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Solterona: La construcción de una vida propia

Solterona: La construcción de una vida propia

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Solterona: La construcción de una vida propia

valoraciones:
3/5 (21 valoraciones)
Longitud:
393 páginas
6 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Apr 11, 2016
ISBN:
9788416420988
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

Kate Bolick creció pensando que acabaría casándose. Incluso tenía una fecha límite para hacerlo: los treinta años. Se concedió hasta entonces para estudiar, experimentar y decidir qué hacer con su vida profesional. Sin embargo, cuando llegó a la treintena ese deseo de casarse se había evaporado. Una nueva década cargada de ambiciones se abría ante ella. Y el matrimonio se convertía en una molestia. K. Bolick no ha escrito un libro de autoayuda ni una guía inspiracional. A través de su mirada y de su experiencia consigue explicar cómo la literatura de Edna St.Vincent Millay, Maeve Brennan, Edith Wharthon, Neith Boyce y Charlotte Perkins Gillman la ayudaron a apasionarse, a no buscar en los demás sino en ella misma, a vivir como una mujer que no necesita de nadie para construir su identidad.
Editorial:
Publicado:
Apr 11, 2016
ISBN:
9788416420988
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Kate Bolick’s first book, the bestselling Spinster: Making a Life of One’s Own, was a New York Times Notable Book. A contributing editor for The Atlantic, Bolick writes for a variety of publications, including The New York Times, The New Republic, The Wall Street Journal, Cosmopolitan, Elle, and Vogue, and hosts “Touchstones at The Mount,” an annual interview series at Edith Wharton’s country estate, in Lenox, Massachusetts. Previously, she was executive editor of Domino and a columnist for The Boston Globe.


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Reseñas de lectores

  • (3/5)
    If we allowed for half stars, this would get three and a half. But we don’t. So three it is!

    This book is not what I expected it to be. I think I was looking for something slightly less memoire and containing some measure of humor. That isn’t to say that Ms. Bolick isn’t a great writer; she managed to take a book that I probably would never have read had I truly understand what I was in for and make it interesting. But in case you thought this would be an out-loud feminist discussion, it’s not that. At least, it isn’t entirely that.

    This is a very subtle book. At times I wasn’t really certain where it was going. Ms. Bolick chooses to tell us her own story of not desiring marriage by sharing the life stories of her “five awakeners” (a term that, I should say, had my rolling my eyes each time it appeared). All white women with some economic means, these women are certainly interesting, and do a passable job of demonstrating the challenges women have faced when choosing a path that doesn’t match the one that it seems most everyone else is both taking and expecting them to take.

    This book can’t help but be a very narrow study, as it is a memoire of sorts; it is about Ms. Bolick’s life and struggle with her desire to have control over her life on her own terms. She isn’t asexual; she has many relationships, and experiences love. She just doesn’t think that marriage is on her list. And while this is about her experiences, I have to say I wish that one of her “awakeners” had been a woman of color. Ms. Bolick also makes some comments regarding women in the workplace that I don’t necessarily think hold true for non-white women, even though they are presented as universal truths. Hmmm.

    Like I said, it’s not what I was expecting. If the title and a couple of two-sentence synopses made you interested in the book, I suggest reading a few more reviews before picking it up to make sure it’s where you want to spend your time.
  • (1/5)
    Highly anticipated reading this book which is a memoir about (subtitle) "Making a Life of One's Own". The author is 40 year old at the end of the book and she uses five independent of the 19th and early 20th century as role models for herself. the book fails miserably.
  • (4/5)
    I was pleasantly surprised by this book which I received as part of the Early Reviewers program. The strongest parts were the sections of memoir where Bolick shares her experiences. She's strikingly forthright about her reactions and her feelings and at time it felt like having a conversation with a friend. The strategy of linking her experiences to examinations of the lives of five women from the past whose writing and experiences have inspired her is a good one although I didn't come away with a vivid impression of any of them.
