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Shakespeare; Or, the Poet

Shakespeare; Or, the Poet

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Shakespeare; Or, the Poet

valoraciones:
3/5 (1 clasificación)
Longitud:
47 página
41 minutos
Publicado:
Aug 8, 2017
ISBN:
9781974995134
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

In The Poet, an essay by U.S. writer Ralph Waldo Emerson, the author expresses the need for the United States to have its own new and unique poet to write about the new country's virtues and vices. It is not about men of poetical talents, or of industry and skill in meter, but of the true poet. After reading the essay, Walt Whitman consciously set out to answer Emerson's call. When the 1855 edition of Leaves Of Grass was first published, Whitman sent a copy to Emerson, whose letter in response helped launch the book to success. In that letter Emerson called the collection the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom America has yet contributed.
Publicado:
Aug 8, 2017
ISBN:
9781974995134
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882) was an essayist, poet, and philosopher. The founder of the Transcendentalist movement that dominated American letters during the mid-nineteenth century, he mentored Thoreau and Whitman, and defined the shape of American literature for a generation.

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Shakespeare; Or, the Poet - Ralph Waldo Emerson

SHAKESPEARE; OR, THE POET

By

RALPH WALDO EMERSON

This edition published by Dreamscape Media LLC, 2017

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About Ralph Waldo Emerson:

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States.

Emerson gradually moved away from the religious and social beliefs of his contemporaries, formulating and expressing the philosophy of transcendentalism in his 1836 essay Nature. Following this work, he gave a speech entitled The American Scholar in 1837, which Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. considered to be America's intellectual Declaration of Independence.

Emerson wrote most of his important essays as lectures first and then revised them for print. His first two collections of essays, Essays: First Series (1841) and Essays: Second Series (1844), represent the core of his thinking. They include the well-known essays Self-Reliance, The Over-Soul, Circles, The Poet and Experience. Together with Nature, these essays made the decade from the mid-1830s to the mid-1840s Emerson's most fertile period.

Emerson wrote on a number of subjects, never espousing fixed philosophical tenets, but developing certain ideas such as individuality, freedom, the ability for mankind to realize almost anything, and the relationship between the soul and the surrounding world. Emerson's nature was more philosophical than naturalistic: Philosophically considered, the universe is composed of Nature and the Soul. Emerson is one of several figures who took a more pantheist or pandeist approach by rejecting views of God as separate from the world.

He remains among the linchpins of the American romantic movement, and his work has greatly influenced the thinkers, writers and poets that followed him. When asked to sum up his work, he said his central doctrine was the infinitude of the private man. Emerson is also well known as a mentor and friend of Henry David Thoreau, a fellow transcendentalist.

Source: Wikipedia

Shakespeare; ⁵²⁵ or, the Poet

1. Great men are more distinguished by range and extent, than by originality. If we require the originality which consists in weaving, like a spider, their web from their own bowels; in finding clay, and making bricks, and building the house; no great men are original. Nor does valuable originality consist in unlikeness to other men. The hero is in the press of knights, and the thick of events; and, seeing what men want, and sharing their desire, he adds the needful length of sight and of arm, to come to the desired point. The greatest genius is the most indebted man. A poet is no rattlebrain, saying what comes uppermost and, because he says everything, saying, at last, something good; but a heart in unison with his time and country. There is nothing whimsical and fantastic in his production, but sweet and sad earnest, freighted with the weightiest convictions, and pointed with the most determined aim which any man or class knows of in his times.

2. The Genius⁵²⁶ of our life is jealous of individuals and will not have any individual great, except through the general. There is no choice to genius. A great man does not wake up on some

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  • (3/5)
    Interesting thesis, but the editor has provided FAR too many footnotes, over 10 on some pages, and many are quite superfluous unless you know next to nothing about the topic or culture in general.