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The Prophet

The Prophet

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The Prophet

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (59 valoraciones)
Longitud:
69 página
44 minutos
Editorial:
Publicado:
Apr 7, 2020
ISBN:
9781513263779
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

A worldwide best-seller since its date of original publication in 1923, The Prophet has become a token of free thought and intellectual betterment across many generations of readers. This unique and timeless classic is composed of 28 prose poetry fables, each examining a different facet of the human experience. A treasure worth holding close, The Prophet is an unforgettable book of poems worth savoring.

The Prophet serves as an intricate examination of the world through the eyes of prophet Almustafa on his way back to his native country after having been in exile for the past twelve years. On the ship carrying him home, Almustafa becomes engulfed in conversation with various passengers on board. Each conversation differs from the last while all providing valuable experiences for Almustafa. Providing insight, clarity, and depth, Almustafa’s musings on each subject make way for the ways in which one can better learn to understand the levels of deep human emotion. From the intricacies of human thought, and circumstance, Gibran’s words have carried with them a certain meditative and instructive examination of what it feels like to be human. With honorable mentions from celebrity authors and poets, the importance of reading The Prophet cannot be overstated. An absolute must-read for anyone seeking emotional enlightenment, guidance, or human insight. With each poem and line varying in length and explanation, The Prophet is as topical today as it was when it was first published.
Editorial:
Publicado:
Apr 7, 2020
ISBN:
9781513263779
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Khalil Gibran (1883–1931) was an essayist, novelist, and mystic poet. He wrote The Prophet, a collection of philosophical essays that went on to become one of the bestselling books of the twentieth century. Though he was born in Lebanon, he moved to Boston’s South End as a child and studied art with Auguste Rodin in Paris for two years before launching his literary career. Much of Gibran’s work contains themes of religion and Christianity as well as spiritual love.


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Vista previa del libro

The Prophet - Kahlil Gibran

FAREWELL

Almustafa, the chosen and the beloved, who was a dawn unto his own day, had waited twelve years in the city of Orphalese for his ship that was to return and bear him back to the isle of his birth.

And in the twelfth year, on the seventh day of Ielool, the month of reaping, he climbed the hill without the city walls and looked seaward; and he beheld his ship coming with the mist.

Then the gates of his heart were flung open, and his joy flew far over the sea. And he closed his eyes and prayed in the silences of his soul.

But as he descended the hill, a sadness came upon him, and he thought in his heart:

How shall I go in peace and without sorrow? Nay, not without a wound in the spirit shall I leave this city. Long were the days of pain I have spent within its walls, and long were the nights of aloneness; and who can depart from his pain and his aloneness without regret?

Too many fragments of the spirit have I scattered in these streets, and too many are the children of my longing that walk naked among these hills, and I cannot withdraw from them without a burden and an ache.

It is not a garment I cast off this day, but a skin that I tear with my own hands.

Nor is it a thought I leave behind me, but a heart made sweet with hunger and with thirst.

Yet I cannot tarry longer.

The sea that calls all things unto her calls me, and I must embark.

For to stay, though the hours burn in the night, is to freeze and crystallize and be bound in a mould.

Fain would I take with me all that is here. But how shall I?

A voice cannot carry the tongue and the lips that gave it wings. Alone must it seek the ether.

And alone and without his nest shall the eagle fly across the sun.

Now when he reached the foot of the hill, he turned again towards the sea, and he saw his ship approaching the harbour, and upon her prow the mariners, the men of his own land.

And his soul cried out to them, and he said:

Sons of my ancient mother, you riders of the tides,

How often have you sailed in my dreams. And now you come in my awakening, which is my deeper dream.

Ready am I to go, and my eagerness with sails full set awaits the wind.

Only another breath will I breathe in this still air, only another loving look cast backward,

And then I shall stand among you, a seafarer among seafarers.

And you, vast sea, sleepless mother,

Who alone are peace and freedom to the river and the stream,

Only another winding will this stream make, only another murmur in this glade,

And then shall I come to you, a boundless drop to a boundless ocean.

And as he walked he saw from afar men and women leaving their fields and their vineyards and hastening towards the city gates.

And he heard their voices calling his name, and shouting from field to field telling one another of the coming of his ship.

And he said to himself:

Shall the day of parting be the day of gathering?

And shall it be said that my eve was in truth my dawn?

And what shall I give unto him who has left his plough in midfurrow, or to him who has stopped the wheel of his winepress? Shall my heart become a tree heavy-laden with fruit that I may gather and give unto them?

