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El águila del imperio

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El águila del imperio

valoraciones:
4/5 (18 valoraciones)
Longitud:
425 páginas
7 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 ene 2011
ISBN:
9788435046305
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

En esta primera entrega de la serie asistimos a los primeros pasos de Quinto Licinio Cato, que obtiene la libertad en Roma a cambio de enrolarse en la legión romana.Tras una primera campaña en Germania, viaja a las islas británicas, tierra de brujas habitada por salvajes.
De la mano del rudo centurión Lucio Cornelio Macro, iniciará una emocionante y divertida carrera militar.
La segunda legión augusta, por entonces al mando de Vespasiano, será testigo de sus primeras hazañas.
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 ene 2011
ISBN:
9788435046305
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Simon Scarrow teaches at City College in Norwich, England. He has in the past run a Roman history program, taking parties of students to a number of ruins and museums across Britain. He lives in Norfolk, England, and writes novels featuring Macro and Cato. His books include Under the Eagle and The Eagle's Conquest.


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3.9
18 valoraciones / 18 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    Es una novela muy entretenida, te "engancha" casi desde el primer momento
  • (3/5)
    A really good yarn involving a couple of Roman soldiers mixed up in the invasion of Britain some long time before Brexit.
  • (4/5)
    I discovered this at a book store, but decided to acquire the book as a Kindle edition, rather than a physical book. I have partially decided that purchasing paperback editions of ephemeral novels is not a good use of shell space, and the Kindle allows me to indulge in escapist fiction without a prolonged wait to get to the bookstore. This is the first novel in the series about Cato and Macro, Roman centurions in the time of Claudius. Cato is a son of a freedman in the imperial household, sent to join the legion so he can gain citizenship. He is appointed immediately as an optio because of the imperial influence. Macro is his centurion, and they become friends, and the basis for the continuing series. There is a plot against the emporer, fighting with German tribes, and the initial invasion of Britain. Cato and Macro retrieve the gold left behind by Julius Caesar, become known to Narcissus, the power behind Claudius, and to Vespasian, here the good legate leading the legion, and the conniving Vitellius. Very convincing historical fiction, fast paced, and absorbing.
  • (4/5)
    This book was a nice surprise that I completely enjoyed from start to finish. The comparisons of the writing style to that of Cornwell is pretty much right on, and I felt that there was just enough mix of history and action to make this a fun read for those who enjoy adventure stories and Roman History.

    This book follows a few main characters, with the central character being the recently freed palace slave Cato. Cato is forced to join the army, and the story follows him from his training to a fight in the German frontier lands to the eventual climax of the book with a large fight against the Britons. Exciting stuff and just enough history to make the time period come alive.

    I would not describe this book as great literature, but it sure was fun and I look forward to the next one.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting, and at times quite funny, story of a young man who finds himself in the Roman Legions in Gaul under Emperor Claudius.
  • (5/5)
    The first book in the Eagle series was really addictive reading for me. Two totally different characters thrown together in the brutal world of the Roman Legion, where together they form an unlikely partnership that quickly becomes warm, witty and intriguing. The author does a good job of making the Roman world, that can often be portrayed as a stuffy and aloof, seem real and identifiable to modern readers who might not otherwise enjoy this genre. The dialogue especially helps in this sense. I picked this up one Christmas holiday a few years back and had it finished the next day...and was then on the net looking for the rest of the series. Well worth a read.
  • (4/5)
    This is an enjoyable adventure story that smacks slightly of 80's buddy movies, with the new guy and the experienced veteran who unhappily takes him under his wing.It's fascinating to read a roman story that doesn't focus entirely on the political chicanery but more on the life of the common soldier. The story flows well with a good build up to the final few action sequences and story twists.I certainly intend to pick up the rest of the series and I'm kicking myself that I didn't go down to see the author when he appeared at my local bookseller recently!
  • (4/5)
    Pacey thriller, fulfilling the author's wish to write a military page turner set during the Roman invasion of Britain. The actual invasion of Britain (over three quarters of the way through) is a bit of an anti-climax and the Britons are not really in it until the battle at the end, except as an amorphous horde over the next hill or just inside the nearest patch of mist. Not as good as Saylor, but diverting and exciting. I will be reading the following 7 (at the latest count) novels in the series.
  • (5/5)
    Again - a good Roman based story. The characters are very believable and Cato and Marco are excellent. I wasn't keen on Centurion though - I felt it was a rehash of an earlier story. The others are well worth reading for fans of historical fiction.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent character development of Cato and Macro with intriguing plot and fast action. This is the author's first novel: hopefully he will be able to keep things going without falling into a repetitive rut. If so, he will rate right up there with Bernard Cornwell and Dewey Lambdin!
  • (4/5)
    Very entertaining read.
  • (4/5)
    Very interesting take on actual historical events when the Emperor came over to expand Roman rule of Britain.