  • (2/5)
    Kate Bolick can write well and she is intelligent. There are many literary references, and an outline of five great women who have inspired her in her life including three of my favourite female authors: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Edith Wharton, and two people I learned about for the first time: Neith Boyce and Maeve Brennan. What bothered me was how much of a memoir/autobiography it was. It read like a Carrie Bradshaw rant about herself. I kept thinking that maybe if I cared more about who this author was then this memoir and reading journey would have been more inspiring. I also wanted this book to be what it promised: a book covering the history and cultural analysis of the spinster. I wanted to know about perception, barriers, how to break them...I wanted to feel inspired. There were several parts when she was discussing biographies of authors that I did feel somewhat inspired, but then it would slowly vanish in the background as Bolick started talking about her life again....the men she dates, the things she does on a daily basis. Lastly, and perhaps this is somewhat shallow but it REALLY bothered me, was that she writes many times about how ugly she was, and how "not like other girls" she was in terms of looks and how she was not desirable. Just google her...or flip the book over. She literally looks like a model for any beauty product. She's white, tall, thin, beautiful hair......it honestly felt like she was mocking the reader and was fishing for compliments. So if you expect the book to be about what it means to be a spinster, or a social history of it, you will NOT find it here. This book is exclusively about Kate Bolick and 5 authors who were women and who inspired her, and then she tells you why in her life particularly these women were important.
  • (4/5)
    This book is on my to be read again and again list. Pick any chapter and there is something that expands your thoughts on single women in a better light then usually portrayed. It's encouraging to note the independent woman from the past as an influence to building today's standards. That the adversity I feel today is a lighter load because of the women before me.
  • (4/5)
    I got this book as an Early Reviewer, and it definitely felt a like a work in progress, befitting it's Advance Reader's status. Still I enjoyed meeting or getting to know better the women that Bolick viewed as her "awakeners", women who taught her things through the ages. I think this is less a book about being single and more a book about being complete in yourself as a woman, something that can be hard to achieve. Worth reading.
  • (4/5)
    "Whom to marry, and when will it happen - these two questions define every woman's existence."So begins Spinster, a fascinating and personal and historical look at why women choose to remain unmarried. Using her own life experiences, along with her "five awakeners" - columnist Neith Boyce, essayist Maeve Brennan, social visionary Charlotte Perkins Gilman, poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, and novelist Edith Wharton - Kate Bolick explores how she and the convention-defying women who came before her came to live the "spinster" life. I was incredibly happy to discover that Bolick is a staunch feminist (not only that, but one who understands that as a white woman, she has a distinctly different experience than, say, a single woman of color - something she says could be an entire book unto itself...someone please make that happen!), and that she was unapologetic in presenting her lifestyle choices. I love me good feminist critique, and combine that with social and literary commentary and I am one happy reader!As a single woman who recently ended a 5+ year relationship living in the South (where students I supervise and people I work with are either getting married and starting families or have already done so years before), I thought this book would be a good remedy to my uncertainty, and I'm pleased to say it was. Through Bolick and her awakeners, I found kindred spirits. And while I may not be a famous writer or social critic, there was a lot I could take away from their experiences. I'm glad this book came to me when it did, and I will happily pick it up again should I ever need a reminder that it is okay to be a spinster.
  • (4/5)
    Even in the modern age, marriage is the defining question of a woman's life - even if she decides not to marry, it's an important decision, sometimes the most important. Through a lens of her own experiences and the stories of women writers she's found inspiring through her life, Kate Bolick examines ways women have pushed back against this question, carving out lives for themselves in spite of society's expectations for them.I wasn't terribly familiar with most of the women Bolick discusses - Neith Boyce, Maeve Brennan, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edna St. Vincent Millay and Edith Wharton - although I did know some of their work, so I was fascinated to learn more about their lives. Bolick is using a broad definition of "spinster" here. Many of these women did marry, but, she argues, they found marriage to be stultifying and damaging to their work, and so they also divorced or lived separately from their husbands rather than sacrifice their lives to something that didn't work for them. Bolick compares their solitary lives with her own, where even though she's never married, she dates compulsively throughout her twenties and thirties.I enjoyed the historical parts of the book more than Bolick's memoirs, but I think the personal story is important to the book as a whole. We get to learn not only from famous women writers but from Bolick herself, who struggles with modern expectations in an entirely different way from her heroines.
  • (2/5)
    This book is more about single female writers in history and how they have influenced and inspired the author than anything else. It's OK but very literary.
