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Mueller's War

Mueller's War

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Mueller's War

valoraciones:
4/5 (50 valoraciones)
Longitud:
71 página
1 hora
Publicado:
Mar 27, 2019
ISBN:
9781645288367
Formato:
Libro

Nota del editor

Scribd Original…

Get more insight into the man at the eye of the ongoing political storm in our first Scribd Original. Award-winning journalist Garrett Graff gives us the first in-depth account of Mueller’s time as a Marine during the Vietnam War, and reveals why and how Mueller became who he is today: an inscrutable man, with integrity beyond reproach.

Descripción

For 675 days, he was arguably the most important man in America, responsible for the historic investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Yet through it all, Robert Mueller remained a mystery to many. In an era when leaks and backbiting are the political norm, the former FBI director distinguished himself with his reticence and determination to get the job done. The work has been both damning and detailed. Over the course of his Russia probe, Mueller won guilty pleas from the Trump campaign’s chairman and deputy, the national security adviser, and a foreign policy aide, as well as President Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen. Even more were indicted, including Trump’s longtime friend and adviser Roger Stone. By the end, what started as a probe into the 2016 election had sprawled into at least 18 separate investigations, run not just by Mueller’s team but by at least seven other prosecutors’ offices as well.

To understand the man at the helm of this historic inquiry, we need to go back to 1968, when, as a newly minted Marine lieutenant, Robert Mueller was shipped to Vietnam and put in charge of a unit that saw almost nonstop combat. Mueller joined their ranks during what would be the deadliest period of the Vietnam War. He soon convinced his wary men that he was distinctly different from many of the Ivy League leaders they’d had in the past. The men of Hotel Company were so tough and battle-hardened, they had earned the nickname Magnificent Bastards. Smart, decisive, and duty-bound, the future FBI director led his unit into some of the bloodiest fighting they would ever see, including the notorious battle for Mutter’s Ridge. His time in the Marines would earn Mueller the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart and, above all, the trust and respect of his men. In the decades of public service that would follow, nothing would match that year of combat. “I’m most proud the Marines Corps deemed me worthy of leading other Marines,” he says.

In this first detailed account of the defining period in Mueller’s life, Garrett M. Graff, author of the bestselling The Threat Matrix: The FBI at War, follows Mueller’s journey from prep school to Princeton to the jungles of Vietnam. Groomed for service from a young age, Mueller approached his military career with a no-nonsense integrity that would become his trademark. He unhesitatingly led his men into battle and bravely pulled them off the field when they fell. Graff re-creates those terrifying moments and speaks at length with the survivors who, to this day, are awed by the actions of their young lieutenant. Ironically, most of those men were unaware that the man who led the Russia investigation is the same Robert Mueller who led them in battle. Even in the midst of the most controversial and high-profile investigation in American political history, Mueller prefers to keep a low profile and live by his nation’s military principles: duty, honor, country.

Publicado:
Mar 27, 2019
ISBN:
9781645288367
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Garrett M. Graff is a journalist and historian who has spent more than a dozen years writing about politics, technology, and national security for numerous publications, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, Wired, Bloomberg Businessweek. He is the former editor of Politico and Washingtonian magazines and is executive director of the Aspen Institute’s Cybersecurity & Technology Program. His books include The Threat Matrix: Inside Robert Mueller’s FBI, Raven Rock: The Inside Story of the U.S. Government’s Secret Plan to Save Itself—While the Rest of Us Die, and The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9/11, to be published in fall 2019 by Simon & Schuster.


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Cotizaciones principales

  • The last time Mueller tried private practice was in the early 1990s, when his tenure as assistant attorney general for the Criminal Division ended with the George H. W. Bush administration. He’d lasted barely a year before calling Eric Holder, then the U.

  • By the end of the year, Mueller had been rotated out of Vietnam and was working at a desk at Marine headquarters in Washington. There he came to a different conclusion. “I didn’t relish the U.S. Marine Corps absent combat,” he told me.

  • Many young Americans went out of their way to avoid fighting; thousands began to trek to Canada. Others, like Donald Trump, who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1968, relied on medical deferments for a variety of ailments and maladies.

  • For the most part, Mueller skipped such activities, though he was into the era’s music. (Creedence Clearwater Revival remains a particular favorite.) He used his rare downtime to read: novels, nonfiction, anything that made it into the jungle.

  • There was, it turned out, only one thing he was bad at—and it was a failing that would become familiar to legions of his subordinates in the decades to come: He received a D in delegation.

Vista previa del libro

Mueller's War - Garrett M. Graff

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A MONTH BEFORE the 2016 presidential election, Robert Mueller traveled to West Point, the site of the U.S. Military Academy, to collect one of the armed forces’ most storied awards. The Thayer Award, named after the so-called Father of the Military Academy, Sylvanus Thayer, is given each year to an American who demonstrates utmost devotion to the country and who has lived the academy’s principles of duty, honor, country. Its honor roll reads like a Who’s Who of the American Century: Dwight Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, Neil Armstrong, Walter Cronkite, Billy Graham, Bob Hope, and Edward Teller, the inventor of the atomic bomb, along with various presidents, generals, cabinet secretaries, and Supreme Court justices. 

