Disfruta de millones de libros electrónicos, audiolibros, revistas y más

A solo $11.99/mes después de la prueba. Puedes cancelar cuando quieras.

No disponibleLa profecía del águila
Actualmente no disponible en Scribd

La profecía del águila

Continuar navegando

Actualmente no disponible en Scribd

La profecía del águila

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (8 valoraciones)
Longitud:
618 páginas
10 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 jul 2018
ISBN:
9788435046992
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

La pareja de centuriones formada por Macro y Cato se encuentra en Roma a la espera de ver cómo se resuelve el conflicto en que se han visto metidos como resultado del asesinato del general Plautio, cuando inesperadamente cae en sus manos una misión de la que depende el futuro del Imperio romano.Se trata de recuperar unos papiros de incalculable valor que se hallan en manos de piratas, lo que les obliga a embarcarse y enfrentarse a las terribles hordas de piratas que pugnaban por aquella época (45 a. C.) con las tropas romanas por el control del Mediterráneo.
Sin duda, se trata de la aventura más arriesgada a la que se han enfrentado los personajes de Scarrow hasta la fecha, y en este caso con la particularidad de desconocer por completo el medio en el que han de desenvolverse (el mar) y, por si fuera poco, en compañía de uno de sus más acérrimos rivales, Vitelio.
Scarrow es un genio imprimiendo sentido del humor, humanidad a los personajes y una estupenda recreación de la vida cotidiana en Roma que muestra un profundo conocimiento de las costumbres militares de la época.
El vigor narrativo insuperable en el relato de acciones y de tramas marcadas por la rivalidad y las traiciones, a lo que, en esta ocasión, hay que añadir una apasionante recreación de las batallas navales y de la vida en el mar.
Una serie que no dejará indiferentes a lectores apasionados de las novelas de civilizaciones antiguas y en este caso a los apasionados de las batallas navales.
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 jul 2018
ISBN:
9788435046992
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Simon Scarrow teaches at City College in Norwich, England. He has in the past run a Roman history program, taking parties of students to a number of ruins and museums across Britain. He lives in Norfolk, England, and writes novels featuring Macro and Cato. His books include Under the Eagle and The Eagle's Conquest.


Relacionado con La profecía del águila

Libros relacionados


Reseñas

Lo que piensa la gente sobre La profecía del águila

4.3
8 valoraciones / 6 Reseñas
¿Qué te pareció?
Calificación: 0 de 5 estrellas

Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    Its a great novel to wind up, relax and entertain.
  • (4/5)
    A good read like the others and I didn't have to wallow up tp my knees in blood.
  • (5/5)
    I've said it before and I'll say it again: it's not fantastic, but it's a good read. I can't put these books down!And that's quite something coming from someone with an aversion (to say the least) to Romans. I like Macro and Cato. I want to know what they are up to. I hope Vitellius gets...well, something nasty...at some point.I suppose Simon Scarrow is a better writer than I give him credit for. Because, eventhough I complain about his style (I love the game of finding the word 'bodily' in every book), he's got me hooked. So he must be doing something right.Now, where's the next one?
  • (3/5)
    Simon Scarrow's sixth installment of his "Eagle" story follows Centurions Macro and Cato during a transitional phase in the threaded storyline of this Sand and Sandals series. In the last book, "The Eagle's Prey", our heroes were banished from the war front in Britannia, where the majority of the previous five books took place. "Prophecy" centers on Rome's battle against piracy in and around the northeast Italian coast while providing a launch pad for our characters to explore the further reaches of the Roman Empire."Prophecy" is built around two primary plot points. The first is Rome's battle with piracy in the Adriatic Sea. The second is a mystery around the discovery of certain scrolls that the pirates have seized and are holding for bid with high-dollar potential buyers. The story starts in Rome, several months after the episode in Brittania, and provides new scenery for our boys from the Legion. While not many pages were dedicated to their time in Rome, the urban capital makes for a strong change of pace to the overall series storyline.Furthering that change of pace, Scarrow places the bulk of the story on and around the sea, including numerous naval battles, and the requisite drama associated with the high seas. Macro and Cato are already well-cast characters. If you're not familiar with the series, you won't be too enlightened by their development, however we do get a peek into Macro's youth. I enjoyed the book. There's something comforting about returning to characters you know, including Vespasian who teams up again with Macro and Cato. Vitellius returns in his role as leading foil, setting up what will likely be an ultimate battle between he and Vespasian for Rome's leadership in 69 AD.Scarrow isn't writing historical literature...he's writing historical fiction - it's fun, down to earth, adventurous and exciting. He knows his space well and is comfortable with his characters' place and the enticement to his audience.I find the entire series a great escape and touch-point to the wold of the Roman Empire.
  • (4/5)
    Great stuff. Scarrow's "Eagles" series is difficult to put down. I find I read one and then must immediately read the next. Here our two rough heroes find themselves all at sea chasing pirates, while their real mission is to recover an item of profound imperial importance. There is also a dash of soap opera with Macro's discovery of his mother and his own background. Good fun. Recommended.
  • (3/5)
    Another day, another novel on the Kindle. I have been unable to do much except escape from my daily concerns by becoming involved in the lives of Cato and Macro, Roman Centurions. They are led to disaster by an old centurion who allows revenge to deflect him from defending a ford. Cato is selected for decimation, but saved by Macro. Cato then leads the other condemned men to find the British rebel, Caratacus, and eventually captures the Briton.