  • (3/5)
    It's been a month since I've read this and I still don't have anything to say about it. It's not bad; it's just not memorable.
  • (4/5)
    In a deeply personal memoir, author/essayist/editor Kate Bolick admits to a solitary impulse; a desire to claim and redefine what it means to be a "spinster". This feeling follows her from a childhood in Newburyport, Massachusetts, a job with a publishing company in Boston, college in New York followed by freelance work and editorship of a home and lifestyles magazine. Along the way are spectral guides (or 'awakeners') of beloved women authors, each of whom provide insight in her efforts towards self actualization. Several were known to me: poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, social reformer and writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and a personal favorite, author Edith Wharton. I enjoyed her insight into these strong women and their relationships (or lack of one) with men. Even more interesting were the explorations with unfamiliar faces, journalist Neith Boyce and essayist Maeve Brennan. What wonderful discoveries! You'll want to read on and discover them all in more depth. What can these women collectively tell us about the role of the self has in the creation of art of writing and the art of living? Can they inform our ability to define ourselves outside of 'traditional' roles? For Bolick and her readers, the term, Spinster, loses its pejorative sense. "I grant that a wholesale reclamation of the word spinster is a tall order. My aim is more modest: to offer it up as shorthand for holding on to that in you which is independent and self-sufficient, whether you ar single or coupled." Bolick writes from the perspective of a heterosexual woman born in 1972. One wonders if younger women are able to find their own way more readily. Gay women, especially those literary denizens of 'Boston Marriages', have already found ways to order themselves outside of societies strictures. Overall, an enjoyable read.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this book enough to purchase it in hardcover even though I had an advanced reader's copy. Many readers objected to Kate Bolick interweaving her dating history throughout, but I enjoyed that narrative and felt it made the book more relatable. Additionally, [Spinster] is an excellent companion read to [Selfish, Shallow, and Self-absorbed: Sixteen Writers on the Decision Not to Have Kids], and without conducting a scientific survey of both books, I'd say the #1 reason to forego marriage and children is to have more time to read and write. LOVE THAT. We're of the same tribe in believing the perfect afternoon comprises a nap or two sandwiched between hours of uninterrupted reading.[Spinster] succeeds for young women seeking encouragement, support or permission to go solo, or simply not be guilt-tripped into thinking a woman seeking solitude is an unnatural and wicked creature. Current culture complicates the question of marital status because there are so many options, but this does not deter Kate one bit. She does not "cheat" the idea of spinsterhood so to speak by living with a man outside of marriage or even having a male "roommate." She dates and has longish relationships, but she does not marry.The fear of ending up as a bag lady living on the streets in old age does not belong only to single women. Essayist Maeve Brennan met that fate, but it seemed like an inevitability considering her mental challenges later in life. In spite of how Brennan's life ended, Kate chose Maeve as her favorite of the 5 "awakeners" and took Brennan on as a kind of mentor and guide to living the spinster life. At the end of Spinster, Kate goes deeper to find out how such a vibrant and intelligent woman ended up destitute, perhaps to make sure she did not take the same missteps.Many existing issues could complicate this book, but the author stays within parameters she has established and does a very good job getting her viewpoint across. Also, she crafts many lovely sentences; one reader complained the book was "overwritten." I guess that's like the Emperor saying that Mozart's music had "too many notes." I liked it.
  • (2/5)
    To be honest, I wonder if it's fair to review a book when I've only managed to get through one chapter of it before giving up on it. However, I received a copy of the book in exchange for my honest review, and the fact that I didn't want to finish it says plenty about the book. Therefore, this review may help others who are thinking about picking it up.SPINSTER begins "Whom to marry and when will it happen--these two questions define every woman's existence." It's billed as "a revelatory and slyly erudite look at the pleasures and possibilities of remaining single."In retrospect, the use of the word "erudite" in the book description should have been my first clue to give this one a pass.The writing style is part of the problem with SPINSTER. The first note I made within a few pages was "overwriting interrupts the flow." By "overwriting" I mean that Bolick's writing reminds me of a college student trying to sound smart in a term paper. Though I'm certain Bolick IS smart, if SPINSTER is meant to be read by the masses, shorter sentences and the removal of SO MANY unnecessary words and explanations would have made the book much more readable. Though I guess I can't speak to the whole book, so I'll say that those changes would have made the first chapter much more readable.I was excited to get the book, and I thought SPINSTER would be something I could pass on to my daughter as she thinks about the future. Sadly, that won't be the case.I'm sorry I couldn't make it through the whole book. Perhaps there are some wonderful insights into making the choice for female singlehood. Hopefully others will let me know if that's the case.*I received a copy of this book from the publisher and LibraryThing in exchange for my honest review.