At West Point, Mueller and the academy superintendent, Lieutenant General Robert L. Caslen Jr., stood shoulder to shoulder in the superintendent’s olive drab Humvee, its status clearly denoted by the three white stars on the license plate. As the golden evening sun poured down on the plain at West Point, they watched the academy’s corps of cadets troop by, resplendent in their gray dress uniforms. Mueller wore his own version of a uniform—white shirt, conservative blue tie, navy blue suit—familiar to anyone who had seen him as FBI director. He rarely varied much, fashionwise, sometimes in his wilder moments opting for a red tie. 

That night, Mueller accepted the Thayer Award during a ceremony in Washington Hall and reminisced about the role those three principles—duty, honor, country—had played in his own life. I often tell people I have been blessed with three families, he told the cadets. My family—my wife and children—my Marine Corps family, and, for twelve years, my FBI family. From all three families, I have learned one or two lessons. Mueller proceeded to tell stories of each family that illustrated the four key virtues he saw as central to a life well lived: service, integrity, patience, and humility.

For Mueller, the Thayer Award was a capstone to a life of public service, work that had begun fifty years earlier in the jungles of Vietnam and ended in the seventh-floor director’s suite at FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C. 

In the years since he’d left office, in 2013, as the longest-serving FBI director since J. Edgar Hoover himself—his original ten-year term extended by two years through special congressional legislation that passed the Senate by a unanimous vote of 100–0—Mueller had settled into that unique role bestowed upon the small number of distinguished, wise old owls in the twilight of their career whose personal integrity stands beyond reproach: inquisitor for hire. He was the person companies in crisis called to examine and clean up an internal scandal, a person whose very hiring would instantly calm shareholders, board members, and regulators. 

His first major role had been investigating the NFL’s handling of the 2014 Ray Rice domestic violence incident, in which the Baltimore Ravens running back knocked his girlfriend unconscious in a casino elevator. Mueller authored a definitive account of the league’s culpability that was quickly dubbed the Mueller report by the media. More recently, Volkswagen had appointed him the settlement master to oversee the more than five hundred lawsuits stemming from its diesel emissions scandal. 

These forays into the private sector had been marked by unhappiness, a frustration that he wasn’t in service to the country, wasn’t waking each morning, making his bed—as the Marines had taught him to do—and then heading off to fight the good fight for justice. The last time Mueller tried private practice was in the early 1990s, when his tenure as assistant attorney general for the Criminal Division ended with the George H. W. Bush administration. He’d lasted barely a year before calling Eric Holder, then the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, and asking to return as a junior prosecutor, the equivalent of a three-star general retiring only to reenlist as a second lieutenant. 

Yet by the time he stood on that autumn Thursday to accept an honorary saber from First Captain Hugh McConnell at West Point, Mueller seemed to be at peace with his quieter life. At seventy-two, he’d just celebrated his fiftieth wedding anniversary the month before. His wife, Ann, and their two adult daughters were present in the West Point audience; his older daughter, Cynthia, had been born while he was overseas, fighting in Vietnam. He and Ann had now lived in the same house for almost fifteen years, a delightful respite from what, by Ann’s count, had been seventeen moves as she followed Bob’s career back and forth across the country. 

All of that would soon change. 

The very next day—Friday, October 7—Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson issued a joint statement saying that the upcoming election was under attack by Russia. The U.S. Intelligence Community is confident that the Russian Government directed the recent compromises of e-mails from U.S. persons and institutions, including from U.S. political organizations, read the unprecedented statement. The recent disclosures of alleged hacked e-mails on sites like DCLeaks.com and WikiLeaks and by the Guccifer 2.0 online persona are consistent with the methods and motivations of Russian-directed efforts. These thefts and disclosures are intended to interfere with the U.S. election process.

The country wasn’t quite done with Bob Mueller, as it turned out.

Fast-forward seven months to May 2017, when

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Reseñas de críticos

  • The findings from special council Robert Mueller's recently concluded top secret inquiry into the Trump Campaign and Russian interference into the 2016 election ("The Mueller Report") have been dominating headlines. In our first Scribd Original, award-winning journalist Garrett Graff gives us the first in-depth account of Mueller's time as a Marine during the Vietnam War, and reveals why and how Mueller became who he is today: a man with integrity beyond reproach.

    Scribd Editors

Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    Vivid depictions of combat in Vietnam. Great read.

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (1/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    Overrated for a man that wasted our Taxes based on lies

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (5/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    No question. One of the best books on modern integrity I’ve read.

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (5/5)

    Esto les resultó útil a 3 personas

    He was a great marine,a man who cared,now I know that muller report will be an honest offering.1338066

    Esto les resultó útil a 3 personas

  • (4/5)

    Esto les resultó útil a 3 personas

    With all things political regarding our ‘President’ aside, this is a great story of military heroism and personification of an American​ hero and public servant.

    I teared up about the soldier swapping weapons with the other who carried the grenade launcher who got hit by a .50 cal and then died after it hit his artery. Vietnam was a true failure and ‘fake news’ at its peak.

    It is unfortunate we require our finest to die to the quickest deaths in the face of war for the sake of ‘democracy’.​

    I hope Mueller succeeds with his report in healing our country of wrongs.

    Esto les resultó útil a 3 personas

  • (1/5)

    Esto les resultó útil a 2 personas

    Misleading, author should be ashamed to even try to mislead people.

    Esto les resultó útil a 2 personas

  • (5/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    nice..
    its fantastic
    I Think Mueller's War Book Is Good For Our Inspiration Guys :

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona