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El gigante enterrado
El gigante enterrado
El gigante enterrado
Libro electrónico417 páginas8 horas

El gigante enterrado

Calificación: 3 de 5 estrellas

3/5

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Información de este libro electrónico

Inglaterra en la Edad Media. Del paso de los romanos por la isla sólo quedan ruinas, y Arturo y Merlín –amados por unos, odiados por otros– son leyendas del pasado. Entre la bruma todavía habitan ogros, y británicos y sajones conviven en unas tierras yermas, distribuidos en pequeñas aldeas. En una de ellas vive una pareja de ancianos –Axl y Beatrice– que toma la decisión de partir en busca de su hijo. Éste se marchó hace mucho tiempo, aunque las circunstancias concretas de esa partida no las recuerdan, porque ellos, como el resto de habitantes de la región, han perdido buena parte de la memoria debido a lo que llaman «la niebla». En su periplo se encontrarán con un guerrero sajón llamado Wistan; un joven que lleva una herida que lo estigmatiza; y un anciano Sir Gawain, el último caballero de Arturo vivo, que vaga con su caballo por esas tierras con el encargo, según cuenta, de acabar con un dragón hembra que habita en las montañas. Juntos se enfrentarán a los peligros del viaje, a los soldados de Lord Brennus, a unos monjes que practican extraños ritos de expiación y a presencias mucho menos terrenales. Pero cada uno de estos viajeros lleva consigo secretos, culpas pendientes de redención y, en algún caso, una misión atroz que cumplir. Sumando el viaje iniciático, la fábula y la épica, Kazuo Ishiguro ha construido una narración bellísima, que indaga en la memoria y el olvido acaso necesario, en los fantasmas del pasado, en el odio larvado, la sangre y la traición con los que se forjan las patrias y a veces la paz. Pero habla también del amor perdurable, de la vejez y de la muerte. Una novela ambientada en un pasado remoto y legendario que vuelve sobre los grandes y eternos temas que inquietan a los seres humanos.

IdiomaEspañol
Fecha de lanzamiento2 nov 2016
ISBN9788433937438
El gigante enterrado
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Autor

Kazuo Ishiguro

Kazuo Ishiguro nació en Nagasaki en 1954, pero se trasladó a Inglaterra en 1960. Es autor de ocho novelas –Pálida luz en las colinas (Premio Winifred Holtby), Un artista del mundo flotante (Premio Whitbread), Los restos del día (Premio Booker), Los inconsolables (Premio Cheltenham), Cuando fuimos huérfanos, Nunca me abandones (Premio Novela Europea Casino de Santiago), El gigante enterrado y Klara y el Sol– y un libro de relatos –Nocturnos–, obras extraordinarias que Anagrama ha publicado en castellano. En 2017 fue galardonado con el Premio Nobel de Literatura.

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Comentarios para El gigante enterrado