  • (5/5)
    this is not the book I thought it would be when I picked it up. It was something much more. Part history, part sociology, part memoir, part a window into one woman's path into being. She puts into conversation women who struggle with living between the two extremes of single and not-single in such a way that doesn't advocate for one over the other: a unique experience in today's world. I will be returning to her for years to come.
  • (4/5)
    Less a self-help book, or a political call to arms for all the single ladies, "Spinster" is an intellectual look at the history of so-called "spinsters" (particularly in the 19th century) and how their stories and wisdom might resonate with today's single women. I really enjoyed this book for what it was. It's not perfect, and as others mention in their review, it's at times over-written and forced. But I like that Bolick takes pride in the fact that she didn't just happen to not get married--she actively chose the single life and finds pleasure in it. I think there are plenty of people who trumpet their support for single people while secretly (perhaps subconsciously) assuming that at the end of the day everyone would prefer to be paired off (even consummate bachelor George Clooney tied the knot). This book is a voice for those who genuinely prefer to be single."Spinster" isn't the ultimate word on the lives of single women, but it's worthy to be on the shelf along with other memoirs, histories, and manifestos about the single life.
  • (3/5)
    This was an interesting book . It seemed to be half memoir with mini bios on five historical women that may have lead a spinster life mixed in . It would've been better if it was a straight ahead research about spinster hood . She should have made her personal story separate .
  • (4/5)
    I think I've been waiting to read this book most of my adult life. The idea of reclaiming the word 'spinster' is long overdue and Bolick does an admirable job of introducing women who have identified as such, as well as pointing out what it might mean for 21st century women. These historical profiles of Bolick's 'awakeners' was the most compelling part of the work, and it was fascinating to delve into the sometime dichotomy of how these women identified and the way they actually lived their lives. While I was disappointed, and occasionally annoyed, by Bolick's own story, it also revealed to me how broad the interpretation of the modern spinster might actually be. While reading this, I often stepped away feeling empowered and moved by the words and lives of these women. And also grateful to be living in a world with more choices.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed reading this memoir. Bolick uses a broader definition of "spinster" than I would. Most of the historical figures she writes about were married at some point in their lives. They were all writers. Bolick takes a personal journey to figure out if spinsterhood is the key to being a successful writer. Certainly many women struggle to find balance between our relationships and our work, whatever that may be.
  • (2/5)
    Not a fan. With the modern cover I expected a modern story of a modern woman embracing a life of her own.
  • (3/5)
    The word spinster has very negative connotations to it. It is not used as often in this day and age as it used to be but it still carries the suggestion that the woman to whom it refers is a failure. She has failed to get married, which must, of course, be the goal of any right thinking woman. Except that marriage is no longer necessarily a goal; nor is it expected. Once upon a time, women did have to rely on men financially and so marriage made sense. With women fully able to support themselves, you would expect that marriage would no longer be such a coveted goal, and yet, in many cases, it still is. Kate Bolick has set out to examine why, to find inspirational women who point to another way, to reclaim the word spinster, and to share her own experience as an unmarried woman in her new book Spinster: Making a Life of One's Own.This book is part memoir, part biography, part sociology. As she discusses her own life and the societal expectations up against which she runs time and time again, she talks about five women who inspire her, the women she calls "awakeners," whose own paths were unconventional, who helped her find her voice and to stay on the path she's chosen. Essayist Maeve Brennan, columnist Neith Boyce, poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, novelist Edith Wharton, and social visionary Charlotte Perkins Gilman are the women who guided her, whose lives she examines not only in conjunction with her own but also in contrast to the world they lived in as well. Interestingly, all of her awakeners did in fact marry at some point in their lives albeit unhappily so while they might have been disapproved of in their own times, they would not have been called spinsters. It is very clear that Bolick greatly admires the women she's chosen but trying to knit her own life into the mix felt forced and as if it all didn't fit nearly as well as she wanted it to do. The narrative tone is inconsistent with portions of the book sounding quite pedantic while others were much more personal, perhaps a result of too many foci here. Also, the fact that she talks about her own status as always single is a bit disingenuous given her almost constant involvement in long term monogamous relationships, one after the other. If she's calling that single, she has a very narrow definition of coupled, one narrower than most people these days. There are some interesting tidbits buried here and she has clearly done a huge amount of research to compile the sociological and biographical portions of the book. An interesting concept for sure, I really wanted to like and be engaged by this a whole lot more than I did.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this book. Some reviewers have complained about Bolick's use of the word 'spinster' to describe a woman who chooses to set her own course, whether or not in a relationship. But when applied with Bolick's parameters the word makes total sense. I thoroughly enjoyed her exploration of her 'Awakeners' since I have always been curious about, and inspired by, writers that have plotted independent courses, particularly Edith Wharton and Edna Saint Vincent Millay. Bolick's other Awakeners were interesting and thought provoking. All in all an entertaining and thought provoking book.
