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"Where's Your Bathroom?"

"Where's Your Bathroom?"

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"Where's Your Bathroom?"

Longitud:
156 página
1 hora
Editorial:
Publicado:
Apr 6, 2019
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

A transgender woman drives across America in search of the truth behind the anti-LGBTQ Legislation Movements of Mississippi, Tennessee, and Texas. Will she incur the wrath from the public in the anti-LGBTQ states? What will happen when she uses the bathroom or dressing rooms? How will the public treat her? Along the way, she will review the places she stays, shops and eats. Are they transgender friendly? Is the bathroom issue the will of the majority or a select minority? Is the bathroom issue even real? How does legislation like this affect our youth?

Editorial:
Publicado:
Apr 6, 2019
Formato:
Libro

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"Where's Your Bathroom?" - Tracy Hinton

Tracy Hinton

Where's Your Bathroom?

A Transgender Woman Drives Across America In Search of the Truth Behind the Anti-LGBTQ Legislation Movements.

Copyright © 2019 by Tracy Hinton

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise without written permission from the publisher. It is illegal to copy this book, post it to a website, or distribute it by any other means without permission.

First edition

This book was professionally typeset on Reedsy

Find out more at reedsy.com

This book is dedicated to the LGBTQ community, family members, supporters, and the nonprofit organizations that support them.

All You Need Is Love

Love, love, love

Love, love, love

Love, love, love

There’s nothing you can do that can’t be done

Nothing you can sing that can’t be sung

Nothing you can say, but you can learn how to play the game

It’s easy

Nothing you can make that can’t be made

No one you can save that can’t be saved

Nothing you can do, but you can learn how to be you in time

It’s easy

All you need is love

All you need is love

All you need is love, love

Love is all you need

All you need…

John Lennon & Paul McCarthy

Contents

Preface

Acknowledgement

Driving Across America: Nevada, Texas and Oklahoma

Mississippi

Tennessee

Albuqurque, New Mexico

The Politics of Manipulation; Change is Bad

Anti-LGBTQ Legislation; Our Youth

Embrace Change, Embrace a Transgender

Conclusion

Preface

Sixteen states—Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington and Wyoming—have considered legislation that would restrict access to multiuser restrooms, locker rooms, and other sex-segregated facilities on the basis of a definition of sex or gender consistent with sex assigned at birth or biological sex.

Six states—Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia—have considered legislation that would preempt municipal and county-level anti-discrimination laws. North Carolina is the only state to pass this type of legislation (House Bill 2 and House Bill 142). The legislation is still pending in Missouri, South Carolina, and Texas.

Fourteen states—Arkansas, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia—have considered legislation that would limit transgender students’ rights at school. The bills in New Jersey and Oklahoma are in response to withdrawn federal guidance issued in May 2016 regarding school’s obligations to transgender students.

Recently Tennessee approved legislation on bathroom rights. Indecent exposure and the initial language included the following no defense language:

A medical, psychiatric, or psychological diagnosis of gender dysphoria, gender confusion, or similar conditions, in the absence of untreated mental conditions, such as schizophrenia, does not serve as a defense to the offense of indecent exposure.

This must be a big topic in Tennessee. The public must be outraged for politicians to take such a hardline. Would I experience this outrage? What about other states? Recently the Supreme Court issued a statement rejecting to take up a challenge to a Mississippi law that allows businesses and government officials to deny services to LGBT people as if doing so would conflict with certain sincerely held religious beliefs.

The court leaves in place a 2016 law passed in Mississippi that allows business owners to decide the transgender bathroom issue individually based on their religious belief. The bill dumbed Religious Freedom gave business owners the power to discriminate. Could I open a business in Mississippi and do the same against certain religions? Could I say, I really would love to let you use our restroom but you believe in X religion? Religious conservatives applauded the Supreme Court decision. The Mississippi legislation to protect religious rights was supported by Gov. Phil Bryant.

With the Supreme Court rejecting the cases, it leaves a federal appellate court ruling stand that allowed the 2016 ruling to take effect. Several advocates have been outspoken on the subject including Beth Littrell, a lawyer for Lambda Legal. Beth stated, We had challenged it before it went into effect … before people were hurt and turned away and left without all the access to health care and government services that everyone else has.

The appeals court acknowledged that they weren’t stating if the law was unconstitutional or not. They were saying that the plaintiff in the case had no legal standing to bring the case forward. To me, it’s a sleight of hand. I understand the legal process. I also understand the intent of the question. The intent of the question was if the ruling unfairly discriminated against members of the population. So why didn’t the Supreme Court hear the case? They did not state their reason. The law provides for the protection of a persons’ religious belief or moral convictions. The following is a section of the law enacted:

(a) Marriage is or should be recognized as the union of one man and one woman;

(b) Sexual relations are properly reserved to such a marriage; and

(c) Male (man) or female (woman) refer to an individual’s immutable biological sex as objectively determined by anatomy and genetics at the time of birth.

As I have said from the beginning, this law was democratically enacted and is perfectly constitutional. The people of Mississippi have the right to ensure that all of our citizens are free to peacefully live and work without fear of being punished for their sincerely held religious beliefs, Bryant said, according to Mississippi Today.

Certainly, in Mississippi, the transgender bathroom issue was a hot topic.

How about Texas? In 2017, the transgender bathroom debate dominated the media and Texan legislators. The Texas Privacy Act, better known as the bathroom, would restrict the use of bathrooms and other intimate areas such as changing room use to the identified gender on a persons’ birth certificate. The Texas Privacy Act was sidelined for more recently urgent issues. Companies like Facebook, United Airlines and IBM helped kill the bill. Will it be back? The religious body thinks so. The bill seemingly cracks down on transgender rights while expanding the rights of religious groups. They want to keep men out of women bathrooms. They want to expand religious freedom.

Across America, the transgender bathroom debate continues. Voters appear to be concerned, and legislators seize upon the opportunity to build upon their political base. I was concerned, the anti-transgender bills across our great country seemed to materialize out of thin air.

When I ran for Congress, I was a participant in a debate at one of the largest gatherings of people from the farming community called Farm Fest. I had a lot I wanted to discuss including country of origin of ingredients in our foods. That topic of debate didn’t happen. It was about gays. I was stunned. I sat there listening to the topic and like the transgender issue, I couldn’t believe it. When it was my turn, I said to the enormous group, "There’s a lot I can debate here. Country of origin,

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