And shall my desires flow like a fountain that I

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Lo que piensa la gente sobre The Prophet

4.3
59 valoraciones / 58 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (2/5)
    While reading this, it occurred to me that I would like to be drinking whatever Gibran was drinking while he wrote it. This is a book I have seen here and there, sometimes among shelves of old books in people's houses, ever since I was old enough to notice books. I don't think we had a copy in our home, but I could be mistaken. Certainly it hasn't come down into my possession as did many of my favorite books of my father's. In any case, the best word to describe "The Prophet" is drivel. Sure, it has a few nice quotes: "Let there be spaces in your togetherness" being a pretty clever one. And its assertion that live and death, pleasure and pain, etc. etc. etc. are just opposite sides of the same coin are certainly true to an extent. But the language is just pretty silly. Compared to other religious books--and I would treat this as such--it is pretty harmless, however.
  • (5/5)
    What can one say? Wisdom and beauty combined.
  • (4/5)
    I read The Prophet perhaps way way too quickly - its short enough to be read in a few hours, but deep enough to take years to digest. There's lots in there that would be good quotes to remember. It reminded me a little bit of the song 'Best of all possible worlds' in Candide(?) where this one know-it-all explains his unrelenting optimism.
  • (2/5)
    The translation I read makes it seem as if Gibran were trying to condense "Thus Spake Zarathustra." I'm not sure whether this is a fault of the specific translation
  • (3/5)
    Wijsheidsliteratuur op en top. Toch begrijp ik die Tagore-idolatrie niet echt goed.
  • (5/5)
    Beautiful and inspiring.
  • (5/5)
    I picked up a First Edition copy at Thrift Store! The Greatest Find of My life!
  • (3/5)
    "The Prophet" is a book that by it's own religious nature will vary in quality depending on one's personal views.
    I say this because as someone who has completly step back from any religious belief, I struggled with some of the book's content; some "truths" presented are those shared by many religions and therefore are completly dependent on belief.
    That being said, I would still recomend this book because of the beautiful imaginery recalled by the Prophet to deliver his teachings; most are so rich that there were parts I re-read several times because understanding the simple images felt many times like an ephifany in the sense that it gave order to some portion of the human experience without simplifying it.

    All things considered, it was worth reading since this is a small and well written book whose effect is more likely than not to bring some more perspective on religious beliefs.
  • (1/5)
    A useful work. That is, if you want to learn how to write a book that impresses millions with its apparent depth while saying nothing.
  • (2/5)
    Was not quite my cup of tea. Might re-read. Might re-rate then.
    But I just say - "It was okay"
  • (5/5)
    I originally read this book in high school over 30 years ago and found it beautiful. Today I find it enlightening, calming, and a constant source of re-examination. I actually keep a copy with me at all times to read whenever I need to wait somewhere and want a quick reminder. Very thought provoking and very new age.
  • (4/5)
    A beautiful book! The poetry is exquisite and often quoted for its beauty and profound insight. A MUST-READ! Gibran's prophet speaks eloquently on the topics of everyone's life: Love, Marriage, Children, Work, Joy and Sorrow, ... Time, ... Religion...This timeless work will have you thinking deeply and THAT is its greatest gift!
  • (4/5)
    (Read in 2002.) Favorite quotes:“And ever has it been that love knows not its own depth until the hour of separation.”“All these things shall love do unto you that you may know the secrets of your heart, and in that knowledge become a fragment of life’s heart.”“The deeper that sorrow carves into your being, the more joy you can contain.”
  • (5/5)
    a great look at life. a spiritual read on all topics of life. it has taken on a new meaning every time I read it.
  • (5/5)
    This is one book in which, as I came to the last few pages, I subconsciously began to read slower and slower: trying to make it last as I savored every word. There is real poetry in this book...the best kind that is full of wisdom and deep things said in the simplest way. A beautiful, gently philosophical read.
  • (5/5)
    Loved it. It is an aspirational book, full of advice based on ideal types...but that's great because we need to reach for something.
  • (5/5)
    "The Prophet" is a beautiful and timeless work of art. From the mouth of an old man about to sail away to a far off place, we hear the simple and lyrical wisdom of life and all its components, such as love, work, materialism, crime, freedom, friendship, pleasure, and death. This is a classic guide book for life, full of philosophical eloquence. It is a profound and poetic serman that puts much into perspective without feeling dogmatic or religious. Especially poignant were the writings on Marriage, Children, and Joy and Sorrow. The book can be read in less than an hour, but I'd suggest spending more time with it, allowing yourself to fully absorb this masterpiece. Ten stars.
  • (5/5)
    This small and beautiful collection of poems is wonderful. They cover any range of topics of life such as marriage and childhood. They are a great pick you up.
  • (5/5)
    i was surprised to learn that gibran was actually an (arab-)american poet and writer, considering that his body of work is almost completely left out of the western and american poetry "canon." the prophet is truly a gift that gibran left for the world. of all writing that i've read this is by far the most practical and accessible, and it's no wonder that it is the most widely read work of all time. the omission of this book from the western poetry canon smacks of racism, but also calls into question the definition and function of poetry in society. because the fact is that most poets will never touch as many people in such a profound way as gibran's prophet has and continues to--particularly those considered to be the "best" within the isolated privileged halls of academia. gibran's prophet's wisdom crosses cultures and time, despite the lack of enthusiam from the ivory towers of poetryland. in fact, the prophet is gibran himself."Beauty is life when life unveils her holy face. But you are life and you are the veil. Beauty is eternity gazing at itself in the mirror."
  • (5/5)
    Timeless in its wisdom. Less is definitely more in this slim volume. Excellent guide for living.
  • (5/5)
    In the seventh grade I learned teachers didn't know as much as they led us to believe. I'd read The Prophet and wanted to talk about it with my Tag English teacher. He had no idea who Kahlil Gibran was. It took me at least a week to wrap my brain around that fact.More years later than I'd care to admit, I still remember the impact the book had on me and, while I've never read it a second time, several passages and the overall impact stick with me.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite books of inspiration. I gave my Friday crew the book before they left for college. One of my favorite memories will always be sharing the book at Starbucks this summer.
  • (5/5)
    This book is priceless. If you haven't done so, read it soon. So much wisdom so sweetly and lovingly put forth.
  • (4/5)
    Pretty quick read with some wise insights into human nature and our relationship with God. Some favorites:

    "Verily the lust for comfort murders the passion of the soul, and then walks grinning in the funeral."

    On search for freedom:
    "And my heart bled within me; for you can only be free when even the desire of seeking freedom becomes a harness to you, and when you cease to speak of freedom as a goal and a fulfillment."

    On the mystery of death and afterlife:
    "In the depths of your hopes and desires lies your silent knowledge of the beyond;
    And like seeds dreaming beneath the snow your heart dreams of spring.
    Trust the dreams, for in them is hidden the gate to eternity."
  • (5/5)
    I feel like this is one of those essential books that everyone should read at least once in their lives. And, while it took me longer than it probably should have, I've finally read it.So much insight in Gibran's narrative, things that are timeless because they speak to the basics of human nature, which regardless of how much we "advance" as a society, will always remain true.Freedom, Time, Beauty, Crime & Punishment, Beauty, Teaching, Speaking; all concepts that the Prophet touches upon. Just do yourself a favor and pick this one up, it's definitely worth the read.This is one I'm going to keep close to me so I can reference it often.
  • (5/5)
    Sometimes you read a book, sometimes a book reads you.
  • (5/5)
    Always a good, quick read. Each time I read this text, I find new gems inside it. The pictures are a bit disturbing at times, but beautiful nonetheless. The story revolves around a man ('The Prophet') who is leaving his adopted country to finally return to his native land. He speaks to a large crowd who has gathered to see him depart, on such things as love, marriage, children, material objects, and death. Spiritual and inspiring.
  • (5/5)
    another MUST read for EVERYONE
  • (5/5)
    I just now got around to reading The Prophet. A lot of what's in here is common sense, easily recognized truths. One wishes that human beings would live by these sentiments, rather than just nodding their heads when they read them and then forgetting them in the context of real life. Some of the talk about God didn't appeal to me, although I recognize that Gibran seems to be talking about God more in the sense of a benign force in the universe rather than a being to be worshipped. Other bits flew right past me and would require rereading and further thought. And the ending bit about reincarnation--well, isn't it pretty to think so?Even though this reads like an early version of the New Age self-help books that are now ubiquitous, Gibran certainly had a gift for poetic language and simple but evocative imagery, which elevates his writing above all that other claptrap. This is a book that I can see myself returning to often. Read in 2014 for the RandomCAT Challenge.
  • (4/5)
    20 years ago my sister passed away and a professor at my university handed me this book to read "On Joy and Sorrow". It stayed with me for the next 20 years until I finally tracked it down to this book. The message in "On Joy and Sorrow" is one I've tried to pass on to a friend or two when it seemed it would be helpful.

    Having just finished the whole book, there are many passages here that are as thought provoking. Just about every aspect of life is covered in this small tome, and I'd recommend it to anyone who enjoys looking at the deeper meanings in everyday life.