  • (4/5)
    If I had known about Kate Bolick before I had read this book I would not have considered her a "spinster" since she is what I consider a serial monogamist. Rarely, as she describes herself, was she outside of a relationship. But I think that the idea of spinster and what that entails really does need a reworking. In Kate Bolicks definition, or what I put together from reading this as her definition, is a woman who doesn't marry. I'm ok with that. So keeping that in mind this is not a book discussing the Spinster as the popular zeitgeist would portray her. It's also not a call to arms for feminism and in my opinion feminism as a topic is tertiary to this book being a personal memoir and a discussion about five specific women who have inspired Kate Bolick and who she used as teachers during her journey of personal spinsterhood. I personally found this all very interesting. Ms. Bolick does pick some interesting women to discuss and learning the results of their lives and where there choices lead them was certainly helpful to me as a woman who also has no interest in marriage. But make no mistake this is not a nonfiction book discussing the spinster and society (though someone please write that or suggest books already written in that vein to me!) this is a personal memoir about living in the modern world and author's personal journey of singlehood. I understand the wish for more diversity in this book but I also didn't take this into consideration for my rating since as a personal memoir it makes sense that it would cover the authors own experience (white, privileged, East Coaster, editor) and the women she finds personally inspiring. Also, the topic of WOC and singlehood really deserves a book of its own. In my opinion.I finished reading the book in about a week (with travel inbetween. Would have gone faster otherwise) and was very engaged and compelled by the writing and the content. She is an engaging writer though definitely for people not as interested in the topic of single women as I am it might be that she is in research mode far to often. I wish she had spent more time on the author of Yellow Wallpaper but that's just a personal preference.So conclusion: Interesting topic, not as traditionally feminist as the title would hint at, more personal memoir than anything else, if you're not interested in the subject the awakener parts might be a little dry, in my opinion worth reading and a book I will be keeping and might even reread in the future. Better to go into reading this book thinking of it as a personal memoir and not a discussion on society and spinsterhood as a whole.Thank you to Early Reviewers and Crown for providing my ARC even if it did arrive late and past publication date. grr.
  • (4/5)
    I received this book for free through LibraryThing's Early Reviewers.This book wasn't quite what I was expecting. The book focuses heavily on the 5 women who served as the author's "awakeners". When I first started reading it I wasn't quite sure where it was headed. It's hard to explain, but this book wasn't as feminist as I thought it was going to be. However, it does bring up interesting points of view of how to live your life and is incredibly well written and very engaging. I finished reading it in about 2 days.
