD

Retinal Histopathologic Abnormalities

Retinal in vivo Abnormalities

Retinal Nerve Abnormalities

Retinal Vasculature Abnormalities

Retinal Cellular Abnormalities – RGC Apoptosis

NON-RETINAL OCULAR CHANGES IN AD

AD-RELATED CHANGES IN RETINAL DISEASES

AD-related Changes in Glaucoma

AD-related Changes in AMD

TARGETING OF AMYLOID-ß IN TREATMENT OF GLAUCOMA AND AMD

CONCLUSION

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

REFERENCES

Pathophysiology of Alzheimer Disease: Current Drug Therapy

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

HYPERTENSION AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

ROLE OF RENIN ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM (RAS) IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

GENETIC POLYMORPHISM AND AD

TREATMENTS FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

HERBAL DRUGS FOR THE TREATMENT OF AD

CONCLUSION

ABBREVIATIONS:

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Acknowledgements

REFERENCES

Biological Mass Spectrometry for Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Requirements of Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

Application of Mass Spectrometry for Alzheimer's Disease

Imaging Mass Spectrometry for Alzheimer's Disease

Advantages and disadvantages of Mass Spectrometry

CONCLUSION

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

REFERENCES

The Structure-Activity Relationship of Melanin as a Source of Energy Defines the Role of Glucose to Biomass Supply Only, Implications in the Context of the Failing Brain

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Basal Brain Energy Metabolism

The Role of Pyridine Nucleotides and the Abnormal Expression of Genes

Oxidative Stress

Remarks and Conclusion

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

REFERENCES

Neuro-protective Properties of the Fungus Isaria japonica: Evidence from a Mouse Model of Aged-related Degeneration

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

IJE Improves Nerve Function in Aged Mouse Brain

1. Neuroprotective Effects of IJE

2. Histochemical Observation

3. Assessments of Acute and Sub-acute Toxicity

NMR Analyses in the I. Japonica Extract

1. Chemical Component of I. Japonica

1.1. Living Substances

2. Biologically Active Substances

2.1. Cyclic Peptides

2.2. Isariotins and Its Related Natural Products

2.3. Cyclic Terpenoids

2.4. Others

3. NMR and Mass Study of Water Extract of I. Japonica

Visualization of the Physiological and Pathological Alterations in the Central Nervous System using MRI and MRS

1. Fine Imaging Using Ultra-high Field MRI

2. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

3. Brain Temperature Estimation Using MRS

CONCLUDING REMARKS

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

REFERENCES

Frontiers in Clinical Drug Research -

 Alzheimer Disorders

(Volume 6)

Edited by:

Atta-ur-Rahman, FRS

Kings College,University of Cambridge,Cambridge,UK

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PREFACE

The book series, "Frontiers in Clinical Drug Research – Alzheimer Disorders", is intended to present the important advancements in the field in the form of cutting edge reviews written by experts. Volume 6 of this eBook series is a compilation of seven well written chapters contributed by prominent researchers in the field. It includes the treatment of brain inflammation, stem cell strategies, retinal neurodegeneration, pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease, and a number of other related areas.

Chapter 1 by Adams discusses the use of plant medicines as an alternative treatment to decrease the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In chapter 2, Haigang Gu describes the recent progress of stem cell strategies for AD modeling and therapy. Cordeiro et al. in chapter 3 focus on the retinal neurodegeneration in AD. The pathological similarities between AD and eye diseases are also discussed. In Chapter 4, Gupta & Jhawat highlight the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease with respect to the current drug therapy.

In chapter 5, Abdelhamid and Wu present the use of biological mass spectrometry for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. This review also highlights the recent developments in disease diagnosis using mass spectrometry. Chapter 6 by Herrera emphasizes the structure-activity relationship of melanin as a source of energy. The last chapter by Suzuki et al., discusses the neuro-protective properties of the fungus Isaria japonica (IJ). The results showed that products derived from IJ may prevent or decrease the impact of dementia, especially AD.

The 6th volume of this book series represents the results of a huge amount of work by many eminent researchers. I am grateful to the authors for their excellent contributions. I would also like to express my gratitude to the editorial staff of Bentham Science Publishers, particularly Mr. Mahmood Alam (Director Publication), Mr. Shehzad Naqvi (Senior Manager Publications) and Ms. Fariya Zulfiqar (Assistant Manager Publications) for their hard work and persistent efforts.

Prof. Atta-ur-Rahman, FRS

Kings College

University of Cambridge

Cambridge

UK

List of Contributors

The Treatment of Brain Inflammation in Alzheimer’s Disease. Can Traditional Medicines Help?

James David Adams*

School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, 1985 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA

Abstract

The blood brain barrier degenerates in many people as they age. This degeneration can lead to inflammation, amyloid accumulation, neuron loss, tangle accumulation and dementia. Damage to the blood brain barrier may involve oxygen radical production through a visfatin mediated mechanism. Several plant medicines have been traditionally used to decrease the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Antioxidant mechanisms of action have been described for these medicines that may protect the blood brain barrier. These plant medicines provide alternative treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.

Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, Anti-inflammatory prevention, Plant medicines.


* Corresponding author James David Adams: School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, 1985 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA; Tel: 323-442-1362; Fax: 323-442-1681; E-mail: jadams@usc.edu

INTRODUCTION

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) involves neurodegeneration induced by amyloidβ. This neurodegeneration results in loss of neurons, plaque and tangle formation and ultimately in dementia. Many AD patients are treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors to slow the progression of mild AD. Eventually, most AD patients die from pneumonia and not neurodegeneration.

