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Rest Not in Peace

valoraciones:
4/5 (25 valoraciones)
Longitud:
278 página
5 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Sep 20, 2013
ISBN:
9781782640097
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

Master Hugh is asked to provide a sleeping potion for Sir Henry Burley, a friend and guest of Lord Gilbert at Bampton Castle.

Sir Henry, (with his wife, a daughter by a first wife, two knights, two squires, and assorted servants), has outstayed his welcome at Bampton Castle. The next morning after Master Hugh provides the potion, Sir Henry is found dead, eyes open, in his bed. Master Hugh, the target of the wife's wrath, is asked by Lord Gilbert to determine the cause of death ...

Editorial:
Publicado:
Sep 20, 2013
ISBN:
9781782640097
Formato:
Libro

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  • (4/5)
    I have been really enjoying this series it transports me back to a far time, long before forensics. Once again the detective must use observation, the ability to read people and an understanding of human nature to solve his murders. There were a few false herrings that led me astray yet in the end the conclusion was very satisfactory.
  • (4/5)
    The Chronicles of Hugh De Singleton are growing on me as I read more of them. The stories are all first person and I like the voice of Hugh more as the series grows. Well plotted with enough information so that the culprit is not a surprise, but with many red herrings along the way. A major event at the end will have effects on future stories and it will be interesting to see how it plays out.
  • (5/5)
    Another great Hugh de Singleton story. As usual this book kept me riveted. I didnt want to put the book down. Can't wait for the next one.
  • (4/5)
    Enjoyed this book, but not quite as much as earlier books in this series.
  • (4/5)
    I am a big fan of Mel Starr’s mystery series featuring medieval surgeon/bailiff, Hugh de Singleton. Armed with only rudimentary skills, Hugh manages to solve mysteries while pondering the bigger questions of life and God. In his sixth chronicle, Hugh details the murder of Sir Henry, a penniless knight who along with his family and retinue have been staying with Sir Gilbert, Hugh’s lord. Greed, jealousy, and revenge are among the motives of the suspects, a list which gets longer the more Hugh investigates. My favorite of all 6 books, Rest Not in Peace is the perfect book for those who love a good mystery amidst the setting of medieval life.One of the strengths of this series, is Starr’s ability to present a credible murder investigation without the benefit of modern detection resources. Hugh is left to find clues in footprints, blood spatters and the body language of his suspects. A scholar, Hugh uses his experience and studies to ferret out the criminal. Although the setting is far removed from our sophisticated world, Starr manages to make the actions and thoughts of his medieval characters relevant for today’s reader. Rest Not in Peace is the perfect book for mystery and history fans alike.Recommended.(Thanks to Kregel for a review copy. The opinions expressed are mine alone.)
  • (5/5)
    The historical setting of Rest Not in Peace is medieval England in the year 1368. I previously read and reviewed The Tainted Coin and found Mel Starr's writing style refreshing, development of the characters interesting, educational to behavior of characters of the historical period believable, and felt very comfortable that scenes, behavior, personalities, medical practices, etc. described in the book true to the period. I base this assumption on the educational background and teaching experience of the author as well as his studies of medieval medical practices. So often historical reads are romances and filled with the give and take of the male and female protagonists. However, in Mel Starr's The Tainted Coin and Rest Not in Peace, I discovered Master Hugh de Singleton, Surgeon and found him a character of many fine points that the author develops quite well and the books are absolutely clean reads.The story is written first-person with the voice of Singleton. He is the bailiff for the Lord's estate as well as a surgeon. Author Mel Starr is a historian by education and trade and has thoroughly researched this period novel. Included in the front of the book are words and terms to help understand the terminology of the period such as foods, pieces of clothing, and names of objects. But you don't feel as though you are reading a history book. In Rest Not In Peace, Hugh de Singleton is called to the castle as the bailiff to investigate the death of a guest of Lord Gilbert. I especially enjoy the sentence structure utilized by the author that captures the mode of speech indicative of the 1360s England. True it is not "old English," but it does set the tone for a period difference. In the process of discovery and investigation, station in life in medieval England again allows that the gentry are afforded more leeway than the common man. Social order and the privilege of rank that existed and played a role in meeting out justice for those who broke the laws.Singleton's contemplations are interesting and often take place on his way home as he crosses Shill Brook where he subtly draws analogies between the brook's water flow and the situation he is investigating. This is also a spot where he seems to calm his senses and "cleanse" himself mentally, emotionally, and perhaps even spiritually.DISCLOSURE: I received a complimentary copy of Rest Not in Peace from Kregel Publications on behalf of Monarch Books and the author for the purpose of my honest review. I was under no obligation to provide favorable comments. Opinions expressed are solely my own.
  • (4/5)
    Hugh de Singleton, bailiff and surgeon, is at it again. The year is 1638, the place is Lord Gilbert's castle. The victim is Lord Henry, a guest of Lord Gilbert. Although Lord Henry at first appears to have died in his sleep, a single drop of blood on the floor leads Hugh to further investigation and the discovery that Lord Henry was murdered.Lord Gilbert asks Hugh to find the murderer. Hugh follows a variety of clues--some helpful, some misleading, of course--and in turn suspects the late lord's squires, his knights, his wife, and his daughter. Other crimes are also discovered and another murder is committed. In the end, Hugh is able to determine the culprit and turn him over to the "local" (a day's ride away) sheriff to await his fate. I enjoyed the book and highly recommend it to others who enjoy historical mysteries. While there are references to events from previous books, this book is easily capable of being read on its own.I received this book through LibraryThing's Early Reviewers group.
  • (5/5)
    Triumphing in the face of adversity, this latest adventure will have you trying to solve the crime right along with Master Hugh. So many suspects, so little time...
  • (3/5)
    *I received this book free in exchange for a review.*"Death is but the path to God, but most men would prefer to travel that way in some distant future day."Alas for poor Sir Henry Burley, his day was forced upon him by person or persons unknown. It's Master Hugh de Singleton's job to figure out who that person was. This was the first book in this series I've read, but I didn't feel too confused or lost. I do like this time frame and I found the glossary of terms at the beginning helpful, especially since the author likes to tell us what they are eating at every single meal.The mystery was pretty good, but there really wasn't enough to fill this many pages. He needed to add a subplot or cut 50 pages. I felt like it would have been better for a sidekick or confidant or something, so Hugh could talk the case over with someone more knowledgeable than his wife or Sir Gilbert. Altogether, it didn't really strike me as especially memorable and I'm not sure I'd read another by this author.
  • (4/5)
    Nice entry, a little slow at times.
  • (4/5)
    Rest Not in Peace was one of the better instalments in the Hugh de Singleton series. There were lots of twists and turns, suspects and motives, and the culprit was not immediately obvious. Sometimes I did get a little confused between the characters, and perhaps a tad lost, trying to remember who was who and what was what, but it was a generally believable and plausible mystery. The next book in the series, which I read after this one, contained what I thought to be a major flaw in the information given to the reader, but I did not spot any such thing here.