  • (5/5)
    Being just a week away from my 34th birthday, there are so many aspects of this book that I can relate to. I couldn't think of a better time in my life to have this come into it. I can relate to her awakeners because, in many ways, I have many of my own; These women that I've looked up to for years and keep me going. I enjoyed taking this path of acceptance with Ms. Bolick and she really helped me look into myself a lot and to try harder to look at my own spinsterhood in a more positive light. I can see this being one of those books that I go back to from time to time as a reminder to just keep traveling no matter what life does or doesn't bring you and that it's okay to walk the road less traveled.I highly recommend to ladies of any age.*I received an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review*
  • (3/5)
    Author/editor Kate Bolick has written what is basically a memoir although she also discusses five women who inspired her to be a "spinster". While I have always thought of a spinster as a never-married woman, Bolick takes the view that it's anyone not presently married, even if the person currently lives with a partner. (Which is what she has spent a sizable part of her adult life doing.) She details her travails of trying to make a living by writing and the necessity of falling back on editing. Her mentors in the pursuit of "spinsterhood" are Neith Boyce, Maeve Brennan, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and novelist Edith Wharton. Most date from the early 20th century or late 19th, although Maeve Brennan lived until late in the 20th century. If the reader just wants the high points of the book, reading the final page of each chapter will give a fine synopsis of that particular woman inspired Bolick. As a whole, I found the stories of Bolick's own life more interesting than the historical sections. It's a bit of a slog to make it through the book, but it's doable.
  • (4/5)
    This book was an excellent read, though not at all what I expected. I thought this would be more of an analytical non-fiction describing the reasons behind the declining marriage rate in this country and the effects it has on the single woman, but it was more of a memoir entwined with a history lesson. Bolick weaves the stories of five "spinsters" (Maeve Brennan, Neith Boyce, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Edith Wharton, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman) with her own coming-into-awareness as a still unmarried woman now in her 40s. Her choices of role models stretch the meaning of spinster beyond how I would define the term, as all of the women mentioned married at least briefly. But it is precisely because they saw so little satisfaction in marriage that Bolick, who has had plenty of relationships but nursed through all of them a "spinster wish," identifies with these choices. Her idea of a spinster allows for sex on a woman's own terms. Those who for philosophical or circumstantial reasons either choose not to or simply haven't had the opportunity to pursue sexual relationships will likely see a huge gulf between themselves and the women profiled in this book. In spite of this, if taken as a memoir of self-discovery through the lens of encountering one's own role models (which it is) rather than a manifesto of how single women do and/or should behave (which it is not), the book is a compelling read. Bolick has mastered the art of following a single thesis through multiple shifts in time and through different characters' perspectives, and I would love to see her apply these skills to a work of fiction someday.
  • (2/5)
    I wanted to love this book so very much. I completely agree with the author's point that unmarried women are unjustly stigmatized in American society (and of course, historically), which doesn't happen to their bachelor counterparts. I was hoping to read a celebration and cultural history of the unmarried life, with its attendant freedoms and challenges, but instead was disappointed to find that the book is mostly about Ms. Bolick's coming-of-age, relationship history, and a series of women she regards as models (these women are interesting, and definitely worth reading about, but I would recommend longer studies when available). When Ms. Bolick complained about Boston, her job at The Atlantic (which many people would have snapped up in a heartbeat), and then complained that her Brooklyn street looked too much like Newburyport, I simply couldn't take it anymore. I had to stop reading. I'd also point out that up to that point in the book, she makes almost no mention of unmarried queer women's legacies or lives (she does note that ESVM was bisexual) or the kinship structures that they put in place. Perhaps she gets to that later in the book--I'd be happy to hear it if so. Overall, hugely disappointing.
  • (1/5)
    Oh my god, what a pretentious, self-absorbed waste of time. All I took away from this book was that the author is deeply neurotic and almost impossible to please. I frankly pity her friends and family, who have to listen to tripe like her navel gazing analyses of relationships ad nauseum. Avoid this book unless you have a high pain threshold for pretentious babble.
  • (3/5)
    Like many other readers, I went into this book expecting one thing (a social history of unmarried women, perhaps interspersed with personal reflections) and got something else (a combination memoir and literary history of five women who might or might not be considered spinsters). That's not to say that this isn't an enjoyable read, and I'm sure that many women will see themselves within it and become fervent fans. Bolick has a very readable style, though I'm not sure this was organized as well as it could have been. My main problem with the book is personal: I didn't connect with Bolick or any of her five "awakeners," and my experience of spinsterhood is worlds away from hers. That's not to say that there's anything wrong with her experience, or mine -- but I was hoping to feel a personal connection to this work, and I really didn't.
  • (3/5)
    The author goes into the history of women writers who "awakened" her to realising that she was happiest alone. Some interesting history, and some personal insights into the author, it was an easy read.