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Erecciones, eyaculaciones, exhibiciones

Erecciones, eyaculaciones, exhibiciones

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Erecciones, eyaculaciones, exhibiciones

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (11 valoraciones)
Longitud:
226 páginas
4 horas
Publicado:
Jul 7, 2013
ISBN:
9788433927842
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

Éste es el primer libro que se publicó en España de un autor entonces desconocido, Charles Bukowski, que alcanzó de inmediato gran popularidad. Se ha comparado a Bukowski con Henry Miller y Hemingway, con Célice y Artaud, con Charlie Parker y W. C. Fields, y en pocos años pasó de escritor «maldito» a leyenda viviente. Los relatos aquí reunidos parecen extraídos de las tripas ulcerosas de su narrador, escritos entre ataques de delirium tremens, orgías y fantasías alcohólicas, utilizando el crudo lenguaje de la calle, de la escoria, de la basura, como nadie lo había hecho. Crónicas brutalmente divertidas de la pesadilla yanqui, del «desierto de neón», tan exentas de hipocresía, tan auténticas, que hacen estremecer. Apostamos a que el lector de este libro estará de acuerdo con la receta de Neil Baldwin: «Tomar una porción de Hemingway, añadir una dosis de humor (del que Hemingway extrañamente carece, mientras Bukowski es un virtuoso), mezclar con un puñado de hojas de afeitar y varios litros de vino barato, luego una o dos gotas de ironía, agitar bien y leerlo al final de la noche: así tendrá el auténtico sabor Bukowski».

Publicado:
Jul 7, 2013
ISBN:
9788433927842
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Charles Bukowski (1920-1994) fue el último escritor «maldito» de la literatura norteamericana. En Anagrama se han publicado sus seis novelas, Cartero, Factótum, Mujeres, La senda del perdedor, Hollywood y Pulp; seis libros de relatos, Escritos de un viejo indecente, Erecciones, eyaculaciones, exhibiciones, La máquina de follar, Se busca una mujer, Música de cañerías e Hijo de Satanás; los libros autobiográficos Shakespeare nunca lo hizo y Peleando a la contra; los diarios de El capitán salió a comer y los marineros tomaron el barco; el libro de entrevistas con Fernanda Pivano Lo que más me gusta es rascarme los sobacos; los textos reunidos en Fragmentos de un cuaderno manchado de vino. Relatos y ensayos inéditos (1944-1990) y Ausencia del héroe. Relatos y ensayos inéditos (1946-1992), así como su biografía Hank. La vida de Charles Bukowski, de Neeli Cherkovski. En esta colección se ha publicado también un volumen con sus tres primeros libros de relatos (Escritos de un viejo indecente, La máquina de follar y Erecciones, eyaculaciones, exhibiciones).


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4.5
11 valoraciones / 11 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    I tend to find P. G. Wodehouse’s short story collections a bit hit and miss. This one’s a sure hit. Would’ve rated it five stars but the Mr Mulliner stories, like in other collections, didn’t quite reach the spot.The one Uncle Fred story and the several that follow Freddie Widgeon are among the author’s finest compositions. This is light fiction that induces heavy laughter.A dashed good read, what?
  • (4/5)
    A collection of short stories from 1936 mostly about love-lorn members of the Drones club with three chapters from the bar-parlour of the Angler's Rest. One of PGW's better books.
  • (5/5)
    Note: The contents of the US and UK collections with this title differ quite significantly (as is the case for most Wodehouse story collections): this review relates only to the UK version.One of Wodehouse's finest collections of short stories, including the one many people (me included!) cite as their favourite, the immortal "Uncle Fred flits by", which first introduced Lord Ickenham, later to appear as central character in several novels. As a senior mischief-maker already in possession of wife, title and fortune, he provides an interesting contrast from the usual Wodehouse plot in which a young man tries to win the girl of his dreams. We get quite a few of those in this collection, but mostly in the "tall tales" framework allowed by the Mulliner and Egg/Bean/Crumpet formulae. "Goodbye to all cats" and "The fiery wooing of Mordred" give us two of Wodehouse's funniest country-house weekends; "Trouble down at Tudsleigh" sends up the poetic enthusiasms of Wodehouse's youth; "The amazing hat mystery" successfully plays the very difficult literary trick of presenting a childishly simple story as though it is fearsomely complicated; and "Tried in the furnace" delivers in a couple of pages the most gloriously awful parish outing you could wish for. Needless to say, as this is Wodehouse in the 1930s, there is linguistic treasure on practically every page.
  • (4/5)
    I used to watch the TV Jeeves and Wooster stories (starring Hugh Laurie, and the magnificent Stephen Fry) but I hadn't actually read a Wodehouse book until, oh, about a year ago. I began with some of the Jeeves and Wooster books and was a little unsure about reading one that didn't feature those two marvellous characters.Although 'Young Men in Spats' appears to be a novel (it is divided into chapters) each one is a self-contained short story, although some of the characters turn up in several stories, and all the stories have the same starting points - the Drones Club and the Anglers' Rest. Although the world depicted in these stories is not one I can recognise from my own experience (although I like the fact that many of the stories feature places in my home county of Worcestershire), and in spite of the farcical nature of many of the events related, the characters strike me as very human in their frailties (and strengths). It's all very funny, but also rather touching, the way these young men bumble through a variety of rather ridiculous situations.PG Wodehouse described his style of novel-writing as 'making a sort of musical comedy without music and ignoring real life altogether'. I think this quote sums up the charm of his novels very well.Some of the lines I particularly enjoyed, which are so evocative of the characters they are describing :"...old Lady Punter had gone up to her boudoir with a digestive tablet and a sex-novel...""You won't catch Freddie joining any Foreign Legion, once he gets on to the fact that it means missing his morning cup of tea.""He described her to me, and I received the impression of a sort of blend of Tallulah Bankhead and a policewoman.""Hitherto, I should mention, my nephew's poetry, for he belonged to the modern fearless school, had always been stark and rhymeless and had dealt principally with corpses and the smell of cooking cabbage."It's all wonderfully light-hearted, good-to-be-alive stuff, very British (although the Britain it deals with has either vanished or never existed). How can anyone who loves life not love Wodehouse? [Jan 2005]
  • (4/5)
    Consistently light, whimsical, funny, but also taking place in a coherent universe that sprung from his imagination, P.G. Wodehouse is one of the most consistent prolific authors and Young Men in Spats is no exception.

