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Thanks to the international bestseller The Da Vinci Code, people are more fascinated with Leonardo Da Vinci than ever. This multitalented man--arguably the greatest genius of all time--was not only a magnificent artist, scientist, and inventor, but also a politically minded radical who defied convention and participated in secret societies. This engaging, entertaining book reveals all the secrets about this wildly gifted man, from his prescient inventions and his lost art to his animal rights activism and his sexual preferences--not to mention his enemies and allies in the dark, turbulent world of his time. Readers learn everything they didn't know about the quintessential Renaissance Man the easy way, thanks to the engaging style of 101 Things You Didn't Know about Da Vinci.
Publicado: Simon & Schuster el
ISBN: 9781440518607
Enumerar precios: $9.95
Leer en Scribd móvil: iPhone, iPad y Android.
Disponibilidad de 101 Things You Didn't Know About Da Vinci by Shana Priwer
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