    Admittedly, Hugh was never the sharpest knife the drawer, and could have followed the lead he did to solve the mystery more quickly, but then there would be no story… Admittedly there were a few loose ends, but then I think all mystery and detective stories have these upon occasion. I found the religious content satisfying as well- although Hugh’s some of Hugh’s actions do not always sit well with his convictions, when there could be other ways of getting the information he needs.

    The historical information was, as usual interesting, with the details about surgery- though most of it was focused on food in this one. I really should have made more use of the glossary, but with the PDF version it was not easy to keep flitting back and forth. Good for fans of Medieval and clean mysteries.

    I received a PDF version of this book from the publisher, via Netgalley for review. I was not required to write a negative one and all opinions expressed are my own.
  • (3/5)
    Like the other books in this series, I enjoyed it. The descriptions of time and place are interesting and engaging, but Hugh's relationships are starting to become repetitive. I hope the author adds more depth to the characters and the plots soon. The ending of this book was especially abrupt, even though the plot points were wrapped up.
  • (4/5)
    This is the sixth book in this series about medieval surgeon and bailiff Hugh de Singleton. I read the fourth, Unhallowed Ground, but missed the fifth. It isn't really necessary to read this series in order but the back story would probably make more sense if you did.In this chronicle Hugh is summoned to Bampton Castle early one morning to examine a guest, Sir Henry Burley, who died overnight. Hugh had provided some crushed lettuce seeds the night before for the guest because he was having trouble sleeping. Although lettuce seeds are quite a mild sedative (who knew?) and even a large dose would not kill a man, the widow has accused Hugh of poisoning her husband. On careful examination Hugh discovers a small drop of blood next to the man's head. He then finds a puncture wound in his ear which was probably made by an awl or thin blade. The sheriff of Oxford is summoned to investigate the murder but his tactics are rather rough and ready. It will take Hugh's tact and skill to find out who committed the murder and why.As in Unhallowed Ground there are lots of details about medieval life, especially the food. Hugh uses his intelligence to solve the crime when modern sleuths would rely upon forensics. It is hard to say which method is more successful.Anyone who is a fan of the Brother Cadfael books or The Mistress of the Art of Death will enjoy this book and series.
  • (4/5)
    Hugh de Singleton, surgeon and bailiff for Brampton Castle, must solve yet another murder. When Sir Henry Burley, a guest at Brampton Castle, was found dead in his bed, Master Hugh set about gathering clues. Sir Henry had enemies, more than he could count, but exactly who would resort to murder and why? When Sir John Peverel ends up dead as well, it only creates more questions and clues. A note slipped under Lord Gilbert's door, a bodkin, a blood stained piece of linen, a carved piece of wood and a bloody kirtle--all clues leading to the culprit. With a lot of questioning and the mind of a detective, Master Hugh soon discovers a murderer at Brampton Castle.This is my first book in this series and my first book by Mel Starr. Thankfully, each book can be read as a series or as a stand-alone novel. I have never read a murder mystery set in the medieval time period and I was a little concerned about the outcome. I have to say, though, that it worked very well. It was a delightful, clean murder mystery that kept me thoroughly entertained. It had some great plot twists and turns I wasn't expecting that kept me wondering just who the murderer was. Each time I thought I had it figured out I was, once again, running down rabbit trails. If you have read any of this series you will enjoy continuing with Rest Not in Peace. If this series is new to you and you like a light-hearted mystery you will enjoy this book also. I recommend it to any mystery lovers who don't like a lot of blood and gore in their mysteries.Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for my honest review. The opinions stated are mine alone and are honest and forthright. If I recommend a book you can believe its a book I would read for myself. I received no monetary compensation for this review.
  • (4/5)
    My second review for LibraryThing! Woohoo!!! I've read all the Hugh de Singleton books, so I was really glad to get this one. Reading books with continuing characters is like visiting old friends. I've watched Hugh go from a single man looking for a good woman to a caring, family man. It's always great to read his interactions not only with his wife and child but also with his employer and the denizens of the castle and village. This time Hugh is called on to determine if Sir Henry's death was God's work or man's while defending himself against the sharp tongue and withering glances of the widow who insists it was Hugh's sleep potion. There are plenty of suspects to choose from, and as each one is examined, you're sure that's the one. Eventually, Hugh determines the guilty party. We're also given some good news and bad news. Can't wait for the next book in Hugh's saga.