Calificación: 3.0297565374211 de 5 estrellas
3/5

1,109 clasificaciones120 comentarios

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  • Calificación: 4 de 5 estrellas
    4/5
    Ponderous, but not painful. Languid, but not laborious. Even in a tale of knights and ogres and dragon's curse, Ishiguro stays focused on memory and fidelity and an elderly couple's love for one another. Super.
  • Calificación: 3 de 5 estrellas
    3/5
    I found the writing lyrical and fitting to the dark ages setting, but I'm not sure I liked the ending. I'll have to think about it more.
  • Calificación: 2 de 5 estrellas
    2/5
    “That’s true, good lady, but then we boatmen have seen so many over the years it doesn’t take us long to see beyond deceptions. Besides, when travellers speak of their most cherished memories, it’s impossible for them to disguise the truth. A couple may claim to be bonded by love, but we boatmen may see instead resentment, anger, even hatred. Or a great barrenness. Sometimes a fear of loneliness and nothing more. Abiding love that has endured the years—that we see only rarely. When we do, we’re only too glad to ferry the couple together. Good lady, I’ve already said more than I should.” Axl and Beatrice, an elderly couple, live in post-Roman Britain. They – like everyone – are suffering from some strange memory loss that prevents them from recalling large parts of their lives: “Now I think of it, Axl, there may be something in what you’re always saying. It’s queer the way the world’s forgetting people and things from only yesterday and the day before that. [...] Like a sickness come over us all.” Sometimes, though, either Axl or Beatrice do remember things from their past; just like one morning Axl remembers their son who has moved to a village not too far from their home. Not having seen him for many years, they decide to visit him. The entire book is basically about their journey and the people they meet. This book is definitely not for the casual reader – you always have to read closely and attentively or you will miss a lot of small details that are not always of great relevance but which help form the “big picture”, e. g. we learn early on that Beatrice and Axel aren’t allowed to own and use a candle at their home. When they’re talking about a cloak much later on, we learn said cloak was one they “later we lost in that fire”. Furthermore, the entire book can be read in a number of ways – as a somewhat simple story of the arduous journey of our elderly couple, or maybe that journey itself isn’t one of physical hardship but an allegory for their life together and the challenges they encountered. Even individual encounters and deeds during the journey can often be interpreted in many ways. The more abstract interpretation is all the more plausible as the writing style is very formal, sometimes excessively so: “Master Ivor told us of it, and we thought it poor news to succeed your brave intervention.” Nobody – at least today – talks like that. While this is, undoubtedly, yet another means to achieve a feeling of estrangement, it is too much for me. In addition to this strange formality, the narrator often doesn’t directly describe the landscape but how it could or would have been at the time narrated: “There would have been elms and willows near the water, as well as dense woodland, which in those days would have stirred a sense of foreboding.” This adds again to the feeling of estrangement from the literal story itself and makes it harder for me to actually enjoy the story. It distances the reader from the story and while that might be the right way if you only care about your art and not your reader, I didn’t like that. I always felt like I was being led by the nose somewhere and tried to anticipate it. I felt like being manipulated to be “educated” and I didn’t enjoy it. The weird forgetfulness everyone is afflicted by makes for very strange dialogue like this one: “What’s this you’re saying, princess? Was I ever the one to stop us journeying to our son’s village?” “But surely you were, Axl. Surely you were.” “When did I speak against such a journey, princess?” “I always thought you did, husband. But oh, Axl, I don’t remember clearly now you question it. And why do we stand out here, fine day though it is?” Uh, yes, and why are you tormenting us with repeating dialogues like that all the time?! It’s really truly annoying to have to keep reading stuff like that. On the other hand, it’s the most important narrative feature of this book so I do understand the general need to make sure we fully understand it and its implications. Even more so since both Beatrice and Axl do remember additional fragments of memories whenever they talk in length about any given topic. Quite a bit of information is given in that indirect way. Especially information that has been hidden before – because every character in this entire book is hiding things – some major, some minor – from everyone else. Sometimes with good reason, sometimes we simply don’t know and have to find our own answer. Everything in this book is taxing like that, even down to the names of our heroes: Beatrice literally means “she who makes happy" - and she is Axl’s one and only. The only person for whom he really cares and she makes him happy. Axl means “father of peace” (or “father is peace”) and even that is quite fitting as we will learn late in the book. “The abbot will insist we carry on as always. Others of our view will say it’s time to stop. That no forgiveness awaits us at the end of this path. That we must uncover what’s been hidden and face the past. But those voices, I fear, remain few and will not carry the day.” While I was reading “Giant”, I constantly felt like the author was wagging his finger at me and lecturing me. Literature, to me, though, is not about lecturing. I want “my” books to entertain me, to make me think and question things but not by moralising, lecturing, finger-wagging but unobtrusively. Maybe that’s too near to “edutainment” (which I have no qualm with) for some but that’s just the way I feel. I don’t like reading the old classics (Schiller, Goethe, etc.) either anymore – they're just too far from my life and times. “Giant” does read like such a classic or, possibly, a play: “Should I fall before I pass to you my skills, promise me you’ll tend well this hatred in your heart. And should it ever flicker or threaten to die, shield it with care till the flame takes hold again. Will you promise me this, Master Edwin?” At least a few amusing passages found their way into this book (possibly by accident!): “Let’s come away, child,” Axl said. “This is no sight for you or your brothers. But what is it made this poor ogre so sick? Can it be your goat was diseased?” “Not diseased, sir, poisoned! We’d been feeding it more than a full week just the way Bronwen taught us. Six times each day with the leaves.” Ultimately, though, “The Buried Giant” is lost on me due to its excessively allegorical nature and narrative complexity – if a book is so taxing, I can hardly enjoy reading it anymore, it’s simply too much for me. Maybe it’s Ishiguro handing us all the essential information to make up our own mind and come to our own conclusions and it’s just me. I didn’t give up on this book but I’m giving up on its author for good.