    The stories revolve around the Drones club and features characters that show up elsewhere in Wodehouse canon. Each of the stories begins with a framing discussion in the club that leads someone to recount a story, more often than not about Freddie Widgeon, that involves a series of genteel misunderstandings, accidents, hapless loves, sometimes ending well and sometimes ending badly, but always with the same measure of good cheer.
  • (4/5)
    An uneven collection of short stories featuring members of the Drones Club, most being rather predictable.The highlight is the story, Uncle Fred flits by", featuring Pongo Twistleton and his Uncle Fred, which recounts the havoc wreaked by Uncle Fred on a visit to London, when Uncle Fred takes Pongo to look at some land that once comprised the landed estate of another uncle, but which is now a suburb. The humour is in the bizarre series of stories that Uncle Fred tells to gain access to suburban house when a shower of rain occurs and the increasingly improbable stories then told as other visitors call at the house. A real gem.The Mr Mulliner stories were also good.
  • (4/5)
    Consistently light, whimsical, funny, but also taking place in a coherent universe that sprung from his imagination, P.G. Wodehouse is one of the most consistent prolific authors and Young Men in Spats is no exception.The stories revolve around the Drones club and features characters that show up elsewhere in Wodehouse canon. Each of the stories begins with a framing discussion in the club that leads someone to recount a story, more often than not about Freddie Widgeon, that involves a series of genteel misunderstandings, accidents, hapless loves, sometimes ending well and sometimes ending badly, but always with the same measure of good cheer.
  • (5/5)
    Not a bad collection of Wodehouse stories, but it would be easily forgettable if not for the brilliant “Uncle Fred Flits By”. Unlike almost all of Wodehouse’s protagonists, Uncle Fred is an instigator. He does not cower at nonsensical threats, or suffer to be lead by the nose from one farcical engagement to another. He charges head-first into trouble, and gleefully emerges unscathed at the other end. This story is an entire screwball comedy condensed into a few short pages, and Wodehouse manages to execute it without a single loose end. So much of English humor, Waugh and Wodehouse included, comes from the protagonists (often weak-willed and colorless young men) finding themselves in hot water. This can be frustrating to those accustomed to American-style humor, in which the protagonist is far more active and tends to lead his enemies around by the nose. Daffy Duck is a British protagonist; Bugs Bunny is American. I only wish Uncle Fred had been more widely featured—after a while one longs for someone to put Constance Keeble, or Aunt Agatha, in their places!
  • (4/5)
    A collection of short stories featuring the romantic misadventures of various young men of the Drones Club (or, in several cases, the Angler's Rest). It's all pretty typical Wodehouse: it's frothy and silly, all the stories feel much the same, and ten minutes later it's hard to remember the details of any of them. But while you're reading them, it's impossible to keep the smile off your face.Good old Wodehouse. Always such a reliable way to combat the dreaded book slump.
  • (3/5)
    Freddi, Pongo and other young men go through no end of scrapes while being in love. Freddie is always falling in love at first sight only to foil his own romantic schemes, and others meet with various levels of success. The stories are all told at their men’s clubs by “crumpets” or by Uncle Fred to other young men, known affectionately only as crumpets, eggs and other edibles.

    The stories are a mixed bag as far as how funny each is, so I rounded it to three. I only read one story per day to be sure I didn’t tire of the humour and spoil any that way. This is my first time reading one of Wodehouse’s books of short stories, and the first that didn’t feature Wooster and Jeeves. I may well read another at some time in the future. I chose this to fulfill two of my monthly challenges, and it was a good, light, summer sort of read.
  • (4/5)
    This collection of stories is typically Wodehouse – not too bright young men find themselves in sticky situations and somehow, no thanks to their own efforts, things work out in the end. The situations are absurd and the dialogue is silly, but it works. I tried one of Wodehouse's books in print and didn't get very far with it. I do much better with the audio version of his books. Jonathan Cecil's narration is absolutely perfect. Highly recommended.