  • (4/5)
    This is part of series featuring Hugh de Singleton, surgeon and bailiff to Lord Gilbert of Bampton Castle. It is set around the time of the Plague in medieval England. A guest of Lord Gilbert's , a penniless knight named Sir Henry is found dead the morning after taking a sleeping draught of Hugh's. The widow immediately accuses Hugh but after examining the body he finds evidence of murder (and proves it could have been the sleeping draught). There are several suspects to consider including the widow, his daughter, his squires and his knights. Sir Henry was not a nice man.Mel Star does an excellent job with the characters and setting. The mystery was very well done, with plenty of clues and red herrings. Well developed, believable, no jarring anachronisms, plenty of little details that really give you the feel of the period. There are references to events in other books in the series but I did not feel that I was lacking anything by not having read them. I now want to read them.
  • (5/5)
    Sir Henry Burley and his entourage have overstayed their welcome at Lord Gilbert's castle. Unfortunately Lord Gilbert must allow them to stay a little while longer after Sir Henry is found dead in his bed. Lady Margery, Sir Henry's widow, is quick to point an accusing finger at Hugh, who gave the knight a sleeping draught. Although the death appears natural at first, Hugh's keen sense of observation soon takes the investigation in another direction.Lady Margery is eager to move on, but before she can, Hugh must clear his name and find out who in the castle wanted the man dead. It seems that the penniless knight had no shortage of enemies, but who would have access to commit the crime? After all Bampton castle is secure at night. It is up to Hugh to uncover clues and family secrets that will lead him to the real murderer before the grieving widow takes flight.The Bottom Line: This well-told tale will appeal to a wide audience and is highly recommended for readers who enjoy cozies, medieval mysteries, and Christian fiction. Written in first person, the writing style is accessible and reveals the main character's thoughts and observations. This is a very fast paced book with lots of twists and turns. Author Mel Starr keeps the reader guessing in this house party style mystery. This series continues to get better and better as Hugh's character continues to grow and struggle with both his sense of responsibility and faith. While it is not necessary to read the books in order, the series can be best appreciated if one does. Also, this book includes a glossary of medieval terms and a map of Bampton. Finally, descriptions of several medieval medical procedures are included, but are not too graphic for the average reader.
  • (3/5)
    Sir Henry Burley arranged to visit Lord Gilbert using a service he had done for His Lordship a decade earlier in battle at Poitiers. After a long month of Sir Henry and his company comprised of his wife, Lady Margery, daughter, two knights, two squires, several valets and a groom many at Bampton Castle were looking forward to his departure. This was achieved through murder where upon Lord Gilbert turned to his bailiff and surgeon, Master Hugh de Singleton, to determine the culprit.The method of murder is intriguing and could pass for natural causes. It requires conjecture and skill to determine the motive and murderer.This is the sixth chronicles of Hugh de Singleton, I read and reviewed the third ”A Trail of Blood” for Early Reviewers in April, 2011. I ended the review with this sentence “I enjoyed the book but would not go looking for another to read.” I had forgotten about “A Trail of Blood” when I requested “Rest Not in Peace.” In the latter book the character development is better, except for the one character who previously stood out, Kate, Hugh’s wife. Now that they are married she is much more of a one dimensional medieval wife and mother, not the independent women she showed signs of in “A Trail of Blood.” For me this is close to a cosy medieval mystery and I don’t like cosies of any period.
  • (5/5)
    This is my first Hugh de Singleton, and consequently Mel Starr book, and I very much enjoyed it. I like how the author portrayed medieval times, people, places, and customs. Things we take for granted, like freedom of speech and no noble system, were brought out to a delightful degree. I've always been curious about this time in history, the Plague, medicine, how families interacted with each other - or didn't - and this is right up my alley.

    I especially enjoyed that Singleton didn't look down on his wife and child because of their sex, but valued his wife's opinion and intelligence and treated her as valuable and loved. Add to that, no foul language, no gratuitous sex scenes, and well thought out plot, and you have a winner.

    Highly recommended for those who loved to read clean mysteries.
    *My thanks to the publisher for providing me a copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinions. I was not required they be positive.*
  • (5/5)
    This the second book of Mr. Starr’s I have read. He has been added to my all-time favorite author’s list! I plan to read all his books. The setting in the 1300’s continues to fascinate me along with all the historical background of life in those times. The star once again is Hugh de Singleton, bailiff and surgeon to Lord Gilbert of Bampton Castle. After almost a month, Lord Gilbert was tiring of playing host to Sir Henry Burley, his wife, daughter, 2 knights, 2 squires and the rest of his entourage. All hopes are dashed of them possibly departing when Sir Henry is found dead in his bed one morning. Upon first observation his death looks to be of natural causes, but Hugh is never one to take things as they appear. He quickly discovers that the guest has been murdered in a very crafty way that would have gone undetected by most. This turns out to not be a simple case! His investigation opens the possibility of Sir Henry’s wife, daughter, and knights! Before he can pin point anything specific another murder occurs and makes things even more complicated! Lord Gilbert has reached his limit with the unpleasant company and just wants Hugh to be done with it, and find a murderer so they will leave!I was captivated by the plot. The more Hugh uncovers, the more unsure he is of who the murderer is. One minute I found myself thinking “Oh it has to be that one”, and the next “Hmmm this person could be the guilty party too.” It kept me on my toes guessing and wondering if the case could be solved. I loved Hugh’s keen observations and brilliant ideas to attempt to flush out the criminal. Once again I thoroughly enjoyed all the personal information about the daily life during in medieval times. This book also included a glossary of words that were used in that era we are not familiar with. They added even more to the historical detail and gave a vivid picture how people lived, from the wealthy to the poor. The ending is a surprise, not only who murdered Sir Henry, but another very expected turn of events. Hugh Singleton is the Sherlock Holmes of the middle ages! Mr. Starr’s is not only a very talented writer, but I appreciate the wholesomeness and good taste in which his books are written. You would be hard pressed to find a murder mystery in this day and time that is not filled with blood, gore, and foul language. This book would be a wonderful read for a young person who likes mysteries. I cannot emphasize enough how entertaining this book is. You definitely will want to read it! Hats off to Mr. Starr once again!I received this book free from Kregel Publishers. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. .
  • (3/5)
    I first have to apologize to the author for taking so long to write this review. The book was misplaced and I didn't feel it was right to write the review until I had finished the book after it had been located. That being said, the author did a really good job of staying true to the time period with terminology and descriptions. Some readers may get turned off by the religious discussions that take place between the characters, but I felt that it was just a part of the story - many people in the time period that the book takes place were very religious. The mystery (murders) in the story was well developed and I found myself wanting to get to the end to find out "who did it". Well written, and I might even pick up dome of the other books in the series.