  • Calificación: 5 de 5 estrellas
    5/5
    It's a rare treat to stumble across something so beautiful and magical - the sort of book one can relax into like a hot soak at the end of a long day. It broke away from a large number of the genre tropes to provide a piece of literary fantasy. It speaks on war, revenge, hate, love - not romance, but love. It was pure pleasure to read.
  • Calificación: 4 de 5 estrellas
    4/5
    Sad, but good.
  • Calificación: 4 de 5 estrellas
    4/5
    The Buried Giant sort of snuck up on me really. Several rainy days on a holiday led me to the warm embrace of a fine second-hand bookshop. I saw The Buried Giant, amongst a few other gems, and added it to my pile. Vaguely I remembered reading Ishiguro some other time: a check when I returned to my computer and had access to LibraryThing informed me that I had read When We Were Orphans, but rated it as somewhat mediocre, and certainly it left no impression on me after seven years. I simply could not recall reading it. The rain eased up, and The Buried Giant slipped my mind.Until some down time a few months later. So I reached for it, and it would not let me go. In fact it worked its own strange spell, as strange as that of the breath of she-dragon Querig, compelling and rewarding this reader yet without cause to have done so. The characters trudge along, make their way towards various self-discoveries that emerge from a mystical mist of amnesia, and leave me. And that’s it, really. I think the goat survives.Or does it? Does anyone? The sixth century is a strange lull in the history of the British Isles. At least according to the narrative Arthur’s peace has held, but can peace ever hold where xenophobia and perceived injustice lurk? Saxons loiter with intent, and only amnesia holds them at bay. Pilgrims meander, though amnesia tends to make them wonder why, whither and whence from time to time. Recollections of a life once lived form, and then prove to be chimeric, slipping away. Bad things, good things … things just happen. Amnesia is redemptive. Or does it condemn? One or the other. Amnesia makes it hard to know, really, for the coordinates, the reference points are lost, and why were we loving and hating and fighting and walking anyway?And eventually, one supposes, the Saxons will return, and blood will flow again. Comme ci comme ça. Yet I could not put this book down, and my life is that iota the richer for reading it. I think. What was it about, again?
  • Calificación: 4 de 5 estrellas
    4/5
    (Warning: here be spoilers! If you haven’t read the book, stop here. If you’ve read the book and are ready to reflect on it, read on.)Yes, Buried Giant is a work of fantasy, but in an “Arthurian legend” sense, not an “elves and dwarves” sense. And like all good Arthurian legends, this extended allegory has a dense and not entirely comfortable moral: The Buried Giant is a reminder that the act of living can become an empty and absurd exercise if one abdicates both the rewards and responsibilities of life. In this compelling morality tale, King Arthur, Sir Gawain, and the magician Merlin, in a desperate bid to end the eternal escalation of tribe-against-tribe violence, hatred, and revenge, cast a spell of forgetfulness over Britain and its citizens; in exchange for peace, the peoples of the island live in a state of eternal amnesia, the events of past weeks – even past days – fading away before they can become memories. Without memory, there can be no enduring hatred. Without hatred, no betrayal, no brutality, no anguish … but also, no pain of regret, no deepening of love, and no dawning of wisdom. The questions Ishiguro poses don’t have easy answers, nor are they meant to: Is “peace” without understanding, without sacrifice, without wisdom, a laudable accomplishment or a lost opportunity? Can a just end justify evil means? Is brutality a choice, or an inseparable condition of human nature? Are the tales we humans invent to transform the horrors of war into acts of heroism and nobility, merely an artifice we construct to justify our own brutality? (a la the whole Arthurian cycle, Ishiguro implies, in an act of artful inversion.) What makes life worth living? Can love that has never been tested be “true”? Is a life devoid of the hope of change or transformation, of passion or purpose, any sort of life at all? The tale is artfully and gorgeously told, naïvely sweet passages progressively giving way to increasingly dark episodes, the alteration in tone so gradual that you barely notice the metamorphosis until, suddenly, you realize that pretty much everything you took for granted at the beginning of the story has been overturned. Ishiguro’s figurative furbelows aren’t necessarily difficult to decipher (a woman carried away by “wolves” that obviously aren’t; a ferryman whose job is clearly more metaphysical than physical; hills beneath which rest the bodies of buried giants, except that what’s buried isn’t giants …), but perhaps that’s what makes them so emotionally fraught – much like myths and legends, these metaphors, symbols and allegories evoke powerful themes and passions, as instinctive as they are ancient.In other words, don’t let the relative simplicity of the storytelling fool you. Like all the Arthurian legends that have come before – Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Quest for the Holy Grail – there are layers and layers of powerful meaning beneath the surface of this luminous and complex tale - the question (always the same question when it comes to Arthurian tales) is whether readers will possess the perception to recognize them and the courage to face them.
  • Calificación: 3 de 5 estrellas
    3/5
    This was an amazing fairy tale about the end of love's journey, not just the frilly beginnings. We follow Axl and Beatrice on a quest to discover their past and why they, and everyone else, seems to have lost it.
  • Calificación: 3 de 5 estrellas
    3/5
    Writing skills -A
    Story and Subject Matter -D

