Disfruta de millones de libros electrónicos, audiolibros, revistas y más

A solo $11.99/mes después de la prueba. Puedes cancelar cuando quieras.

No disponibleEl águila abandona Britania
Actualmente no disponible en Scribd

El águila abandona Britania

Continuar navegando

Actualmente no disponible en Scribd

El águila abandona Britania

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (6 valoraciones)
Longitud:
593 páginas
10 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 jul 2018
ISBN:
9788435046978
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

En lo que parece que va a ser el ataque definitivo contra las hordas de Carataco, la tercera cohorte debe desempñar un papel de primer orden, cortando una posible retirada.Sin embargo, el fracaso en el cumplimiento de esta misión, la desbandada que éste provoca y las luchas internas en el seno de la propia cohorte va a desencadenar una situación crítica.
En su búsqueda de una cabeza de turco, el nuevo centurión superior se fija en los centuriones Macro y Cato que tendrán que tomar una difícil decisión.
Encadenando escenas sumamente divertidas, espléndidas recreaciones de batallas y una acertada reproducción de la vida en un campamento romano rodeado de bárbaros britanos, el autor ha dado una de las mejores novelas de un ciclo que gana interés y emoción en cada nueva entrega.
La presencia y los avatares de los romanos en Britania es un aspecto de la historia poco tratado hasta la fecha en novelas históricas, y la obra de Scarrow cubre perfectamente esta carencia.
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 jul 2018
ISBN:
9788435046978
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Simon Scarrow teaches at City College in Norwich, England. He has in the past run a Roman history program, taking parties of students to a number of ruins and museums across Britain. He lives in Norfolk, England, and writes novels featuring Macro and Cato. His books include Under the Eagle and The Eagle's Conquest.


Relacionado con El águila abandona Britania

Libros relacionados


Reseñas

Lo que piensa la gente sobre El águila abandona Britania

4.3
6 valoraciones / 4 Reseñas
¿Qué te pareció?
Calificación: 0 de 5 estrellas

Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    Another day, another novel on the Kindle. I have been unable to do much except escape from my daily concerns by becoming involved in the lives of Cato and Macro, Roman Centurions. They are led to disaster by an old centurion who allows revenge to deflect him from defending a ford. Cato is selected for decimation, but saved by Macro. Cato then leads the other condemned men to find the British rebel, Caratacus, and eventually captures the Briton.
  • (4/5)
    Rollicking good yarn. I am starting to feel a measure of sympathy for the Brits.
  • (5/5)
    Once again a brilliant book by Simon Scarrow. The previous book, The Eagle and the Wolves, was quite a surprise for me. I thought it was exciting and thrilling and I was worried 'the next book' wouldn't be as good. Quite frankly, it isn't, but it's damn close! I don't know how he does it, but Simon Scarrow manages to get the two Romans (Macro and Cato) into bigger trouble every time. Even more amazing: he also manages to get them out of it. I'm impressed with the man's imagination; I even find his solutions to their problems believable. Of course it helps that I know next to nothing about the Romans to begin with.Just like the previous books: plenty of battle, intrige, blood and gore. Just my kind of thing!
  • (4/5)
    “The Eagle's Prey” is Simon Scarrow's solid fifth volume in his "Eagle" series focused on roman military adventures in the early first century, AD. This is not the best of Scarrow's series, but it's an entertaining story of well-written action sequences held together by a reasonably solid, if not unique and totally cohesive, plot.If you're new the adventures of now-Centurions Macro and Cato, you should look to “Under the Eagle” (#1) and “The Eagle's Conquest” (#2) for the best in terms of character introduction and genuinely fun and detailed action/adventure. This book stands alone in a self-contained story with brief character introductions, but can't be enjoyed fully without having the foundation of the first two "Eagle" books.In "Prey", Macro and Cato are Centurions assigned to the 2nd Legion of the Roman Army. Led by Legate Vespasian (future Emperor), the 2nd is tasked with subduing native peoples in Britain in the mid first century, AD. Both are in their second seasons of campaigning on the Isle and look forward to the endgame in putting down what appears to be their primary foe in the barbarian Caratacus. Both Cato and Macro end up implicated in the 2nd's failure to contain Caratacus, and find themselves fighting an upstream battle against their superiors in a three-part conflict that's a running theme throughout Scarrow's series: 1) do what's moral and right; 2) do what's proper as a Roman legionary and for Rome; 3) minimize the personal and professional damage while often going against the grain.“Prey” is a fine book…the story moves along swiftly and the characters have that familiarity like a cousin that was close when you were younger but whom you now only see 3 or 4 times a year. That familiarity is borne from their growth throughout Scarrow’s series, but also because their characterizations are a bit flat and predictable.All of the “Eagle” books have a tv-movie feel. Think about the original “Star Trek” or “Star Trek – The Next Generation”…they were both cutting edge in their own rights, but at the end of the day they were built on TV budgets and to fit in TV schedule lengths. Compared against the stronger or newest Star Trek films, they appear a little shallower in production and storyline. Following the analogy, I'd compare of Scarrow’s “Eagle” to TV Star Trek as compared to deeper and more emotive film “Gladiator”.I’ve found that I genuinely enjoy picking up the next story in the ongoing saga of Cato and Macro. I look forward to peeling back the next layer of their personalities, and uncovering the next chapter in their journeys in the Roman Army. Overall, I recommend this book.