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Che (Movie Tie-In Edition): The Diaries of Ernesto Che Guevara

Che (Movie Tie-In Edition): The Diaries of Ernesto Che Guevara

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Che (Movie Tie-In Edition): The Diaries of Ernesto Che Guevara

valoraciones:
3/5 (1 clasificación)
Longitud:
237 página
3 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2013
ISBN:
9781921700842
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

The book of Soderbergh's epic movie "Che," featuring a selection from Che's diaries, as well as his fiery speech at the United Nations, New York, in December 1964. With an extensive biographical chronology, this book shows the young Argentine's evolution from the wide-eyed medical student of "The Motorcycle Diaries" era to the revolutionary hero the world knows as Che.
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2013
ISBN:
9781921700842
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Ernesto Che Guevara was a doctor and communist figure in the Cuban Revolution who went on to become a guerrilla leader in South America. He was born in Argentina. Guevara became part of Fidel Castro’s efforts to overthrow the Batista government in Cuba. He served as a military advisor to Castro and led guerrilla troops in battles against Batista forces. Executed by the Bolivian army in 1967, he has since been regarded as a martyred hero by generations of leftists worldwide. Guevara’s image remains a prevalent icon of leftist radicalism and anti-imperialism.

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Che (Movie Tie-In Edition) - Ernesto Che Guevara

Clara.

MAP OF CUBA 1959

MAP OF BOLIVIA 1966

"LET’S BE REALISTS, LET’S DREAM

THE IMPOSSIBLE."

ERNESTO CHE GUEVARA

PROLOGUE

BY ERNESTO CHE GUEVARA

The stars drew light across the night sky in that little mountain village, and the silence and the cold made the darkness vanish away. It was—I don’t know how to explain it—as if everything solid melted away into the ether, eliminating all individuality and absorbing us, rigid, into the immense darkness. Not a single cloud to lend perspective to the space blocked any portion of the starry sky. Less than a few meters away the dim light of a lamp lost its power to fade the darkness.

The man’s face was indistinct in the shadows; I could only see what seemed like the spark of his eyes and the gleam of his four front teeth.

I still can’t say whether it was the atmosphere or the personality of that individual that prepared me for the revelation, but I know that many times and from many different people I had heard those same arguments and that they had never made an impression on me. Our interlocutor was, in fact, a very interesting character. From a country in Europe, he escaped the knife of dogmatism as a young man, he knew the taste of fear (one of the few experiences which makes you value life), and afterwards he had wandered from country to country, gathering thousands of adventures, until he and his bones finally ended up in this isolated region, patiently waiting for the moment of great reckoning to arrive.

After exchanging a few meaningless words and platitudes, each of us marking territory, the discussion began to falter and we were about to go our separate ways, when he let out his idiosyncratic, childlike laugh, highlighting the asymmetry of his four front incisors:

The future belongs to the people, and gradually, or in one strike, they will take power, here and in every country.

The terrible thing is the people need to be educated, and this they cannot do before taking power, only after. They can only learn at the cost of their own mistakes, which will be very serious and will cost many innocent lives. Or perhaps not, maybe those lives will not have been innocent because they will have committed the huge sin against nature; meaning, a lack of ability to adapt. All of them, those unable to adapt—you and I, for example—will die cursing the power they helped, through great sacrifice, to create. Revolution is impersonal; it will take their lives, even utilizing their memory as an example or as an instrument for domesticating the youth who follow them. My sin is greater because I, more astute and with greater experience, call it what you like, will die knowing that my sacrifice stems only from an inflexibility symbolizing our rotten civilization, which is crumbling. I also know—and this won’t alter the course of history or your personal view of me—that you will die with a clenched fist and a tense jaw, the epitome of hatred and struggle, because you are not a symbol (some inanimate example) but a genuine member of the society to be destroyed; the spirit of the beehive speaks through your mouth and motivates your actions. You are as useful as I am, but you are not aware of how useful your contribution is to the society that sacrifices you.