The current consensus is that AD is caused by amyloidβ toxicity in the brain [1]. It is clear that extracellular amyloidβ is toxic to neurons. Amyloidβ aggregates into fibrils, sheets and plaques. Some intermediate amyloid protein aggregates in the plaque formation process are toxic to neurons.

The role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of AD is well established [1]. Inflammation in AD can be secondary to amyloidβ accumulation. In other words, amyloidβ causes inflammation in the brain. Inflammation can also occur early in

the disease process and initiate amyloidβ accumulation and AD pathology [2]. This inflammation involves microglial cells, astrocytes, perivascular macrophages and monocytes that infiltrate into the brain [2]. There are a number of different inflammatory molecules that are produced in the brain in this inflammatory process and as a consequence of amyloidβ production including chemokines, complement molecules, cytokines, inflammatory and acute phase proteins, cyclooxygenase-2, and free radicals [2-5].

Tau phosphorylation leading to tangle formation may occur as the result of amyloidβ oligomer toxicity [1]. Microglial and astrocytic activation are also involved in alteration of tau phosphorylation [1]. Neurofibrillary tangles are frequently found in AD brains.

The question that remains unanswered is why does amyloidβ production increase in the brains of people who will develop AD? This question can be avoided by claiming that 100% of people will develop AD if they live long enough. In other words, amyloidβ accumulation is a natural process in the brain that cannot be avoided. However, many very old people do not develop AD.

Anti-inflammatory Agents in AD

Several epidemiological studies have examined the use of anti-inflammatory drugs in patients and have found that the use of these drugs may decrease the induction of AD. These studies have been critically reviewed [2, 5, 6]. The use of indomethacin was reported to slow the progression of AD [7]. This finding was later disputed [8]. Patients suffering from arthritis have a decreased risk of developing AD, perhaps because of their use of anti-inflammatory agents [9]. Several other reports have failed to show a protective effect of anti-inflammatory agents in the progression or development of AD. In addition, several attempts to slow the progression of AD with various anti-inflammatory drugs have failed to show an effect. It must be remembered that oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are very toxic, especially to the elderly. NSAIDs have effects on prostaglandins, lipoxins, resolvins, thromboxanes and other lipid metabolites. NSAIDs cause strokes, heart attacks, kidney damage and ulcers. They cause 42,000 or more deaths in the US every year. NSAIDs should be avoided in trials that hope to delay the progression of AD. Steroids damage the hippocampus and should also be avoided [10]. Perhaps the choice of anti-inflammatory agent has been inappropriate so far. In addition, the doses chosen may have been inappropriate in past studies. The doses chosen were probably too high and induced too much toxicity.

Risk Factors for Developing AD

If all people get AD with age, then the only risk factor for developing AD should be age. However, there are other risk factors that increase the chance of developing AD. The risk factors for developing AD are age, head trauma, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, apolipoprotein E4, thrombosis, peripheral inflammatory factors, decreased muscle mass and high alcohol consumption [11-13]. Women are more likely to develop AD than men [11-13]. Brain trauma can cause gliosis, inflammation and deleterious changes to the brain that may be important in AD. Peripheral inflammatory factors cause high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, atrial fibrillation and thrombosis [14]. These peripheral inflammatory factors include adipokines made in visceral and ectopic fat that are released into the blood. Inflammatory adipokines include visfatin, leptin, resistin, tumor necrosis factor α, IL-6 and others.

As people age, visceral and ectopic fat deposits develop. Toxic lifestyles, including lack of exercise and over eating, cause fat accumulation. Ectopic fat is fat that surrounds arteries, infiltrates muscles and other sites. Visceral fat accumulates in the peritoneal cavity. Therefore risk factors for AD are probably high blood levels of inflammatory adipokines released by visceral and ectopic fat. Obesity has increased greatly since the 1980s as reported by the Centers for Disease Control (www.cdc.gov). The incidence of AD has also increased greatly since 1980, in parallel with the increase in visceral obesity [15]. According to the Centers for Disease Control, among the entire US population, 93,500 people died while affected with AD in 2014. The entire US population, age adjusted death rate from AD increased by 39% from 2000 through 2010.

Several studies found the incidence of AD decreased over the last 25 years or more by about 25% [16-19], in spite of the increases in obesity and type 2 diabetes. These studies were done in selected populations and point to better education and better treatment of heart disease as ways to prevent AD. This indicates that patients who are educated enough about risk factors for AD to seek out better health care and other healthy lifestyle practices have a decreased risk. Weight reduction can be part of a healthy lifestyle. All of these studies advise that patients who practice healthy lifestyles have a decreased risk of developing AD. Is the incidence of AD actually decreasing in the US? The answer is clearly that the incidence of AD is increasing in the total US population.

Apolipoprotein E4 transports lipids inside the brain, including cholesterol and triglycerides. When triglycerides accumulate, the alternative fat ceramide is made in greater amounts. Apolipoprotein E4 is made in astrocytes and transports lipids to neurons by interacting with receptors in the low density lipoprotein receptor family. Since apolipoprotein E4 is a risk factor for developing AD, lipids are probably important in the mechanism of induction of AD.

Muscles produce myokines such as adiponectin, irisin, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-15 [20]. These myokines stimulate lipolysis, decrease atherosclerosis and are anti-inflammatory. Muscle is also responsible for clearing some insulin and glucose from the blood. Loss of muscle tissue causes insulin levels to increase leading to insulin resistance, also known as type 2 diabetes. Loss of anti-inflammatory myokines may be important in the induction of AD.

Alcohol consumption leads to visceral fat and ectopic fat accumulation since alcohol activates sterol regulatory element

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