    Somehow I came up with a three star rating, but maybe it should really be a two?

    I know he was trying to be all folk tale-like and mythical but it wasn't imaginative enough to fit in those categories, so it really was just plain dull. His writing style carried me through to the end, but just barely.
  • Calificación: 3 de 5 estrellas
    3/5
    Liked the idea and some of the writing was beautiful, but 375 pages written in the style of a medieval romance was trying sometimes. The characters were more metaphor and allegory than actual people, and that made it hard to connect to the story through them. Almost feel that it would have made a better short story. I loved Never Let Me Go and Remains Of The Day, but this was disappointing.
  • Calificación: 4 de 5 estrellas
    4/5
    Very inventive. Most enjoyed learning the early history of Britons and Saxons and immersion into that long ago time.. HOWEVER, ultimately found the fable format tiresome and a yawn: this symbolizes that, and that symbolizes this, ok got it. Not so fond of the sparse prose style either that used plot and action exclusively rather than description or metaphors (excepting that the whole story was a metaphor of the couple's journey to death).
  • Calificación: 3 de 5 estrellas
    3/5
    This one was weird. I liked some elements of it, but overall I found it just odd and not all that interesting. Just not quite my cup of tea, I guess.
  • Calificación: 5 de 5 estrellas
    5/5
    Alzheimers takes the memories of many loved ones today. But Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel, The Buried Giant, is set in a mythically historical England, in the time just after King Arthur; and memories, while lost, might not have to be gone forever.The novel’s told in a dreamlike blend of mythic, epic, and quietly personal prose. Familiar characters and situations from legend combine with an intriguing historicity to lend a sense of urgency. And mysteries, lost with memory, gradually reshape and reawaken a quietly fantastical reality.The giant, buried on the plain, must not be woken up. But what of giants buried in the past? What of memories that surge from the featureless mist? What of the history between two people who remember only that they should be in love?The buried giant hides cool surprises in its pages—some appear with the delight of recognition from ancient tales; others with a sting for the present day. Should wrongs go forgotten and unpunished? Are betrayals better not remembered? Does love hold or let go?The Buried Giant is a strange novel, deeply absorbing and oddly reflective, bound together by a jigsaw puzzle of ideas and images, and haunted by memory.Disclosure: I bought it because I loved the cover. I love the book too.
  • Calificación: 5 de 5 estrellas
    5/5
    Was für ein wunderschönes Buch! Es hat gute Chancen, mein Lieblingsbuch 2017 zu werden.Das alte Ehepaar Axl und Beatrice lebt im 5. Jahrhundert in Britannien. Das ist eine Zeit, über die man wenig weiß. Axl und Beatrice machen sich auf eine Reise zu ihrem Sohn. Sie begegnen dem sächsischen Krieger Wistan, der den halbwüchsigen Edwin aus den Klauen eines Untiers gerettet hat, später dem Artusritter Gawein, der auf seinem alten Gaul Horaz durchs Land irrt. Das alles beherrschende Thema ist das Vergessen. Niemand scheint sich erinnern zu können. Es stellt sich bald die Frage, ob es besser ist, nichts zu wissen und friedlich, da unwissend, weiter zu leben. Diese Frage wird hervorragend behandelt und aufgelöst. Nebenbei erlebt man eine wunderbare und respektvolle Liebesgeschichte eines alten Paares. Überhaupt sind die Figuren ausgezeichnet dargestellt. Die Sprache ist altmodisch, aber gerade deshalb schön. Und am Ende fügt sich eins zum andern. Übrig bliebt ein Leserlebnis, das lange nachhallt in Gedanken und Gefühlen. Absolut toll.
  • Calificación: 3 de 5 estrellas
    3/5
    Not at all the story I was expecting from the blurb. The blend of history, legend, myth, fantasy made this book a frustrating read for me. I don't mind any of those elements when I'm expecting them but this book defied expectations in not always pleasant ways. Having said that I would recommend this book for book clubs as there is a great deal to discuss: the themes, narrative style, use of mythology and so much more. Even though I really didn't like it I want someone I know to read it so I can talk about it.
    The one point I found very jarring was the beginning of chapter 3 "...a tall fence of tethered timber poles, their points sharpened like giant pencils,.." this is the only point in the descriptions Ishiguro references something so clearly modern and it stuck in my brain like a splinter. A really annoying splinter.
    The other thing I was confused about was initially I thought this story was about a journey through ancient Britain and set in reality (concluded from blurb)so when things like orgres and dragons were mentioned at first I thought the characters were responding to an unknown threat by making up a mystery beast to explain things they didn't understand.
    Overall not a bad book but just not what I was expecting and not my thing. It is sure to appeal to people who go for opaque stories and frustrating conclusions.
  • Calificación: 2 de 5 estrellas
    2/5
    A strange book with elements of Beowulf, Don Quixote and Dante's Divine Comedy. The plot revolves around the effects of a mist that robs people of their memories. However in order to try and get the plot to work the effect is selective amnesia which is never explained.