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El gladiador

valoraciones:
3.5/5 (7 valoraciones)
Longitud:
573 páginas
10 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 ene 2011
ISBN:
9788435045148
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

LOS ENEMIGOS DEL IMPERIO BUSCAN VENGANZA.
Tras sus peripecias en Palmira ("Centurión"), Macro y Cato regresan por mar a Roma cuando una inesperada y violentísima tormenta los lanza a un escenario dominado por el caos.
Creta acaba de ser víctima de un terremoto devastador que ha acabado con casi toda autoridad romana en la isla, y sus habitantes intentan sobrevivir como pueden en un ambiente dominado por la miseria, la violencia y la anarquía. Cuando Macro y Cato intenten tomar las riendas de la situación e imponer un mínimo control sobre la situación, descubrirán que el hambre, el riesgo de epidemias y las carencias de personal sanitario suficiente son sólo males menores.
Un viejo "amigo" de los dos oficiales romanos, convertido ahora en un veterano gladiador, ha encontrado en este desorden una oportunidad excelente para liderar un levantamiento de esclavos que no tienen nada que perder y mucho que ganar. Los problemas para Macro y Cato se acumulan.
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 ene 2011
ISBN:
9788435045148
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Simon Scarrow teaches at City College in Norwich, England. He has in the past run a Roman history program, taking parties of students to a number of ruins and museums across Britain. He lives in Norfolk, England, and writes novels featuring Macro and Cato. His books include Under the Eagle and The Eagle's Conquest.


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3.4
7 valoraciones / 6 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (3/5)
    This is not a book I would normally choose to read but I was glad I did. Its the story of Marco and Cato they with a boat load of other Romans get shipwrecked in Crete after an earthquake. The slaves are rebelling chaos reigns and its up to them to sort out the mess. A slave called Ajax is leading the revolt. Marco and Cato have crossed paths with Ajax before and it was them that executed his father. Ajax wants blood and wants to kill his old adversaries. Marco and Juila (Catos girfriend are held hostage) Cato has to go to Egypt to enlist reinforcements. A large battle commences Julia and Marco are rescued, Marco joins in the fighting. Ajax escapes he will be hunted down in the next book though.. Good read this was quite interesting and I could imagine what it was like 2000 years ago.
  • (3/5)
    OK, these books contain quite a lot of anachronistic language and fairly predictable plotlines, but they have tremendous pace and excitement. I have a soft spot for them.
  • (3/5)
    Some of the dialogue seems far too anachronistic for the time period. The plot is pretty good, as are the characters. The way characters swear, or otherwise say or refer to things just seems a bit to modern and doesn't fit into the timeline for romans.
  • (4/5)
    One of the best in Scarrow's series about Cato and Macro, two Roman legionaries, to date. I've been reading them more or less in order, and the last few, though entertaining enough, have felt a bit formulaic. Gladiator though is a return to the form of the early books in the series. The plot is well constructed, a cut above the usual Roman military tourism. Central to the plot is a slave revolt in Crete, and Scarrow succeeds in portraying the perspective of both the rebel slaves and the Roman soldiers. Yes, much like C.S. Forrester's Hornblower series, or Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe novels, this is about characters who mysteriously play a central role in just about every campaign of the wars they live through; yes, there are quite a few battle scenes; yes, they're not great literature. But, like Hornblower and Sharpe, they're engagingly written, with a good eye for historical detail.
  • (4/5)
    After success in the last book, and as this is a series, we do expect success by the end of the novel, it is time to make our way home to Rome and for the heroes to get their rewards. Macro and Cato have been stepping up and giving great needed service to Rome, and Claudius and they deserve accolades.Instead an earthquake and tidal wave beset them as they are near Crete. It throws the Island into turmoil, seriously hammering the infrastructure and forcing our two Centurions to step up once more. We see the continuing evolution of Cato as a leader and we also see that Macro, once the Master, now becoming the lieutenant. Something that we knew from book one was a possibility and long overdue. What comes as an unexpected and pleasant addition is that we have an enemy who we had left behind long ago, emerge. One that gives us plausible cause to believe he is not only present at the recovering Crete, but his actions will and do impact the story. In all, a very good book and nice to see Cato finally on his path instead of treading water. A definite reread when we have the entire series finished.
  • (4/5)
    Another enjoyable and fun read about our two heroes as they battle Rome's enemies. This time it is slaves, slaves who use the opportunity provided by a destructive earthquake on the island of Crete to revolt against their masters, and attempt to free themselves. With a little help from the governor of Egypt and some daring do, Cato crushes the rebels, saves his girl, and his friend, but is then despatched to chase down the slave leader, following him across the Mediterranean. An Odysseus like conclusion.

    To the same quality as the previous books in the series. I will admit the tension about the fate two centurions (though Cata is appointed a prefect by the end of this novel), is hard to find. It is obvious that if any two people survive a disaster it will be these two. They have survived so much thus far.