    Good plot too.
  • (3/5)
    A well-researched look at Roman military operations during the invasion of Britain in the First Century. Scarrow has done a very effective job of painting a realistic picture of warfare as it might have been fought in this time and place, and spiced the package liberally with political intrigue. His character development is uneven, although when it is good, it is very good indeed. The ending is inconclusive and unsatisfying; probably intended to be a precursor to a sequel. Solid entertainment though.
  • (3/5)
    Could do with some more character development. An easy read though. Probably an airport novel. I thought it was historical fiction, but apart from some commentary at the beginning on the structure of a legion, there was nothing that helped me to know whether anything in the book bore any resemblance to anything in history. Some of these sorts of stories hold the tension because you invest your concern in the underdog overcoming and stronger adversary. I find it hard to regard the Romans as underdogs. Therefore found myself cheering for the Germans and the British. I reckon this tension detracts a little from the enjoyability of the book.
  • (4/5)
    Simon Scarrow's "Under the Eagle" is the first in a terrific series of novels on the Roman Military. The series follows two soldiers - Macro and Cato - fighting under Vespasian in the mid-first Century AD."Under the Eagle's" action is terrific and Scarrow has done a very good job of making each battle sequence unique. It's perhaps the best in Scarrow's series, but I've found the second, "The Eagle's Conquest", equally as enjoyable.The core components of the story consist of the introduction of the characters, their initial bonding during an action-packed fight in Europe, and then, as the war front moves to Britain, a series of exciting battles orbiting the search and discovery of war loot buried in Britain by Julius Caesar about a century earlier."Under the Eagle" introduces our two main characters. Macro is the older battle-hardened Centurion. He fights hard and drinks harder. Cato is a freed slave who grew up in the palaces on the Palatine Hill in Rome. He's young, lanky, bookish and completely unfamiliar with a military lifestyle. Coming from different worlds, Macro and Cato clash. And the story launches it most persistent theme by defining the growth of each character individually and the growth of their relationship.It's a "buddy" book, with action, adventure, and fun interplay between characters set in the dramatic locations of a peaking Roman Empire.The characters are a bit thin and superficial, but are drawn from familiar military examples. In Scarrow's world, while the weapons, strategies, tactics and politics are very Roman, the character-types are pretty timeless. You could conceivably modify the language slightly and picture Macro and Cato in WWII, Vietnam, or even on an alien world.If you're looking for military action, then this book is for you. It's a fast and engaging read. It's not the deepest of military dramas, so if you're looking for something more substantial, I'd recommend Wallace Breem's "Eagle in the Snow", or Robert Graves' "I, Claudius".Consider "Eagle" a solid snack, compared to the full meal you'd get with Breem or Graves. Another analogy would place "Eagle" as a summer blockbuster, but you shouldn't expect it to win many Oscars.All in all...I highly recommend this book and series.
  • (3/5)
    A good read. A young boy is enlisted into the Roman Army and grows up quick and comes of age. Throw in some Empirial power struggles add some spy versus spy and you have a book to spend a few quite evenings in.
  • (4/5)
    This is a page turner.Granted, Simon Scarrow is not the best writer in the world, but he's definitely good enough. His writing is entertaining, he is great in coming up with good intriges and tells a good tale. What he is really good at is creating characters. When I read this book I could almost touch Macro and Cato. Wonderfully done and they also develop as the story goes on. A true pleasure to read.I like the fact that Simon Scarrow know so much about the Romans and their army/battles. He mixes fiction with history and comes up with quite an interesting mix. It reads like a novel (which of course it is), but you learn something at the same time.Where I used to find Romans incredibly boring, I am now enjoing reading about them and I'm seriously thinking about buying the entire Eagle series.I like the style of the book as well. It's straight and to the point. A real no nonsense approach. As I said in the beginning, it's a page turner. You can't really go wrong with this.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting crime story set into the period when Romans (under emperor Claudius) are preparing for second invasion of British Isles.[return][return]We follow Cato, intellectual of sorts, from the time he enters the Second Legion, becomes sergeant under centurion Macro and finally ends up involved into court machinations and plots.[return][return]Interesting read, very fast-paced action but nevertheless it is obvious this one is intended to be the first in series of books ending is somewhat undefined.[return][return]Recommended.