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valoraciones:
4/5 (28 valoraciones)
Longitud:
33 página
14 minutos
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jun 1, 2012
ISBN:
9788492683901
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

Edición ilustrada del relato clásico de Perrault El gato con botas realizada por Javier Zabala, Premio Nacional de Ilustración 2005. Se trata de un cuento popular europeo, recopilado en 1697 por Charles Perrault en su Cuentos de mamá ganso y que ha dado lugar a múltiples adaptaciones. El gato con botas basa su inteligencia en la observación y la lógica. La traducción es nueva y, además, se trata de una edición bilingüe para lectores de todas las edades.

"Edición ilustrada y bilingüe de uno de los cuentos populares europeos más conocidos."
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jun 1, 2012
ISBN:
9788492683901
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Charles Perrault (1628-1703) was a French author best known for his contribution to the creation of the fairy-tale genre. His most notable works include "Little Red Riding Hood," "Cinderella," "Puss in Boots," "The Sleeping Beauty," and "Bluebeard." Many of his tales have been adapted into operas, ballets, plays, and films.

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El Gato con botas - Charles Perrault

EL GATO CON BOTAS

Charles Perrault

Ilustraciones de Javier Zabala

Traducción de Íñigo Jáuregui

Título original: Le Maître chat ou le Chat botté

© Charles Perrault

© de la traducción: Íñigo Jáuregui

Edición en ebook: agosto de 2014

© Nórdica Libros, S.L.

C/ Fuerte de Navidad, 11, 1.º B 28044 Madrid (España)

www.nordicalibros.com

ISBN DIGITAL: 978-84-92683-90-1

Diseño de colección: Diego Moreno

Corrección ortotipográfica: Ana Patrón

Maquetación ebook: Caurina Diseño Gráfico

Cualquier forma de reproducción, distribución, comunicación pública o transformación de esta obra solo puede ser realizada con la autorización de sus titulares, salvo excepción prevista por la ley. Diríjase a CEDRO (Centro Español de Derechos Reprográficos, www.cedro.org) si necesita fotocopiar o escanear algún fragmento de esta obra.

Contenido

Portadilla

Créditos

Ilustración

Ilustración

El gato con botas

Le Maître chat ou le Chat botté

Contraportada

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Lo que piensa la gente sobre El Gato con botas

3.9
28 valoraciones / 32 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    This audiobook was well done; the reader's enunciation is very clear and read with expression; the characters' voices are fun. The music was a little off, but not too distracting.
  • (3/5)
    I had mixed feelings about this book after reading it. I liked the book because the illustrations were helpful to see while reading. This particular book has a lot of words, so having illustrations along with the text is helpful. Also, having the illustrations allows this book to have an audience of a wider age range. Unfortunately, I didn't like the pace of the story. The beginning of the story went well because the reader was introduced to some background knowledge of Puss and the Master, but I felt as though the middle-ending and the ending were rushed. By the time I finished the book, I was very confused as to what happened. The pace could have definitely been better.I believe that the purpose of this book is to have this famous folktale in the form of a book. Puss in Boots is a folktale many have heard and probably have seen in movies. Therefore, having this book allows readers see where Puss in Boots came from and what he did.
  • (3/5)
    This story was fun and exciting. Its about how a boy is helped by his cat. The cat was very sneaky and he did lots of a bad things to get power. I think this story was a pretty cool read. This story is a classic folktale and I think should be read by an older class.
  • (2/5)
    im not sure the lesson that this story is trying to teach. Is it if you lie and steal you will get far in life? It was a good story but im not sure that it is one I would share with my class one day. I did like the pictures in the story.
  • (5/5)
    Puss in Boots was about a cat and his owner who became rich through lies. Puss would play up his master to the king. In th end the king was pleased with Puss' master that he let the master marry his daughter. I love the story of Puss in Boots. I would definitely read this to my students as a fun read aloud. I think all ages would enjoy this book, especially grades 1-5.
  • (5/5)
    In this illustrated version of the renowned author, Charles Perrault, we follow a wonderfully illustrated story of a cat named puss and his master. The illustrations are pleasant and align nicely to the story at hand. As Puss goes around lying about his master and tricking everyone in order to make his master rich, I kept wondering when he would be find out, when his behavior would not match that of a "Marquis de Carabas." But I think I was over complicating the story by thinking along these lines. USE: entertainment.
  • (3/5)
    While this classic story is not a personal favorite of mine, the illustrations in this version are beautiful. Oil based realistic, romantic style images complement this tale. The story of a clever cat who manipulates people in his environment to benefit his orphaned master seems a bit dark at times. May be used a discussion for higher level thinking and dilemma examples.
  • (3/5)
    A chuckled through my re-read of this book because of the violence and sneaky dealing of this original retelling. Awesome illustrations.
  • (3/5)
    When a son inherits his dad's cat, he is unsure of the value it will have for him. The son is surprised to know that the cat can speak. The cat requests a pair of boots that he believes will show his owner his worth. The cat set out on his journey to change his owners life. The cat lies to all of the people that he comes into contact with to benefit himself. Besides the illustrations, I found the book to be boring. I would not share this book with a group of students.
  • (4/5)
    Fabulous illustrations accompany this tale about a very resourceful cat! I enjoyed it.
  • (5/5)
    A great classic story. It's not too long and the pictures are great for the kids. It's a really great fun story of bravery. It's great for any age I believe.
  • (4/5)
    This book is appropriate for all elementary grades .It gives a quality message that everything is good for something you just have to figure out what that is. The illustrations has a dreamy like, fairy tale kind of look to it that makes the reader want to look more at the pictures than read. They were done in oil painting.
  • (4/5)
    Puss tells the peasants that they "will be chopped as fine as herbs for the pot!" if they deny the land belongs to his master. NO warm and fuzzy kitty eyes here.
  • (4/5)
    Wonderful illustrations that almost pop up off the page to grab the readers attention. It would be a great book to share with students if I were to do a folklore unit in the classroom.
  • (5/5)
    Puss in Boots is a creative and entertaining story that will captivate any audience. It stirs the imagination and relays a tale as old as time. Children who are interested in Puss from "Shrek" will be drawn to this book. It has beautiful illustrations, and they help propel and add imagery to the story.
  • (3/5)
    Once again Perrault has created a beautiful retelling of this classic tale. In this version the illustrations breath new life into the tale with flashy red boots and a glow in Puss' eyes. A new twist - the ogre is instead a magician.In the classroom: fairy tales, story element comparison, author study, animals as characters,
  • (4/5)
    Summary: An old Miller dies and leaves his things to his three sons. The oldest got the Mill. The middle the Donkey and the Youngest the Cat. The youngest is upset but the cat tells him that he will make sure things will work out. So he goes and hunts game every day and takes it to the king. He makes the king believe that the youngest son is a grand man. In the end he marries the princess and eventually becomes king. The cat lives a good life after all that.Personal Reaction: The Pictures were great and it was a good take on the story. I have heard several types of this story and this one is by far my favorite. It reminded me of Puss on the movie Shrek. Classroom Extention Idea's:1. Use this as a way to talk about Fairytales and what makes a Fairytale a Fairytale.2. Have the kids draw their own versions of the tale.
  • (3/5)
    A young son inherits a cat--Puss. The son is displeased with his inheritance, but the cat proves the son wrong. This book proves that great things can come from small, unwanted packages. The illustration tells the story more than the words do, but this version is a brilliant retelling.
  • (5/5)
    The success of this version of Perrault's well-known tale is due primarily to the caliber of artist Fred Marcellino's work. Filled with light and muted colors, illustrations vary in layout between double-page spreads captioned with text to full-page and partial-page panels: every page has something for listeners to see. This is important given the length of the text, itself displayed in an unintimidating, enlarged muted-brown font, framed in a thin-line border. Those unfamiliar with the fairytale will marvel at Puss's clever plan to elevate his master, especially when he outwits a not-too-scary-looking ogre. This Caldecott-honor book is a worthy addition to any K-3 classroom or home library.
  • (4/5)
    Puss is left to youngest son of a poor miller. The son thinks that Puss is a terrible inheritance, but Puss devises a plan to get the young man everything he wants and more. A fun story that shows that good things can come in unexpected and crazy places.
  • (4/5)
    I have found that the pictures in this version of 'Puss' appeal immensely to kindergartners through third graders. Children who often have a hard time sitting still for a story have sat transfixed as I read this book, holding the pictures in front of them all the time and giving them lots of opportunities to check out the wonderful use of light and color. The illustrator uses a lot of wonderful yellow that is very appealing to young children and seems to draw them into the book. I love reading this book out loud both to see children's reaction and also because I love the detail and color in the pictures.
  • (3/5)
    A fairytale about trust and friendship
  • (3/5)
    The story is about a father that dies, the youngest son is left with just a cat. His older brothers was left with the family bisness( a mill) and a donkey. Who will want a lazy fur ball? If your cat is the Puss In Boots you would want this kitty!! The cat only ask of the boy for a pair of boots and a sack. The cat uses the two items to gain his master a princess and wealth. I wish this was my cat. The clever kitty tricks everyone in the story.I enjoyed the adventure and how all I need is a sack and boots to gain a better life,but I did not like how the cat uses deception. Therfore, I rate it as three stars. The picture is well illustrated and will capture and hold the attention of the students if read out loud.As a classroom assignment 1. The students could draw different animals from mice to lions. This will open a discussion about every animal has a good quailty.2.I can ask the students about an gift they recieved and did not like. The children can hopefully learn to be appreciative of anything they are given
  • (3/5)
    A royal book of a clever cat that does wonders for his owner. The book begins with the three brothers dividing up the estate and belongings of their father. One fellow ends up with a cat, and believes that his life is doomed without any land or riches. Little did he know, Puss in Boots was there to save the day. In the end the fellow has land, a castle, and a royal wife.
  • (4/5)
    I couldn't resist the insouciant Puss with the gleam in his eye, posing on the book cover like a Goya portrait. Jean-Marc Rochette's wonderful color illustrations alternate with lively pen and ink drawings. The Spanish text moves along at a lively clip as well.
  • (5/5)
    Luscious production and hard-edged text make this a stunning rendition.
  • (4/5)
    2.Fred Marcellino’s picture book, “Puss in Boots,” is about a tale that has charmed readers for over three hundred years. The book’s big idea is mainly about lying, and cheating to win richness. Mainly, a cat lies, cheats, and threatens others for his master’s richness that range from comedy and mischievous actions. The big idea occurs by the cat’s slyness and tricky behaviors. Personally, I enjoyed this book, but I do not see a positive message for children. The book is silly, and violates the natural laws of our world which exposes children to exploration and imagination. I liked the main character, Puss, who is the cat that does anything he can to give his master, Marquis of Carabas, the king’s daughter, his hand in marriage. But, in order to do so Puss has to lie and cheat to impress the king. The main character is believable through the language the author incorporates. The language is descriptive and clear as though his personality was human like. Next, the minor characters, such as the king, princess, and Marquis of Carabas, are well developed, help move the plot forward in smooth transitions, and portray humans back in the day. Though the characters are portrayed in a traditional time period, the illustrations shadow the appropriate mood of the story. For example, the front cover of the book presents Puss in red, brown, and tan colors that set the attitude of mischievous and sly. The cat’s illustration focuses around his eyes which gives the reader a perspective that he achieves something important. Most importantly, I enjoyed the reading quality of the book. The words were clear, concise, and matched the illustrations.
  • (4/5)
    Puss In Boots, written by Charles Perrault and illustrated by Fred Marcellino, is also a Caldecott Honor award-winning book. The illustrations in this book are very detailed and colorful. The pictures alone do not tell the story, but they do add to the text. They pictures in the book also depict the time period that the story was set in very well. The elegant clothing that the characters don are of early times in France. The lines in the characters’ faces are often drawn with a lot of expression, although the lines are softer and less distinguished. The colors in the book are warm on some pages and bright on others reflecting the text on the page. The textures are all very smooth and sort of flat. The Puss, himself is seen as a cartoon animal with his boots, sack and his sword throughout the story except on the first and last pages where he is seen as an ordinary house cat.
  • (4/5)
    Fred Marcellino’s account of Puss in Boots, a trickster folktale from France, is noteworthy and a must have for any library collection. The detailed illustrations in this book draw the readers’ eyes to the expressions of the characters, extending the story. Puss is the inheritance of a poor miller’s son. Discouraged by being left with Puss, the owner is fearful of starving to death. To show his worth, Puss requests a pair of boots and a sack that sets forth a serious of events that trick a king into believing that his master is a wealthy man. Puss’s cleverness results in his master gaining a large castle and estate from an Ogre and the marriage of the king’s daughter. In the end, Puss lives in luxury. Although some of the vocabulary words might be unfamiliar to younger children, the overall adventures and masterful telling of this folktale will keep the attention of readers. Age Appropriate: 4 to 8 years-old
  • (5/5)
    I would give the story 4 stars, but the illustrations should get 6! The mischievous Puss in Boots devises a plan to get his master (but more than likely himself) a life full of luxury. I read this book because it was recommended to me. After reading it, I went back through and read/viewed the illustrations a second time. I also read it aloud to a 1st grader and as we read we talked about Puss and his cunning plans. It was somewhat difficult for the 1st grader to comprehend the story, however he did enjoy the illustrations. In the classroom I would read this book aloud to all of the students. After every page, or few pages I would stop and have the students write about what they thought the book was about. Then after the reading is finished, we would discuss how students’ thinking changed as we progressed through the book. This teaches students to look to the text for evidence to support their thinking or to dispel misconceptions about the text.