I saw his teeth and the cheeky grin with which he foretold history, I felt his handshake and, like a distant murmur, his formal goodbye. The night, folding in at contact with his words, overtook me again, enveloping me within it. But despite his words, I now knew… I knew that when the great guiding spirit cleaves humanity into two antagonistic halves, I would be with the people. I know this, I see it printed in the night sky that I, eclectic dissembler of doctrine and psychoanalyst of dogma, howling like one possessed, will assault the barricades or the trenches, will take my bloodstained weapon and, consumed with fury, slaughter any enemy who falls into my hands. And I see, as if a great exhaustion smothers this fresh exaltation, I see myself, immolated in the genuine revolution, the great equalizer of individual will, proclaiming the ultimate mea culpa. I feel my nostrils dilate, savoring the acrid smell of gunpowder and blood, the enemy’s death; I steel my body, ready to do battle, and prepare myself to be a sacred space within which the bestial howl of the triumphant proletariat can resound with new energy and new hope.

From: The Motorcycle Diaries: Notes on a Latin American Journey by Ernesto Che Guevara.

"THE AMERICAS WILL BE THE

THEATER OF MY ADVENTURES

IN A WAY THAT IS MUCH MORE

SIGNIFICANT THAN I WOULD

HAVE BELIEVED."

ERNESTO CHE GUEVARA

(writing to his mother from Guatemala, April 1954)

PART ONE

THE ARGENTINE

THE MOVIE CHE (PART 1)

IS BASED ON

REMINISCENCES OF THE CUBAN

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

BY ERNESTO CHE GUEVARA

EXCERPTS OF THIS BOOK ARE REPRODUCED HERE

GUATEMALA

TO MY MOTHER, JUNE, 1954

Dear old lady,

…The latest events belong to history—a quality which I think is appearing for the first time in my notes. A few days ago, some aircraft from Honduras crossed the border with Guatemala and flew over the city in broad daylight, machine gunning people and military objectives. I enlisted in the health brigades to help on the medical side and in the youth brigades that patrol the streets by night. The course of events was as follows. After the aircraft had passed, troops under the command of Colonel Castillo Armas, a Guatemalan émigré in Honduras, crossed the frontier at several points and advanced on the town of Chiquimula. The Guatemalan government, which had already protested to Honduras, let them enter without offering any resistance and presented its case to the United Nations.

Colombia and Brazil, two docile Yankee instruments, put forward a plan to pass the matter to the OAS. The Soviet Union rejected this and was in favor of ordering a ceasefire. The invaders failed in their attempt to use aircraft gunfire to get the masses to rise up, but they did capture the town of Bananera and cut the railway to Puerto Barrios. The aim of the mercenaries was clear enough: to take Puerto Barrios and bring in all kinds of weapons and further mercenary troops. This became apparent when the schooner Siesta de Trujillo was captured trying to unload weapons at that port. The final offensive collapsed, but in the midland towns the attackers committed acts of real barbarism, murdering members of SETUFCO [United Fruit Company Workers Union] at the cemetery by throwing a hand grenade at their chests.

The invaders thought that if they just gave a shout, the entire people would come out and follow them—and for this purpose they parachuted in weapons. But in fact the people immediately rallied under the command of [President] Árbenz. The invading troops were checked and defeated on all fronts and driven back past Chiquimula, near the Honduran frontier. Pirate aircraft flying from bases in Honduras and Nicaragua continued to machine-gun the fronts and towns. Chiquimula was heavily bombed, and several people were wounded and a little girl of three killed as a result of the bombing of Guatemala

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  • (3/5)
    Che Guevara waas more than just an icon on a T-shirt, in his time he was a real revolutionary who played a key part in the Cuban revolution and was aiming to overthrow South American dictatorships to free the people.

    This book is a translation of the diary that he wrote when he was in Bolivia with a small team of revolutionaries. It is written with daily notes and reports on their progress as they move through the jungle, avoiding the army that is looking for them and talking to the peasants to get them onside.

    They have some early success in skirmishes with the army, but as they go on they suffer from health issues and have to keep continually moving. Their small numbers mean that every battle counts, but as the number of men on the government side increases, they start to lose men and the initiative that they had. Before long they are caught and captured.

    Takes a while to get going, and in the end isn't too bad as a read. It is full of facts about where they are and their progress, but throughout you get a sense of fear of the men as the net closes. The introduction is by Fidel Castro, and is a bit of a rant. Otherwise it is a reasonable read